pdf viewer c# : Add photo to pdf form SDK Library service wpf .net asp.net dnn organized_crime_markets_and_trends11-part2001

Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Markets and Trends
111
The little reliable data on trafficking include the number of victims who have 
been identified by the police or have sought the help of a non-governmental 
organization in Bulgaria or abroad. Such is the data used in the present overview 
of trafficking in Bulgaria, as well. By data of the Regional Clearing Point (RCP) 
with the Stability Pact in Belgrade, the number of victims – Bulgarian and foreign 
nationals – who have received assistance in Bulgaria between 2000 and 2003 is at 
least 423. Of these, 352 were Bulgarian citizens and 71, foreigners.
163
The group 
of the Bulgarian citizens is made up largely by girls and women who came back 
to Bulgaria of their own accord with the help of assistance programs, as well as 
girls and women identified as victims by the police in the country where they 
used to reside. The data produced by RCP are a minimum estimate and come 
close to those collected by the International Organization on Migration (IOM) 
and published in 2005, which constitute the most exhaustive source to date on 
the cases of trafficking registered in Bulgaria. According to IOM, the number of 
victims of Bulgarian nationality identified and assisted in Bulgaria in the period 
from January 2000 to December 31, 2004 was 620 and the number of foreign 
nationals identified in Bulgaria in the same period was 86.
According to RCP, who cite data by Animus Association Foundation obtained 
through partner organizations abroad, in addition to the victims identified in Bul-
garia, between early 2000 and May 2002, there were 485 Bulgarian women who 
became victims of trafficking and sought help outside Bulgaria, and 21 women 
and girls received assistance in Italy in 2002.
165
We could further add data about crimes related to prostitution and sexual ex-
ploitation from Belgian and German criminal statistics for 2001-2005; data from 
Greek criminal statistics for 2004-2005; trafficking victim data from the Nether-
lands for 2000-2003 (see Table 8). According to the data from all four countries, 
a total of 938 girls were registered as trafficking victims.
163 Stability Pact Task Force: Belgrade, First Annual Report on Victims of Trafficking in South Eastern 
Europe. Counter-Trafficking Regional Clearing Point of the Stability Pact Task Force, 2003, p.49
164 IOM, International migration data and statistics. World Migration 2005: costs and benefits of 
international migration, Geneva, 2005.
165 See RCP 2003, p. 55. In addition, 9 Bulgarians applied for a B9 residence permit (granted to 
victims of trafficking) between 1996 and June 2002 in the Netherlands. No information is avail-
able about the number of applicants per year. (Dutch National Rapporteur, 2003)
Table 7. Number of identified trafficking victims in Bulgaria 
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
Total
Foreign nationals
24
41
4
6
11
86
Bulgarian citizens
46
96
164
172
142
620
Source: Data published by IOM
164
Add photo to pdf form - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
how to add a picture to a pdf document; how to add image to pdf file
Add photo to pdf form - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add photo pdf; add jpeg signature to pdf
112
Prostitution and Human Trafficking
and Human Trafficking
and Human Traf
Clearly, IOM and Animus Association have by no means used all of the data from 
Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, and Greece, since the sum of the registered girls 
in these 4 countries in 2002-2004 exceeds the figure cited by the Bulgarian and 
the international organization.
It should equally be noted that for the period from late 2003 to the end of the 
first half of 2005, the Bulgarian National Investigation Service (NIS) conducted 60 
investigations on human trafficking and worked on 56 requests for investigation 
from court authorities of foreign countries. Nearly half of these requests came 
from the three countries for which data is available – 6 from Belgium, 8 from 
Germany, and 19 from the Netherlands.
166
Based on Animus Association data on trafficking victims who turned for help to 
the organization’s Crisis Center on more than one occasion in 2003, 2004, and 
2005, it is possible to make a rough estimate of the annual flow of trafficking 
victims coming from Bulgaria.
166 National Investigation Service (NIS), Genezis, razvitie i projavni formi na organizirana prestapnost v 
Balgaria, Sofia, 2005, p.121
Table 8. Registered victims of trafficking 
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
Total
Germany
24
91
128
127
62
432
Belgium
11
44
74
29
182
340
Netherlands
19
40
59
48
147
Greece
10
9
19
Total
75
194
250
166
253
938
Table 9. Victims seeking help from the Animus Crisis Center
Year
One-time visitors
Repeat visitors
2003
32
3 in 2004
2 in 2005
2004
50
3 in 2004
4 in 2005
2005
33
2 in 2005
Source: Coordinator of the AAF crisis unit, January 2006
VB.NET Image: Mark Photo, Image & Document with Polygon Annotation
on PDF file without using external PDF editing software. VB.NET Methods to Add Polygon Annotation. In this Public Partial Class Form1 Inherits Form Public Sub
add picture to pdf; adding an image to a pdf in acrobat
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
VB.NET image cropping method to crop picture / photo; size of created cropped image file, add antique effect Public Partial Class Form1 Inherits Form Public Sub
add photo to pdf form; add picture to pdf file
Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Markets and Trends
113
Using the capture-recapture method,
167
it is possible to make the following 
estimate: the number of victims of trafficking for sexual exploitation in 2003 is 
estimated at a minimum of 267, and in 2004, at least 275. Since data on repeat 
visits are only missing from one support center for victims in Bulgaria, these 
figures should be added to the results obtained on the basis of data from other 
organizations to obtain a very crude estimate of the scope of trafficking in women 
for prostitution in Bulgaria. Thus computed, it remains incomplete due to lack 
of accurate information about the number of victims who sought assistance from 
other organizations, as well as the number of repeat visits. Comparing the data 
from Animus Association with those of IOM on the overall number of identified 
trafficking victims (see Table 7) it is possible to estimate the number of trafficking 
victims at approximately 1,436 in 2003 and 781, in 2004. Once again, these are 
tentative figures assuming the rate of visits is similar in the various centers. If this 
is not the case, the figure may well be in the range of several thousand girls and 
women, as estimated by the European Institute for the Prevention of Crime – 
3,000-4,000 per year.
168
Profile of Trafficking Victims in Bulgaria Based on Registered Cases
IOM reports that 88% of the victims who sought help from its victim assistance 
programs between early 2000 and July 2004 came from Romania, Ukraine, 
Moldova, Belarus, Bulgaria, and the Dominican Republic. These data are not 
representative about the number and origin of trafficking victims from Bulgaria 
or about the country’s place in international trafficking since the IOM data base 
compiled over the past 5 years only includes information from the organization’s 
regional offices that have been established in some Balkan countries, including 
Bulgaria, as well as in some countries of Africa, Asia, and Latin America.
169
Nev-
ertheless, this information does provide some idea about the profile of traffick-
ing victims in Bulgaria although according to IOM and other researchers, victim 
profile is difficult to define on the basis of the available data. 
Age and Social Status of Trafficking Victims
According to IOM, most of the Bulgarian citizens, who become victims of traf-
ficking are women aged between 18 and 25, typically unemployed and with 
no regular income, with low education and coming from problem families.
170
Table 10 shows the age-group distribution of Bulgarian trafficking victims. 
Table 10 shows the age-group distribution of Bulgarian trafficking victims. 
Table 10
167 The basic capture-recapture method is based on a ”two-sample model”. It involves an initial 
random sampling of the population, marking the samples, releasing the marked samples back 
into the population and then recapturing another sample randomly from the population. Based 
on the number of individuals captured in both samples, it is possible to estimate the total 
population. The assumption is that all individuals have the same probability of being captured.
168 See Heinu, 2003
169 IOM 2005, p. 418; IOM have an office and programs for trafficking victims in Santo Domin-
go.
170 IOM 2005: p. 6 and pp. 418-420; according to NIS data, a mere 5% of trafficking victims are 
male.
VB.NET Image: Image Scaling SDK to Scale Picture / Photo
about this VB.NET image scaling control add-on, we RE__Test Public Partial Class Form1 Inherits Form Public Sub can only scale one image / picture / photo at a
add image to pdf reader; how to add a jpeg to a pdf
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
VB.NET Image & Photo Resizing Overview. The practical this VB.NET image resizer control add-on, can powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add a jpeg to a pdf; how to add jpg to pdf file
114
Prostitution and Human Trafficking
and Human Trafficking
and Human Traf
According to RCP, based on data from IOM, as well as other victim support 
organizations in Bulgaria and abroad, nearly half of the cases registered in 2002 
involved girls aged under 18 and one-third, young women aged 18 to 24. Thus, 
in 2002, the largest proportion of trafficking victims were under-aged girls (48%). 
The cases reviewed by Stateva in the 1997-2000 period also involve girls under 
18 and young women under 21.
171
The recurrent 15-21 age profile finds another 
confirmation in the conclusion of NIS of 2005 that the average age of the victims 
is 18 to 25 and there is generally a trend toward falling age of the victims.
172
According to RCP (2003), 10-15% of the female victims in 2002 had children 
(there is no data about whether they had children before they fell victim to 
trafficking or gave birth later), and by IOM data, 27% of the Bulgarian women 
assisted under their programs between 2000 and 2004 had children, with 82.8% 
being single mothers.
Education
A large number of the Bulgarian female victims included in the IOM database 
only went to school to the 4
th
or 6
th
grade, 30.8% and 22.4%, respectively, and 
4.7% had no education at all. Thus 57.9% of all female victims have no high-
school education and 28.9% have graduated high school.
173
If we go back to 
older data about Bulgaria, a similar education profile is found for the women 
victims of trafficking in 1997-2000, with 37.5% having primary education and 
33.4% still school students.
174
According RCP (2003), most of the women victims 
in 2002 also had relatively low education (the data are contradictory as to the 
proportion of high-school graduates and of those with primary education). 
Family History
The information about the family history of trafficking victims for the period 2000-
2004 is scarce. The available data on the women involved in trafficking between 
1997 and 2000 who visited the Rehabilitation Center with Animus Association in 
171 Stateva, M., Izsledvane na sluchai na trafik na zheni, Sofia, 2001
Izsledvane na sluchai na trafik na zheni, Sofia, 2001
Izsledvane na sluchai na trafik na zheni
172 NIS 2005, p. 121
173 IOM 2005, p. 419
174 Animus Association. Trafficking in Women: Questions and Answers, 2001 p. 46-47.
Trafficking in Women: Questions and Answers, 2001 p. 46-47.
Trafficking in Women: Questions and Answers
Table 10.  Age distribution of trafficking victims in 2000–2004 
Under 14
Per cent
14–17 years old
6.54%
18–24 years old
64.49%
25–30 years old
12.15%
Over 30
14.02%
NA
2.80%
Source: Data published by IOM; IOM statistics on international migration
VB.NET Image: How to Save Image & Print Image Using VB.NET
of saving and printing multi-page document files, like PDF and Word printing assembly with VB.NET web image viewer add-on, you VB.NET Code to Save Image / Photo.
add image field to pdf form; adding an image to a pdf file
C# Image: How to Add Antique & Vintage Effect to Image, Photo
this C#.NET antique effect creating control add-on is widely used in modern photo editors, which powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
adding an image to a pdf in preview; add an image to a pdf acrobat
Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Markets and Trends
115
that period shows that 10 women (43.5%) had grown up in families with severe 
forms of domestic violence and 6 women were victims of incest.
175
International 
studies on prostitution and trafficking have found that among the women and 
girls engaged in prostitution in general, quite a few have experienced some form 
of abuse (including sexual) in the family, as well as sexual abuse outside the 
family. A 2004 study by the British Poppy Project, which offers victim support, 
found that of all female trafficking victims interviewed (of whom 75% came from 
Eastern Europe), 38% had experienced various forms of abuse prior to getting 
involved in trafficking; 46% were victims of sexual abuse and/or rape; 31% had 
suffered sexual abuse in their childhood; and 46% had experienced domestic 
violence in the family (typically as children).
176
Additional insight into the family 
environment of trafficking victims is provided by the Animus Association data of 
1997-2000: 13% were found to be children of divorced or separated parents; 
25.7% came from single-parent families (for some of the women, it was a single 
mother with more than 3 other children); 4.3% of the victims included in the 
survey were orphans.
Regions of Origin
According to the National Investigation Service, the following regions in Bulgaria 
are most affected by human trafficking: Bourgas, Russe, Plovdiv, Pazardjik, and 
border regions like Svilengrad and Petrich.
177
Animus Association data provide 
additional information about the victims’ places of origin. The towns of Varna, 
Dobrich, and Russe, the border regions of Blagoevgrad, Kyustendil, Kurdjali, and 
Petrich, as well as smaller settlements in these regions, are places where there 
are many women victims of trafficking. In an analysis of trafficking in Bulgarian 
women of 2001, the National Coordinator of La Strada Program for Bulgaria, 
Nadya Kozhuharova,
178
mentioned a village in Varna District where three traf-
ficking victims were found to come from. By Animus Association data, they are 
not the only victims from that location.
179
Such cases call for closer analysis in 
terms of the ways of involving the girls in trafficking and the role of organized 
criminal groups in the process. Equally worthy of attention are the areas where 
there seems to be no human trafficking (if that really is the case). According to 
NIS, such regions are Smolyan, Montana, Lovech, and Yambol.
180
Recruitment Methods
Up to 2001, Bulgarian citizens needed visas to travel to most European Union 
countries. In 2001, the visas for most European countries were dropped. It is only 
logical to assume that with the lifting of visa limitations, there would be changes 
in the dynamics of human trafficking and of migration practices in general since 
traveling abroad had become easier. Thus IOM reports that human trafficking vic-
tims increasingly cross the borders through the official checkpoints with regular 
175 Stateva, M., op.cit., p. 47
176 Kelly, E. ”You can Find Anything You Want: A Critical Reflection on Research on Trafficking in 
Persons within and into Europe.” – International Migration, January 2005, vol. 43 (1–2).
177 NIS, 2005, p. 122
178 Animus Association. Trafficking in Women: Questions and Answers, 2001
Trafficking in Women: Questions and Answers, 2001
Trafficking in Women: Questions and Answers
179 Ibid, p. 19
180 NIS, 2005, p. 122
VB.NET Image: Tutorial for Flipping Image Using Our .NET Image SDK
version of .NET imaging SDK and add the following becomes a mirror reflection of the photo on the powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
add a picture to a pdf document; adding images to pdf files
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned signature and remove multiple or all images from PDF document
how to add a photo to a pdf document; add image in pdf using java
116
Prostitution and Human Trafficking
and Human Trafficking
and Human Traf
identification documents.
181
NIS confirms this trend and what is more, all too 
often, after expiry of the three-month term of residence in an EU country the 
victims are brought back to Bulgaria and subsequently taken out again. NIS also 
notes that some countries issue working visas for prostitution of Bulgarian citizens 
(e.g. Austria).
182
In connection with the opportunities created by visa-free travel, 
Dutch researchers have observed that the number of Bulgarian prostitutes in 
Amsterdam visibly increased after 2001.
183
There is, however, no reliable informa-
tion as to whether human trafficking has increased or it is a matter of increasing 
migration for the purpose of working in the sex industry.
184
RCP point to unemployment and the wish for a better life as the main factors for 
exposure to trafficking. Between 2000 and May 2002, 59% of all those surveyed 
left to work in the entertainment industry and services (deceived with promises of 
jobs in clubs, hotels, and restaurants); 4% received an invitation (the survey did 
not register the purpose of the visit); and 1% left for the purpose of marriage. 
The ways of involvement in trafficking prior to 2001 are largely in practice even 
now. In view of the victim profile outlined above, it would seem that the reasons 
and conditions conducive to trafficking have undergone little change over the 
past years even though none of the cited sources provides representative data. 
According to an unpublished survey of Animus Association Foundation, 38% of 
the victims were kidnapped in the street; 33.3% were lured by promises of good 
jobs abroad; 22.2% were sold by relatives; 2.8% left as tourists; and 2.8% were 
blackmailed on account of financial debts. The percentages have been calculated 
on the basis of 36 cases on which information was available and the data are 
not representative regarding the involvement of Bulgarian women since some 
(even if few) of the victims registered with the Animus Association center were 
not Bulgarian citizens. Nevertheless, they do provide some idea about trafficking 
practices in Bulgaria up to 2000. A comprehensive review of all studies on traf-
ficking in women in Bulgaria from the late 1990s to 2005 shows that the largest 
number of victims were involved in trafficking by false promises of employ-
ment. For example, RCP data for 2000-2002 indicate that Bulgarian women and 
girls were for the most part involved in trafficking by job promises.
185
It was 
likewise observed in the NIS report of 2005 that job offers usually concern the 
following occupations: waitresses, dancers, actresses, housemaids, photo models. 
The proposed remuneration by far exceeds payment in Bulgaria.
186
Based on 
investigation findings, NIS further concluded that in Bulgaria, many cases of traf-
ficking occur with the victim’s consent, and the use of violence and threats is 
not as common (there is no indication of whether this consent was the result 
of deceit). Thus, according to NIS, more than one-fourth of the women realized 
or supposed they would be working in the sex industry abroad. What most of 
181 International migration data and statistics. World Migration 2005: costs and benefits of interna-
tional migration. IOM, 2005, Geneva.
182 NIS, 2005, p. 115
183 Trafficking in Human Beings – Third report of the Dutch National Rapporteur, Bureau NRM, The 
Hague, 2005.
184 First Annual Report on Victims of Trafficking in South Eastern Europe. Counter-Trafficking Regional Clear-
ing Point of the Stability Pact Task Force 2003. Stability Pact Task Force: Belgrade.
185 Counter-Trafficking Regional Clearing Point of the Stability Pact Task Force 2003. First Annual 
Report on Victims of Trafficking in South Eastern Europe. Stability Pact Task Force: Belgrade., p.50
186 NIS, 2005, p. 119
Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Markets and Trends
117
those leaving of their own accord are not aware of are the working conditions, 
which include poor remuneration, abuse, insecurity, performance of sex services 
without protection. According to NIS, the women’s expectations, typically includ-
ing a considerable degree of independence and control of their own work, are 
drastically at odds with reality.
187
The following trend emerges among the mechanisms of involvement: in many 
cases the victims know, and sometimes are related to, the recruiters (Table 11). 
According to NIS, the involvement of family relations is particularly characteristic 
of trafficking of persons of Roma origin. IOM data (2005), which are incomplete 
since information is not available on all of the cases registered, indicate that 
57.94% of those who actually involved the victims in trafficking were male and 
30.8%, female. According to NIS statistics, 95% of the perpetrators are male, a 
large number of them with low level of education and previous convictions of 
violence.
There are various mechanisms of control over the victims and these are often 
applied in combination. They include: binding through indebtedness by demand-
ing reimbursement for greatly exaggerated costs of organizing the trip; depriving 
the victims of their identification papers; isolation; frequent transfers from one 
place to another; abuse (emotional, physical, and sexual) and threats against the 
victim’s family and friends.
189
The Role of Organized Crime in Human Trafficking 
According to analyses by the authorities, as confirmed by numerous studies in 
the past 15-20 years, a large part of human trafficking in Europe, particularly for 
sexual exploitation purposes, is in the hands of organized crime. The chief pre-
condition for this is that in many countries the sex industry is held in monopoly 
by organized criminal groups. It is worth noting that organized crime is most 
187 Ibid.
188 IOM, 2005, p. 421
189 See Chomarova, 2001, pp. 22-26; NIS 2005, p. 120
Table 11. Persons responsible for involving the victim in trafficking
Per cent
Family member/Other relative
8.41%
Partner
3.74%
Friend
23.36%
Procurer
0.93%
Stranger
38.32%
Other
NA
25.23%
Source: Data published by IOM in 2005
188
118
Prostitution and Human Trafficking
and Human Trafficking
and Human Traf
active in this very type of trafficking – for prostitution purposes – because of 
the huge profits generated by this particular crime. NIS reports, for instance, 
that a single girl can ensure € 12,000 to 18,000 net profit a month;
190
six girls 
are thus enough to secure an income of €1 million a year.
In this sense, the trafficking in women, girls and less commonly, men, for sexual 
exploitation purposes and organized crime are directly connected. This applies to 
a high degree to Bulgaria, too, where prostitution is controlled by criminal rings 
and independent practice, by some opinions, is virtually impossible. 
At the same time, the claim that the entire traffic for sexual exploitation purposes 
from and to Bulgaria is run by organized crime is clearly a misrepresentation. The 
screening of accessible criminal investigations on trafficking in Bulgaria, Central 
and Western Europe has shown that there are numerous cases of small groups 
and individually operating procurers of whom there is no evidence of affiliation 
with organized crime. Most of the information, however, is fragmentary and some 
of it comes from indirect sources such as media publications and investigative 
reports. It is therefore difficult to determine the actual influence of organized 
crime.
What is common with individual, group, and organized crime is that, as a rule, 
human trafficking for prostitution begins long before the stage of sexual exploita-
tion since the transportation and crossing of the border checkpoints, arranging 
legal visas or false papers, financing the trip and the other formalities in the 
process of emigration are all areas of criminal activity. This is a process that may 
involve national criminal organizations and networks of several criminal organiza-
tions cooperating on specific projects, as well as individual local participants.
Types of Organization of Human Trafficking by Criminal Rings
Even though there exist various forms of trafficking for sexual exploitation that are 
unrelated to organized crime, the available data gives reason to assume it plays 
a structurally determining role. This is why organized crime models in human 
trafficking are of special interest in analyzing the problem in Bulgaria.
According to Monzini,
191
the criminal groups involved in trafficking in women 
can be divided into three main categories: small and loosely connected criminal 
groups, middle-size criminal groups, and complex transnational criminal orga-
nizations. With the first kind, the recruiters also act as transporters and exploit-
ers. They are often friends or acquaintances of the future victims. Abroad, they 
establish contacts with local criminal networks (preferably of the same nationality) 
operating at the lowest levels of illegal prostitution. For instance, Monzini cites 
Czech groups in Austria, Albanian groups in Italy, and Polish ones in Germany. 
The next category deals largely with recruitment and transportation, ”selling” their 
victims to middlemen, usually in capital cities and border areas. Some of these 
groups also organize the so-called ”mobile prostitution” – moving women from 
190 NIS, 2005, p. 118
191 Моnzini, P. Trafficking in Women and Girls and the Involvement of Organised Crime, with Reference to 
the Situation in Central and Eastern Europe. Paper presented at the first Annual Conference of the 
European society of Criminology, September 6–8, 2001.
Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Markets and Trends
119
one town or brothel to another. They are relatively well-organized and include 
recruiters, bodyguards, people who choose the routes and arrange transporta-
tion, and decision-makers who negotiate the financial conditions with pimps and 
nightclub owners. The last category – that of transnational organizations – includes 
organized criminal groups able to coordinate each phase of the trafficking pro-
cess. These are criminal networks with a high degree of specialization by area 
of activity (from recruitment to laundering the profits). Their leaders are usually 
engaged in some legal business and do not have any direct and/or visible con-
nection to human trafficking.
192
Elisabeth Kelly
193
reviews the models of organized crime and trafficking in women 
in Eastern Europe proposed by Louise Shelley, et al.,
194
and the UN Office for 
Drug Control and Crime Prevention. According to these models, the criminal 
groups dealing with human trafficking in Eastern Europe and the Balkans have 
the following characteristics:
192 Ibid.
193 Kelly, E., Op. cit., p. 251
194 Shelley, L., ”Trafficking in Women: The Business Model Approach,” Brown Journal of International 
Affairs, Vol. X, Issue I, 2003.
195 Kelly, L., Op.cit., p. 251
Table 12.  Typology of organized crime and typology of human 
trafficking in the Balkans and Eastern Europe 
Typology of organized crime (general model 
common in Eastern Europe and in China)
Source: UN Office on Drugs and Crime 
Typology of human trafficking
Source: Louise Shelley
195
Source: Louise Shelley
195
Source: Louise Shelley
Standard hierarchy 
Single leader
Clearly defined hierarchy
Internal discipline
Known by a specific name
Strong social/ethnic identity
Violence essential to activities
Influence/control over the defined territory
Natural resource model (characteristic of post-soviet 
organized crime)
Chiefly dealing with trafficking in women
The victims are treated as a natural resource
The victims are sold to the most proximate buyer 
High degree of violence and violation of the victims’ 
human rights
Violent entrepreneur model (characteristic of the Balkans)
Almost exclusively dealing with trafficking in women 
Middlemen to Russian organized crime 
Increasingly well-integrated as they take over the sex 
services market in the destination countries 
Connected to top-level law-enforcement officials in 
the home country 
Profits from trafficking used to finance other illicit 
activities; invest in property and businesses abroad 
Significant use of violence
120
Prostitution and Human Trafficking
and Human Trafficking
and Human Traf
While the UNODC model is more general, the models outlined by Shelley to 
some extent overlap with the groups described by Monzini. There is not sufficient 
data to decide which one is more relevant to trafficking in women from Bulgaria. 
There is a certain reason to believe that different types of criminal groups are in-
volved in human trafficking in Bulgaria, some of which regional ones (e.g. groups 
from Bourgas, Pazardjik and Sliven
196
). No specific information is available on the 
organization of trafficking for forced labor or for other purposes. 
Organized Crime Roles at Various Stages in Trafficking in Women
Regardless of the type of group to which they belong, the members of criminal 
groups take on the following roles in the trafficking in women:
• Selecting and recruiting potential victims.
197
The role of the trafficker may 
be to kidnap a girl or a woman from the street or to get friendly with a 
woman and propose a relationship or job (usually abroad). At the lowest 
levels the traffickers are usually local people who know (sometimes only 
indirectly) a specific woman or girl or her family and friends. Part of the 
process of recruitment is the collection of information about the victims 
and their families. It is used to decide which girl is suitable, as well as to 
subsequently threaten and blackmail the victim. Thus, for instance, if a traf-
ficked woman has a younger sister she will be threatened that if she does 
not obey her trafficker or procurer and tries to escape, her sister will be 
forced to prostitute herself, too. Such cases are familiar to the victim sup-
port organizations. Information matters even when selecting the victim – if 
she comes from a very poor family; or from a dysfunctional family; if her 
mother is a prostitute or the father, an alcoholic; if she lives alone with her 
elderly grandmother because her parents abandoned her (all examples from 
real-life case histories of trafficking). The less resources the woman has to 
defend herself (at the time of recruitment and later), the easier it is to lure 
and recruit her. In some Roma meta-groups, a very common recruitment 
method used by the criminal groups (especially a few years ago) is the 
promise of marriage and many girls get officially engaged to their traffickers 
with the consent and approval of their families.
198
The practice also exists 
for a woman to be sold for trafficking by friends, family, or acquaintances. 
Even these cases are usually connected to organized crime. Last but not 
least, there is the practice of abduction, also carried out by organized 
criminal groups. Specific cases of kidnapping are familiar to victim support 
organizations.
199
• Subjugating the victim. As a rule, those who first use physical and psy-
chological violence against the victim are members of criminal groups. The 
abuse may include sexual abuse, torture, beatings, humiliation, hunger, iso-
196 NIS 2005; also, 168 Chassa weekly, April 1-7, 2005.
168 Chassa weekly, April 1-7, 2005.
168 Chassa
197 In this case ”victim” is only used to refer to a victim of crime.
198 Such practices have been described for Albania; the approval concerns the engagement and does 
not necessarily imply awareness that they will be involved in trafficking; see Davies. Aspects of 
Albanian trafficking methods: reinventing the Kanun as the extreme of co-dependency, А briefing docu-
Albanian trafficking methods: reinventing the Kanun as the extreme of co-dependency, А briefing docu-
Albanian trafficking methods: reinventing the Kanun as the extreme of co-dependency
ment prepared for the French Court of Appeal. Migration Research Centre, University of Sussex, 
2000.
199 An account of such a case appeared in Trud daily, August 8, 2001.
Trud daily, August 8, 2001.
Trud
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested