pdf viewer c# : Adding a jpg to a pdf Library SDK component .net wpf winforms mvc organized_crime_markets_and_trends17-part2007

Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Markets and Trends
171
Table 14.  Car thefts by district police directorate (DPD)
1995
2001
2006
Number of car 
thefts
Clear-up rate of 
recorded car thefts
% total car thefts
Number of car 
thefts
Clear-up rate of 
recorded car thefts
% total car thefts
Number of car 
thefts
Clear-up rate of 
recorded car thefts
% total car thefts
Sofia City Police Directorate
6,208
6.75
39.29
5,450
6.15
50.31
2,796
7.30
55.03
Bourgas DPD
550
20.36
3.48
647
8.96
5.97
473
12.90
9.31
Varna DPD
1,899
9.58
12.02
1,137
7.30
10.50
350
22.00
6.89
Plovdiv DPD
1,280
14.38
8.10
630
12.54
5.82
220
20.00
4.33
Stara Zagora DPD
451
21.29
2.85
318
21.70
2.94
152
35.53
2.99
Sofia DPD
354
32.49
2.24
296
16.22
2.73
101
26.73
1.99
Pazardzhik DPD
266
31.58
1.68
230
13.04
2.12
87
25.29
1.71
Blagoevgrad DPD
352
24.43
2.23
52
48.08
0.48
84
42.86
1.65
Dobrich DPD
361
27.42
2.28
189
15.34
1.74
73
27.40
1.44
Veliko Tarnovo DPD
310
28.39
1.96
115
17.39
1.06
72
36.11
1.42
Vratsa DPD
242
21.07
1.53
227
15.42
2.10
71
21.13
1.40
Pleven DPD
572
20.63
3.62
154
20.13
1.42
71
30.99
1.40
Shumen DPD
278
27.34
1.76
180
24.44
1.66
52
23.08
1.02
Pernik DPD
573
7.85
3.63
319
16.93
2.94
50
30.00
0.98
Sliven DPD
125
28.80
0.79
77
36.36
0.71
47
29.79
0.93
Yambol DPD
138
34.78
0.87
53
35.85
0.49
45
51.11
0.89
Targovishte DPD
88
38.64
0.56
49
40.82
0.45
41
63.41
0.81
Rousse DPD
376
19.15
2.38
74
22.97
0.68
39
46.15
0.77
Lovech DPD
210
28.57
1.33
73
31.51
0.67
36
41.67
0.71
Gabrovo DPD
162
28.40
1.03
56
41.07
0.52
33
45.45
0.65
Montana DPD
149
28.86
0.94
72
30.56
0.66
33
48.48
0.65
Razgrad DPD
131
44.27
0.83
81
19.75
0.75
33
48.48
0.65
Haskovo DPD
215
28.37
1.36
149
18.12
1.38
33
42.42
0.65
Kardzhali DPD
58
46.55
0.37
19
36.84
0.18
26
92.31
0.51
Kyustendil DPD
144
31.94
0.91
60
33.33
0.55
24
50.00
0.47
Silistra DPD
110
48.18
0.70
50
12.00
0.46
16
37.50
0.31
Vidin DPD
140
56.43
0.89
67
23.88
0.62
14
64.29
0.28
Smolyan DPD
38
65.79
0.24
6
66.67
0.06
6
83.33
0.12
Transport Police Dpt. 
at the General Police 
Directorate
19
42.11
0.12
2
50.00
0.02
3
33.33
0.06
TOTAL
15,799
15.51
100.00
10,832
10.98
100.00
5,081
16.71
100.00
Source: Ministry of Interior
Adding a jpg to a pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add picture to pdf; pdf insert image
Adding a jpg to a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add photo to pdf for; add a jpeg to a pdf
172
The Vehicle Theft Market
Assessments of motor vehicle theft based on police records often disregard a 
large segment of the market in the 1990s–vehicles stolen in Western Europe and 
smuggled into Bulgaria. The interviews with car thieves and dealers led to the 
suggestion that such cars with cleaned-up factory numbers and legalized papers 
are available in fairly large quantities, steadily growing since 2001. Interviews with 
police officers suggested that over 30% of the SUVs of several makes, such as 
BMW X5, Audi Q7, Mercedes GL and М, including the rare Porsche Cayenne, 
were restyled.
269
Black car market actors, though, claimed that their share was 
even larger, reaching 50% for some stolen vehicle models. None of these figures, 
however, could be verified.
270
Compared to 1992–1998–the period when car traf-
ficking channels were working smoothly and registration of smuggled vehicles with 
the home traffic police was practically unhindered, both border and domestic 
controls have improved since successive rounds of measures were introduced 
in 1998, 2002 and 2003. Car trafficking networks that imported cars for sale in 
Bulgaria, however, also adapted their methods to changing policing and insurance 
realities at home and across Europe. The techniques they started to use were 
aimed at keeping the theft undetected for as long as possible, and even after 
detection–at disguising the car, so that it would be difficult to prove the offense 
at court. 
As stated by police interviewees, the sophisticated methods deterring detection 
and making use of the numerous legal lacunae around the investigation of ve-
hicle theft offenses greatly discourage car theft police units, as such cases take 
up ample resources (e.g. 5–6 months of an officer’s working time) with no sound 
prospects for a successful probe. Often, the car under investigation gets blocked 
and unusable by either its current owner (who may be an innocent purchaser 
of the stolen vehicle), or the person from whom it was initially stolen. In many 
cases, the latter has already been paid insurance and wouldn’t go further to 
get the car back, much as the insurance company wouldn’t be willing to make 
any extra expenses. For this reason, the police prefer focusing their efforts on 
less convoluted mass-produced car theft cases, in which no advanced falsifica-
tions techniques are used. The leading car trafficking players know the regulatory 
framework as well as police attitudes in detail, which helps them keep ahead of 
the situation.
The major approach used in trafficking vehicles stolen abroad is that of car 
doubles–a process having several distinct stages. At the first stage, the car deal-
erships and importers must be identified. They must have clients convinced that 
they can buy a new, luxury car at this specific outlet at a special discount, say 
10–20% cheaper than elsewhere in the country.
271
Other clients will deliberately 
choose to buy a stolen car in order to save half or more of its regular market 
price. A third group of clients will order a specific model of car with particular 
269 Here again, the resemblances with the Russian auto theft market are striking. Gerber, G., and 
Killias, M. The Transnationalization of Historically Local Crime: Auto Theft in Western Europe and Russia 
Markets, European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice, Vol. 11, No. 2 / May, 
Markets, European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice, Vol. 11, No. 2 / May, 
Markets
2003.
270 In contrast to the common type of car theft, nearly 100% of which are registered, stolen and 
uncovered cars that have been tampered with are either not registered or their records are 
mixed with other types of records from customs, tax administration and traffic police.
271 A variation of this behavior occurs when the owner of a crashed car would order the same 
model, being well aware that he will be supplied with a vehicle stolen in Western Europe.
JPG to Word Converter | Convert JPEG to Word, Convert Word to JPG
What's more, using filters, adding morphing effects, watermarks, and do some color Open JPEG to Word Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in
adding images to pdf files; add signature image to pdf acrobat
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Gratis control for creating PDF from multiple image formats such as tiff, jpg, png, gif Besides, using this PDF document metadata adding control, you
add an image to a pdf in preview; how to add a photo to a pdf document
Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Markets and Trends
173
equipment. The traffickers will then make a rough estimate of the number of 
cars the selected dealerships could sell to their clients and order the batch of 
vehicles. Such luxury cars, however, should not be imported in conspicuously 
high numbers, as that may provoke suspicions. 
At the second stage, the target vehicle is identified and stolen. Europol
272
and 
national police data from Spain, Italy and France reveal that the modus operandi 
in vehicle theft is changing to several technically unencumbered methods, such as 
car jacking with use of violence and theft of original keys, so that the offenders 
do not need to disable the sophisticated security features of modern cars. 
The third stage is transportation to the Bulgarian market. The stolen vehicle may 
be transported in a regular container supplied with false freight documents for 
goods that are not normally monitored. The risk, however, is high, as container 
shipped cargo is generally closely monitored. The second major task at this stage 
is to find a car double and collect any possible identification number or sign on 
it - on the frame, engine, gear box, immobilizer, windowpanes, mirrors, seats, 
belts, etc. The double may be a wrecked car bought from its owner at a small 
price or one found in car dealership and inspected carefully under the false 
pretenses of intended purchase, during which its identifications are meticulously 
copied. The few such schemes that have been resolved by investigative bodies 
reveal extensive use of advanced technologies. For instance, details about the cars 
in demand in the destination country (Bulgaria) are sent via the internet, mobile 
phone built-in cameras are used to photograph the targeted double’s identity 
numbers, which are then sent back in messages, etc. All codes and numbers 
of the stolen car are then replaced by skilled mechanics using fine instruments, 
so that the falsification could only be spotted with very precise detectors. The 
newly produced double has extremely low odds of being caught, as the original’s 
absence is not investigated in the first place. Indeed, such schemes are rarely 
captured and police recorded at all, and the actual share of cars thus altered 
cannot be calculated with any certainty. Police figures across the EU also show 
that only a small percentage of such cars are found. This raises the question why 
Bulgaria, rather than EU countries, is picked as a destination market. Possibly, 
among the Bulgarian population there are still multiple purchasers believing they 
can get a high-class car at a preferential price or willing to risk driving a stolen 
vehicle that they could never afford under normal circumstances. 
There are two more schemes for importing motor vehicles stolen in Western Eu-
rope. The first was originally used in the 1990s, but is already becoming obsolete. 
It is an insurance fraud employed by vehicle owners who sell their car on the 
black market at a price three times as low as its theft coverage. When all transfer 
procedures are completed and the car is transferred to the market country,
273
usually two months after the deal (that is the maximum period admissible when 
applying for insurance), the owner reports the car stolen to the police and the 
insurance company. If his insurance was, for instance, 30,000 German marks and 
272 Europol, An Overview of Motor Vehicle Crime from a European Perspective, January 2006.
273 Interviews with respondents А, S, N; similar practices occur in other East European countries and 
Russia as well, see Gerber, G., and Killias, M. The Transnationalization of Historically Local Crime: Auto 
Theft in Western Europe and Russia Markets, European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal 
Theft in Western Europe and Russia Markets, European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal 
Theft in Western Europe and Russia Markets
Justice, Vol. 11, No. 2 / May, 2003.
VB.NET Imaging - Generate Barcode Image in VB.NET
as common image files such as png and jpg. quality PLANET postal barcode images in PDF, Word and VB.NET barcode generator component for adding POSTNET barcode
attach image to pdf form; add jpeg signature to pdf
C# Word - Insert Image to Word Page in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB It's a demo code for adding image to word page using C# 0); REImage image = new REImage(@"C:\logo2.jpg"); page.AddImage
add jpg to pdf form; add photo to pdf in preview
174
The Vehicle Theft Market
the amount he got on the black market one third of that–i.e. 10,000 German 
marks, he would pocket 40,000 from the non-existent theft. When at some point, 
EU insurance companies shortened the period for reporting the theft to a few 
hours, the scheme became nearly unusable, as for such a short time the car 
could at best be transferred through the border to a neighboring country and 
could be trafficked further only if its identity was changed. Therefore, this modus 
operandi was replaced by the bankrupt company scheme, which came in wide 
use in 2006. It involves the setting up or buying of an extant company abroad, 
which then leases several cars. The cars are transferred to the destination country 
and sold at the black market. The company at the source state is then made 
bankrupt, leasing payments are terminated, and the cars are not restored.
Finally, there is a reverse scheme of expensive car doubles–the original cars are 
found in Bulgaria, with the owner providing all necessary ID, including number 
plates, vehicle documents, and insurance papers, which are exported to Western 
Europe. A stolen car of the same model is then imported, which has to be exam-
ined by the traffic police before its Bulgarian registration documents are issued. 
The original car is taken to these examinations and thus the trafficked double is 
provided with legal documents. There are cases in which a car has had four to 
five such clones. 
Volume of the Auto Theft Market
In contrast to the mid-1990s, in recent years the number of car thefts not re-
ported to the police has dwindled to 1–2%. Current estimates of recent police 
statistics suggest that over 60% of car theft victims are offered to have their car 
restored against a certain sum. Ransoms are usually demanded when the car is 
not covered against theft. With insured cars, which, according to expert estimates, 
are around 30%, the thieves approach the insurance company to offer a deal. 
All in all, it can be calculated that ransom was demanded from 3,500 people in 
2005 when the number of stolen vehicles was 5,900, and from 3,000 individuals 
in 2006 when 5,000 were stolen.
274
Some experts claim that 90% of victims pay 
the ransom demanded of them.
275
In around 10% of the cases insurance fraud is 
involved when a person, who has found out about the theft but is not the owner, 
approaches the insurance company to claim the insurance amount.
The above figures could be used as a basis to make a rough estimate of the car 
theft market’s size in 2005–2006. Findings from the National Crime Survey reveal 
that on average the value of a stolen car is 6,100–6,200 levs, whereas the average 
ransom is around 2,200.
276
The latest police data, however, show that in 2006 
stolen cars’ value markedly rose to 10,000–12,000 levs. It may be surmised that 
the ransom has also risen to an average of 3,000–4,000. Thus, the total market 
274
Non-existent thefts were reported by 10 to 15% of car owners who wished to get rid of an 
old vehicle or a vehicle that would not pass the registration procedure. In those cases the own-
ers usually sold the car for scrap which made them exempt from fines or fees that could be 
imposed on them.
275 A victimization survey carried out by Vitosha Research in November 2006 found out that 31% 
of car theft victims were asked for ransom, and 56 % of them paid it. The relatively low ratio 
of demanded and paid ransoms could be explained with the respondents’ unwillingness to self-
report behavior that is as an offense under the law.
276 Crime Trends in Bulgaria 2000 – 2005, Center for the Study of Democracy, Sofia, 2006.
C# Image: How to Draw Text on Images within Rasteredge .NET Image
to make this image text adding application work LoadImage = new Bitmap("C:\\1.jpg"); Graphic Text powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
add image to pdf acrobat; add jpg to pdf preview
VB.NET Image: Visual Basic .NET Guide to Draw Text on Image in .
is the Visual Basic .NET method for adding text on Dim LoadImage As New Bitmap("C:\1.jpg") Dim Text powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document,
add picture to pdf preview; adding image to pdf form
Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Markets and Trends
175
value of stolen vehicles seems to have gone up from 30 million levs in 2005 to 
55 million in 2006. The total revenues of car ransom seekers have increased 
from 7.7 million in 2005 to 10.5 million levs in 2006. 
To measure the average profits of a car theft ring, it could be assumed that 60% 
of car thefts are committed in Sofia. Thus, ransom revenues in 2005–2006 would 
amount to 4.6–6.3 million levs. The Sofia Directorate of Interior has estimated 
that at the local market where 10 to 20 auto theft groups are active, one group 
could make between 230,000 and 630,000 levs per year. A member of a group 
of 80 to 100 individuals could then make from 45,000 to 80,000 levs annually. 
4.6. CAR THEFT MARKET DEVELOPMENT SCENARIOS
A comparison of the stolen motor vehicle market in Bulgaria in 1995 with the lat-
est data from 2006 suggests that its profits have shrunk five to six times, whereas 
stolen car numbers have fallen to the pre-1990 level. This raises the question 
whether car safety has increased to reach socialist-time levels or whether orga-
nized criminal car-theft networks are not any longer the severe problem they 
used to be. Despite the decrease, if the share of thefts not cleared-up is over 
50% this is a sign of the presence of criminal enterprises on the market. As re-
gards car theft Bulgaria remains one of the countries with lowest clear-up rate. 
Considering the convergence of the factors described above (rapid overall de-
crease of auto thefts, invariably low clear-up rate, networks immune to inves-
tigation, emigration of many well-known auto thieves to the EU, and the well 
covered market of doubles) one could outline several probable scenarios for the 
future of the auto theft market in Bulgaria: 
First, an optimistic scenario could be proposed. With this scenario car thefts 
will persistently decrease, as manufacturers will continuously improve built-in de-
fenses. Factory made electronic devices will only be available at franchise dealer 
service points and gray car workshops will disappear. The growing number of 
insured cars (due to attractively priced comprehensive insurance and third party 
liability packages) will discourage their owners from paying ransom in case of 
theft. Due to advanced equipment for total video surveillance and comprehensive 
electronic data storage, the police will improve evidence gathering and effectively 
detect motor theft offenses. These trends will compel more experienced thieves 
to exit the auto theft market.
A more realistic scenario will be for the decline of auto thefts to stop when it 
reaches an average of 4,000 stolen vehicles annually. At present, the number of 
stolen cars per capita in Bulgaria is one of the lowest compared to the rest of the 
EU. At the same time, theft and trafficking remain a lucrative business, as Bulgaria 
is surrounded with the much less controlled car theft markets of other Balkan 
and Black Sea states, and regions like the Caucasus and the Middle East. It could 
reasonably be expected that new cross-border possibilities will open up to Bulgar-
ian auto theft networks after the borders of EU states were lifted in 2007.
C# PowerPoint - Insert Image to PowerPoint File Page in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET pptx"); BasePage page = doc.GetPage(0); REImage image = new REImage(@"C:\logo2.jpg"); page.AddImage
how to add jpg to pdf file; add an image to a pdf acrobat
VB.NET Image: Create Image from Stream; Stream to Image Converter
image sharpening and old photo effect adding, resize source TIF encoder, GIF encoder and JPG encoder powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
add image to pdf reader; how to add image to pdf form
176
The Vehicle Theft Market
The pessimistic scenario takes into account cyclical trends captured by both 
home and EU statistics. Such records demonstrate that after long-term lows, car 
thefts tend to rise again. As more expensive and newer cars will increase in 
number, Bulgarian auto thieves could focus on this segment by developing new 
theft methods and enhancing their ties with actors on the international car theft 
market.
277 EU crime experts point out that data about car thefts in Germany may lack in realism, as local 
statistics only records stolen cars for which charges are pressed.
Table 15.  Stolen vehicles in the EU (2004)
Vehicles stolen
Vehicles not recovered
Clear-up rate
Austria
5,973
3,536
59.2
Belgium
19,104
8,173
42.8
Bulgaria
7,569
1,109
14.7
Denmark
9,838
1,391
14.1
Finland
12,353
2,469
20.0
France
186,430
116,472
62.5
Germany
35,034
277
Greece
15,010
6,468
43.1
Ireland
9,065
5,399
59.6
Italy
221,925
115,641
52.1
Luxemburg
526
238
45.2
Netherlands
22,989
9,598
41.8
Portugal
14,832
9,222
62.2
Spain
122,248
85,001
69.5
Sweden
38,058
3,304
8.7
UK
214,000
85,000
39.7
Cyprus
427
225
52.7
Czech Republic
24,230
3,786
15.6
Estonia
1,209
625
51.7
Hungary
9,065
Latvia
3,306
1,865
56.4
Malta
825
238
28.8
Poland
51,319
Slovakia
4,801
1,107
23.1
Slovenia
1,026
380
37.0
Source: Europol
5. THE ANTIQUITIES TRADE – DEALERS, TRAFFICKERS, 
AND CONNOISSEURS
In contrast to the strictly illicit and rigorously prosecuted drug business, the 
antiquities
278
market involves a wide spectrum of activities from clandestine ex-
cavations and looting through legal sales at auction houses and antique shops to 
displays at established museums or private collections. In many cases, irrespec-
tive of their origin, antiquities can be supplied with false provenance documents 
and sold at auctions as though legally acquired. Sometimes the end owners do 
not even have to go that far–a 1999 study of British archaeologists Christopher 
Chippendale and David Gill demonstrated that a bulky 75% of the artifacts in 
the sample of large private museum collections surveyed are unprovenanced.
279
State museums of international repute are no exception. The Director of the 
Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York claims that most of the antique artifacts 
imported in America in the last decade or so have been trafficked in violation 
of source countries’ laws.
280
278 For the purposes of this paper the commonly known term antiquities has been used throughout 
antiquities has been used throughout 
antiquities
to signify moveable cultural property, such as artifacts from the past or old coins, which are 
the main objects of black trade, in alternation with the legal term monument of culture taken 
monument of culture taken 
monument of culture
from Bulgarian heritage legislation (with its variables movable monument of culture and 
movable monument of culture and 
movable monument of culture
immovable 
monument of culture). The Law on Monuments of Culture and Museums defines the latter term 
as ”any movable and immovable authentic material evidence of human presence or activity 
which possesses scientific and/or cultural value and is of public significance.” Objects of high 
value belong to the category of national cultural assets or treasures. The more awkward cultural 
and historical property is still in official use at certain Bulgarian institutions (for instance, the Min-
and historical property is still in official use at certain Bulgarian institutions (for instance, the Min-
and historical property
istry of Interior), but is becoming obsolete. The term monument of culture is a local coinage that 
monument of culture is a local coinage that 
monument of culture
differs from internationally recognized terminology. For instance, the UNESCO Convention on 
the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of 
Cultural Property (14 November 1970) adopts the term cultural property and defines it as ”prop-
cultural property and defines it as ”prop-
cultural property
erty which, on religious or secular grounds, is specifically designated by each State as being of 
importance for archaeology, prehistory, history, literature, art or science and which belongs to the 
following categories: (a) rare collections and specimens of fauna, flora, minerals and anatomy, 
and objects of palaeontological interest; (b) property relating to history, including the history of 
science and technology and military and social history, to the life of national leaders, thinkers, 
scientists and artist and to events of national importance; (c) products of archaeological excava-
tions (including regular and clandestine) or of archaeological discoveries; (d) elements of artistic 
or historical monuments or archaeological sites which have been dismembered; (e) antiquities 
more than one hundred years old, such as inscriptions, coins and engraved seals; (f) objects of 
ethnological interest”.
279 There are countries such as Germany where any artifact can easily be registered with no re-
quirement to state its source, while the certificate received would commonly read ”provenance 
unknown”. Thus, prosecution is possible only if the artifact was stolen from an already legal 
collection and its previous owner filed a lawsuit.
280 Archeology, May/June 1993, p.17.
Archeology, May/June 1993, p.17.
Archeology
178
The Antiquities Trade – Dealers, Traffickers, and Connoisseurs
Alerted by the increasing challenges to historical heritage preservation faced by a 
number of nations, in the second half of the twentieth century the international 
community undertook the first round of measures against the trafficking of mov-
able monuments of culture. Europe and the wider world, however, are creating 
a continuing market demand for cultural property that foments its trans-border 
traffic to the present day. 
Heritage legislation in the EU is far from harmonized and even the underlying 
approach to cultural property protection differs from state to state. The regulation 
of the market of illicit antiquities can be addressed through a variety of solutions, 
sometimes complete opposites, precisely because it ravels legal, quasi-legal and 
purely criminal aspects. The major regulation patterns known are the conservative
(or South European) and the liberal (or North European).
281
The first approach
is exemplified by the Greek Law 3028/2002 on the Protection of Antiquities and 
Cultural Heritage in General. The second type of regulation can be found in its 
purest form in the Netherlands, known for its liberal heritage legislation and a 
large variety of public–private partnerships in this field. The main points where 
the two models differ concern ownership, the rules governing domestic trade 
and export of antiquities and the powers of the state to regulate that trade. 
Irrespective of the chosen model, however, in all EU member states there are 
private organizations in the field of culture, private museums, auction houses that 
can sell antiquities freely, as well as a long history of antiquities trade and pri-
vate art collections.
282
Due to its past affiliation to the communist bloc, however, 
Bulgaria’s private business with cultural goods has remained poor, depleting even 
further with the dissolution of the communist state. 
The scope of this paper allows for a brief analysis of only some aspects of the 
illegal acquisition, trade, collecting and trans-border trafficking of antiquities and 
the ways they interact with the semi-legal and purely legal cultural objects market 
at home and abroad.
5.1. DOMESTIC TRADE IN ANTIQUITIES
Prior to 1989 Bulgaria’s communist regime policed looters
283
and controlled the 
export of antiquities rather uncompromisingly. Private collectors who were not affili-
ated to high party officials were openly repressed, as in the case of the renowned 
gold coin collector Zhelyazko ”the Emperor” Kolev. The Law on Monuments of 
Culture and Museums (LMCM) issued back in 1969 defined the cultural objects 
market actors as: government agencies, private collectors and local state-owned 
museums, which remained the case until the democratic changes took place. As 
the communist state with the institutional structure that bound it fell apart, looting, 
trade and smuggling of antiquities in Bulgaria entered their golden age.
281 For further details see Chobanov, T., ”Analysis of Foreign Cultural Heritage Legislation and 
Practices” in: Comparative Study of the National Cultural Heritage Legislation in Bulgaria and Some EU 
Member States, Sofia, 2006, p.45.
Member States, Sofia, 2006, p.45.
Member States
282 Ibid.
283 Looters of the old type were treasure seekers who dug up in deserted areas known by word of 
mouth to cache treasure-troves underground. They rarely approached and damaged archaeologi-
cal monuments.
Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Markets and Trends
179
Looting and Lowest-Level Antiquities Distribution
Driven by the lax law enforcement and the mass poverty that struck the popu-
lation with the social and economic crisis the number of treasure hunters and 
plundered sites in the early 1990s drastically increased. Initially chaotic, archaeo-
logical pillaging grew structured and specialized in terms of the loot targeted and 
the activities performed, gradually forming a hierarchy of participation. Looters, 
middlemen and smugglers practically had free rein, going about their business 
unpunished throughout the late 1990s as well. Two factors contributed to the 
flourishing of illicit archaeological effort and trading in movable monuments of 
culture. 
Society and the authorities tend to be lenient to such offenses, which generally 
remain underreported, as looting and trading in antiquities do not cause direct 
damages to the individual. Furthermore, several striking archaeological findings 
at the start of the new millennium spurred excessive enterprise among looters. 
Newly unearthed sites were swarmed and pilfered even as archaeologists and 
historians were trying to conduct proper explorations. 
MoI experts claim that looters have so far combed the better portion of the cul-
tural layer (estimates mention some 80%), part of which consists of immovable 
monuments–mainly Thracian hills, tombs and other sites dating back from antiq-
uity to the Middle Ages. Estimates about active looters range between 100,000 
to 250,000.
284
Despite the striking figure most of these people are either amateur 
treasure hunters, or incidental finders. The professionals among them do not 
exceed several thousands. In the late 1990s the latter were becoming much bet-
ter equipped and regularly used fine-tuned metal detectors (capable of registering 
the type of metal that lies buried several meters underground and provide 3D 
images of the buried artefacts) and more advanced excavation technology (such 
as bulldozers, tractors and navies).
The criminal groups that deal with field exploration and illicit excavations are 
highly mobile. They are most active in summer, making excavations in arable 
lands and forests. Sometimes they purchase fields in close location to archaeologi-
cal sites and deep-dig the soil without any precaution. Alternatively, the land is 
leased or the would-be agrarians are paid to plough it, while their true intention 
One major archaeological site that has been drawing treasure hunters for many years is the Roman settlement 
Ratsiaria whose remnants are located in close proximity to the village of Archar in Dimovo municipality. Local 
looters are assaulting the place as a matter of routine. In 2006 alone the police caught the perpetrators–individu-
als, or whole looting gangs–of fifteen forays to the site. Prompt police investigations led to convictions in seven 
of the cases, while the rest have not yet been finalized. 
Source: Information from the National Police Service of 25 January 2007.
Box 6. The Archar case
284 Interview with representative of the Cultural and Historical Property Contraband Section at the 
NSCOC.
180
The Antiquities Trade – Dealers, Traffickers, and Connoisseurs
is to search for loot with metal detectors.
285
Apart from looting, which is normally 
prosecuted as a crime, there are other activities, such as construction in areas 
bordering on or within territories protected by heritage legislation, whose ruinous 
effect on cultural sites shouldn’t be underestimated.
Considering their scale and price, local experts have called the domestic market 
of illicit antiquities ”small trafficking” in contrast to cultural property export to 
other, market nations which is ”big trafficking”.
286
Domestic trade in cultural 
items should be set apart form criminal trans-border trafficking as in most cases 
the former belongs to the gray, rather than the black market. On the domestic 
market further transactions are made between private collectors trading coins or 
other artifacts with each other. The primary market chain involving local finders, 
local dealers and local collectors feeds into the domestic exchange of coins or 
other collectibles. Another market that in recent years has flourished enough to 
become a self-supporting business for some people is the manufacture and sale 
of fake antiquities. Reportedly, a number of clandestine mints are operating in 
Bulgaria mainly to supply the US coin market. Counterfeiting found or pillaged 
ancient coins before selling them is also common practice among local looters 
and dealers.
287
Initially the internal market of antiquities is supplied through a local network 
of looters and dealers to satisfy the demand for artifacts and coins of thousands 
of numismatists across the country.
288
Such high domestic demand indicates the 
existence of many illicit private collections, some of them so rich that they rival 
museum deposits. Antiquities can also be found in collections owned by private 
banks. 
Experts claim that artifacts are purchased and sold several times before reaching 
private home collections or trans-border dealers. Large-scale traffickers are several 
dozens.
289
Some of them are already permanently based abroad as antique shop 
owners. They are so connected as to be able to produce particular coin types 
and artifacts on demand in the market country by directing a robbery or loot-
ing mission at the right place in the source country. Mid-scale dealers operate 
by regions, selecting the artifacts supplied by local finders and offering the most 
valuable ones to their bosses.
Foreign nationals (mostly Germans and Greeks) are also increasingly involved 
in this business and further play the role of middlemen in illicit export. Greeks 
specialize in supplying Bulgarian Orthodox church-plate to foreign markets, which 
may explain the growing number of church and monastery burglaries committed 
locally. The demand from foreign states and the number of non-local dealers 
285
Report of the Crime Counteraction, Public Order Maintenance and Prevention Chief Directorate 
(CCPOMPCD) of the National Police Service, 25 January 2007, p.2.
286 Interview with Ministry of Culture experts, January 18, 2007.
287 The story of six looters was recently reported in the Bulgarian media. The gang had been digging 
up antiquities from ancient hills, tombs and caves and selling them together with the replicas 
they were producing, Plovdiv21.com, August 10, 2006, <http://www.plovdiv24.com/news/18384.
html)>
288 Ibid.
289 By expert estimates of the NSCOC.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested