pdf viewer c# : Add a picture to a pdf file software Library project winforms asp.net web page UWP OReilly_-_POSIX_Programmers_Guide8-part1996

3.
Create the output file.
4.
Write to the output file.
5.
Compute square roots.
6.
Report and process errors.
7.
Return control to the system.
If we use the POSIX-defined functions, we are assured that these functions are portable among
POSIX-compliant systems.
What other portability issues might affect the design of this program?
·
A target machine may have a 16-bit 
int
. Since that would limit us to numbers less than
65,535, we use long for integer variables.
·
We need to know the maximum length filename that a user might type. Unfortunately,
POSIX does not give us this information. We can determine the maximum length of a
filename that we are guaranteed to be able to create, but that is not what we need. We
de
fine the macro 
MAX_NAME
to be the longest path name a user may type. In this example,
we set the value to 255, which should cover most cases. An alternate technique is to define
a huge limit (e.g., 5000). That change can be made by modifying a single line.
·
The program needs to know the language the user understands. Our example assumes that
the user understands English. Chapter 10, 
Porting to Far-off Lands, 
describes methods to
allow an application to be portable from culture to culture.
We can now start to write some code. First, accept a filename from the user:
(void)printf("What is the name of the output file: "); 
(void)fgets(filename,MAX_NAME+1,stdin); 
filename[strlen(filename) - 1]= '\0'; 
outfile = fopen(filename,"w"); 
The 
printf()
function prompts the user for a filename. The use of 
(void)
in front of the
call to 
printf()
tells the reader that we are ignoring the value returned by the function.
There is not much we can do if messages to the user's terminal fail. Casting
the value to be void
also prevents warnings from 
lint
.
The 
fgets()
function reads up to 
MAX_NAME+1
characters into the array 
filename
from
the user's keyboard 
(stdin)
. The newline character is also stored in the array. The next
statement discards the newline character. The 
fopen()
function opens the file for o
utput and
sets 
outfile
to the resulting file descriptor. Our program does not place any restrictions
(other than total length) on the filename.
P
age 55
We need to prompt the user to supply starting and ending values. Because we do the same thing
to get each value, a function can be defined to do this task. We can call the function with:
from = getlong("Starting value"); 
Add a picture to a pdf file - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add picture to pdf; add picture to pdf file
Add a picture to a pdf file - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add picture to pdf form; add image to pdf in preview
to = get_long("Ending value"); 
We define the 
get_long()
function later.
Next, we write the values and the series of square roots into a file. Again, we will define a
function and write the code for it later.
compute_square_root(outfile, from, to);
Last, we return to the operating system and report our success with:
return(EXIT_SUCCESS);
The (almost) complete 
main()
program looks like:
main() 
FILE      *outfile;          /* The output file */ 
char      filename[MAX_NAME];/* Name of the output file */ 
long      from,to;          /* The limits for the output table */ 
(void)print
f("What is the name of the output file: "); 
(void)fgets(filename,MAXNAME,stdin); 
filename[strlen(filename) - 1]= '\0'; 
outfile = fopen(filename,"w"); 
from = get_long("Starting value"); 
to = get_long("Ending value"); 
compute_square_root(outfile, from, to); 
return(EXIT_SUCCESS); 
Not bad; however, it would be a good idea to make sure that the 
fopen()
worked correctly,
and to report the error if it did not.
if (outfile == NULL) 
perror("Cannot open output file"); 
exit(EXIT_FAILURE); 
after the call to 
fopen(
We should also add:
if (fclose(outfile) 1= 0) 
perror("Error on close"); 
to close the output file and check for errors before returning to the operating system. The
perror()
function converts the error number stored in 
errno
to an error message. The
string given as the argument is written to 
stderr
, followed by a colon
P
age 56
and a space. Then, the error message is written followed by a newline. If the system has some
non-standard error codes, 
perror()
should correctly convert them to text. Using 
perror()
is more portable than trying to decode the error number in our program.
C# TIFF: How to Insert & Burn Picture/Image into TIFF Document
Support adding image or picture to an existing or new new REImage(@"c:\ logo.png"); // add the image powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to add an image to a pdf file in acrobat; add image pdf acrobat
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
NET image cropper control SDK; VB.NET image cropping method to crop picture / photo; you can adjust the size of created cropped image file, add antique effect
adding a jpg to a pdf; adding image to pdf in preview
We left three functions—
get_long(),compute_square_root()
, and
format_output
to be defined later. The 
get_long()
function has an argument that is the
prompt message. The prompt can be displayed as follows:
(void)printf("%s: ",prompt);
We can read in the number with a simple call to 
scanf()
:
scanf("%d",&value);
It would be nice , however, to do more error checking and keep asking the question until we get
a valid response.
while (1) 
(void)printf("%s: ",prompt); 
if (fgets(line, BUFF_MAX, stdin) == NULL) 
exit(EXIT FAILURE); 
if (sscanf(line,"%d",&value) == 1) return(value); 
(void)printf("P
lease input an integer\n"); 
The 
scanf()
function scans characters from the user's terminal 
(stdin)
. The 
sscanf()
function is very similar except it scans characters from a string; in this case, line. The return
value of 1 tells us that exactly one specifier (
%d
) was matched. By using
fgets()
to read the
data and 
sscanf()
to parse it, we can tell the difference between I/O errors and format
errors. The symbol 
BUFF_MAX
is the maximum number of digits the user may type. We define
BUFF_MAX
after the #include statements at the start of the
program.
After adding a few declarations, our function is complete:
long get_long(char *prompt) 
long value; 
char line[BUFF_MAX]; 
while (1) 
(void)printf("%s: ",prompt); 
if (fgets(line, BUFFMAX, stdin) == NULL) 
exit(EXIT_FAILURE); 
if (sscanf(line,"%ld",&value) == 1) return(value); 
(void)printf("Please input an integer\n"); 
}
The 
compute_square_root
function must calculate a series of square roots using the
sqrt()
function in the math library. The 
sqrt()
function returns the square root of
P
age 57
its argument. It would be simple enough to write your own square root function. However,
using a library function, we get maximum performance without knowing any of the details of the
hardware. We construct a simple 
for loop
to do the main work of the func
tion:
VB.NET Image: Image Scaling SDK to Scale Picture / Photo
VB.NET method to scale image file in .NET Framework VB.NET sample code for how to scale image / picture; RasterEdge VB.NET image scaling control SDK add-on.
how to add image to pdf file; how to add image to pdf acrobat
C# Word - Paragraph Processing in C#.NET
Add references: C# users can set paragraph properties and create content such as run, footnote, endnote and picture in a paragraph.
add signature image to pdf acrobat; adding a jpeg to a pdf
void compute_square_root(FILE *fileid,long start,long stop) 
{
long i; 
double f; 
for (i=start; i <= stop; i++) 
f = (float)i; 
fprintf(fileid, "%10.0f   %10.6
f\n", 
f,sqrt(f)); 
We should check for errors when writing to a file, so we revise the for loop as follows:
for (i=start; i <= stop; i++) 
f = (float)i; 
if (fprintf(fileid, "%10.0f   %10.6f\n", 
f,sqrt(f)) < 0) 
perror("Error writing output f
ile"); 
exit(EXIT_FAILURE); 
We can write a heading into the file with:
fprintf(fileid,"     N      SQRT(N)\n");
We don't actually need the 
format_output
function, after all. The 
fprintf()
function is
powerful enough to do the job. A separate function to format the output would not make the
program any clearer or more reusable. We modify our initial idea about how to
do the job and
as the program takes shape.
It is a problem that we never check for errors when printing the header to the file. Instead of
adding more 
perror()
statements, we add a new macro, 
PANIC
. The 
PANIC
macro prints
an error message and stops. The first 
printf()
becomes:
if (fprintf(fileid,"      N       SQRT(N)\n") < 0) 
PANIC; 
We use the 
PANIC
macro when an error is possible but very unlikely.
The 
PANIC
macro deserves a few comments. It is defined to call an external panic( ) function
with two arguments:
__FILE__ 
Defined by the C compiler as a character string literal containing the name of the
program being compiled.
P
age 58
__LINE__
A decimal constant for the current source line number.
The 
panic()
function is defined in 
panic.c
:
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we this VB.NET image resizer control add-on, can provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to add a jpeg to a pdf file; add png to pdf preview
VB.NET Image: Create Code 11 Barcode on Picture & Document Using
This PDF document editor add-on contains unique APIs for VB.NET developers to decode, encode and process PDF file independently.
how to add picture to pdf; how to add a jpeg to a pdf
#define  POSIX_SOURCE 1 
#include <stdlib.h> 
#include <stdio.h> 
void panic(char *filename,int line) 
(void)fprintf(stderr,"\n?Panic in line %d of file %s\n" 
,line,filename); 
(void)perror("Unexpected library error"); 
abort(); 
and a typical error message is:
?Panic in line 27 of file example.c 
Unexpected library error: disk full 
The message helps the programmer locate the place where the error was detected. It also may
give the user some idea of how to get around the problem.
The 
abort()
function causes abnormal program termination. On some systems it may
generate information that is useful for debugging, such as a 
core
file. POSIX does not specify
any debugging facilities, but provides the hooks for vendors to add rich debug e
nvironments.
The 
abort()
function will stop the application on all POSIX systems
The last step is to include the required headers. Each library function requires at least one
header. The only way to know which headers to include is to look up each function in the
Function section of the Reference Manual at the end of this book. After a
while, you will learn
which headers are required for each function. In this case, we need only two headers:
<stdio.h>
and 
<math.h>
.
Example 3-1 is a strictly conforming C program and does not need the 
#define
POSIX_SOURCE
. I am in the habit of including the 
#define
. If you want to have as many
modules as possible depend only on standard C, it would be a good idea to use the 
#define
POS
IX_SOURCE
statement only on modules that depend on POSIX calls. The Functions
section in the Reference Manual tells you which functions are in all standard C
implementations and which are only in POSIX systems.
Our complete source is shown in Example 3-1:
EXAMPLE 3-1. 
sqrt.c
#define _POSIX_SOURCE 1 
#include <stdio.h> 
#include <stdlib.h> 
#include <math.h> 
#define BUFFMAX 10 
#define MAXNAME 255 
P
age 59
#define PANIC (panic(__FILE__,__LINE__)) 
extern void panic(); 
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
to drawing on TIFF file page. RaterEdgeDrawing = New RaterEdgeDrawing() drawing.Picture = "RasterEdge" drawing & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
add image in pdf using java; add image to pdf
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Codes to Add Antique Effect to Image with .
mature technology to replace a picture's original colors add the glow and noise, and add a little powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to add an image to a pdf in preview; add a jpeg to a pdf
void compute_square_root(FILE *fileid,long start,long stop) 
{
long i; 
double f; 
if (fprintf(fileid,"        N         
SQRT(N)\n") < 0) 
PANIC; 
for (i=start; i <= stop; i++) 
f = (float)i; 
if (fprintf(fileid, "%10.0f   %10.6f\n", 
f,sqrt(f)) < 0) 
perror("Error writing output file"); 
exit(EXIT_FAILURE); 
}
}
long get_long(char *prompt) 
long val
ue; 
char line[BUFF_MAX]; 
while (1) 
(void)printf("%s: ",prompt); 
if (fgets(line, BUFF_MAX, stdin) == NULL) 
exit(EXITFAILURE); 
if (ssc
anf(line,"%ld",&value) == 1) return(value); 
(void)printf("Please input an integer\n"); 
}
main() 
FILE     *outfile;          /* The output file */ 
char     filename[MAX_NAME+l
];/* Name of the output file */ 
long     from,to;           /* The limits for the output table */ 
(void)printf("What is the name of the output file: "); 
(void)fgets(filename,MAX_NAME+l,stdin); 
filename[str
len(filename) - 1]= '\0'; 
outfile = fopen(filename,"w"); 
if (outfile == NULL) 
perror("Cannot open output file"); 
exit(EXIT_FAILURE); 
from = get_long("Starting value"); 
to = get_long("Ending value"); 
compute_square_root(outfile, from, to); 
if (fclose(outfile) != 0) 
P
age 60
perror("Error on close"); 
return(EXIT_SUCCESS); 
}      
Portability Lab
To review the contents of this chapter, try to do the following exercises:
1.
What will the following program fragment print?
short     d=17; 
printf("%07d\n",d); 
printf("%7d\n",d); 
printf("%-7d\n",d); 
It is 
not 
considered cheating to try it!
2.
When should one use a 
%hd
format specifier? How about 
%ld
? What are the portability
problems, if any, with plain 
%d
?
3.
If we need to transfer some floating-point data from one machine to another and write it to
an ASCII file using the 
%f
format specifier, what are some of the machine-specific things
that may show up?
4.
What is the difference between 
fputs()
and 
puts()
? What about the difference
between 
fputc()
and 
putc()
?
5.
What does the 
fscanf()
pattern 
"[A-Z]"
do? Does it work on all computers?
6.
What is one of the problems in using the 
%s
specifier in 
fscanf()
?
7.
The function 
gets(buffer)
is the same as 
fgets(buffer,INT_MAX, stdin)
with one exception. What is that exception?
8.
The 
gets()
function has a weakness that was exploited to invade a major computer
network. What is that weakness? When can 
gets()
be safely used?
9.
What is the difference between a stream opened with:
fopen( "foo", "w");
and one opened with:
fopen("foo","wb");
10.
Why is it a good idea to use the 
fclose()
function?
11.
What does:
fwrite(array,2,100,outfile);
do? Assume that 
array
is an array of 
short int
and 
outfile
is a stream open for
writing.
12.
Improve the 
fwrite()
function call in Exercise 11 to make it more portable.
13.
What is a possible advantage of 
fsetpos()
over 
fseek()
?
P
age 61
14.
What is the difference between:
(void)printf ("Help!");
and:
printf("Help ");
Would you expect one to be faster than the other? Why or why not?
15.
Modify the square root program given at the end of this chapter to make more use of the
PANIC
macro. What advantages and disadvantages does the new program have compared
to the old one?
P
age 63
Chapter 4 
Files and Directories
This chapter discusses the portable use of files and directories. We describe the POSIX file
system, covering the many things that can be done portably as well as the traps and pitfalls
that may be hidden in these operations. The functions described in thi
s chapter perform the
operating system services that deal with the creation and removal of files and directories
and with the detection and modification of their characteristics. They allow applications to
gain access to files for the I/O operations descri
bed in the next chapter.
The POSIX file system is based on existing UNIX systems. POSIX defines a common portable
interface to files. Applications do not need to know if they are using an AT&T or a BSD file
system.
The UNIX ''less is better'' philosophy imposed a few simple rules on files:
·
All input and output is done using files. Disks, tapes, displays, and scientific instruments
are all manipulated using the same function calls.
·
A file is an ordered sequence of bytes. All meaning is provided by the program that reads
or writes the data.
·
One type of file is a list of other files; this type of file is called a directory.
While these rules may seem obvious, each one represents a breakthrough. Many systems before
and after UNIX have required one set of calls to write to a user's terminal, another set to write
to a disk, and yet another set to write to a printer. Other system
s distinguish between various
types of files and the system gets involved in the job of managing the contents of the file. There
are systems with many formats of files and records. While more complex systems may provide
"more services" for the programmer, 
UNIX has a powerful advantage: There is less to learn.
Portable Filenames
For a filename to be portable across systems, it must consist of only the following characters:
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z 
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 . _ -
That is, uppercase and lowercase letters, numerals, period, underscore, and hyphen. The
hyphen must not be used as the first character of a portable filename. Uppercase and lowercase
letters retain their unique identities. For example, 
makefile
,
P
age 64
Makefile
, and 
MAKEFILE
name three unique files. Fully portable filenames have 14 or
fewer characters.
If the world were simple, all files would be named using portable filenames. In practice, UNIX
filenames may contain any character except slash (/) and null. Users may have good reasons for
using these characters. If an application is to handle any filenam
e and yet be portable, here are
a few guidelines:
·
If a program accepts a filename from the user, assume that the filename may contain any
combination of characters and may be hundreds of characters long.
·
If a program has built-in filenames, use only portable filenames with 14 or fewer
characters. Include the name of your program or some other unique text to avoid conflicts.
For example, 
dirlst.rc
or 
scalc.save
.
·
Use the 
tmpnam()
or 
tmpfile()
functions for temporary files.
·
POSIX does not reserve any filenames. However, some filenames are used by various
systems and should be avoided. These include: 
a.out,core,.profile,.history
,
and 
.cshrc
. Do not read or write any file in the 
/etc
directory.
Directory Tree
The file system starts with a master file directory called 
root. 
The root directory is simply a
list of files, some of which may be directories. Each directory, in turn, is simply a list of files,
some of which may be directories.
This structure is typically represented as a tree, as shown in Figure 4-1.
The root directory is called /. In this case, / contains the files 
usr,lib,etc,bin
, and
test
. The directory 
usr
in the root directory contains two other files, 
don
and 
sue
.
In order to locate a file, we can start at root and name all of the directories until we get to the
target file. This is called the 
absolute pathname 
of the file. Given the tree above,
/usr/don/book/chapters/4
is the path to the file called 4 at the bottom
of the tree.
This contains the text for this chapter. The string 
/usr/don/book/chapters/ 
is the
path prefix 
and the string 4 is the 
filename. 
The / character is the delimiter used between
filenames. The / character may not be used in a filename and no oth
er character may be used in
its place.
Current Working Directory
Most of the time, an application works with a small set of files that have a common path prefix.
For example, it is convenient to be able to specify 4 as a filename rather than the pathname
/usr/don/book/chapters/4
. We can supply a default path prefix to a
pply whenever a
pathname does not begin with a slash. This is called the 
current working directory 
or
sometimes the 
working directory. A relative pathname 
specifies a file or directory in the
current working directory.
P
age 65
Figure 4-1. Directory tree
The pathname of the current working directory can be obtained with the 
getcwd()
function. It
is defined as:
char *getcwd(char *buf,size_t size);
The argument 
buf
is the address of a character array in which to place the absolute pathname
of the current working directory. The 
size
argument is the maximum number of bytes to be
stored in 
buf
. If successful, the 
buf
argument is returned. If an error oc
curs, 
NULL
is
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested