pdf viewer c# : Add a jpeg to a pdf Library application component asp.net windows html mvc organized_crime_markets_and_trends1-part1999

Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Markets and Trends
11
exercised through stable structures involving hundreds and even thousands of em-
ployees and companies in complex hierarchical relationships. Such mechanisms 
are used to secure monopolistic profits part of which are redistributed through 
corrupt networks among local bureaucrats, magistrates, MPs, and ministers. These 
mechanisms or models are universally applicable, regardless of whether in crimi-
nal privatization, bank crediting, illegal trafficking in goods, pilfering of natural 
resources, etc.
Three different forms of organized crime in this country can be distinguished:
7
• The first type are the so-called „violent entrepreneurs” whose activity was 
initially largely based on violence.
• The second type is represented by the group of the extreme-risk entre-
preneurs. They are more likely to be permanently involved in systematic 
criminal activity in view of the great competitive advantages of this type 
of entrepreneurship. So far their activity has tended to remain outside the 
focus of public attention. 
• The third type constitute huge structures headed by so-called oligarchs 
(akin to the notorious Russian model) whose ambitions are aimed at mo-
nopolizing the most profitable activities and sectors in the state with the 
help of the methods of corruption and clientelism. 
The common principle for all three groups is the aspiration to capture the mar-
kets regardless of the different structures and methods of operation. Moreover, 
entry into the various legal, grey, and black markets takes place within the con-
text of the restructuring of the planned economy into a market economy and 
its liberalization accompanied by the arrival in the market of big international 
companies (Table 1).
or indefinite period of time; 3. the respective group is suspected of committing serious crimes 
punishable by at least 4 years” imprisonment; 4. the group in question is acting in the pursuit 
of material gain and/or power. To these four criteria should be added any two of the following 
characteristics: 5. there is division of labor among the members of the group; 6. measures are 
taken to reinforce discipline and control; 7. use of violence or other means of intimidation; 
8. use of commercial and business structures; 9. involvement in money laundering; 10. the 
activity of the group is in part of transnational character; 11. exerts influence over legitimate 
social institutions (the political class, government, justice administration, the economy). See 
Michael Levi, The Organization of Serious Crimes, in: The Oxford Handbook of Criminology, ed. by 
The Organization of Serious Crimes, in: The Oxford Handbook of Criminology, ed. by 
The Organization of Serious Crimes, in: The Oxford Handbook of Criminology
Mike Maguire, Rod Morgan and Robert Reiner, 2002, p.882. It is worth noting the following 
definition of this phenomenon: ”any organized group that has its leadership insulated from 
direct involvement in criminal acts and ensures organizational integrity in the event of a loss of 
leadership”. See www.iir.com/28cfr/sample_operating_Policies_definitions.htm
7
These general categories have been identified based on available studies, „grey literature”, 
investigative reports by journalists, analyses by special services in Bulgaria, as well as data about 
the related situation in other countries – in the Balkans, in Eastern Europe, and particularly in 
Russia.
Add a jpeg to a pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
how to add image to pdf form; add an image to a pdf with acrobat
Add a jpeg to a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
how to add image to pdf in preview; adding an image to a pdf file
12
Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Typology and Trends
Table 1. Sources, methods, and stages in the development 
of organized crime in the context of the Bulgarian 
transition
Violent Entrepreneurs
Extreme-risk
Entrepreneurs
Oligarchs
Sources
1.
Former sportsmen in 
heavy athletics and high-
ly physical sports such as 
weight-lifting, wrestling, 
etc. 
2.
Former officers from the 
Ministry of Internal Affairs 
3.
Former criminal convicts 
1.
Representatives of occu-
pations requiring no edu-
cation degree but with a 
degree of entrepreneur-
ship under socialism: taxi 
drivers, bartenders, ware-
house managers, waiters, 
etc.
2.
Representatives of pro-
fessional groups such 
as foreign trade special-
ists, accountants, jurists 
(mainly lawyers), as well 
as students in these sub-
jects.
3.
Former criminal convicts
1.
Former high-ranking busi-
ness executives 
2.
Former communist-party 
functionaries 
3.
Former officers from the 
special services
Method
Use and selling of violence 
through large groups 
Using networks to execute 
criminal and semi-criminal 
operations, mostly involv-
ing import and trafficking of 
goods, as well as lease and 
purchase of state and mu-
nicipal property; obtaining 
bank credits (the group of 
the so-called credit million-
aires), and others.
National wealth redistribu-
tion through the use of 
the new political elites and 
establishment of holdings 
comprising dozens of com-
panies. Gaining domination 
over financial institutions 
and taking control of state 
financial institutions (includ-
ing the Central Bank) and 
the media.
Markets – 
initial emergence
1.
Providing security for re-
tail companies and out-
lets, and entertainment 
establishments.
2.
Debt collection, puni-
tive actions, mediation in 
conflicts between busi-
nesses.
3.
Trafficking from and to 
the former Yugoslavia.
4.
Trafficking in excise 
goods – spirits, cigarettes, 
crude oil.
5.
Thefts, smuggling and 
trade in automobiles.
Gaining advantages from the 
unlawful entry into all possible 
markets
:
1.
Trade in scarce goods – 
starting with mass con-
sumer goods such as 
cooking oil and sugar in 
the first months of the 
1990 spring crisis.
2.
Ranging from the import 
of used cars and spare 
parts to car and registra-
tion fraud schemes.
3.
Ranging from trade in 
real estate to speculative 
operations such as buying 
up municipal and state-
owned housing, including 
by eviction of tenants.
Conquering key markets by:
1.
Setting up financial com-
panies – financial houses, 
banks, etc.
2.
Controlling the input and 
output of state enter-
prises.
3.
Creating, gaining domi-
nation and control over 
mass-media.
4.
Controlling large shares 
of mass markets (cartels).
5.
Partnering with risk en-
trepreneurs and setting 
up holdings present in 
as many markets as pos-
sible.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Convert PDF to JPEG Using VB.NET. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic. dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Drawing.dll.
how to add an image to a pdf; adding image to pdf
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic. dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Drawing.dll.
how to add image to pdf document; how to add image to pdf
Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Markets and Trends
13
Table 1. Sources, methods, and stages in the development 
of organized crime in the context of the Bulgarian 
transition (continued)
Violent Entrepreneurs
Extreme-risk
Entrepreneurs
Oligarchs
Markets – 
initial emergence
4.
Trade in foreign cur-
rency, including currency 
speculations.
5.
Participation in the black 
markets, including prosti-
tution and drugs.
6.
Establishing strategic alli-
ances with big multina-
tional corporations. 
Markets –
second stage
1
.
Insurance transforming 
the security and entering 
the mass insurance 
market – symbiosis with 
the stolen car market.
2.
Pirated CD 
manufacturing, 
considerable investments 
in advanced technology.
3.
After the end of the 
Yugoslav embargo, 
attempts to make up for 
the losses in income by 
taking control over the 
most profitable smuggling 
markets (including drugs).
Cooperation 
between the three 
groups
The oligarchs’ role is to 
solve problems with law-
enforcement and judiciary. 
Extreme risk entrepreneurs 
serve as advisors, trustees, 
and income and investment 
channels.
Using the structures of these 
groups to conquer market 
shares and to deal with 
problems with competitors 
or partners; joining up 
with the oligarchs to 
ensure access to markets, 
protection, and assistance 
against the state.
Intimidation and control 
over small businesses 
through extreme punitive 
action (including destruction 
of property and murder); 
using extreme-risk 
entrepreneurs (including 
through financing) in 
problematic operations.
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
add jpg to pdf acrobat; add a picture to a pdf
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
add a jpg to a pdf; how to add jpg to pdf file
14
Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Typology and Trends
1.1. EVOLUTION OF VIOLENT ENTREPRENEUR GROUPS
The violent entrepreneur groups are emblematic of Bulgarian organized crime and 
ever since the beginning of their activity have been synonymous with criminal 
business in this country. The different stages in their development over the two 
decades of the transition quite eloquently illustrate the ambivalent relationships 
between the criminal and the political elites, vacillating between antagonism and 
corrupt partnership.
The beginning (1990-1992)
The model of entrepreneurship of violence (also dubbed „selling protection”) 
has been well-documented in the criminological literature. In its Bulgarian ver-
sion, group members were initially recruited from among athletes, whence the 
popular name „wrestler groups” or „wrestlers”. Similarly to the former Soviet 
Union and the German Democratic Republic, Bulgaria had a very well developed 
system for training professional athletes in the Olympic sports. A network of sports 
schools was in place where huge numbers of children were trained to become 
professional athletes. At the time, the state ensured lifelong support for the elite 
athletes. With the end of communist rule, the system was deprived of financial 
support practically leaving tens of thousands of athletes out in the street. Some 
of them, and particularly the heavy sports athletes, joined the violent entrepre-
neur groups that guaranteed a new identity, good incomes, and prospects for 
quick prosperity in the chaos of the transition. The thus recruited members of 
these structures had the unique psychological and physical experience in using 
violence, winning combats, enduring pain, etc. Structurally, the sports schools 
themselves formed the backbone of the future structures of organized crime.
The second pool of recruits for the violent entrepreneur groups were former 
officers from the police and special services. In the period 1990-1992,
8
12-17 
thousand employees were discharged from this system for ideological reasons. It 
is generally believed that the representatives of this group, whose names rarely 
become public, have played a key role in the choice of the activity of the violent 
entrepreneur structures. They further take on the critical function of mediators in 
the event of problems with the law enforcement authorities.
The third pool was made up of criminals, a great many of whom were given 
amnesty in the early 1990s. Their role, however, cannot be compared to countries 
with a long history of organized crime, such as Russia (the Soviet Union).
The successful establishment of the violent entrepreneur groups in the first half of 
the 1990s was related to the far-reaching political, economic, and institutional cri-
sis that paralyzed the state and facilitated its usurpation by new elites involved in 
8
The period January-May 1990 was marked by mass lay-offs of State Security – the former secret 
police of the communist regime - officers; it was followed by a second round of lay-offs in 
January-June 1991, and a third one in 1992.
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Sticky Note to PDF Page in C#.NET. Able to add notes to PDF using C# source code in Visual Studio .NET framework.
add jpg to pdf document; how to add an image to a pdf in acrobat
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Load 3 image files (BMP, JPEG and PNG Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")); images.Add(new Bitmap RootPath + "\\" 1.png")); / Build a PDF document with
adding a jpeg to a pdf; how to add an image to a pdf file in acrobat
Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Markets and Trends
15
semi-criminal networks. The grave economic crisis
9
and the economic isolation
10
produced a huge deficit of resources. As a result, it proved practically impossible 
to conduct a controlled policy of transition from planned centralized governance 
to market economy.
At the same time, the political processes led to instability of government. Over 
a period of seven years (November 1989 – June 1997) there was a succession of 
2 interim and 8 elected governments. Upon each political change, one of the 
most affected systems was that of the Ministry of Interior (MoI). These changes 
also had extremely adverse implications for the judicial system. In the first period 
of the transition, the law-enforcement agencies were practically paralyzed, in-
cluding with respect to organized crime. In the security sector, the processes of 
dismantling the old communist services placed a number of law-enforcement and 
control functions in a state of institutional vacuum. In fact, by the early 1990s 
the state had effectively lost its monopoly on violence which freed the hands 
of the violent entrepreneur groups. Law-enforcement authorities appeared par-
ticularly powerless to protect the proliferating, mostly small, businesses the very 
emergence of which actually gave the start to the transition from state-controlled 
to market economy. These new shops, restaurants, hotels, and other businesses, 
largely in the area of services, found themselves almost completely helpless in 
the face of the explosion of criminal activity. By official data, in three years alone 
(1990-1992), overall street crime increased four times with the rate of some 
types increasing 10 to 20 times. 
The violent entrepreneur structures quickly filled the emerging vacuum and the 
market for the sale of violence and protection became critical to the survival of 
any business in the following 7-8 years. Similarly to the situation in the other East-
European countries, in Bulgaria there evolved a market for „protection against 
violence”, in addition to racketeering.
11
The actual start of this process was set in 
1991 when a group of well-known Bulgarian athletes (Olympic and world med-
alists) demanded that private security activity be licensed by the state. This was 
seen as a means of survival after the „drastic cuts in public spending on sports”. 
The Ministry of Interior rapidly regulated private security activity arguing that it 
would give the laid-off officers a chance to earn a living legitimately. As a result, 
tens of thousands of former MoI and Ministry of Defense employees, a large 
9
During socialism, Bulgaria was a country with a remarkably open economy – foreign trade 
accounted for close to 60-70% of its domestic product. About 60% was with the Soviet Union, 
and another 15% with the remaining countries of the Eastern Bloc. The end of CMEA – the 
trade organizations of the communist countries - led to a dramatic drop in foreign trade and 
by 1990-91, Bulgaria had lost 2/3 of its markets. The onset of the war in Yugoslavia practically 
confined Western Europe’s interest to the Central-European countries. In addition, Bulgaria lost 
its second most important market – the Arab countries – with the war in Iraq in 1990-1991. The 
biggest problem of the country’s population is the drastic fall in the standard of living which used 
to be equivalent to (German Democratic Republic and Czechoslovakia) or higher than (Poland, 
Hungary and the Baltic republics) that in Central Europe.
10 Bulgaria had the largest foreign debt in Eastern Europe. Unlike countries such as Poland, 
indebted to other states, the bulk of the Bulgarian debt was owed to private institutions (the 
London Club). In early 1990, the creditors refused to extend payment deadlines and the country 
found itself incapable of servicing its debt. As a result, Andrey Lukanov’s government declared a 
debt moratorium and Bulgaria was plunged into almost total financial isolation.
11 See Philip Gounev. Bulgaria’s Private Security Industry in: Private Actors and Security Governance, 2007, 
p.110
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C#: Convert PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# File: Compress PDF; C# C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to
add picture to pdf form; adding a jpg to a pdf
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
C#: Convert PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# File: Compress PDF; C# C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to
add jpg to pdf acrobat; how to add a jpeg to a pdf file
number of former athletes and even criminals who had been given amnesty not 
only obtained legal jobs but also the right to carry arms and demonstrate force 
in a situation of general insecurity. This was basically the start of the raising of 
an army of experienced armed people who actually served as a legal cover for 
the emerging organized crime.
From the very beginning, private security providers began offering protection not 
only to private, but also to state-owned enterprises. Subsequently, these essen-
tially racket groups registered as security companies. The typical scheme involved 
taking over a specific territorial zone and defending it against rival racketeering 
groups. The gang’s territory covered all newly opened offices, shops, warehouses, 
restaurants, and other commercial outlets. The owners were coerced to resort to 
the services of the security company, with physical violence and/or damaging or 
destruction of property ensuing from any refusal to do so.
Gradually, in addition to the simple protection racket paid by the companies, the 
owners were offered extra services. In the context of an ineffective judicial system 
and with annual inflation in the range of 30-40% - which benefited debtors – 
debt collection became the most commonly offered service. It is in this context 
that the first territorial clashes between competing security structures arose. How-
ever, they subsequently quickly merged together. By mid-1993, in Bulgaria there 
were security companies of the violent entrepreneur type that covered nearly half 
of the biggest cities in the country.
The Yugoslav embargo and the flourish of smuggling (1992-1995)
The Yugoslav embargo catalyzed the formation of the structures of organized 
crime. It was imposed in the summer of 1992, when the Bulgarian government 
adopted the UN restrictions on export to the countries of former Yugoslavia. 
This measure put in place favorable conditions for organized transborder crime. 
With its already established structures for executing various forms of coercion, 
including violence, organized crime had an exceptional advantage over all other 
participants in the smuggling business (residents of border regions and private 
companies). Over the next period there occurred a specialization of various orga-
nized crime structures depending on the schemes they employed to earn profits 
from illegal export to the former Yugoslavia. It was towards the end of the 1990s 
that the actual scope was revealed of this criminal activity, covering the export of 
crude oil by tankers and trains, as well as petty smuggling by individual persons 
crossing the border by car. The documents disclosed in this period also shed 
light on the particular system of contraband franchising where all participants in 
transborder trafficking paid special fees to the organized crime representatives 
in charge of the area and the border checkpoints. The impact of the embargo 
against Yugoslavia on Bulgarian organized crime is comparable to that of the US 
Prohibition on American organized crime in 1920-1933.
Immediately following the emergence of the violent entrepreneur groups, contra-
band had an important place in their activity and over the years they managed 
to organize more or less lasting trafficking channels for drugs, as well as for legal 
goods. One of the reasons for the involvement of the violent entrepreneur groups 
in transborder operations was the shortage of goods. The Soviet model of planned 
16
Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Typology and Trends
Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Markets and Trends
17
economy provided for full state monopoly on the consumer market – the type 
of imported goods as well as their quantity and price were determined by state 
planning authorities. As a result of this policy, in Bulgaria, as well as in the rest of 
Eastern Europe, there was a constant and general shortage of goods that intensi-
fied in the first year of the transition. With the elimination of state monopoly of 
the consumer goods market, there was a staggering surge in imports – ranging 
from cheap Turkish goods to expensive electronics and luxury cars. The newly 
formed organized crime structures immediately captured the new trend. Unlike 
Russian organized crime, which specialized in obtaining a cut from the sales and 
profits of importing companies, the Bulgarian violent entrepreneur groups actually 
got involved in the import business themselves. Several types of involvement in 
this process could be outlined.
The first type is primarily associated with the riskiest type of import – contra-
band. The use of violence and the involvement of former security-service officials 
(maintaining contacts with officials in customs, the tax authorities, and most no-
tably the MoI), allowed the structures of organized crime to take over the illegal 
trafficking in excise goods – imported cigarettes and spirits. Particularly profitable 
in this respect were some of the most basic consumer goods that became scarce 
in the country at different times (petrol products, sugar, cooking oil). The other 
group of products of interest to the import companies controlled by violent en-
trepreneur groups included consumer electronics, used cars, car spare parts, and 
others. 
The second type of involvement is associated with payment for the various 
services provided by organized crime to business, starting with the clearance of 
the goods and processing of import documentation at customs; through securing 
police protection, to collecting from non-payers and dealing with the competition 
by violent means.
The third type is related to the small-scale importer market. In the early days 
of the transition, the so called „suitcase trade” with Turkey (which began in the 
autumn of 1989) was completely free, chaotic, and uncontrolled. This type of im-
port and trade took place with the help of „import organizers” and go-betweens 
(dubbed „guides”).
12
The scheme typically used the former state-owned facilities 
which in addition to warehouse storage served as retail and wholesale outlets.
13
The violent entrepreneur groups managed to place under their control a great 
many of the participants in the Turkish trade chain. Thus, at the entry point the 
guides charged an additional security fee while the distribution network was di-
vided among the most powerful security providers. The regular clashes between 
the latter repeatedly led to turmoil and conflicts over control of the warehouses 
and the guides. In the periods of wars between the various national and regional 
structures of the groups involved, there were frequent burnings and destruction 
of goods, and the participants were fined, kidnapped, physically abused and even 
killed for their affiliation with a given group.
12 See Transport, Contraband, and Organized Crime, Center for the Study of Democracy, 2004, Sofia, 
p.50.
13 Ibid., p.51.
The golden era of violent entrepreneur groups: capturing the insurance market
By mid-1993, the chaotic occupation of free territories allowing the sale of violent 
services, the participation in illegal trafficking of goods, and control over the black 
markets such as car theft, drug trafficking, prostitution, illegal gambling, etc, had al-
ready come to an end. In the process of redistribution and amalgamation of these 
markets, one violent entrepreneur structure of nationwide coverage came out with 
monopoly positions – VIS-1.
14
Its principal activity was the provision of „violence-
related services”. The model created and successfully developed by VIS-1 functioned 
through affiliation of local „security companies” with the main organization in Sofia. 
The goal was for VIS-1 to be represented in all of the big towns of the country 
and the local companies started presenting themselves as its subsidiaries. Any newly 
joining structure preserved its territory (town, region, clients, etc) and could count 
on assistance against the competition, and respectively, was obliged to assist the 
members of VIS-1.
15
At that time, the state made no attempt whatsoever to restrain the activity of the 
company. According to some analyses, the MoI even intervened and took sides in 
some of the most fiercely competitive markets such as Sofia. Thus, for instance, in 
the clashes with competitors such as „the Karate Fighters” - the structure associated 
with Ivo Karamanski - and „the Sevens” [the 777 security company], the MoI rep-
resentatives often intervened in favor of VIS-1. By mid-2004, VIS-1 employed about 
2,000 people assigned to „brigades” of varying size. The analysis of the structure of 
VIS-1 and of other similar groups suggests that in many respects they borrowed from 
and copied their counterparts in the countries of the former Soviet Union. The larger 
structures as a rule had at least a three-tier hierarchy and many of the designations 
literally reproduced the Russian ones (see Figure 1).
16
18
Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Typology and Trends
14 The name derives from the Bulgarian abbreviation for Loyalty, Investments, Security.
15 For instance, if a problem should arise for a representative of VIS-1 in a given town (region) 
he may request and would receive assistance from the headquarters and from structures of the 
organization in neighboring towns. Within one year the organization had grown immensely and 
the firms under its umbrella managed to assimilate, drive out, or destroy the local competition. 
This applied in equal measure to ordinary security companies and to rival criminal groups 
operating in their area. VIS-1 thus managed to achieve nationwide coverage. Nevertheless, they 
failed to establish a monopoly on the „security business” in the bigger towns. In the largest ones 
such as Sofia, Plovdiv, Varna, and Bourgas, and some smaller towns, various local racketeering 
structures such as TIM, 777, and others preserved their influence and even held the largest share 
of the market. It should be noted that legally VIS-1 was a registered as a legitimate company 
offering security services.
16 The reasons for this similarity are uncertain. The most popular explanation accounts for it with 
the clash between the Bulgarian violent entrepreneur structures and their counterparts from the 
former Soviet Union (mainly Russian, Ukrainian, and Caucasian) upon their attempt to establish 
themselves in Bulgaria. Another hypothesis is related mainly to the involvement of Bulgarian 
violent entrepreneur structures in the activity of trade companies exporting and importing to 
and from the countries of the former Soviet Union and Russia in particular. It is well-known 
that after 1991-92, the Russian criminal structures became the guarantors of trade deals with 
Bulgarian counterparts. At the time, in order to conduct a deal with a Russian cigarette importer, 
for instance, the exporter had to approach a similar violent entrepreneur structure in Bulgaria 
to guarantee the payment.
Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Markets and Trends
19
By the mid-1990s, however, the widespread practice of racketeering and the 
many incidents involving the use of physical violence had created extremely 
negative public attitudes against the racketeers. The political change that took 
place at the time
17
led to undertaking a series of government measures to put a 
check on the activities of private security providers. In the summer of 1994 the 
MoI had its the first tentative plans to rein in private security activity, in some 
cases even proposing to ban it altogether. The requirement was introduced for 
licensing of security companies by MoI and they were banned from having na-
tionwide coverage.
18
As a result, many of the racketeers lost their authorizations 
and had to leave the market. 
In order to get around the new restrictions, in 1995 VIS-1 re-registered under a 
new name and area of activity. The new VIS-2 identified insurance as its prin-
cipal activity. In practice, however, clients were offered a whole package, as it 
were: should the clients decline the proposed insurance plan, they not only lost 
their protection but were subjected to physical coercion until they capitulated. 
Officially, however, the contract proposed by VIS-2 concerned insurance of the 
site rather than security provision. This insurance racket in fact followed logic 
contrary to that of the normal insurance business: instead of the client paying 
17 In the summer of 1994, after the withdrawal of BSP support for Lyuben Berov’s government, 
snap parliamentary elections were held and a new government was formed as a result.
18 See Ordinance No 14/25.03.1994 on the Issuing of Permits for Provision of Security of Sites 
and Individuals by Legal Entities and Natural Persons (Issued by the Minister of Internal Affairs, 
prom. SG No 28/01.04.1994, amend. No 99/02.12.1994, No 18/28.02.1997, abolished No 
19/02.03.1999.)
Figure 1. Structure of a violent entrepreneur group 
�������
�����������
���������
���������
���������
���������
�������
���������
�������
���������
�������
���������
�������
���������
�������
���������
�������
�������
�������
�������
�������
�������
�������
�������
��������������
���������������������
��������������
���������
�������
�����������
������
Sorce: Vadim Volkov, Violent Enterpreneurs: The Use of Force in the Making of Russian Capitalism, 2002
20
Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Typology and Trends
for compensation in the event of an insurance incident, in this case they were 
paying protection racket to prevent damages by the racketeer. 
Car insurance became the main sector of insurance-related activity of VIS-2. In 
the mid-1990s, about 70-100,000 automobiles were brought into this country, 
mainly from Western Europe, each year (90% of which were second hand). 
Owing to the huge demand in Eastern Europe and the Near East there grew an 
enormous market for stolen cars. As a result, in Bulgaria car theft reached several 
hundred vehicles a month. In terms of the scale of the country, this meant one 
in three-four households or companies with a newly purchased car was likely 
to have it stolen. Traditional insurers were unable to cope with this surge in car 
theft, delayed or were incapable of paying claims.
It was this very market that became the target of insurance racketers. In the new 
situation, the vehicles insured with VIS-2 received protection against theft by the 
organization’s own structures, but also the guarantee that independent criminal 
perpetrators would be pursued if they should steal a car insured by VIS-2. Thus, 
a new service was added to the provision for commercial sites (shops, restaurants, 
warehouses, etc) – recovering stolen property and even paying compensation in 
the event of a criminal incident. In the course of time, clients realized that the 
services of this new type of insurer and the acquisition of the VIS-2 sticker mini-
mized the risk of theft or damage to their vehicles. The rapid development of 
VIS-2, however, gave rise to internal organizational problems. Its local competi-
tors began to join up against the company’s national headquarters. Similarly to 
legitimate corporations, any attempt to reinforce centralized management created 
tension inside the organization. As a result, the first two leaders who refused to 
acknowledge the authority of Vassil Iliev left the VIS-2 system. They formed the 
core of the new violent entrepreneur structure, SIK [Sofia Insurance Company]. 
new violent entrepreneur structure, SIK [Sofia Insurance Company]. 
new violent entrepreneur structure, SIK
Unlike VIS, the new company did not have a single dominating leader. Through-
out its existence, the company and, subsequently, its various spin-offs were man-
aged by eight publicly known figures. The newly established organization was 
soon joined by local rival to VIS across the country, as well as by discontented 
former VIS members. Similarly to VIS-2, the newly-established SIK went into the 
violent insurance business.
Thus, in 1995, there emerged the basic structures of organized crime in this 
country. Over the next period, all criminal and semi-criminal economic groups 
identified with either one of the two leading structures. Although there soon 
emerged other violent insurance companies, such as Apollo Balkan, Korona Ins, 
Levski Spartak, Zora Ins, and others, which successfully imitated the scheme of 
the dominating insurers and managed to gain some market share, to this day the 
division among criminal and economic groups is still consistent with their initial 
allegiance to either VIS-2 or SIK.
The insurance period (1994-1997) can be defined as the golden age of Bulga-
rian organized crime. Although the embargo against Yugoslavia was lifted in 1995 
and the revenues from illegal trafficking to and from the countries of former 
Yugoslavia declined, this was the period when the violent entrepreneur groups 
secured a sphere of influence including over the government, legislature, and the 
judiciary. Indicative of the scope of this phenomenon is the fact that the SIK and 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested