pdf viewer c# : Add png to pdf acrobat Library control component asp.net web page windows mvc OReilly_-_POSIX_Programmers_Guide2-part1953

396
setbuf()—Determines how a stream will be buffered
400
setgid()—Sets group ID
401
setjmp()—Saves the calling environment for use by longjmp()
403
setlocale()—Sets or queries a progra
m's locale
405
setpgid()—Sets process group ID for job control
406
setsid()—Creates a session and sets the process group ID
407
setuid()—Sets the user ID
408
setvbuf()—Determines buffering for a stream
410
sigaction()—Examines and changes signal action
412
sigaddset()—Adds a signal to a signal set
414
sigdelset()—Removes a signal from a signal set
415
sigemptyset()—Creates an empty signal set
416
sigfillset()—Creates a full set of signals
417
sigismember()—Tests a signal set for a selected member
418
siglon
gjmp()—Goes to and restores signal mask
419
signal()—Specifies signal handling
420
sigpending()—Examines pending signals
422
sigprocmask()—Examines and changes blocked signals
423
sigsetjmp()—Saves state for siglongjmp()
425
P
age xx
sigsuspend()—Waits for a signal
427
sin()—Computes the sine function
428
sinh()—Computes the hyperbolic sine of x
429
sleep()—Delays process execution
430
sprintf()—Formats a string
431
Add png to pdf acrobat - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add picture to pdf document; how to add a jpeg to a pdf file
Add png to pdf acrobat - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
adding a jpeg to a pdf; add a jpg to a pdf
sqrt()—Computes the square root function
435
srand()—Sets a seed for t
he rand() function
436
sscanf()—Parses a string
437
stat()—Gets information about a file
441
strcat()—Concatenates two strings
442
strchr()—Scans a string for a character
443
strcmp()—Compares two strings
444
strcoll()—Compares two strings using the curren
t locale
445
strcpy()—Copies a string
446
strcspn()—Searches a string for characters which are not in the
second string
447
strerror()—Converts an error number to a string
448
strftime()—Formats date/time
449
strlen()—Computes the length of a string
451
st
rcat()—Concatenates two counted strings
452
strncmp()—Compares two counted strings
453
strncpy()—Copies a counted string
454
strpbrk()—Searches a string for any of a set of characters
455
strrchr()—Locates the last occurrence of a character in a string
456
strspn()—Searches a string for any of a set of characters
457
strstr()—Locates a substring
458
strtod()—Converts a string to double
459
strtok()—Breaks a string into tokens
461
strtol()—Converts a string to long int
462
strtoul()—Converts a string to unsi
gned long int
464
strxfrm()—Transforms strings using rules for locale
466
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
formats, including GIF, BMP, JPEG, PNG and so on. can manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
add image to pdf online; how to add image to pdf document
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
your VB.NET imaging project; Able to add text or used as PDF watermarks, including, jpeg, bmp, png, gif; Full PDF watermark processing applications in VB.NET are
how to add image to pdf in acrobat; how to add a picture to a pdf file
sysconf()—Gets system configuration information
468
system()—Executes a command
470
tan()—Computes the tangent of x
471
tanh()—Computes the hyperbolic tangent of x
472
tcdrain()—Wait
s for all output to be transmitted to the terminal
473
tcflow()—Suspends/restarts terminal output
474
tcflush()—Discards terminal data
476
tcgetattr()—Gets terminal attributes
477
P
age xxi
tcgetpgrp()—Gets foreground process group ID
478
tcsendbreak()—Sends a break to a terminal
480
tcsetattr()—Sets terminal attributes
481
tcsetpgrp()—Sets foreground process group ID
483
time()—Determines the current calendar time
484
times()—Gets process ti
mes
485
tmpfile()—Creates a temporary file
486
tmpnam()—Generates a string that is a valid non-existing file name
487
tolower()—Converts uppercase to lowercase
488
toupper()—Converts lowercase to uppercase
489
ttyname()—Determines a terminal pathname
490
t
zset()—Sets the timezone from environment variables
491
umask()—Sets a file creation mask
492
uname()—Gets system name
493
ungetc()—Pushes a character back onto a stream
495
unlink()—Removes a directory entry
496
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. and above versions, raster images (Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
add image to pdf java; how to add image to pdf reader
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. be converted from Word document, including Jpeg, Png, Bmp, Gif PDF to Word Conversion.
add image to pdf acrobat reader; add image to pdf in preview
utime()—Sets file access and modification t
imes
497
va_arg()—Gets the next argument
499
va_end()—Ends variable argument list
501
va_start()—Starts a variable argument list
502
vfprintf()—Writes formatted text with a variable argument list
503
vprintf()—Write formatted text to standard output with a
variable
argument list
505
vsprintf()—Write formatted text to a string with a variable argument
list
506
wait()—Waits for process termination
507
waitpid()—Waits for process termination
509
wcstombs()—Converts a wide character string to a multibyte
charac
ter string
511
wctomb()—Converts a wide character to a multibyte character
512
write()—Writes to a file
513
Appendix A Header Files
519
Description of Tables
519
Appendix B Data Structures
551
P
age xxii
Appendix C Error Codes
559
Appendix D Porting from BSD and System V
565
BSD Functions
566
System V Functions
568
Appendix E Changes and Additions in Standard C
569
Preprocessor
569
Character Set
569
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. 2007 and above versions, raster images (Jpeg, Png, Bmp, and Excel to PDF Conversion.
add image in pdf using java; adding an image to a pdf in acrobat
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
software that converts JPEG, TIFF, JPG, TIF, PNG, PCX, GIF is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for
add jpg to pdf acrobat; add picture to pdf preview
Identifiers
569
Keywords
570
Operators
570
Strings
570
Co
nstants
570
Structures, Unions, and Arrays
570
switch Statements
571
Headers
571
Pointers
571
Functions
571
Arithmetic
571
Appendix F Federal Information Processing Standard 151-1
573
Appendix G Answers to Selected Exercises
575
Related Publications
585
Th
e Standards
585
Other Documents of Interest
586
Index
587
P
age xxiii
Preface
In 1988, IEEE Std 1003.1-1988, commonly known as 
POSIX
or
the 
IEEE Portable Operating
System Interface for Computing Environments, 
was published as an American National
Standard. In 1990, IEEE Std 1003.1-1990 was published as an International Standard. POS
IX
defines a standard way for an application program to obtain basic services from the operating
system. More specifically, POSIX describes a set of functions derived from a combination of
AT&T UNIX System V and Berkeley Standard Distribution UNIX. All POS
IX-conforming
systems must implement these functions, and programs that follow the POSIX standard use only
these functions to obtain services from the operating system and the underlying hardware. When
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. common image files, such as Bitmap, Jpeg, Png, Gif): Convert to PDF.
add jpg signature to pdf; how to add image to pdf file
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS project, what would you do to add and draw no more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe
adding image to pdf form; how to add image to pdf form
applications follow POSIX rules, it is easier to move 
programs from one POSIX-conforming
operating system to another.
Most programmers, and the companies that employ them, understand the benefits of developing
programs that are highly portable across a variety of computer architectures and operating
systems. To write portable programs you want to make use of only those fe
atures on a
particular system that are also found on other systems. Writing POSIX-compliant programs
does, in fact, result in more portable programs. However, writing these programs is not so easy
if you rely solely upon the manufacturer's documentation.
A programming reference manual typically combines POSIX-compliant functions with
non-compliant functions. A function might comply with the POSIX requirements but also add
several new features peculiar to that computer system or operating system variant. A
manufacturer may not always point out what features represent added value and are supported
only on that make or model. Even though the computer system you use might conform to the
POSIX standard, you can still write non-conforming applications by making u
se of the
system-specific features added by the manufacturer.
This book is a guide to the operating system interface as guaranteed by the POSIX standard.
You can write complete, conforming applications by using the information in this book. The
POSIX library of functions is complete enough to write many useful and so
phisticated
applications. However, there are many areas that the POSIX standard does not yet address.
Thus, programmers must implement strategies that isolate nonportable code from
portable-code, such that even hardware-dependent features are easily identi
fied. The object of
this book is to help the programmers resolve portability issues at the design stage of
development, and not after the program has been fully implemented on a particular system.
P
age xxiv
The POSIX Standard Documents
Not many people actually read a standard, nor are they expected to. It is more like reading an
insurance policy. When a standards organization such as ANSI or IEEE publishes a standards
document, they view it as a formal document in which the primary aim i
s to be unambiguous.
The language is very technical and precise. The statements ''Applications should not set
O_XYZ
" and "Applications shall not set 
O_XYZ
" mean very different (almost opposite) things.
"Should" means that something is recommended but is not required. "Shall" s
ignifies a
requirement.
The primary aim of this book is to interpret the POSIX standard for the application programmer
and explain it in language that he or she can understand. You can read this book without
remembering the technical meaning of words like 
may, should, 
or 
shall.
The POSIX standard contains a lot of information that was written by and for system
implementers. The standard describes how to write an operating system that conforms to the
POSIX standard. A typical passage is:
All of the described members shall appear in the stat structure. The structure members 
st_mode,
st_ino, st_dev, stuid, st_gid, st_atime, st_ctime, 
and 
st_mtime 
shall have meaningful values for all
file types defined in this part of ISO/IEC9945.
*
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
Also designed to be used add-on for .NET Image SDK, RasterEdge Bitmap Powerful image converter for Bitmap and PDF files; No need for Adobe Acrobat Reader &
adding an image to a pdf form; add photo pdf
GIF to PDF Converter | Convert GIF to PDF, Convert PDF to GIF
and convert PDF files to GIF images with high quality. It can be functioned as an integrated component without the use of external applications & Adobe Acrobat
add image to pdf reader; add photo to pdf reader
If you are an application programmer, you don't want to know how to construct an operating
system. You need to know how to write programs using the POSIX library to obtain the
services that an operating system provides. What this passage means to an applic
ation
programmer is:
The file size returned by the 
stat()
function is only valid for regular files. It may not contain
meaningful information for special files, such as 
/dev/tty
.
Finally, the POSIX standard is difficult to use; that is, it is not organized for a programmer who
wants to consult it while writing programs. It follows the conventions of a standards document.
This book is organized for use as a programmer's guide to POS
IX and a reference guide to
POSIX. The organization of this book is described in more detail in the next section.
In the POSIX standard, there are functions that are defined in relation to the ANSI C standard.
Given the additional requirements placed on C standard functions by POSIX, the programmer
has the chore of reading both the C standard and the POSIX standard to
get complete
information. In this book, standard C functions are described in full in one place.
* IEEE Std 1003.1-1990 Section 5.6.1.
P
age xxv
This book is a clearly written, complete guide to writing POSIX-compliant programs. In fact,
you may not need to own a copy of the POSIX standard. Or, if you do have it, we believe that
you will come to rely on the information in this book and find that it
is more accessible.
Guide to POSIX for Programmers
There are two separate guides that make up this book. The first is a programmer's guide to
writing POSIX-compliant programs. It begins with an overview of what the POSIX standard
actually defines. Then it covers the basic ingredients of a POSIX-compliant p
rogram. There are
a set of chapters devoted to explaining the functional areas addressed by the standard. Each
chapter covers a group of related functions. For example, all of the information on terminal I/O
is in Chapter 8. In this part of the book, we di
scuss in more detail the relation between POSIX
and Standard C, a set of issues regarding internationalization and portability, and finally, how
to design programs that isolate system dependencies from POSIX-compliant code.
The second is a reference guide for everyday use. The library functions are listed in alphabetic
order and there are sections covering error message codes, data structures and the standard
header files.
Here is an outline of the book:
Programming Guide
Chapter 1, 
Introduction to POSIX and Portability, 
answers a number of questions anyone
might have concerning POSIX. It addresses such basic questions as: Why is the POSIX
standard important? What does the POSIX standard cover? What is the relationship betw
een
POSIX and UNIX?
Chapter 2, 
Developing POSIX Applications, 
covers the basics of writing a POSIX-compliant
program. It describes how to make sure your program accesses the POSIX libraries and looks
at the required elements of a conforming program. It also presents a complet
e sample program
that uses many POSIX features. After reading this chapter you can read the following chapters
in any order. If your main interest is POSIX terminal I/O, you can skip right to Chapter 8.
Chapter 3, 
Standard File and Terminal I/O, 
covers the Input/Output facilities of the Standard
C library. These are highly portable functions that perform general-purpose file operations.
Chapter 4, 
Files and Directories, 
deals with the file system as defined by POSIX. It covers
directory structures, filenaming conventions and the library functions to manipulate files and
directories.
Chapter 5, 
Advanced File Operations, 
addresses the basic operations of the POSIX
Input/Output system as well as some advanced concepts like pipes and FIFOs.
P
age xxvi
Chapter 6, 
Working with Processes, 
covers working with processes. It covers creating and
terminating processes and signals.
Chapter 7, 
Obtaining Information at Run-time, 
describes how to obtain information about the
environment, such as the user's name or the current time.
Chapter 8, 
Terminal I/O, 
covers Input/Output to terminals.
Chapter 9, 
POSIX and Standard C, 
covers POSIX and Standard C. This covers some
portability pitfalls and other features of the Standard C language.
Chapter 10, 
Porting to Far-off Lands, 
is dedicated to internationalization. That is issues
having to do with porting a program from one culture to another.
Reference Guide and Appendixes
Library Functions 
is, by far, is the largest chapter in the book. It is a complete list of library
functions in alphabetic order. Every function is defined in its correct place. For example, the
isspace()
function is not listed under 
ctype
as it is in trad
itional UNIX manuals. This
makes this information much easier to find.
Appendix A, 
Header Files, 
lists the standard headers and the information that they define.
Appendix B, 
Data Structures, 
is a complete list of data structures and their members.
Appendix C, 
Error Codes, 
covers all of the error codes.
Appendix D, 
Porting from BSD and System V, 
provides information on porting applications
from BSD and AT&T System V systems to POSIX.
Appendix E, 
Changes and Additions in Standard C, 
describes the changes and additions to the
C language made by Standard (ANSI) C.
Appendix F, 
Federal Information Processing Standard 151-1, 
describes the Federal
Information Processing Standard used by the U.S. Government to purchase systems with
POSIX-like interfaces.
Related Publications 
lists related publications.
Assumptions
In this book, I assume that you understand the C language and have some experience
programming in C for the UNIX operating system. I also assume knowledge of ANSI C syntax.
By and large, I assume you are an intermediate to expert programmer who is interest
ed in the
substance of POSIX but has little or no interest in reading the standards document to find it out.
P
age xxvii
Conventions
Italic 
is used for:
·
New terms where they are defined.
·
Titles of publications.
Typewriter Font
is used for:
·
Anything that would be typed verbatim into code, such as examples of source code and text
on the screen.
·
POSIX functions and headers.
· 
UNIX pathnames, filenames, program names, user command names, and options for user
commands.
Sample Programs Available on Internet
The examples in this book are available on 
ftp.uu.net
in the directory
/published/oreilly/misc/posix_prguide
P
age 1
Chapter 1
Introduction to POSIX and Portability
This chapter offers a basic introduction to the POSIX standard and the efforts that led to its
development; it also explains the relationship between POSIX and UNIX and the ANSI C
standard.
Early computers each had a unique program architecture and a unique operating system. When
an application needed to be moved from one generation of hardware to the next, it had to be
rewritten. In 1964, IBM introduced the System/360. This was the first fam
ily of compatible
computers. They used one operating system, OS/360, and programs could easily be moved to
more powerful models. A single vendor implementing a single hardware architecture across
multiple machines was a first step in achieving portability.
In 1968, AT&T's Bell Labs began work on the UNIX operating system. It allowed a single
operating system to run on multiple hardware platforms from multiple vendors. UNIX,
however, developed along several different lines: AT&T System V, Berkeley Software
Di
stributions, Xenix, and so on. None of the flavors works identically and the precise behavior
of each flavor is not well defined. It can be difficult to move applications from one flavor to
another.
Today there is a major battle of operating systems. Unix Systems Lab's System V, the Open
Software Foundation's OSF/1, Digital Equipment's VAX/VMS, and Microsoft's OS/2 are all
trying to set the standard. Yet, they all agree to support the POSIX standards.
*
POSIX is an international standard with an exact definition and a set of assertions which can be
used to verify compliance. A conforming POSIX application can move from system to system
with a very high confidence of low maintenance and correct operation. 
If you want software to
run on the largest possible set of hardware and operating systems, POSIX is the way to go.
POSIX is based on UNIX System V and Berkeley UNIX, but it is not itself an operating system.
POSIX describes the contract between the application and the operating system. POSIX does
not say how to write applications programs or how to write the operating 
system. Instead,
POSIX defines the interface between applications and their libraries. POSIX does not talk
about ''system calls" or make any distinction between the kernel and the user.
* AT&T Unix System V release 4.0 and OSF/1 release 1.0 are both POSIX-conforming. Digital
Equipment Corporation and Microsoft have both publicly committed to making their operating
systems POSIX conforming.
P
age 2
POSIX completes the generalization started by IBM with the System/360. POSIX is a standard
independent of vendor, operating system, and architecture.
The formal name for the POSIX standard is 
IEEE Standard 1003.1-1988 Portable Operating
System Interface for Computer Environments.
*
We call it POSIX (pronounced 
pahz-icks,
similar to 
positive). 
In fact, IEEE Std 1003.1-1988 is the first of a group of propo
sed standards
collectively known as POSIX.
In 1990 POSIX became International Standard ISO/IEC 9945-1: 1990. The International
Standard is slightly different from IEEE Std 1003.1-1988. The IEEE reaffirmed the standard as
IEEE Std 1003.1-1990. The changes are mainly clarifications with no technical 
impact. We
will point out the few significant differences as we go along.
Who is Backing POSIX?
The United States Government has adopted the POSIX standard as a Federal Information
Processing Standard (FIPS 151) for use in computer systems procurement. The European
Community is getting ready to do the same thing. This has inspired the following Syste
m
vendors
**
to announce support for POSIX:
AEG Modcomp
Harris Computer Systems Division
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested