pdf viewer c# : Adding image to pdf Library software class asp.net winforms azure ajax OReilly_-_POSIX_Programmers_Guide13-part1946

To wait for any child process. This is the same as 
wait()
.
positive
To wait for the specific child whose process ID is equal to 
pid
.
zero
To wait for any child process whose process group ID is equal to that of the calling
process.
less than 
-1
To wait 
for any child process whose process group ID is equal to the absolute value of
pid
.
Process groups are normally used only by shells supporting job control and not by ordinary
applications. This book does not discuss process groups.
The 
options
argument is constructed from the bitwise OR of zero or more of the following
flags, defined in the header 
<sys/wait.h>
:
P
age 108
WNOHANG
Causes the 
waitpid()
function not to suspend execution of the calling process if
status is not immediately available for any of the child processes specified by 
pid
WUNTRACED
Causes the status of any child processes specified by 
pid
that are stopp
ed, and
whose status has not yet been reported since they stopped, to be reported to the
calling process. This is normally used only by the shell program to support job
control.
By the way, the name 
WUNTRACED
comes from BSD. BSD supports several other
func
tions that are not part of POSIX, so the name made sense in the BSD context.
The 
wait()
and 
waitpid()
functions release any resources that the child was using. If you
do not care about the final status of the child, it is not good enough to simply omit the 
wait()
or 
waitpid()
call. A common way to produce a child that does not need
to be waited for is
to 
fork()
a child and 
wait()
on the child. The child performs another 
fork()
to produce
a grandchild. The child then exits and the parent's wait returns. The grandchild is thus
disinherited by the grandparent. The spawned grandchild wi
ll release all its resources when it
terminates because there is no process left to wait for it. This technique is much more portable
than the alternative:
system("command &");
which depends on features that are outside the scope of POSIX.1.
Terminating the Current Process
There are four ways to terminate the current process:
·
Returning from 
main()
.
·
Calling 
exit()
.
Adding image to pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add an image to a pdf with acrobat; add image to pdf acrobat
Adding image to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add photo to pdf preview; how to add picture to pdf
·
Calling 
_exit()
.
·
Calling 
abort()
.
Let's look at them in detail.
Returning from main()
The normal way for a program to terminate is to execute a return (
EXIT_SUCCESS
) statement
from the 
main()
function. The action of returning a value from 
main()
is exactly the same
as calling 
exit()
with that value.
Executing a 
return
with no value is not portable.
P
age 109
Calling exit()
The 
exit()
function causes normal program termination. The 
EXIT_SUCCESS
macro can
be used to indicate successful termination. Since the POSIX standard requires that
EXIT_SUCCESS
be defined as zero, it is safe to write 
exit(0)
, keeping with historical
pract
ice. The call 
exit(0)
is extremely portable.
The 
exit()
function performs the following functions:
1.
All functions registered by the Standard C 
atexit()
function are called in the reverse
order of registration. If any of these functions calls 
exit()
, the results are not portable.
2.
All open output streams are flushed (data written out) and the streams are closed.
3.
All files created by 
tmpfile()
are deleted.
4.
The 
_exit()
function is called.
Calling _exit()
The 
_exit()
function performs operating system-specific program termination functions.
These include:
1.
All open file descriptors and directory streams are closed.
2.
If the parent process is executing 
a wait()
or 
waitpid()
, the parent wakes up and
status is made available.
3.
If the parent is not executing 
a wait()
or 
waitpid()
, the status is saved for return to
the parent on a subsequent 
wait()
or 
waitpid()
.
4.
Children of the terminated process are assigned a new parent process ID. Note: the
termination of a parent does not directly terminate its children.
5.
If the implementation supports the 
SIGCHLD
signal, a 
SIGCHLD
is sent to the parent.
6.
Several job control signals are sent.
C# Word - Insert Image to Word Page in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB It's a demo code for adding image to word page using C#.
add image to pdf reader; adding jpg to pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
add an image to a pdf; add jpg to pdf form
7.
All of the resources used by the process are returned.
Portable programs should use 
exit()
instead of 
_exit()
. The 
_exit()
function exists
mainly because of the structure of traditional implementations and also the structure of
standards committees. The 
exit()
function is defined by the C standard with some fe
atures
that are beyond the scope of POSIX. The only reason for an application to call 
_exit()
is to
defeat the flushing of streams and the calling of functions registered by 
atexit()
.
P
age 110
Calling abort()
The 
abort()
function causes abnormal program termination. Exactly what that means is not
well-defined.
Portable applications should avoid using 
abort()
except in the case of fatal errors. On some
systems, it may provide useful debugging information, such as a 
core
file. 
Terminating Another Process
The 
kill()
function can be used to terminate another process. For example:
kill(pid,SIGKILL);
will kill the process identified by 
pid
. It returns zero on success and 
-1
on failure.
In general, it is safe and legal to kill your children and their children. It may be legal to kill
other processes in the system; however, ordinary applications should not kill any process that
they did not create (or cause to be created).
The 
kill()
function can be used for other functions unrelated to terminating a process.
kill()
is discussed in greater detail later in this chapter.
Signals
Signals inform a process of the occurrence of an event. There are two general types of events:
Errors
For example, division by zero, illegal instruction, or an invalid memory
reference.
Asynchronous events
For example, termination of a child or parent process.
The general concept of signals is as old as UNIX. Early versions of UNIX had a number of
design flaws in the signal mechanism. The BSD system fixed many of these problems, and the
signals standardized by POSIX are very similar to BSD signals with a few imp
rovements.
Each process has an action to be taken in response to each signal defined by the system. A
signal is 
delivered 
to a process when the appropriate action is taken.
During the time between the generation of a signal and the delivery of that signal, the signal is
pending. 
In most cases, this interval cannot be detected by an application. However, a signal
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
PDF document to/from supported document and image forms. to define text or images on PDF document and Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB
add jpg to pdf document; add photo to pdf for
C# PowerPoint - Insert Image to PowerPoint File Page in C#.NET
C#.NET PDF Reading, C#.NET Annotate PDF in WPF, C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET PDF Document Viewer, C#.NET PDF Windows Viewer, C#.NET convert image to PDF, C#.NET
adding an image to a pdf in preview; add picture pdf
can be 
blocked.
Each process has a 
signal mask 
that defines the set of signals currently blocked from delivery
to it. The signal mask from a process is inherited from its parent. The 
sigaction()
,
sigprocmask()
, and 
sigsuspend()
functions control the manipulation of the si
gnal
mask.
P
age 111
One of several actions is taken when a signal is delivered:
·
The process is terminated.
·
The signal is ignored.
·
The process is stopped.
·
The process is continued.
·
The signal is 
caught 
by a signal-handling function in the application.
There is a set of standard signals which a process can use. These signals are:
SIGABRT
Abnormal termination signal caused by the 
abort()
function. A portable program
should avoid catching 
SIGABRT
.
SIGALRM
The timer set by the 
alarm()
function has timed-out.
SIGFPE
Arithmetic exception, such as overflow or division by zero.
SIGHUP
Han
gup detected on controlling terminal or death of a controlling process.
SIGILL
Illegal instruction indicating a program error. Applications may wish to catch this signal
and attempt to recover from bugs. A portable program should not intentionally generate
illegal instructions.
*
After a 
SIGILL
is caught, the only portable thing to do is to 
siglongjmp()
back to
a known place in your program (or call 
exit()
).
SIGINT
Interrupt special character typed on controlling keyboard.
SIGKILL
Termination signal. This si
gnal cannot be caught or ignored.
SIGPIPE
Write to a pipe with no readers.
SIGQUIT
Quit special character typed on controlling keyboard.
SIGSEGV
Invalid memory reference. Like 
SIGILL
, portable programs should not intentionally
generate invalid memory refer
ences.
SIGTERM
Termination signal.
SIGUSR1
Application-defined signal 1.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
adding an image to a pdf in acrobat; how to add a photo to a pdf document
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Supports adding text to PDF in preview without adobe reader installed in ASP.NET. Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text.
add jpg signature to pdf; add jpeg to pdf
SIGUSR2
Application-defined signal 2.
Unless the application changes the action, any of the above signals cause the abnormal
termination of the process.
* Even non-portable programs should avoid intentionally generating illegal instructions. What
happens if a new model defines the instruction to do something?
P
age 112
There is also a set of job control signals. They are: 
SIGCHLD
Child process terminated or stopped. By default, this signal is ignored.
SIGCONT
Continue the process if it is currently stopped; otherwise, ignore the signal.
SIGSTOP
Stop signal. This signal cannot be caught or ignored.
SIGTSTP
Stop special chara
cter typed on the controlling keyboard.
SIGTTIN
Read from the controlling terminal attempted by a member of a background process
group.
SIGTTOU
Write to controlling terminal attempted by a member of a background process group.
Most systems will have signals in addition to those listed here. The POSIX interface allows an
application to manipulate the signals it knows about without disturbing the signals it does not
know about.
Signal Actions
There are three types of actions that can be associated with a signal: 
SIG_DFL
SIG_IGN
, or
a pointer to a function. 
The actions for these values are:
SIG_DFL
Signal-specific default action.
SIG_IGN
Ignore the signal.
It is possible to ignore 
SIGFPE, SIGILL
, and 
SIGSEGV
; however, programs with
illegal instructions, erroneous arithmetic operations, and invalid memory references
are not portable.
The def
ault for 
SIGCHLD
is to ignore the signal. Applications that wish to ignore
SIGCHLD
should set the action to be 
SIG_DFL
, not to 
SIG_IGN
.
*
Pointer to a function to catch signal
VB.NET Image: How to Draw Annotation on Doc Images with Image SDK
multi-page TIFF, Microsoft Office Word and PDF file programmer, you might need some other image annotating tutorials besides adding annotation using VB
adding an image to a pdf file; add picture to pdf preview
VB.NET TIFF: Add New Image to TIFF File in Visual Basic .NET
NET TIFF image processing SDK and its TIFF image adding function at this section, the following parts will describe the sample method for adding image to TIFF
adding images to a pdf document; add a picture to a pdf
On delivery of the signal, the receiving process executes the signal-catching fu
nction.
After returning from the signal-catching function, the process resumes execution.
Signal-Catching Functions
A signal-catching function receives control when a signal is delivered. A signal is somewhat
like an unseen hand placing a call statement in the middle of our program—the signal-catching
function gets control and is able to do things. When the signal catch
er returns, the interrupted
program continues without a trace.
* If a process sets the action for the 
SIGCHLD
signal to 
SIG
_
IGN
, the behavior is unspecified.
P
age 113
There are some cautions that a signal-catching function must observe:
·
While a portable program can catch errors such as illegal instructions; it should not assume
that it can continue from a 
SIGFPE, SIGILL
, or 
SIGSEGV
signal. Thus a portable
program can establish signal catchers to be more robust, but it should not 
depend 
on illegal
instructions or invalid memory references.
·
The program may be in the middle of some function when the signal is delivered. It is not
safe to call arbitrary functions from  a signal-catching function. The following library
functions are defined by the standard as safe:
_exit()
getegid()
rename()
tcdrain()
access()
geteuid()
rmdir()
tcflow()
alarm()
getgid()
setgid()
tcflush()
cfgetispeed()
getgroups()
setpgid()
tcgetattr()
cfgetospeed()
getpgrp()
setsid()
tcgetpgrp()
cfsetispeed()
getpid()
setuid()
tcsendbreak()
cfsetosp
eed()
getppid()
sigaction()
tcsetattr()
chdir()
getuid()
sigaddset()
tcsetpgrp()
chmod()
kill()
sigdelset()
time()
chown()
link()
sigemptyset()
times()
close()
lseek()
sigfillset()
umask()
creat()
mkdir()
sigismember()
uname()
dup2()
mkfifo()
sigpending()
unlink()
dup()
open()
sigprocmask()
ustat()
execle()
pathconf()
sigsuspend()
utime()
execve()
pause()
sleep()
wait()
fcntl()
pipe()
stat()
waitpid()
fork()
read()
sysconf()
write()
fstat()
VB.NET TIFF: Read, Edit & Process TIFF with VB.NET Image Document
TIFF document at the page level, like TIFF page adding & deleting to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and
add a picture to a pdf document; add an image to a pdf form
All other library functions (including 
printf()
and friends) are 
unsafe 
and should not be
called from signal-catching functions.
Examine and Change Signal Action
Both Standard C and the POSIX standard define a set of signal-handling functions. The
Standard C functions are limited. They may be useful for programs that need to operate on
non-POSIX systems, such as MS/DOS or System V.3.
Standard C Signals
First, the C Standard defines only a subset of the POSIX signals. These signals are:
SIGABRT
Abnormal termination signal. This is caused by the 
abort()
function. Standard C
suggests that other events may cause 
SIGABRT
; however, it does not say what those
events might be.
SIGFPE
Arithmetic exception, such as overflow or division by zero.
* IEEE Std 1003.1-1988 defines 
ustat()
as safe to call from signal-catching function. The POSIX
standard never defines 
ustat()
, and it was deleted from the 1990 revision.
P
age 114
SIGILL
Illegal instruction.
SIGINT
Interrupt special character typed on controlling keyboard.
SIGSEGV
Invalid memory reference.
SIGTERM
Termination signal.
Standard C does not require that any of these signals be generated. An illegal memory
reference may, or may not, generate a 
SIGSEGV
.
The Standard C function used to specify signal handling is called 
signal()
and is defined
by:
void (*signal(int sig, void(*func)(int)))(int);
where 
sig
is a signal number. The 
func
argument is a pointer to a signal-catching function or
to one of the following macros:
SIG_DFL
Set the signal to the default action.
SIG_IGN
Ignore the signal.
For example:
signal(SIGINT,SIG_IGN);
will cause the interrupt key (usually Control-C) to be ignored, and:
signal(SIGSEGV,oops);
will cause the function 
oops(SIGSEGV)
to be called on illegal memory references.
Standard C also defines the 
raise()
function as:
int raise(int sig);
to send signal 
sig
to the executing program. The 
raise()
function returns zero if successful
and non-zero if unsuccessful. The 
raise()
function should be used only in programs that
need to meet the C standard and do not use any POSIX features. The 
raise()
function is
more portable than 
kill()
for non-POSIX systems that conform to the C standard. The
kill()
function is much more portable to older UNIX systems.
POSIX Signals
The Standard C 
signal()
function has several problems:
·
There is no way to determine the current action for a signal. This means that a called
function cannot use the 
signal()
function without disturbing the caller. There is no way
to save and restore signal state.
·
When a signal occurs, there is no way to block other signals to keep the signal handler from
being interrupted.
P
age 115
·
There is no way for an implementation to cleanly extend the signal mechanism.
The POSIX-defined signal functions correct these problems.
The main function for manipulating signals is 
sigaction()
. It is defined as:
int sigaction(int sig, const struct sigaction *act, 
struct sigaction *oact); 
The 
sigaction
structure is defined in the header 
<signal.h>
to include the following
members:
Member Type
Member Name
Description
void(*)()
sa_handler
SIG
_
DFL
for the default action.
or:
SIG
_
IGN
to ignore this signal.
or:
pointer to the signal-catching function.
sigset_t
sa_mask
Additional signals to be blocked during the execution of the
signal-ca
tching function. (
sigset_t
and blocked signals will
be defined soon.)
int
sa_flags
This member is used only for the 
SIGCHLD
signal. If the value
SA
_
NOCLDSTOP
is used, then 
SIGCHLD
will not be generated
when children stop.
There may be other flags defined b
y a particular implementation.
A portable program should not use them. It should not be
disturbed by them either.
The 
sigaction()
function sets the structure pointed to by 
oact
to the old action for signal
s ig and then takes the action indicated by the structure pointed to by act.
There may be additional members in a given implementation's 
struct sigaction
.
Portable programs are guaranteed that these members will not affect them. To use
implementation-defined members, implementation-defined flags must be set.
P
age 116
Example: Read with a timeout
Before getting too deeply into signals, it would be useful to go through a complete example.
The following program reads a line from the user. If the user does not type anything for 30
seconds, the 
SIGALRM
signal will interrupt the read and the 
gettext()
function will return
zero. The caller of 
gettext()
can then take some alternate action, such a
s, giving the user
some help.
The program looks like this:
#define _POSIX_SOURCE 1 
/* System Headers */ 
#include <stdio.h> 
#include <signal.h> 
#include <unistd.h> 
/* Local Headers */ 
#include "panic.h" 
/* Macros */ 
#define TIMEOUT 30 
#define TRUE    1 
#define FALSE   0 
/* File scope variables */ 
volatile int flag;            /* The keyword volatile warns the 
* compiler that the variable 
flag 
* may change in a way that is not 
* predictable by the compiler. 
*/ 
/* External variab
les */ 
/* NONE */ 
/* External functions */ 
/* NONE */ 
/* Structures and Unions */ 
/* Signal Catching Functions */ 
/* 
* The ding() func
tion catches the SIGALRM signal and 
* merely sets flag to FALSE. 
*/ 
void ding() 
flag = FALSE; 
return; 
/* 
* The gettext function reads a line from the user's 
* console. If the line is not typed within TIMEOUT 
* seconds, the gettext() function aborts the read and 
P
age 117
* returns zero. 
*/ 
int gettext(char *buffer,int bufsize) 
{
struct sigaction act,oact; 
int              nchars; 
act.sa_handler = ding;   /* Call ding() when the 
* alarm goes off 
*/ 
sigemptyset(&act.sa_mask); 
act.sa_flags = 0; 
if (sigaction(SIGALRM,&act,&oact) != 0) PANIC; 
flag = TRUE; 
(void)alarm(TIME
OUT); 
nchars = read(STDIN_FILENO,buffer,bufsize); 
(void)alarm(0); /* Cancel outstanding SIGALRM (if any) */ 
/* Restore previos signal handler for SIGALRM */ 
if (sigaction(SIGALRM,&oact,NULL) != 0) PANIC; 
if (flag) return(nchars); 
return(0); 
Signal Sets
The POSIX standard allows a great deal of flexibility for an implementation while still
providing portable interfaces. This is evident in the type 
sigset_t
, which holds some sets of
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested