pdf viewer c# : Add a jpg to a pdf software application cloud windows winforms azure class OReilly_-_POSIX_Programmers_Guide5-part1986

typedef  unsigned short       o_uid_t; 
typedef  unsigned char        uchar_t; 
typedef  unsigned char        u_char; 
typedef  unsigned short       u_s
hort; 
typedef  unsigned int         u_int; 
typedef  unsigned long        u_long; 
typedef  unsigned char        unchar; 
typedef  unsigned int         uint; 
typedef  unsigned short       ushort; 
typedef  unsigned lon
g        ulong; 
#endif  /* (__STDC__ != 1) || defined(_SYSV_SOURCE) */ 
#endif  /*  TYPES  */ 
Here we see a header that uses three feature tests: 
_IN_KERNEL
,
_POSIX_SOURCE
, and
_SYSV_SOURCE
. Unless the header is being compiled with Standard C, every name in the
header is defined. Most of these are symbols that end 
in
_
t
and are reserved anyway. Some
of
them are symbols that could conflict with our application: 
physadr
unchar
, etc. Using
Standard C, these symbols are hidden until we expose them with a feature-test macro.
P
age 24
Template for a POSIX Application
There are many ways to structure programs. Many are legal and will work, but some formats
seem to work better. The programs are easier to write, have fewer bugs, and are easier to
maintain. If you are developing new programs, you have the opportunity to es
tablish a template
that assists in producing code with consistent format. As we said earlier, a well-structured
program is portable among the different programmers who may maintain it. Placing program
elements in a consistent order makes finding things eas
ier. We look at a template for writing
POSIX programs.
Before we look at the template, we should say a few words about breaking a program into
several files (or modules). Breaking a large program into several files has some good points
and some bad points. First, the benefits:
1.
Compile times can be reduced because only those modules that change need to be
recompiled. This can make a big difference during debugging. The make utility makes this
very easy.
2.
Multiple people can work on the program at one time.
3.
Well-designed modules can be reused in future projects, a major advantage.
Now the drawbacks:
1.
Compile times are larger when everything has to be recompiled. Link times are also longer.
2.
It is more difficult to keep track of a large number of files than a small number of files.
3.
There can be more global variables.
As a rule-of-thumb, modules should contain between 300 and 1500 lines of codes. We should
always try to design reusable modules. Even though you might not know how the module can be
reused, you can design it in such a way that reuse is easier. We do not wr
ite the module with
Add a jpg to a pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
how to add image to pdf; how to add a jpg to a pdf
Add a jpg to a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add jpg to pdf file; how to add image to pdf acrobat
explicit knowledge of where it will be reused. Our template tries to make it easier to write and
document modules that can be reused.
Let's look at the template and then discuss each part.
/* Feature test switches */ 
#define _POSIX_SOURCE 1 
/* System headers */
/* Local headers */
/* Macros */
/* File scope variables */
/* External variables */
P
age 25
/* External functions */
/* Structures and unions */
/* Signal catching functions */
/* Functions */
/* Main */
You can place this template in a file, for example 
empty.c
, and edit it each time you need to
create a module. This file is also handy if your company uses disclaimers and copyright
statements. They can all be placed into 
empty.c
and used as a starter for 
new programs.
/* Feature test switches */
This section should define the 
_POSIX_SOURCE
macro to enable the POSIX symbols and
disable all unspecified symbols.
/* System headers */
Each Standard C or POSIX function has one or more headers that must be included to define
the symbols used by that function. You should use an 
#include
statement for each required
header. I try to keep these headers in alphabetic order. It is then easy to 
check to see if a given
header is included.
If you have an 
empty.c
template file, you can put in an 
#include
statement for every
header. Then, after your module is written, you can delete the headers that are not needed. It is
easier to delete things with a text editor than to add them.
/*Local headers */
Most projects have at least one project header. These define common data structures and
symbols that are used in many files.
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
example, this C#.NET PDF to JPEG converter library will name the converted JPEG image file Output.jpg. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references
attach image to pdf form; add a jpeg to a pdf
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Add necessary references page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(0) ' Convert the first PDF page to page.ConvertToImage(ImageType.JPEG, Program.RootPath + "\\Output.jpg").
pdf insert image; add image field to pdf form
You may also have things that are part of your personal programming style. These are macros
and functions that you seem to use all of the time. These may be placed in a personal header
and included here.
/*Macros */
Define all of your macros here. Make sure there is a comment to describe any macros that are
not obvious. It is handy to have all macros defined in one place.
/* File scope variables */
These are variable that are shared by several functions in the same file. Again, use comments to
describe how the variables are used. Keeping the variables in one place near the front of the
file makes them easy to find.
P
age 26
/* External variables */
This is the list of variables defined in other modules and used in this module.
/* External functions */
There should be a prototype for each user-written external function that you use. An alternative
is to have a header with a prototype for every function in the project. I prefer to list explicitly
the external functions that each module uses.
/* Structures and unions */
Define all of the structures that are used only in this file. Any structure that is used in multiple
files should be in a local header file. In fact, any structure that may be used in multiple files
should be in a header file. Placing definitions in header
files makes it easier to expand and
enhance your program.
/* Signal catching functions */
Place signal catching functions in one place. Signals are an unusual calling mechanism and
often hard to debug. Unless you point it out clearly in your source code, it may not be obvious
that something is a signal catching function.
/* Functions */
I like to define each function before it is used. That way I do not have to declare any of the
functions that are local to this file. I also find it easier to read source files where the functions
are defined before they are used. That is merely a matter o
f personal preference.
/*Main */
If there is a 
main()
function in this file, I put it last.
Sample Program
Let's look at a complete program that uses many POSIX facilities. At this point, it is not
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
Add necessary references to your C# project: String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
add image to pdf online; add picture to pdf
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Add necessary references to your C# project: String inputFilePath = @"**jpg"; String outputFilePath = @"**pdf"; // Convert Jpeg to PDF and show
add multiple jpg to pdf; add image to pdf in preview
important that you understand the complete program. We will cover each function in detail in
the following chapters.
One easy way to write a program is to start with a program that does one thing and modify it to
do something else. The program that follows uses many POSIX features and can be used as a
starting point for other programs.
The sample is a simple directory listing program. It lists all of the files in the current directory
along with their size in bytes.
P
age 27
I have added a few special features. If the user's terminal is running at 2400 baud or higher, the
program will pause every 24 lines to give the user a chance to read the screen. If the user
interrupts the program with Control-C (or whatever key is assigne
d for interrupt), the program
prints a partial total and exits.
The output from the program looks like this:
Directory /usr/don/POSIX/c: 
Special . 
Special .. 
175 addcr.c 
1406 comm.c 
855 dirhack.c 
463 i.c 
529 include.c 
1662 ldirs.c 
2162 lstuser.c 
172 malloc0.c 
247 mallocl.c 
342 malloc2.c 
449 malloc3.c 
179 panic.c 
1758 pathconf.c 
5344 sample.c 
17984 BSD.h 
18180 POSIX.h 
41 panic.h 
Total of 51948 bytes in 19 files 
If a Control-C is used to interrupt the program, the output would look like:
Directory /usr/bin: 
Special . 
Special .. 
118264 acctcom 
117672 admin 
29080 asa 
754 assist 
754 astgen 
148656 awk 
27912 banner 
1206 basename 
49432 bc 
39288 bdiff 
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
1.bmp")); images.Add(new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")); images.Add(new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.png")); / Build a PDF document with
add a jpg to a pdf; adding image to pdf in preview
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
1.bmp")) images.Add(New REImage(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")) images.Add(New REImage(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.png")) ' Build a PDF document with
adding an image to a pdf; how to add a picture to a pdf file
68264 berk_diff 
634 berk_diff3 
53320 bfs 
38520 cal 
1280 calendar 
70920 captoinfo 
34536 cat 
43912 cb 
2114 cflow 
78184 chgrp 
34632 chgtinfo
29128 chmod 
88424 chown 
Interrupted after 25 files and 1076886 bytes 
P
age 28
At this point it is a useful exercise to stop reading and write a program that matches this
specification. Do not concern yourself with portability. Just write the program so that it works
on your system. How do you read the directory? How do you handle ge
tting interrupted? How
do you find out the speed of the terminal? What assumptions do you make about the operating
system interface? Even if you don't write the program, stop and think about how you might go
about it. 
Welcome back. Let's look at how POSIX solves these problems. Basically, what POSIX
defines is a standard interface between an application and the services it depends on from the
operating system. The POSIX interfaces have several attributes that make them 
portable:
1.
The interfaces are symbolic. They use symbols and the C compiler to map those symbols
onto a given system. For example, the file mode word in BSD 4.2 is an 
unsigned
short
; in AT&T System V.3 it is an 
int
. POSIX defines a new type, 
mode_t
. The
<sys/types
.h>
header defines 
mode_t
for each specific system.
2.
POSIX defines functions to mask system differences. The 
readdir()
function is used to
read a directory. The information is returned in a 
struct dirent
where the actual
format of the directory can be hidden from the application. Compare that to System V
where programs "know" that filenames are 14 characters long and are preceded by a
two-byte i-node number.
3.
Multi-purpose functions like 
ioctl()
have been replaced by a large number of
special-purpose functions. These functions are easier to describe and easier to test.
4.
POSIX also provides methods to test the interfaces and make sure that they work as
described. This does not show up as anything you see while programming. However, it
does help assure that the people who wrote the POSIX library got it right. That increa
ses
the chance that your program will be portable.
Now, what services will this sample program require from the system?
·
We need to interact with the user's terminal. We will use the Standard C library described
in Chapter 3, 
Standard File and Terminal I/O, 
to read and write formatted data. We will
use 
tcgetattr()
and 
cfgetospeed()
to determine the terminal speed. These ar
e
described in Chapter 8, 
Terminal I/O.
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. Add Stamp Annotation. image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and
add an image to a pdf with acrobat; add image in pdf using java
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and
add jpg to pdf acrobat; how to add an image to a pdf file
·
We will need to read directories and get information about files. The 
opendir()
,
readdir()
, and 
stat()
functions will do this for us. They are described in detail in
Chapter 4, 
Files and Directories.
·
We will use POSIX signals and the 
sigaction()
function described in Chapter 6,
Working with Processes, 
to intercept the Control-C.
P
age 29
·
We also make good use of the Standard C library for much of our work. For example, the
div()
function is used to test to see if we have printed a multiple of 24 lines. These
functions are not covered in the tutorial part of this book. However, they are a
ll described
in the Library Functions section in the reference part.
Using the interfaces defined by standards helps us achieve portability. What other portability
concerns might we have? For this program, the maximum length of filenames and pathnames is
the only remaining concern. I have written the program so that it will
work correctly
*
even if
the paths or filenames are huge.
As a last step before looking at the code, we should consider how we are going to structure the
program. What are the major blocks? Figure 2-1 shows a flow chart that will do everything we
need.
This will become the 
main()
function. Now, some of those blocks are a bit complex. They
will become functions. The block that says "Print the directory entry" will become the
print_dir_entry()
function. The flow for that function is shown in Figure 2-2.
The other routines are not very complex. The 
cwdname()
routine returns a pointer to the
name of the current working directory. The 
baud(
)
routine returns the terminal output speed
in baud. Both of these routines are fully described in the example.
The 
intr_key()
routine is a signal catching function; it is called when the user types the
interrupt key (usually Control-C). The 
intr_key()
function is called by the system as if a
function call were magically inserted between two statements. Because we d
on't know exactly
what our program (or the library) might have been doing when the 
intr_key()
function is
called, the function is careful not to disturb any "work-inprogress." The only thing that
intr_key()
does is set the variable 
intr_flag
to 
TRUE
.
Here is the complete program. The program is divided into two files: 
dsksub.c
and
dskuse.c
. The first file contains the major subroutines for this program. These functions are
written with the hope that they will be useful in future projects. The second fi
le contains the
main function and subroutines that are not reusable.
If you wrote your own version of this program, compare what you wrote to this sample. What
system-specific things did you do?
*
The program might truncate the filename if it is longer than the terminal width.
P
age 30
Figure 2-1. Flowchart for 
main()
Here is the first file, 
dsksub.c:
EXAMPLE 2-4. 
dsksub.c
1 /* 
2 * Functions for program to print file names and sizes 
3 */ 
4 /* Feature test switches */ 
5 #define _POSIX_SOURCE 1 
7 /* System Headers */ 
8 #include <assert.h> 
9 #include <dirent.h> 
P
age 31
Figure 2-2. Flowchart for 
print_dir_entry()
10 #include <errno.h> 
11 #include <stdio.h> 
12 #include <stdlib.h> 
13 #include <sys/stat.h> 
14 #include <sys/types.h> 
15 #include <termios.h> 
16 #include <unistd.h> 
17 
18 /* Local Headers */ 
19 #include "panic.h" /* Defines the PANIC macro. 
20                     * PANIC prints an error 
21                     * message when a library 
22                     * function fails 
23                     */ 
24 
25 /* Macros */ 
26 #define TRUE     1 
27 #define FALSE    0 
28 #define SIZE     256 /* Arbitrary size */ 
P
age 32
29 /* File scope variables */  
30 long nbytes = 0;      /* Number of bytes */ 
31 long nfiles = 0;      /* Number of files */ 
32 
33 /* External Variables */ 
34      /* NONE */ 
35 
36 /* External Function
s */ 
37      /* NONE */ 
38 
39 /* Structures and Unions */ 
40       /* NONE */ 
41 
42 /* Signal Catching Functions */ 
43       /* NONE */ 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 /
51 * Function to process one directory entry 
52 */ 
53 void print_dir_entry(struct dirent *p) 
54 { 
55 /* Prints the file size in bytes followed by the 
56  * file name.  If the stat() function fails, 
57  * p
rint question marks.  For special files, which 
58  * may not have a valid size, print special. 
59  */ 
60 struct stat statbuf; 
61     if(stat(p->d_name,&statbuf)  != 0) 
62         (void)printf("??????? "); 
63     el
se 
64         { 
65         if (S_ISREG(statbuf.st_mode)) 
66             { 
67             (void)printf("%71d ",(long)statbuf.st_size); 
68             nbytes += statbuf.st_size; 
69             } 
70         els
71              (void)printf("Special "); 
72         } 
73     (void)printf("%s\n",p->d_name); 
74     nfiles++; 
75     return; 
76 } 
77 /* 
78  * Function to return a pointer to the name 
79  *  
of the current working directory 
80  */ 
81 char *cwdname(void) 
82 { 
83 int            size = SIZE; 
84 char           *ptr; 
85     while(TRUE) 
86     { 
87     ptr = (char *)malloc(size); 
P
age 33
88      if (ptr == NULL) PANIC;      /* Give up if we run out 
89                                    * of memory 
90                                    */ 
91      if (getcwd(ptr,size-1)  != NULL) return(ptr); 
92      if (err
no != ERANGE) PANIC;  /* Any error other than a 
93                                    * path name too long for the 
94                                    * buffer is bad news. 
95                                    */ 
96      free
(ptr);                   /* Return the storage */ 
97      size += SIZE;                /* Try again with a bigger
buffer */ 
98      } 
99 } 
100 
101 
102 /* 
103  * Function to return speed of terminal in baud 
104  */ 
105 long baud(void) 
106 { 
107 struct termios t; 
108 speed_t        baud_code; 
109     if(tcgetattr(fileno(stdout),&t) == -1) 
110         { 
111         /* If standard output is not a terminal 
112     
* return 0.  Any other error is bad news 
113          */ 
114         if (errno == ENOTTY) return(0); 
115         PANIC; 
116         } 
117     baud_code = cfgetospeed(&t); 
118 
119 /* 
120 * We must decode 
the baud rate by hand because the Bxxxx 
121 * symbols might not be in order. 
122 */ 
123    switch(baud_code) 
124        { 
125    case BO: 
126        return(0); 
127    case B50: 
128        return(50); 
12
9    case B75: 
130        return(75); 
131    case B110: 
132        return(110); 
133    case B134: 
134        return(134); 
135    case B150: 
136        return(150); 
137    case B200: 
138        return(20
0); 
139    case B300: 
140        return(300); 
141    case B600: 
142        return(600); 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested