pdf viewer c# : Add an image to a pdf SDK software API .net wpf asp.net sharepoint organized_crime_markets_and_trends15-part2005

Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Markets and Trends
151
As a consequence, in 1993 and 1994, at least according to official statistics about 
new and used car imports and reported car thefts, the latter reached 20-25% 
of all imports. 
According to police officers, during that period, the real number of stolen vehicles 
was at least twice as high. Estimates point to about 40,000 car thefts annually 
between 1993 and 1995–a number lost to statistics due to underreporting. As a 
result of bulging thefts for ransom, victims who would opt for getting their car 
back were forbidden to report the theft under threat of ”complications”. In many 
cases they would receive a phone call within 20 minutes after the car was stolen. 
Theft-for-ransom turned out to be less expensive for crime groups and quicker 
than theft for selling the car further on, as they did not have to look for a trust-
worthy car dealer, wait for a buyer or register and officially transfer the vehicle 
to a new owner. By 1994, the theft of East European vehicles for components 
constituted only 20% of all car thefts. It may safely be supposed that in the four 
years from 1990 to 1994 one in every three cars in the country was stolen. 
Figure 19a. Car imports vs. car thefts (1993–1994)
����
�����������
����������
������
������
������
������
����
������
������
������
������
������
������
������
������
������
Add an image to a pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add photo to pdf reader; add a jpg to a pdf
Add an image to a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add image field to pdf form; acrobat insert image in pdf
152
The Vehicle Theft Market
4.3. MARKET CONSOLIDATION
Toward 1994 local car theft markets had transformed into a country-wide single 
market. At that time the VIS-1 grupirovka already had national coverage. It con-
grupirovka already had national coverage. It con-
grupirovka
fronted or allied with smaller regional players, such as Group 777 in Southern 
Bulgaria (Plovdiv, Sliven, etc.) and First Private Militia in the port city of Bourgas. 
Already in 1995, essential changes occurred as the Law on Private Security Com-
panies was amended and protection firms had to be licensed by the Ministry of 
Interior. This opened an opportunity to transform the private security firms into 
insurance firms. Insurance became a new form of a protection racket, especially 
targeting the growing number of Western cars likely to be stolen. The regular 
insurance companies, which at that point were mainly state-owned, were not will-
ing to provide car insurance as the odds for a vehicle to be stolen by the end of 
the year was 30%. At about that time the protection racket group VIS-1 closed 
down and registered an insurance group under the name VIS -2, thus circum-
venting the new restrictions on private security services and entering the largely 
unsaturated car insurance market. They sold security in disguise, as in the cases 
when a car protected by them was, stolen they offered to pay compensation 
to the victim. As VIS-2 has controlled many car-thieves, their insurance coverage 
usually came down to ordering the thieves to return the stolen car, and on rare 
Figure 19b. New and used car imports vs. car thefts 
(1979–2006)
�������
�������
�������
�������
�������
����
����
����
����
����
����
����
����
����
����
����
����
����
����
����
����
����
����
����
����
�����������
����������
�������
������
������
������
������
������
������
������
������
������
������
�����
�����
�����
�����������������
������������������
�����������
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Get image information, such as its location, zonal information, metadata, and so on. Able to edit, add, delete, move, and output PDF document image.
how to add an image to a pdf; how to add an image to a pdf in reader
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
adding images to a pdf document; how to add image to pdf file
Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Markets and Trends
153
occasions paying for it. The newly emerging insurance sellers at service stations 
and parking lots promoted VIS-2 insurance as highly effective with a main argu-
ment that VIS-insured cars rarely got stolen (the statistics being about one in every 
ten stolen cars). Strangely, at times even the national media supported the same 
assumption, quoting data that it was extremely rare for a VIS-insured car not to 
be found and restored to its owner (one or two in every ten stolen cars. 
As VIS gained new grounds, it became harder to hold together its structure lo-
cally. In early 1995, some of the VIS-2 members departed to form an alternative 
insurance racket grupirovka, called SIC. Within a year, the market became split 
between the two grupirovki both in terms of drawing in local racketeer groups 
grupirovki both in terms of drawing in local racketeer groups 
grupirovki
and controlling car-theft networks, and exerting undue influence over government 
officials. The two companies’ stickers became ubiquitous on offices, vehicles, 
and stores. Their adoption of the structure and management model of insurance 
companies turned the mostly loose racketeering groups into well structured and 
subordinated entities. They hired a large number of insurance professionals, ac-
countants, lawyers, and administrative staff who worked side-by-side with teams 
of hit-men that specialized in punishing disobedient car-thieves and restoring 
stolen vehicles. Between 1995 and 1996 smaller regional splinter racket-insurers 
appeared (e.g. Apolo Balkan, Korona Ins., Levski Spartak, Zora Ins., etc.). 
The Bulgarian racket insurance market displayed several distinctive features. First, 
in 1995-1996 the import of stolen cars from Western and Central Europe
245
con-
tinued to grow. Dozens of crime groups in Western Europe stole and trafficked 
to Bulgaria mainly higher class cars that were in demand in the country, using 
a range of approaches from theft to insurance frauds, counterfeiting car and 
personal ID papers, transporting the vehicles to Central Europe, forging engine 
and frame serial numbers, etc. Interestingly, after the stolen car was sold to a 
Bulgarian customer and insured by the grupirovka, it was often stolen again and 
resold/restored for ransom or exported to the Middle East or elsewhere in the 
Balkans. The complex coordination of criminal activity is exemplified in the 
popular understanding of those involved in the networks that ”a stolen car must 
earn you a sum at least three–four times its price to be worth the effort”. They 
also managed to pin thefts at such precise moments as between the expiry of 
the vehicle’s insurance policy and just before it was newly insured. 
Racket insurance was thus practically in control of the car-theft market. In con-
trast to protection racket in the early 1990s, which resorted to immediate violent 
response to those who had refused property protection, blunt brutality was no 
longer part of the method. Instead, the new insurers convinced the unwilling cli-
ents or those delaying to renew insurance by making them the target of repeated 
incidents. The car-theft supply chain starting in Western through Central Europe 
and reaching the Balkans and the former Soviet republics also flourished, making 
deliveries to each important city and area. Insurers would typically increase their 
market through a scheme in which the car once stolen from Western Europe 
would be sold in Sofia, sold again in a smaller Bulgarian town, stolen from its 
245 There are numerous sources on the car theft market in Bulgaria, among them reporter Kristi 
Petrova’s book War of the Grupirovki, Sofia, 2006, and the much less accessible investigation files 
War of the Grupirovki, Sofia, 2006, and the much less accessible investigation files 
War of the Grupirovki
of the Customs Agency and the National Service for Combating Organized Crime on cases that 
have been terminated at various stages for various reasons.
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
DLLs for PDF Image Extraction in VB.NET. In order to run the sample code, the following steps would be necessary. Add necessary references:
adding an image to a pdf in acrobat; add png to pdf preview
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
how to add image to pdf document; add image pdf acrobat
154
The Vehicle Theft Market
latest owner and then exported to a neighboring country. Thus, insurers profited 
from both their legal business and from theft and repeat sales.
Second, racket insurance earned its prominent place in business largely due to 
its car theft links. Pervasive corruption within the border and national police 
forces and by the law enforcement background of key grupirovki members greatly 
grupirovki members greatly 
grupirovki
facilitated insurance companies and their schemes. ”We have close contacts at 
all border check-points. I have been a police officer myself. We also keep good 
relations with district police departments, which help us a lot, actually they track 
most of the lost cars [...] For each car they trace they will get their 1,500 Ger-
man marks, no matter if it is a senior or front-line officer who found it.” Thus, 
the older of the Margin brothers, notorious SIC leaders, explaining the factors that 
rocketed the company to success in 1995. At that time a police officer’s monthly 
salary was about DM 200–250.
246
Moreover, during this early phase of political 
and economic transition, if a prominent politician or businessman’s vehicle got 
stolen, the victim would remove any area or district police chief for failing to find 
it in less than the blink of an eye. Careers were saved when the stolen car was 
traced, but the obligation for services long afterwards remained. 
A third feature, closely deriving from the second one, was the continued control 
over a variety of crime gangs. Insurance companies were genetically linked to the 
criminal world and continued to draw upon it widely in their business. Through 
their offices the dominant insurers gathered first-hand local knowledge of auto-
theft groups and if their members were all local or coming from remote places/
groups, on their helpers and the outlets (service stations, parking lots and car 
dealerships) involved in distributing the loot. Having thus mapped an area, force-
using insurers would periodically consult local police officers on its accuracy. In 
case any trespassers or rule breakers appeared, the teams of hit-men were ready 
to get them back on track. Alternatively, it was the police that punished them, 
not least because this provided a booster to the local of cleared-up crimes. 
Most importantly, large racket insurers were able to exert rather big influence 
upon political and economic elites. Elected officials, judiciary, entrepreneurs, 
bankers and even diplomats would go to any lengths to get back a stolen car, 
more often than not contacting the local or country-wide operating racket insurer. 
Thus, incumbents in office were in the position of regular customers of those who 
controlled the car-theft market,
247
and in high probability ensured the smooth 
transition of racket insurance into numerous other legal businesses through which 
they could launder their considerable wealth.
One of the methods used by VIS-2 and SIC to widen their coverage was to oust 
smaller independent auto theft groups that did not pay any tribute to them, if 
necessary by using violence. Police bulletins in that period invariably informed 
about detentions of gun or bat-armed BMW-riding gentlemen holding SIC or 
VIS-2 membership cards. SIC leader Krasimir Marinov presented the police with 
an exact list of their employees to avoid ”abuse of membership cards” and keep 
the company’s good repute, while Dimitar Popov, a respected career insurance 
246 See Trud daily, May 5, 2006.
Trud daily, May 5, 2006.
Trud
247 Media reports from this period recount numerous stories of both ruling party members and op-
position having relations with criminal insurers.
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
List<Bitmap> images = new List<Bitmap>(); images.Add(new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.gif")); / Build a PDF document with GIF image.
acrobat insert image into pdf; adding an image to a pdf file
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Sticky Note to PDF Page in C#.NET. Able to add notes to PDF using C# source code in Visual Studio .NET framework.
add image in pdf using java; how to add an image to a pdf file in acrobat
Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Markets and Trends
155
expert and SIC CEO, claimed none of the people using violence were affiliated 
to the company. 
Nevertheless, the most violent conflict that raged on the car-theft market remained 
between the two largest insurance entities. Despite the efforts of both companies’ 
headquarters to negotiate the partitioning of the market, VIS-2 affiliated thieves 
continued to steal SIC-insured cars and vice versa. At times it resembled a mob 
war with wounding, killing and property damage which subsided after negotia-
tions and surged as conflict areas increased. 
Notwithstanding turf struggle and the chaos of copycats and free players, racket 
insurers needed to work effectively to win substantial clientele. As shown by police 
records in the period 1995–1996, car thefts dropped by 12% in 1995 and 26% in 
1996 because of racket insurance (see Figure 19b). It is particularly interesting to find 
out how big the black car market was during this golden age of racket insurance, 
as car theft stimulated its development and vice versa, thus bringing double profits 
to insurance companies. The insurance–theft pattern developed in stages–from a 
monopoly of VIS-2, it was later on joined and rivaled by SIC, and finally by a few 
other smaller companies (such as Apolo Balkan, Korona Ins., Levski Spartak, Zora Ins., 
etc.) gradually becoming a fairly normal market. Independent players unattached and 
unaccountable to any of the larger insurers, however, still continued to operate.
The year 1995 can be taken as a basis when trying to assess the size of the auto-
theft market.
248
By official data a total of 16,700 vehicles were stolen in that year, 
but having in mind the probable 60% of non-reporting and the average price per 
stolen car of 2,500 levs, the total could be estimated at 66 million levs. Besides that, 
there was the market of luxury cars where vehicle prices varied between 20,000 – 
40,000 German marks (the currency most widely used in the mid-1990s
249
). Count-
ing police recorded car theft and the unreported stolen luxury vehicles would add 
another 500 cars per year or 15 million levs. After 1995, as racket protection com-
panies turned to the insurance industry, the auto theft market was complemented 
by car insurance. Reportedly, in 1997 VIS and SIC held 15% of the gross premium 
income, which amounted to around 250 billion levs (250 million after the denomina-
tion later the same year), nearly the same amount as the year before. Thus, in the 
period 1995–1997 they received an annual income of 40 million levs from insurance, 
where car insurance was accountable for around 70% of it. Apart from the 66 mil-
lion levs from car theft, they made a further 28 million from car insurance. It is a 
bit more complicated to calculate what profits were generated through car trafficking 
around Europe. Some of the modest estimates point that around 10% of all cars 
stolen across the EU member states–around 200,000 vehicles annually–were trafficked 
through Bulgaria. With the average fee for trafficking a car through or the price of 
selling it in Bulgaria between 500 and 1,000 German marks this market amounted to 
around 150 million levs. The figure may be inflated, but even if in reality it was no 
more than 30% of that, the total black market in the 1990s easily amounted to 
150–160 million levs. From the perspective of Bulgaria’s dire economic situation in 
that period this was a huge market accounting for nearly 1% of the GDP. 
248 In March 1996, the economic crisis in Bulgaria was already manifesting itself and influencing 
the market with a set of new factors. Data from that year to a great extent would distort the 
estimate.
249 The estimates do not take into account the inflation since then.
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF; Remove Image from PDF Page Using C#. Add necessary references:
how to add image to pdf acrobat; how to add image to pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF; VB.NET: Remove Image from PDF Page. Add necessary references:
how to add picture to pdf; add jpeg to pdf
156
The Vehicle Theft Market
4.4. POLITICAL STABILITY AND MARKET REDISTRIBUTION
The beginning of the end of the racket insurance companies arrived with the po-
litical changes and the new government in February 1997. The United Democratic 
Forces which won the elections made a political decision to ”win the country 
back from criminals”. Despite the fact that SIC, and especially VIS-2, had invested 
a lot in particular politicians and funded the building up of regional structures 
of the ruling party, in late 1997 it was more than clear that the new incumbents 
were determined to put an end to large crime syndicates such as the racket 
insurers. By 1998, all insurance companies had to be re-registered and specific 
provisions in the new Law on Insurance banning private security services by in-
surance companies led to the gradual abandonment of racket insurance prac-
tices. Insurance companies had to be licensed by a National Insurance Council, 
whereas operational level control over the insurance market was to be exercised 
by the Insurance Supervision Directorate at the Ministry of Finance.
250
The first wave of licensing reduced the nearly 100 insurance firms to 27. Union 
Ins (as SIC had renamed itself), Planeta Ins (as VIS-2 was then named), Zora Ins., 
Korona Ins. the Multigroup splinters Sofia Ins. and Sofia Zhivot, Apolo Balkan, 
and Levski Spartak, set up by former members of Ministry of Interior’s Antiterrorist 
Unit, were among those denied license. Racketeer groups were purged from the 
insurance market through partially repressive methods. The police demonstrated 
their determination to fight the grupirovki by such means as forcing citizens to 
grupirovki by such means as forcing citizens to 
grupirovki
remove the protection stickers from their car/store window or warehouse door 
without any explicit regulations in the law banning it. Further on, however, 
amendments to the Law on Insurance banned private security companies from 
managing or owning insurance companies. 
By 1998, while criminal insurers were trying to negotiate licenses with the new 
government and the MoI was attempting to purge from its ranks various level 
officers who were related either to previous ruling elites, or the criminal world, 
the car theft market shrunk to very small proportions in, nearly reaching its 1991 
level. 
During that period not a single grupirovka leader was prosecuted, as the politicians 
grupirovka leader was prosecuted, as the politicians 
grupirovka
chose to reach an agreement with them. In the following two years (1999–2000) 
VIS left the insurance market and SIC managed to transform some of its business. 
As a result, car-thefts started to increase again, growing by 13% in 1999 and by 
another 1/3 in 2000.
The growth in car theft in the period 1999–2000 has been attributed to a num-
ber of factors. The most common interpretation was that in 1997–1998 people 
were financially discouraged from reporting theft, as with the closure of criminal 
insurance companies, insurance purchases dwindled. Thus again, only around half 
of all car thefts were recorded. The police had its own motives for under-re-
cording sensitive offences, car theft among them–pressure from high government 
officials. Adding to this was a 1999 prison amnesty, when about 2,000 criminals, 
250 The Insurance Supervision Directorate was established with the Law on Insurance in 1996, but 
did not start operating until late 1997.
Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Markets and Trends
157
car thieves among them, were freed causing a general rise of the crime level. 
Monthly police records of that period show that within a couple of months the 
number of police-registered stolen cars soared. One highly probable factor for 
this was the fact that insurance companies received their new licenses. They rea-
soned that if car theft continued to decline at the same rate as in 1997–1998, 
people would stop buying car insurance. Besides, once they had a license, they 
could do as they pleased. It is hard to say whether this was an important factor 
at all, or whether auto-thieves could secure any immunity from law enforcement 
with the new police and prosecution chiefs that came with the new government. 
However, in 1999–2000 the insurance company that succeeded SIC managed to 
draw the greatest number of clients, including many former VIS-2 motor insur-
ance buyers. According to data from that period the cars insured with them were 
stolen much less often. Auto thieves and the police claimed that the reason was 
their hit squads were still active. Violent insurance, however, was well past its 
prime (1995–1996) and a number of insurance companies appeared, also selling 
car insurance, that followed regular civilized practices. Some of them did employ 
former law enforcement officers, who were equally well related to the racket 
insurance and auto theft business, but their role was limited to intelligence gath-
ering. The newly established insurance companies did not make payouts unless 
the car-theft was registered with the police, which soon became regular practice 
for all insurance companies. 
Several new trends appeared in auto theft. Data gathered in 2000 by the Bulgar-
ian Association of Insurance Companies showed that around 50% of all stolen 
cars were disassembled and sold for components. Police reports analyzing the 
auto theft market at that time conclude that spare parts were assembled anew 
and the ready cars sold at legal markets and service shops controlled by the 
grupirovki. The Association further found that on 25% of those cars ransom was 
grupirovki. The Association further found that on 25% of those cars ransom was 
grupirovki
paid, while 25% were exported. 
The companies denied an insurance license continued to traffic stolen cars 
along three main routes. Colonel Velikov, former deputy head of the National 
Service for Combating Organized Crime, describes them as follows: to the former 
Soviet republics, assisted by Russians, Georgians and Ukrainians in Bulgaria who 
were related to their local crime syndicates; to the Middle East, shipped with 
the aid of residents of Arab origin; through Macedonia to Albania, by networks 
involving Macedonian and Albanian nationals.
With the demise of racket insurance and the decline of car theft in Western and 
Central Europe the import to Bulgaria of cars stolen abroad also changed. It 
was no longer profitable to import for the mass buyer. In addition, there was 
a shift in the pre-1997 corruption levels that had facilitated trafficking. Earlier, 
police and customs border control officers worked in symbiosis with traffic chan-
nel operators who preferred to pay a monthly ”subscription” for uninterrupted 
import, rather than bribe officials for every single vehicle. The traffic police and 
notary publics were also more than willing to assist stolen car deals inside the 
country. Now, the Bulgarian Customs and border police were stepping up coop-
eration with international security institutions to increase control over insurance, 
the safety and speed of transnational electronic data exchange, etc. Criminals 
were forced to invest much greater effort and resources to circumvent controls, 
158
The Vehicle Theft Market
e.g. changing identifications numbers on most parts of the vehicle–from engine, 
through frame, windowpanes, seats, mirrors to safety belts. They also had to forge 
a long list of papers, including insurance and even driver’s ID papers in both 
the source and the market country. All expenses related to disguising a stolen car 
ranged between 2,000 and 3,000 German marks
251
–the price of a second-hand 
car in Western Europe. Adding the transportation and other transfer costs, import-
ing stolen vehicles for the mass market became financially unfeasible. In the late 
1990s a steady trend to import high-class vehicles sold at about 20,000 to 30,000 
emerged German marks. It was mainly such cars that were trafficked through the 
two border points preferred by car smugglers–Kalotina and Rousse. Furthermore, 
in 1998, for no apparent reason the National Service for Combating Organized 
Crime closed its specialized unit against car trafficking. 
An inquiry of the newly established car trafficking team at the Rousse Regional 
Customs Directorate disclosed a trafficking scheme that gives a good idea of how 
such channels operate. The investigative team asked Interpol for information on 
stolen cars in Europe–a direct move that skipped the usual circuitous information 
gathering route and forestalled the moves of traffickers further along the channel. 
This was the first occasion in the 1990s when a well functioning luxury car smug-
gling channel was monitored. The Rousse customs compared the cars imported 
through their border point in the period 1996–2000 with a value between 50,000 
and 200,000 German marks with data about vehicles of the same value range 
stolen in the same period in Western Europe. This helped narrow the scope of 
checked cases from about 1.5 million (cars stolen annually) to several tens of 
thousands. The vehicles imported through Rousse were mostly Ferraris, Porches, 
SUVs, limousines and several rarer makes. The inquiry found out that among 
the persons involved in the smuggling channel were several high-ranking local 
customs officials and road traffic officers.
252
The channel had been controlled by 
SIC. Its local units had been in charge of securing the vehicles, customs clear-
ance and further registration with the traffic police. On most occasions, the same 
Serbian, Kosovar and Bosnian truck drivers were involved. The smuggled stolen 
vehicles equipped with legal papers inside Bulgaria were further sold to vehicle 
dealerships in Sofia.
253
As the probe progressed, however, the National Service 
for Combating Organized Crime and the Rousse Regional Prosecution Office
254
took steps to terminate the inquiry. None of the officials involved in the scheme 
was dismissed. A similar channel for smuggling vehicles stolen from Europe ran 
251 To stabilise the economy Bulgaria operated under a currency board starting in 1997 when the 
exchange rate was pegged to the German mark and later to the euro.
252 As evident from the inquiry papers of the Customs Intelligence and Investigation Department at 
the Rousse Regional Customs Directorate.
253 Investigative reporters claim that part of the cars sold by the Rousse channel can be traced to 
the auto market owned by the late Fatik–a crime boss shot in 2003.
254 The then regional prosecutor Lyulin Matev’s involvement was covered by Nikolay Ganchevski, 
head of the Military Department at the Supreme Prosecution Office of Cassation (and former 
Regional Prosecutor of Rousse), who was also a close friend of the then Prosecutor General 
Nikola Filchev. Later on in 2006, Matev was investigated for links with the Spanish based boss of 
the Rousse branch of SIC, dubbed Mazola. Soon after the probe was initiated he resigned from 
the Rousse Prosecution Office. His deputy from the time when the car trafficking inquiry was 
subverted (1999–2000), however, has not only remained in office, but is still Rousse’s regional 
prosecutor (see Capital weekly, July 8, 2006; July 15, 2006; 24 chassa daily of July 17, 2006; 
24 chassa daily of July 17, 2006; 
24 chassa
Bankerof June 9, 2007).
Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Markets and Trends
159
through the Kalotina crossing at Bulgaria’s border with Serbia.
255
Partial informa-
tion from probes into this route and another channel passing through the south-
ernmost border checkpoints to Greece (Kulata) and Macedonia (Zlatarevo) was 
made public in 2006.
256
4.5. CONTEMPORARY PERIOD 
As most other black markets in 2001–2002, auto theft underwent a shift carrying 
several implications to its aftermath, specifically, the period 2005–2006.
After 2001, car sales rose dramatically–whereas in 2000 around 100,000 new and 
used cars were imported, in 2005 they reached 180,000. Thus, supply outstripped 
demand for the first time since the 1960s when cars first became a mass com-
modity in Bulgaria. Besides the oversupply of cars within all price ranges, the 
most important shift concerned average prices which plummeted, so that it did 
not pay to buy a stolen car. 
As confirmed by police officers working to prevent car trafficking, border control 
improved considerably in 2002–2003. The creation of the Bulgarian Integrated Cus-
toms Information System (BICIS) made it possible to exchange data with EU member 
states’ customs authorities, including data about imported and exported vehicles. Bor-
der police control also tightened, and thus both the influx of Europe stolen cars to 
Bulgaria and their trafficking across the Balkans to other destination started to drain. 
Falling car theft rates in Western Europe also caused car trafficking to shrink. 
From the record-breaking 2,074,000 thefts in 1993 they decreased to 918,000 in 
2004 (see Table 13). Germany in particular, which was a source country favored 
by Bulgarian auto thieves, displayed a significant drop from its 1993 level–the 
276,000 thefts went down to an all-time low of 35,000 in 2004–even lower than 
Poland which registered 51,000 stolen cars in the same year. 
Insurance companies started making timely payments for car theft, so insured 
victims were already much less willing to pay ransom. Whether total damage or 
theft was involved, car owners tended to get paid within three months, unlike the 
period up until 2002–2003 when the average wait time was six to nine months. 
Insurers also required costly car owners to equip their vehicles with the latest 
security systems, such as alarms, GPS, immobilizers and unique markings on the 
components. The newly introduced car loans also discouraged people who would 
buy an expensive vehicle from buying a stolen car. 
Due to the ineffectiveness of anti-car-trafficking units at police departments, the 
MoI established new specialized bodies at district centers. Thus, expertise could 
be accumulated and sustained, officers could be monitored more successfully, 
and the pressure of criminal networks over local officers–common practice at 
area police departments–could be restricted.
255 See Sega daily, December 11, 2001.
daily, December 11, 2001.
daily
256 Cars stolen in Spain had been trafficked through Kulata and Zlatarevo in the course of two years. 
In April 2006 the Blagoevgrad Regional Directorate of Interior held 13 such cars in a smuggling 
attempt. There is an ongoing investigation into the case (see Monitor, October 26, 2006).
Monitor, October 26, 2006).
Monitor
160
The Vehicle Theft Market
Bureaucratic obstacles that had hindered the recovery of stolen cars found by 
the police were removed. Tracked cars or vehicles confiscated as material evi-
dence used to stay parked for months in front of police departments and those 
that wanted to avoid waiting, used to pay bribes to police officers and prosecu-
tors ranging between 200 to 15,000 levs. High-class expensive cars had usually 
had their identification numbers forged and were hardest to get back from the 
police, involving the biggest bribes. 
The removal of Schengen visas for Bulgarians in 2001 was followed by an emi-
gration wave to Western Europe. Among those that left the country were various 
criminals, including auto thieves, most of whom chose to move to Spain and 
less often Italy, as there were already large Bulgarian communities to which they 
could attach and the local police forces had no experience in tackling criminals 
of Bulgarian origin. 
All those changes contributed to the overall shift in the auto theft market. In 
2002, the car theft rate dropped by 30% and despite the slight rise in 2003, 
the downward trend remained steady in the following years, marking an average 
12.8% decrease for the last five years. 
Apart from shrinking in size, the auto theft market structure also changed. In 
the late 1990s its largest segment was taken by the sale of vehicles stolen in 
Bulgaria or abroad, whereas after 2001 it became difficult and costly to manage 
Table 13.  Stolen cars in the EU (1990–2004) 
1990
1993
1995
1997
1999
2000
2002
2004
Austria
9,078
8,593
7,514
7,043
6,992
10,541
5,099
5,973
Belgium
37,603
35,242
35,780
33,395
25,050
19,104
Denmark
42,697
35,696
36,737
42,701 
35,195
33,730
27,677
9,838
Finland
18,233
21,059
19,772
22,015
29,611
26,391
12,264
12,353
France
433,494
506,888
453,525
417,360
395,947
401,057
252,084
186,430
Germany
106,973
276,745
262,620
190,585
140,636
127,750
57,402
35,034
Greece
6,845
9,660
12,678
16,555
17,091
16,550
17,889
15,010
Ireland
12,182
13,244
11,754
13,589
14,851
15,964
14,598
9,065
Italy
313,400
311,256
305,438
301,233
294,726
243,890
203,694
221,925
Luxembourg
589
1,145
1,196
675
626
542
519
526
Netherlands
49,814
44,044
40,902
37,309
37,831
38,320
30,785
22,989
Portugal
15,542
17,334
22,792
28,163
26,428
22,173
14,832
Spain
135,559
107,698
98,847
133,330
138,961
134,584
106,524
122,248
Sweden
88,687
73,782
70,299
78,826
78,216
86,820
45,160
38,058
United Kingdom
537,354
649,346
553,848
443,975
414,700
375,840
328,186
214,000
TOTAL FOR EU-15
1,754,905
2,074,698
1,930,067
1,763,230
1,669,326
1,571,802
1,149,104
918,843
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested