pdf viewer c# : How to add a jpg to a pdf software Library dll winforms asp.net azure web forms OReilly_-_POSIX_Programmers_Guide10-part1943

The 
closedir()
function is defined as:
int closedir(DIR *dirp)
and is used to indicate that we are done reading a directory. Upon successful completion,
closedir()
returns a value of zero. On error, a value of 
-1
is returned and 
errno
is set to
indicate the error.
The rewinddir() Function
The 
rewinddir()
function is defined as:
void rewinddir(DIR *dirp);
and resets the position of the directory stream indicated by 
dirp
to the beginning of the
directory. No value is returned.
General Comments
Files may be added to or removed from a directory at any time. The 
readdir()
function may
or may not see changes to a directory made after the 
opendir()
(or 
rewinddir()
)
function is called.
P
age 77
POSIX is also vague on the interaction between 
opendir()
and 
fork()
. For best results,
do not perform a 
fork()
while reading a directory.
Complete Example
To demonstrate the use of the functions for reading directories, let's write a program to print
out a directory tree. Here is a brief specification for the program:
1.
Prompt the user and accept the name of a starting directory.
2.
Print the name of the starting directory.
3.
Read the directory and ignore everything except directories.
4.
Print the names of any directories encountered along with any directories that they contain.
5.
Indent each level of directory two spaces. This will make it easy to see what is contained
in each directory. The output should look something like this:
Starting directory: /etc 
log 
zoneinfo 
Australia 
Canada 
Mideast 
SystemV 
US 
YP 
master.d 
boot.d 
How to add a jpg to a pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
acrobat insert image into pdf; how to add a jpeg to a pdf
How to add a jpg to a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
adding jpg to pdf; add jpg to pdf
init.d 
startup. d 
fwdicp.d 
install
.d 
boot.d 
init.d 
master. d 
startup.d 
fwdicp.d 
uninstall.d 
eschatology 
bind 
master 
tools 
doc 
BOG 
Where 
/etc
was given as the starting directory and 
/etc/bind/doc/BOG
a nested
subdirectory.
An obvious structure suggests itself: one routine to process one directory and another routine to
call it for each directory encountered. The flowchart for the main program is shown in Figure
4-5.
P
age 78
Figure 4-5. Flowchart for 
main( )
The 
onedir()
function is recursive. Each time it encounters a directory, 
onedir()
calls
itself. The flowchart for the 
onedir()
function is shown in Figure 4-6.
Let's start by writing the function to process a single directory, as shown in Example 4-1.
EXAMPLE 4-1. 
onedir()
1 /* 
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
example, this C#.NET PDF to JPEG converter library will name the converted JPEG image file Output.jpg. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references
add jpeg to pdf; add photo to pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Add necessary references page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(0) ' Convert the first PDF page to page.ConvertToImage(ImageType.JPEG, Program.RootPath + "\\Output.jpg").
add picture to pdf; how to add image to pdf in preview
2  * This function will process 1 directory. It is called with 
3  * two arguments: 
4  *  indent -- The number of columns to indent this directory 
5  *  name -- The file name of the directory to process.  This 
6  *          is most often a r
elative directory 
7  * 
8  * The onedir function calls itself to process nested 
9  * directories 
10  */ 
11 void onedir(short indent,char *name) 
12 { 
13 DIR     *current_directory;         /* pointer for readdir */ 
14 struct dirent *this_entry;   
/* current directory entry */ 
15 struct stat status;                 /* for the stat() function */ 
16 char cwd[MAX_PATH+1];               /* save current working 
17                                      * directory 
18                             
*/ 
19 int i;                              /* temp */ 
20 
P
age 79
FIGURE 4-6. Flowchart for 
onedir()
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
Add necessary references to your C# project: String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
add image field to pdf form; adding a png to a pdf
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Add necessary references to your C# project: String inputFilePath = @"**jpg"; String outputFilePath = @"**pdf"; // Convert Jpeg to PDF and show
add signature image to pdf acrobat; how to add a photo to a pdf document
21      /* 
22       * Print out the name of the current directory with 
23       * leading spaces. 
24       */ 
25      for (i=l; i <= indent; i++) (void)printf(" "); 
26      (void)printf("%s\n",name); 
27 
28      /* Now open the directory for reading 
*/ 
29      current_directory = opendir(name); 
30      if (currentdirectory == NULL) 
P
age 80
31           { 
32           (void)perror("Can not open directory"); 
33           return; 
34           } 
35      /* Remember the current working directory and connect to 
36       * new directory.  We will then be able to stat() the 
37       * files wi
thout building a prefix. 
38       */ 
39      if (getcwd(cwd,MAX_PATH+1) == NULL) PANIC; 
40      if (chdir(name) != 0) PANIC; 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50      /* Now, look at every entry in the directory */ 
51      while ((this_entry = readd
ir(current_directory)) 
52                      != NULL) 
53           { 
54           /* Ignore "." and ".." or we will get confused */ 
55           if ((strcmp(this_entry->d_name,".")  != 0) && 
56                (strcmp(this_entry->d_name,"..") != 0)) 
57                { 
58                if (stat(this_entry->d_name,&status)  1= 0) 
59                          PANIC; 
60                /* Ignore anything that is not a directory */ 
61                if (S_ISDIR(status.st_mode)) 
62                    
63                     /* If this is a nested directory, 
64                      * process it */ 
65                     onedir(indent+2,this_entry->d_name); 
66                     } 
67                } 
68           } 
69      /* All done.  Close t
he directory */ 
70      if (closedir(current_directory)  != 0) PANIC; 
71      /* change back to the "previous" directory */ 
72      if (chdir(cwd) != 0) PANIC; 
73      return; 
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
1.bmp")); images.Add(new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")); images.Add(new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.png")); / Build a PDF document with
add image to pdf online; adding an image to a pdf in acrobat
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
1.bmp")) images.Add(New REImage(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")) images.Add(New REImage(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.png")) ' Build a PDF document with
adding an image to a pdf form; add image in pdf using java
74 } 
Notes for 
onedir
:
Line
Note
51
This block will be executed for each file in the directory.
54
Programs must not assume that "
.
" and "
. .
" exist or are first. This example workscorrectly.
A program that discards the first two directories returned by 
readdir()
is not portable
.
59
It would be nice to provide some error recovery here. We could print a message and continue.
65
This is the recursive call. Each level will indent by an additional two spaces.
P
age 81
There is only one strange thing here. We want to read a string from the user that may be up to
MAX_PATH
characters long. We cannot just write a call to 
scanf()
using 
MAX_PATH
. That
is:
(void)scanf("%<MAXPATH>s",root)
will not work. We have to build the correct string at run time. We could also use
fgets(root,MAX_PATH,stdin)
to read the filename, but then we would need to
remove the newline from the end of the buffer.
The complete program with all the required headers is shown in Example 4-2.
EXAMPLE4-2 
direct.c
/* 
* Include all of the required headers 
*/ 
#define _POSIX_SOURCE 1 
#include <stdio.h> 
#include <sys/types.h> 
#include <dirent.h> 
#include <sys/stat.h> 
#include <limits.h> 
#include <std
lib.h> 
#include <string.h> 
#include "panic.h"          /* Defines the PANIC macro */ 
/* See Page 58 for a description of PANIC
*/ 
#define MAX_PATH     256 
/
* This function will process 1 directory. It is called with 
* two arguments: 
*  indent -- The number of columns to indent this directory 
*  name -- The file name of the directory to process.  This 
*          is mos
t often a relative directory 
*
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. Add Stamp Annotation. image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and
how to add a jpg to a pdf; add image pdf document
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and
add photo to pdf form; how to add an image to a pdf file
* The onedir function calls itself to process nested 
* directories 
*/ 
void onedir(short indent, char *name) 
DIR     *current_directory;    /* pointer for readdir */ 
struct dirent *this_entry;     /* current directory entry */ 
struct stat status;            /* for the stat() function */ 
char cwd[MAX_PATH+1];          /* save current working 
* directory 
*/ 
int i;                         /* temp */ 
/* 
* Print out the name of the current directory with 
* leading spaces. 
*/ 
for (i=l; i <= indent; i++) (voi
d)printf(" "); 
(void)printf("%s\n",name); 
/* Now open the directory for reading */ 
current_directory = opendir(name); 
if (current_directory == NULL) 
P
age 82
{  
(void)perror("Can not open directory"); 
return; 
/* Remember the current working directory and connect to  
* new directory. We will then be able to stat() the 
* files without building a prefix.  
*/ 
if (getcwd(cwd,MAX_PATH+1) == NULL) PANIC;  
if (chdir(name) != 0) PANIC; 
/* Now, look at every entry in the directory */ 
while ((th
is_entry = readdir(current_directory)) 
!= NULL) 
/* Ignore "." and ".." or we will get confused */ 
if ((strcmp(this_entry->d_name,".") != 0) && 
(strcmp(th
is_entry->d_name,"..") != 0)) 
if (stat(this_entry->d_name,&status) != 0) 
PANIC; 
/* Ignore anything that is not a directory */ 
if (S_IS
DIR(status.st_mode)) 
/* If this is a nested directory, 
* process it */ 
onedir(indent+2,this_entry->d_name); 
/* All done. Close the directory */ 
if (closedir(current_directory) != 0) PANIC; 
/* change back to the "previous" directory */ 
if (chdir(cwd) != 0) PANIC; 
return
int main() 
char root[MAX_PATH+1];            /* array to store the pathname of 
* the starting directory 
*/ 
char scanf_strin
g[20];            /* used to hold a format string 
* for scanf 
*/ 
struct stat root_status;          /* stat structure for starting 
* directory 
*/ 
/* Build a format string for scanf that looks like 
* %<MAXPATH>s. 
*/ 
(void)sprintf(scanf_string,"%%
%ds",MAX_PATH); 
(void)printf("Starting directory: "); 
/* Read the name of the starting directory which 
* may be up to MAX_PATH bytes long 
*/ 
(void)scanf(scanf_string,root); 
P
age 83
/* Verify that it is an existing directory file */ 
if (stat(root,&root_status) != 0) 
(void)perror("Can not access starting directory"); 
(void)exit(EXIT_FAILURE); 
}
if (S_ISDIR(root_status.st_mode) == 0) 
(void)fprintf(stderr,"%s is not a directory\n",root); 
(void) exit (EXIT_FAILURE);  
}
/* If all is well, list the directory
*/ 
onedir(0,root); 
return(0); 
}
Pitfall: Symbolic Links
There is a feature of some UNIX systems called 
symbolic links. 
A symbolic link is a special
type of file that points to another file. For example, a link from 
file
to
/usr/opt/lib/X11/realfile
links the name 
file
to the
file/usr/opt/lib/Xll/realfile
. When 
we open 
file
, we will get 
realfile
instead. That is what the user usually wants.
Although symbolic links originated in BSD, many vendors have now included them in AT&T
ports. POSIX does not support symbolic links and you should not have to concern yourself with
them. Unfortunately, symbolic links may confound your program.
There are several operations which can cause problems. For example, deleting 
file
will
delete the link but will leave 
/usr/opt/lib/X11/realfile
unaffected, which may or
may not be OK.
The real problem comes when the symbolic link is to a directory. If there is a symbolic link in
the directory 
/usr/don/test
of the form:
loop -> /usr/don
the program in Example 4-2 will crash and burn.
Each time 
readdir()
returns 
loop
, the 
onedir()
routine will try to process it. The loop
will continue until some system limit is encountered.
There is no good way to defend against symbolic links. There is no portable way for a
POSIX-conforming program to test for symbolic links. The POSIX.1 committee is adding
symbolic links to a future version of the standard; these changes may be approved in 
1992.
About the only thing we can do in the mean time is to warn users of our software that if they use
(abuse?) symbolic links, they may cause applications to fail.
Of course, the fact that no POSIX-conforming application will ever create a symbolic link does
not help much.
P
age 84
Portability Lab
To review the contents of this chapter, try to do the following exercises:
1.
Write a function to accept the name of a directory and to make it the current working
directory. Print the full pathname of both the old and the new working directories.
2.
Write a program that keeps creating directories called dir until some error occurs. The
result should be 
/dir/dir/dir/dir/dir/dir/dir/dir...
as far as your system
will let you go.
NOTE: Some systems may fail in unfortunate ways. Use caution when attempting this.
3.
Write a program to delete the directories created in exercise 2.
4.
Why would a program need to know a file's i-node number (
ST_INO
)?
5.
Why would it be useful to have multiple directory entries (links) for the same file?
6.
When does the 
unlink()
function delete a file? Is there any portable way to know that
the file is really gone?
7.
Name one piece of information contained in a file's mode word.
8.
What does the symbol 
S_IXUSR
mean?
9.
Why do you think that POSIX defined 
S_ISDIR
as a macro instead of a value?
10.
Is 
sizeof(ino_t)
always less than or equal to 
sizeof(int)
? Is
sizeof(ino_t)
always less than or equal to 
sizeof(long)
?
11.
How can 
chown()
be used to break system security? What is the only completely
portable use for the 
chown()
function?
12.
Why might a program use the 
utime()
function?
13.
Write a program to display a file without changing its access time. Is there any way to
detect that the file has been read?
14.
Does the 
dirent
structure contain any members other than 
d_name
? If so, what are they?
15.
Modify the 
onedir()
function given at the end of this chapter to print the file serial
number of each directory.
16.
The 
onedir()
function ignores the files "
.
" and "
..
". Why does it do this? What would
happen if that check were removed?
17.
Modify the 
main()
function in Example 4-2 to use 
fgets()
instead of 
scanf()
. Is
this an improvement?
18.
Invent a scheme to allow symbolic links to be transparent to strictly conforming POSIX
1003.1-1988 applications. Mail your solution to the author for a cash reward.
P
age 85
Chapter 5
Advanced File Operations
This chapter covers the basic POSIX systems calls such as 
read(),write(),open()
,
and 
close()
. You might think that since these calls are some of the most basic building
blocks of the system, and since there is so much existing practice to look at, that the
re would
be few portability issues. Surprise! These routines have many more pitfalls than the
higher-level routines that use them.
When the C programming language was invented, it was designed to work with the UNIX
operating system. The original scheme had a C language library that made calls on the
operating system using system calls. The scheme is represented in Figure 5-1.
Figure 5-1. Traditional UNIX software layers
The ''high-level'' routines such as 
printf()
and 
fread()
would call more primitive
"low-level" system calls.
In a traditional implementation, the system calls were more efficient than the library, so some
programmers avoided using high-level calls. Today, there is no reason for this
P
age 86
practice because many systems provide very high-performance libraries. For maximum
portability, the high-level routines are your best bet.
The Standard C and POSIX interfaces do not require a layered implementation. It is quite
possible to provide an alternate implementation, as shown in Figure 5-2.
Figure 5-2. Possible POSIX software layers
There is no reason to assume that the low-level routines provide any better performance than
the high-level ones. This is especially true when the application programmer does the work of
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested