pdf viewer c# : Adding images to pdf SDK software project wpf winforms web page UWP organized_crime_markets_and_trends18-part2008

Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Markets and Trends
181
operating in Bulgaria is expected to increase when much of the border control 
(at internal borders) is stripped after the country joins the EU.
Before antiquities reach the end market they pass through a process of filtering 
in three stages. The first filtering is done when looters and their immediate deal-
ers offer cheap, largely affordable items, such as coins or artifacts of no special 
value. Second-tier regional dealers then engage in repeat filtering to offer rich 
private collectors (bosses) the highest-value or unique objects for prices reaching 
100,000 levs per item or coin. The informal monthly tenders held in the city of 
Veliko Tarnovo are a succinct illustration of the process – first filtering is done at a 
collectors’ meeting held every first Saturday of the month, succeeded by a second 
filtering at a more exclusive meeting of dealers and collectors on the following 
day and a third filtering by the top collectors know as bosses. 
At the core of Bulgaria’s internal antiquities market is a network of legal nu-
mismatic exchanges (at which officially no buying and selling goes on) held at 
various times of the year in several cities. The aforementioned meeting at the 
Poltava disco club in Veliko Tarnovo hosted by the local coin collectors’ society 
is the most prominent example. It is a must for the coin and stamp collectors, 
antique dealers and various other collectors from all over the country. In other 
cities, such as the capital Sofia, Plovdiv and Montana antiquities are usually 
traded in numismatic clubs and more rarely at antique outlets or through face-
to-face encounters between purchaser and seller.
The Veliko Tarnovo club meetings accommodates both legal transactions between 
collectors purchasing artifacts which are not strictly definable as ”monuments of 
Table 16.  Overview of the antiquities market
Stages
Activities
Actors
Legality
Market type
I
looting
looting gang 
leaders
looting gangs
occasional 
looters (finders)
criminal
black
National
II
acting as middleman/
dealer;
maintaining private 
collections
small dealers 
regional dealers
large dealers/ 
collectors
sales qualified as 
criminal, purchases 
de facto legal
gray
III
trans-border trafficking
traffickers
border officials
large 
international 
dealers
criminal
black
International
IV
market state sale
international 
dealers/market 
state collectors
legal
white (legal)
Adding images to pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add image to pdf acrobat reader; acrobat add image to pdf
Adding images to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add photo to pdf preview; add a picture to a pdf document
182
The Antiquities Trade – Dealers, Traffickers, and Connoisseurs
culture” and illicit bargains with real antiquities. In isolated cases looters them-
selves come to put their finds for sale. It is more common to come across deal-
ers offering large stocks of coins and artifacts as well as collectors with individual 
objects and old coins. Purchasers also come in two distinguishable groups–the 
private collector and the middleman or dealer commissioned by rich clients or 
bosses to supply them with antiquities of greater value and/or amount. It is 
commonly believed that the most valuable items are traded in privacy, safely 
remote from the numismatic exchanges. There is a growing trend to strike any 
fairly costly antiquity deals outside those legal exchanges, not least provoked by 
law-enforcement clamp-downs such as the police operation disrupting the Veliko 
Tarnovo exchange on December 2, 2006. Such aggressive enforcement seems to 
erode the possibility to monitor the trade of antiquities.
In recent years cultural artifact dealers have been using the internet increasingly 
to market various antiquities and coins with much greater ease. Detailed descrip-
tions and photographs of such objects are offered on specialized commercial 
web pages. Ministry of Interior agencies have also tracked online bids for coins 
of Bulgarian provenance at numismatic sites.
290
Some of the old coins pilfered 
in a notorious recent burglary of the Veliko Tarnovo city museum were also put 
on offer in such online auctions. E-commerce is also the preferred method of 
dealing forged antiquities. 
Police data about recorded antiquities-related offences sheds some light on how 
widespread looting is in Bulgaria:
291
The 2006 clear-up rate for these crimes was 30.1%, that is 61 cases solved and 
76 perpetrators, most of whom Bulgarian nationals, arrested.
292
Another resource of cultural item supplies for both Bulgaria and the major market 
states are the local museums. Throughout the transition years there were persis-
tent reports of burgled museums. On a number of occasions individual museum 
exhibits were found missing or having been substituted with less valuable objects 
(similar old coins in particular can have a hundred-fold difference in price de-
pending on how well preserved they are), or fake items. A prosecution office 
290 Report by the Crime Counteraction, Public Order Maintenance and Prevention Chief Directorate 
(CCPOMP CD) of the National Police Service, 25 January 2007, p. 3
291 Ibid, pp.3-4.
Ibid, pp.3-4.
Ibid
292
Ibid.
Table 17.  Cultural property crimes
Year
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
Recorded crimes 
involving cultural 
and historical 
property
368
349
298
280
224
204
206
Source: National Police Service
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Feel free to define text or images on PDF document and extract accordingly. Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB.NET program.
add jpg to pdf document; adding jpg to pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
add image to pdf file acrobat; add picture to pdf form
Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Markets and Trends
183
inquiry in the fall of 2006 established that exhibits were missing in the archaeo-
logical museums of two major Bulgarian cities – Varna and Burgas. Museum thefts 
raise serious concerns as they involve qualified museum staff whose supposed 
mission and duty is to help preserve the national heritage and because of that 
they are even more blameworthy than the common treasure hunter.
Most Bulgarian museums have poor recording practices of the artifacts in stock. 
The general lack of accountability, in particular of museum directors, further ag-
gravates the situation. The Supreme Prosecution of Cassation has confirmed that 
the major museums in Bulgaria have not had an inventory of their core funds 
made for the last fifteen years which suggests that the responsible state bodies 
have completely neglected their duties. The majority of museums do not ob-
serve the international standard for describing art, antiques and antiquities with 
photographs and exact descriptions of each object (the so called Object ID). In 
Bulgarian museums objects are often loosely described in general terms, which 
makes it impossible for them to be tracked, positively identified and restored. 
The dire state of museum documentation dooms to failure any efforts to trace 
stolen coins or other items transferred abroad.
Other property often illicitly traded in and marketed abroad (chiefly in Greece) 
are old Orthodox icons and church-plate items.
293
As such objects are property of 
the Bulgarian Holy Synod, however, enforcement agencies are not in a position 
to take full stock of this type of national cultural heritage. Customs officers do not 
normally intervene in the trans-border movement of icons either, as they have no 
staff qualified to make assessment requiring such subtle expertise.
294
Nevertheless, 
as foreign demand is rather modest, icons are trafficked out much more rarely 
than they are traded to collectors within the country.
To make their anti-looting and anti-trafficking efforts seem more effective enforce-
ment agencies announce lavish values of the illicitly acquired cultural objects 
they capture. This trend combines with popular beliefs that the antiquities are 
purchased at much higher prices in market countries than at home. Since the 
best developed antiquities market both in Bulgaria and abroad is that of Ancient 
Greek, Roman and Byzantine coins,
295
a closer comparative look at their prices 
at auctions may reveal a different picture. The coin market has the following 
distinguishable characteristics:
1. The fairly low price of most coins makes them accessible for mass purchase 
as individual coins are minted in large amounts and the tradition of coin 
collecting has long been established. Price, however, hardly diminishes their 
historical and aesthetic value.
2. Coin trade is firmly internationalized due to the cross-fertilization of 
historical and political developments, commercial relations and the dense 
cultural layering characteristic of the processes that led to the formation of 
the contemporary nation state.
293 Prosecution officials have described staggering cases of medieval frescos being removed from 
church walls to be trafficked out of the country.
294 Interview with a customs official.
295 There is practically no international demand for Thracian coins.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
how to add image to pdf in acrobat; add multiple jpg to pdf
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Supports adding text to PDF in preview without adobe reader installed in ASP.NET. Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text.
how to add a picture to a pdf document; add photo to pdf form
184
The Antiquities Trade – Dealers, Traffickers, and Connoisseurs
3. The price of the same type of coins can differ widely as prominent private 
collectors and leading museums set particularly high demands on the qual-
ity of the items they would agree to purchase.
4. Serious devaluations are frequently observed, in particular after abundant 
archaeological finds (treasures) which can cause the price of coins once 
extremely costly due to their rarity to crash.
5. The original location where the coins were struck and circulated plays 
an important role in their grading. Only a small portion of local coins are 
not affected by the high price differential between home and international 
market. Thus, a well preserved medieval coin minted by a Bulgarian tsar is, 
generally, more profitably traded in Bulgaria than it would be in any other 
country. 
6. The growing market saturation with the major specimen in the three main 
ancient coin groups and the slight chances for discovering and appraising 
so far unknown coin types has caused a decline in coin prices worldwide. 
Despite the diversification of trade channels (e.g. over the internet), this 
trend will be generally aggravated except for coins graded ”extremely fine” 
where prices are expected to remain stable or to be tilted slightly higher 
by the cheapening of lower-grade coins. 
7. Price ranges depend fairly strongly on national and regional economic 
factors. The same type of ancient coins in comparable condition could 
be more expensive (but in some cases also cheaper) in EU countries and 
almost always so in the US than in Bulgaria or, say, in Serbia, Macedonia, 
Romania, etc. This shows that local income levels can affect coin prices 
similarly to mass commodities.
296
Building on these established trends as well as on empirical data the following 
inferences can be drawn concerning coin pricing at the domestic and foreign 
market and the ways it affects both illicit trade within Bulgaria and trans-border 
coin trafficking.
• There is a clear-cut difference in coin prices in Bulgaria and in other mar-
ket countries primarily resulting from the disparities in purchasing power. 
This fact, however, does not necessarily abet encroachments on cultural 
heritage and illicit coin exportation;
• Coins found during clandestine excavations are sought primarily by local 
private collectors and/or are of fairly low quality. The absolute or relative 
price such finds may reach within the country are often higher than any 
possible foreign auction prices if they were to be trafficked out of Bulgaria;
• It is safe to suppose that purchasing coins abroad and importing them 
in Bulgaria to satisfy demand from local collectors could sometimes bring 
good profits;
296 Pachev, P., Peculiarities of the Pricing of Ancient Coins Compared to Other Heritage Items, pp. 2-3.
Peculiarities of the Pricing of Ancient Coins Compared to Other Heritage Items, pp. 2-3.
Peculiarities of the Pricing of Ancient Coins Compared to Other Heritage Items
VB.NET Image: How to Draw Annotation on Doc Images with Image SDK
to mark and annotate your local images (such as page TIFF, Microsoft Office Word and PDF file other image annotating tutorials besides adding annotation using VB
add picture pdf; add a picture to a pdf
VB.NET Image: Adding Line Annotation to Images with VB.NET Doc
NET full sample codes for printing line annotation on images. VB.NET Image Line Annotation Overview. Mature image processing library for adding line annotation
add image pdf; how to add image to pdf
Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Markets and Trends
185
• If local coin dealers aim to make extensive use of the high price differen-
tials at home and abroad in order to strike sizeable profits, they must be 
ready and willing to risk breaking all existing export controls. The only 
target market financially worthwhile, however, would be that of the US due 
to its very size and purchasing power unrivalled by any other industrialized 
state.
• The cultural property business has numerous specifics, such as mutual 
confidence and confidentiality between the trading parties that may take 
years to build, finding purchasers who would willingly engage in an illicit 
transaction or country-specific hurdles such as buyers suspecting they might 
be sold fake antiquities ”made in Bulgaria”. Therefore it is a trade plied by 
few informed participants.
297
5.2. TRANS-BORDER ANTIQUITIES TRAFFICKING
Channel Operators and Mules
The volume of illicit antiquities export as well as its history and trends are not 
recorded with any consistency nor are sufficient hard data available. Certain 
figures provided by the customs agency could help draw a rough profile of the 
market states to which Bulgarian antiquities are exported, the actors physically 
involved in their transportation and the number and types of trafficked antiqui-
ties. The table below contains data on the attempts at illicit export prevented by 
border officers:
The main actors in antiquity smuggling are identified as follows:
• The so called mules known from drug-smuggling are paid to perform the 
physical transfer of antiquities often unaware of what is being transported 
or of its exact value, but agreeing to carry the goods across the border, 
sometimes in their private cars, for a certain fee.
297 Pachev, ... pp. 2-3
Table 18.  Antiquities seized at Bulgarian borders
Year
Number of border seizures
Number of antique objects seized
2003
17
1,799
2004
12
517
2005
16
4,435
2006
15
6,220 plus 66 kilos of coins and artifacts
Source: Bulgarian Customs Agency
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
Support protecting PDF file by adding password and digital signatures with C# sample code in .NET Class. Feel free to define text or images on PDF document and
adding image to pdf in preview; add an image to a pdf
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
VB.NET PDF - Insert Text to PDF Document in VB.NET. Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program.
add picture to pdf reader; add image to pdf online
186
The Antiquities Trade – Dealers, Traffickers, and Connoisseurs
• Channel operators run trafficking lines, hiring couriers and bribing border 
and customs officials as necessary. This role is often played by local an-
tiquity dealers who thus go international, entering in contact with foreign 
dealers or collectors. Sometimes human trafficking routes and their opera-
tors are used to smuggle out cultural objects.
• International dealers are traders or collectors, most often Bulgarian born, 
but living and conducting business from Western Europe or the US (roughly 
between 30 and 50 individuals). Some of them are former law-enforcement 
officers or have relatives serving in the security sector, thus having access 
to insider information about the dealing in antiquities and their smuggling 
routes. Apart from managing the financial side, i.e. the international bank 
transfers for purchased artifacts and the payments for transportation, they 
have to bring the antiquities to auction houses in the market countries or 
sell them through their own antique shops.
In recent years increasing attempts are made to use the door-to-door delivery 
services offered either by Bulgarian Posts or courier companies. In 2005 alone, 
108 attempted postal deliveries of antiquities or old coins concealed in parcels 
were intercepted. Most of them were addressed to recipients in Western Europe 
On April 1, 1994 preliminary criminal proceedings were started against Angel Borisov–brother of Nikola Filchev, 
later to become Bulgaria’s Prosecutor General–and several other persons in relation to possible contraband with 
old coins and other cultural goods. Three years later, on December 22, 1997 he was charged with contraband 
of antiquities and the offense was described by the lead investigator of the case as particularly grave. On May 
13, 1998 Angel Borisov was arrested at the Kalotina border check point in relation to the same investigation. 
He was detained in pre-trial custody, but eight days later, on March 21, 1998 the Sofia prosecutor Kiril Ivanov 
suspended the custodial measure without giving due reasons. Straight after his release the defendant left Bulgaria 
unhindered.
On March 23, 1999 the authorities at Frankfurt airport intercepted an attempt to export parcels with ancient 
coins whose sender and receiver were identical–Angel Borisov. The Bavarian customs authorities started a probe 
into the matter to find out that „previously, eight similar parcels had been freighted through Germany to the US” 
with a total weight of „over 1000 kilograms of antique coins and burial objects”. The person who had shipped 
the packages on behalf of Angel Borisov did not in the least try to hide the fact that he was acting on behalf of 
the Prosecutor General’s brother.
Upon request of the Bulgarian Supreme Prosecution Office of Cassation all the documents concerning the case, 
in which coins and antiquities whose estimated value was 3,136,112 levs had been trafficked, were sent to them. 
No further information about the case has been publicized after that except a statement by the Prosecution Office 
that the inquiry into Angel Borisov’s case was still underway and that they had evidence that a company owned 
by him was selling antique coins online.
The online news agency Mediapool announced that the name of Angel Borisov, who has been living in Florida 
for several years already, was found under an internet offer selling coins, supposedly part of those stolen in the 
notorious Veliko Tarnovo museum robbery. 
Mediapool.bg. Bulgaria Looks for Its Illegally Exported Antiquities in Various Countries. Filchev’s Brother Still under Probes, 21 March 2007
Box 7. The case of Angel Filchev: dates and figures
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program. C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
add photo to pdf online; how to add a jpeg to a pdf file
Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Markets and Trends
187
and the US and the senders had tried to conceal the items either in tin-foil, or 
carbon paper wrappings.
298
Market States for Bulgarian-Found Antiquities
The main market countries to which antiquities are smuggled out from Bulgaria 
are Germany, Austria, Switzerland, the UK, the Netherlands, and overseas to 
the US and Canada.
299
Bulgarian cultural objects are mostly directed to antique 
shops in Munich, Vienna, Geneva and other major cities in Western Europe where 
they are sold to private collectors or exhibited at the famous London salerooms 
where some of them are auctioned off to US purchasers purportedly as part of 
Western European heritage. These export routes are not merely demand driven, 
but also preferred because of simplified procedures with respect to antiquities 
with Bulgarian provenance. Until recently Germany, for instance, did not set any 
import requirements other than clearing customs and paying a fixed fee, thus 
asking no further questions about origin or ownership. Similarly they were easily 
legalized for exhibition at antique outlets and auctioneering inside the country.
Attempts at illicit export are concentrated at particular border points in their 
transit to those major export destinations. Most antiquity smuggling is registered 
at Kalotina, followed by Vrashka Chuka and Bregovo crossing points. At Kalotina 
antiquities were caught 23 times in 2003, five times both in 2004 and 2005, 
and three times in 2006.
300
In addition, smuggling plots were foiled at Varna and 
Plovdiv airports in 2006 when four attempts to freight antiquities on passenger 
planes to Western European cities were made.
298 CCPOMPCD Report, 25 January 2007, p. 3.
299 CCPOMPCD Report, 25 January 2007, p.2.
300 Information by the Bulgarian Customs Agency about cultural property export violations.
The widely reported case of a unique Byzantine plate on sale at Christie’s in the fall of 2006 illustrated how dif-
ficult it is to return cultural property once it has been illicitly exported out of the source country. Despite the ef-
forts of Bulgarian Prosecutor General and Culture Minister to stop the tender, the auction was held, but fortunately 
there was no one to offer the minimum price of £300,000. Bulgarian authorities claimed that the dish was an 
object of extremely high artistic value and that it was one of the 13 Byzantine plates found near Bulgaria’s town 
of Pazardzhik in 1999. This set of dishes was the second find in the same area after 1903, when the so called 
Pazardzhik treasure was discovered. Unfortunately, Naiden Blangev, who found the second part of the treasure, 
does not possess the necessary photographic evidence to support Bulgaria’s claims.
Christie’s, on the other hand, claim that the London plate is part of the 13 or 14 dishes originally found in 1903. 
Later on, 11 of those were bought by the British carpet merchant А. Barry. In 2003, nine of the dishes were 
purchased by the private Greek Benaki Museum, whereas the London dish was sold a couple of times before 
reaching its present owner Sir Claude Hankes Drielsma, Chairman of the Windsor Leadership Trust. Dating the 
plate to 1903 means that the item would be beyond the scope of the 1970 UNESCO Convention on the Means 
of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property.
24 Chasa, 4 April 2007
Box 8. The London dish from Pazardzhik 
188
The Antiquities Trade – Dealers, Traffickers, and Connoisseurs
The largest scale customs haul of antiquities so far was seized at Vrashka Chuka 
in the fall of 2006. A number of cardboard boxes were found in a truck cab 
containing 4,484 antique coins, 54 arrowheads, 27 antique appliqués, 57 rings, 
12 agricultural tools, 14 artifacts made of horn, 2 lead seals, and 375 other 
antique articles, amounting to a striking total of 5,040 objects. A few days later 
another sizeable catch was made on a train crossing through Kalotina–antiquities 
and old coins wrapped in 24 juice and milk cartons, weighing 66 kilograms.
Usually, Bulgarian nationals are involved in the transfer of antiquities in cars or 
buses. In 2003–2004 for instance, 60% of export control violations were per-
petrated by Bulgarians (43 individuals), while in seven cases the offender was 
unknown, as the items were found in postal or express packages, in such parts 
of buses where anyone could have cached them, or had been dumped in the 
surrounding area where they were subsequently found by customs officers. Cases 
of illegal antiquities export far outnumber illicit import–in 2003–2004 there were 
78 prevented exports against 11 caught imports. Although smaller in scale, the 
import of artifacts into Bulgaria testifies to the existence of sustained local col-
lector demand.
As Bulgaria joined the EU, rigorous discretionary checks at internal borders were 
removed. This is expected to channel illicit antiquities export to new destinations 
and pose the need for selective intelligence-led checks which will be made pos-
sible only if coordination between enforcement bodies and other state institutions 
on international trafficking routes and cases is significantly improved.
5.3. REGULATING THE MARKET IN ANTIQUITIES
In recent decades regulations affecting the market of illicit antiquities both 
across states (export prohibitions) and domestically (measures curbing the sup-
ply, e.g. looting and museum theft) have been tightening. The first international 
legislative instrument enacted with that aim was the 1970 UNESCO Convention on 
the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership 
of Cultural Property. The Convention tries to establish common rules for tackling 
of Cultural Property. The Convention tries to establish common rules for tackling 
of Cultural Property
cultural property claims across national boundaries. Eighty six states had ratified 
the Convention by 1996, including an important market country such as France 
who did that recently, although the UK has not yet ratified it.
Other relevant global regulatory instruments are: the Convention for the Protec-
tion of World Cultural and Natural Heritage (1972), 
tion of World Cultural and Natural Heritage (1972), 
tion of World Cultural and Natural Heritage
European Convention for the Pro-
tection of the Cultural Heritage (1992), the Council of Europe 
tection of the Cultural Heritage (1992), the Council of Europe 
tection of the Cultural Heritage
Convention for the 
Protection of the Architectural Heritage in Europe (1985), the 1995 UNIDROIT
Protection of the Architectural Heritage in Europe (1985), the 1995 UNIDROIT
Protection of the Architectural Heritage in Europe
301
Convention on Stolen or Illegally Exported Cultural Objects, and the 1986 Code of 
Convention on Stolen or Illegally Exported Cultural Objects, and the 1986 Code of 
Convention on Stolen or Illegally Exported Cultural Objects
Ethics for Museums of the International Council of Museums (ICOM). ICOM 
introduces strict rules governing the acquisition and transfer of collections 
and the personal responsibility of museum employees involved in their pres-
ervation. In 1994 Interpol Secretary General, too, signed an appeal to gov-
ernments to take action against increasing illicit transfer. For the purpose of 
301 International Institute for the Unification of Private Law.
Organized Crime in Bulgaria: Markets and Trends
189
protecting cultural objects that can be classified as ”national treasures” Council 
Directive 93/7/EEC of 15 March 1993 on the Return of Cultural Objects Unlawfully 
Removed from the Territory of a Member State is effective in the EU.
Removed from the Territory of a Member State is effective in the EU.
Removed from the Territory of a Member State
Some states such as Germany have started in recent years to implement harsher 
import regulations for antiquities, and even British import controls, formerly 
among the most liberal, are becoming stricter. Traditional source states from 
Southern Europe such as Greece and Italy have greatly improved the coordina-
tion of their anti-trafficking efforts with Central European state, e.g. Switzerland. 
A model approach towards settling antiquities disputes and tackling their traffick-
ing is the pact signed by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City and 
the Italian government, in which the Met agreed to return twenty-one artifacts
302
in its collection that Italy claims were looted from archaeological sites within its 
borders. In exchange for the artifacts, Italy has lent the Met prestigious objects 
from Italian collections. Italy is now pressing the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los 
Angeles for the restitution of a statue of Aphrodite.
303
5.4. ADOPTING EUROPEAN STANDARDS TO REGULATE 
THE MOVEMENT OF ANTIQUITIES
Bulgaria has signed a number of international legal instruments for the protection of 
cultural monuments
304
and after the EU accession all legislation concerning culture 
protection is automatically to be applied in the country, most prominently Council 
Regulation 3911/92/EEC of 9 December 1992 on the export of cultural goods and 
Commission Regulation 752/93/EEC laying down provisions for the implementation 
of Council Regulation 3711/92/EEC. Notably, Regulation 3911/92/EEC allows each 
Member State to introduce additional national measures to protect its cultural heritage.
In 2004 a special Annex was added to the Law on Monuments of Culture and Mu-
seums (repealing the former Art. 33) to regulate permanent and temporary export 
seums (repealing the former Art. 33) to regulate permanent and temporary export 
seums
of movable cultural property. This Annex contains a list of the range of items that 
can be defined as cultural goods in full compliance to Regulation 3911/92/EEC,
305
whereas the three types of license already in use that must be attached to the 
customs declaration of exported cultural goods are pertinent to those prescribed 
in Regulation 752/93/EEC.
306
302 For further details on the case, see: Watson, P., and C. Todeschini, The Medici Conspiracy. The 
Illicit Journey of Looted Antiquities–From Italy’s Tomb Raiders to the World’s Greatest Museums, New York, 
Illicit Journey of Looted Antiquities–From Italy’s Tomb Raiders to the World’s Greatest Museums, New York, 
Illicit Journey of Looted Antiquities–From Italy’s Tomb Raiders to the World’s Greatest Museums
Public Affairs, 2006.
303 At the same time, the museum’s former curator of antiquities, Marion True, is on trial in Rome 
on charges of illicit antiquities trafficking (PND Philanthropy News Digest, 24 February 2006).
PND Philanthropy News Digest, 24 February 2006).
PND Philanthropy News Digest
304 Among them are: Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and 
Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property, Convention for the Protection of World Cultural and Natural 
Heritage, CoE European Cultural Convention, Convention for the Protection of the Architectural Heritage in 
Europe, Europe Agreement, establishing an association between the European Communities and 
their Member States, of the one part, and the Republic of Bulgaria, of the other part.
305 See Mitnicheska Hronika No.5 (2006), p.10.
Mitnicheska Hronika No.5 (2006), p.10.
Mitnicheska Hronika
306 In line with the provisions of the law and the Ordinance on Regular and Temporary Export of Movable 
Cultural Property the customs bodies must ensure that the following documents are attached to 
Cultural Property the customs bodies must ensure that the following documents are attached to 
Cultural Property
the export customs declaration:
190
The Antiquities Trade – Dealers, Traffickers, and Connoisseurs
Trans-border movement of monuments of culture is made possible by EU leg-
islation which sanctions legal export for antiquities that do not qualify as national 
treasures for which a certificate must be issued. Thus, moveable cultural property 
can be exported (temporarily) if it belongs to a collection legitimized under cur-
rent legislative provisions.
The following three types of export licenses are associated with the transfer of cultural objects from one Member 
State to another:
Standard license
This license is issued for temporary or permanent export of separate cultural objects or a number of cultural 
objects in a single consignment.
In order for a single export license to be issued for several cultural goods, the competent authorities must 
assess whether the goods are of the same category, part of the same consignment to the same export 
destination, and when the export is temporary the exporting party must be obliged to return the goods 
to the issuing Member State in the same consignment as exported. If those criteria are not met, separate 
licenses are issued for the individual cultural goods.
When cultural goods are to be displayed at an exhibition or fair a license for temporary export is issued.
The period of validity of the license cannot exceed twelve months from the date of issue.
Specific open license
This license covers repeated temporary export of a specific cultural good (e.g. a musical instrument) which 
is liable to be temporarily exported from the Community on a regular basis for use and/or exhibition in 
a third country. The cultural good must be owned by, or be in the legitimate possession of, the particular 
person or organization that uses and/or exhibits the good.
The person or organization concerned should offer all the guarantees considered necessary for the good to 
be returned in good condition to the Community.
A license may not be valid for a period that exceeds 24 months.
General open license
This license covers repeated temporary export of a cultural good which is liable to be temporarily exported 
from the Community on a regular basis for use and/or exhibition in a third country. 
The goods must form part of the permanent collection of a museum or other institution.
In the case of an application for temporary exportation, it must be specified which particular cultural goods 
shall remain outside the Community’s borders in the following 24 months.
The license may be used to cover any combination of goods in the permanent collection at any one 
occasion of temporary export. It can be used to cover a series of different combinations of goods either 
consecutively or concurrently. 
A license may only be issued if the authorities are convinced that the institution offers all the guarantees 
considered necessary for the good to be returned in good condition to the Community. 
The period of validity of the license cannot exceed 24 months from the date of issue. 
Box 9. EU antiquities transfer related legislation
– for the cultural goods listed in the Annex to Art. c33а of LMCM–standard license, specific 
open license or general open license issued by the head of the Museums, Galleries and Fine 
Arts Directorate (MGFID) at the Ministry of Culture;
– for movable cultural objects classified as national treasures–temporary export license endorsed 
by the minister of culture;
– for cultural objects which are not covered in the Annex to Art. 33а of the Law and are not 
classified as national treasures–certificate issued by the Director for Museums, Galleries and 
Fine Arts.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested