pdf viewer c# open source : How to add a jpg to a pdf software SDK project winforms windows html UWP Owen_Gaines_Poker_math_that_matters7-part2063

60 
So, the equation looks like this. 
10 / (10 + 20) 
10/30 = 0.333  
I give different methods so you can use the one with which you 
feel the most comfortable. 
We’ll do one more for practice.  Let’s imagine that same $10 
pot, except this time our opponent bets $5.  Now we’re getting 
15:5 which can be reduce to 3:1.  Turning this into a percentage, 
we get 
1
4
or 25%.  Or, we could use the x / (x+y) method.   
x=5 and y=15 
5 / (5+15) 
5/20 = 0.25 
So, if we make the call and win 25% of the time, we will break 
even with our call.  And again, we want to win the pot more than 
25% so we’re actually making money on average. 
Let’s run four trials of this situation and watch how it works.  If 
we won the pot one time out of four and lost the pot the other 
three times, our results would look like this. 
1
st
time we lose $5. 
2
nd
time we lose $5. 
3
rd
time we lose $5. 
4
th
time we win $15. 
How to add a jpg to a pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add image to pdf in preview; how to add photo to pdf in preview
How to add a jpg to a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add jpg to pdf online; how to add image to pdf file
61 
When we sum all the results, we get zero. 
-$5 - $5 - $5 + $15 = 0 
So, you see we’ve broken even over this scenario.  Now, there’s 
an even shorter way to approximate this percentage at the table 
that requires only a minimal amount of memory.  In NLHE, you 
come across the same bet sizes very frequently in terms of how 
much the opponent bets compared to the pot.  So, we can just list 
those and memorize how often we need to be good for each one.  
We can look at what our opponent bet in relation to the pot and 
estimate how often we need to be good. 
Table 5. Percent we must win after villain bets. 
His Bet 
We Must Win > 
2x the size of the pot 
40% 
Pot-size 
33% 
2/3 the size of the pot 
28% 
1/2 the size of the pot 
25% 
1/3 the size of the pot 
20% 
1/4 the size of the pot 
16% 
Just by memorizing Table 5, you can normally get right on or 
very close to how often you need to win in order not to lose 
money on your call.  You may even want to put this little chart 
by your monitor until you find you no longer need it. 
Let’s tie this together with everything we’ve learned so far with 
an example. 
Hero: 5
♠6♠
Villain: A
A
Board: K
♠T♠
2
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
example, this C#.NET PDF to JPEG converter library will name the converted JPEG image file Output.jpg. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references
add picture to pdf in preview; how to add a jpeg to a pdf
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Add necessary references page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(0) ' Convert the first PDF page to page.ConvertToImage(ImageType.JPEG, Program.RootPath + "\\Output.jpg").
adding an image to a pdf in preview; adding an image to a pdf file
62 
We have a flush draw.  The pot is $25.  Our opponent has $24 
left in his stack, and we have him covered.  He’s first to act and 
goes all-in.  Do we call or fold?  We can do this problem right at 
the table in just a couple seconds.  Let’s look at our pot odds.  He 
bet almost the pot. So, from memorizing our chart, we know 
we’ve got to be good about 33%.  Now, how often will we win?  
We count our outs and see we have nine outs to win.  Using our 
4/2 rule, we multiple our 9 outs times 4 (since we’re all-in on the 
flop) and come up with 36%.  This is greater than the 33% we 
need, so we should call.  Not too bad, right? 
Although it may seem cumbersome now, you will become very 
quick with this after some practice.  You could run an EV 
calculation to check the EV of this call when you’re away from 
the table.  Realize in the wager, when we win, we’ll win $49.  
This is $25 in the pot, and our opponent’s $24 bet.  When we 
lose, we’ll lose the $24 we put in to call. 
0.36($49) - 0.64($24) = EV 
$17.64 – $15.36 = $2.28 
I do want to show you an alternate way to calculate your EV.  
This way you can use whichever method you like the best.  We 
can multiply the total pot after we call by the probability we’ll 
win it.  Then we subtract what we had to call. 
0.36($73) – $24 = EV 
$26.28 - $24 = $2.28 
So, with this call our EV is $2.28 
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
Add necessary references to your C# project: String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
adding jpg to pdf; add an image to a pdf with acrobat
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Add necessary references to your C# project: String inputFilePath = @"**jpg"; String outputFilePath = @"**pdf"; // Convert Jpeg to PDF and show
add png to pdf acrobat; how to add an image to a pdf file
63 
Let’s try one more. 
Hero: A
K
Villain: J
T
Board: J
9
8
2
The pot is $40.  Our opponent bets $10.  Should we call or fold?  
We see his bet was 1/4 pot, so we know from Table 5 we need to 
have 16% equity to call.  We now look at our outs and see we 
have six outs.  Using the 4/2 rule, we multiply 6 times 2 and get 
12%.  This is smaller than the 16% we need, so we should fold.  
Again, we can run an EV calculation to check the EV of this call 
when we’re away from the table. 
0.12($50) - 0.88($10) = EV 
$6 - $8.8 = (-$2.80) 
Or 
0.12($60) - $10 = EV 
$7.20 – $10 = (-$2.80) 
Examining pot odds can be done in seconds at the table.  Make 
sure you take time to memorize Table 5 and practice until you’re 
very comfortable with this process. 
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
1.bmp")); images.Add(new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")); images.Add(new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.png")); / Build a PDF document with
add jpg to pdf acrobat; add an image to a pdf acrobat
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
1.bmp")) images.Add(New REImage(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")) images.Add(New REImage(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.png")) ' Build a PDF document with
acrobat insert image in pdf; add jpg to pdf
64 
Quiz 
(Answers on pg. 174) 
For the following questions, answer call or fold. 
1.  Hero: 8
9
Villain: A
J
Board: 7
8
2♠A♠
Pot was $10, and villain goes all-in for $5. 
2.  Hero: A
A
Villain: 5
6
Board: 7
8
J♠
Pot was $24.   Hero goes all-in for $28.  What should 
villain do? 
3.  Hero: A
Q
Villain: J
J
Board: 
3♠5
5
Pot was $10.  Villain goes all-in for $6.50. 
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. Add Stamp Annotation. image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and
pdf insert image; add a picture to a pdf file
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and
add photo to pdf preview; add image pdf document
65 
4.  Hero: 9
6
Villain: J
J
Board: 3♠5
5
2
Pot was $20.  Villain goes all-in for $10. 
66 
Implied Odds 
In this section, we'll be discussing how the decision of whether 
or not to call or fold is impacted by having money left to bet.  
This idea is called implied odds Implied odds is looking at 
your reward to risk ratio in the light of future betting.  Let's start 
out with an example. 
Hero: 6
♠7♠
Villain: A
K♠
Board: 4
5
A
K
The villain bets $5 into a $10 pot.  We can quickly determine if 
we have immediate pot odds to call this bet.  Our opponent bet 
1/2 pot, so we know we need 25% equity to call.  We have eights 
outs to the nuts, and we're on the turn.  So, our equity is about 
16%.  This is less than the 25% we need, so looking only at this, 
we should fold.  However, what we still need to know is if we 
still have money to bet on the river.  If we have more money to 
bet, we may be able to call. 
One important point to make here is that we know his hand in 
this example, but he cannot know our hand.  Why would it be a 
problem if he knew our hand?  If he knew our hand, he would 
just check and fold on the river if we made our straight.  If he 
does this, we won't get any money from him on the river.  This 
really highlights an important consideration with implied odds.  
How easy is it to spot your draw?  A draw like a flush draw is 
very easy to spot.  Imagine there are two cards of the same suit 
on a flop, and you called your opponent’s turn bet.  If the river 
brings that same suit, your opponent is going to be concerned 
about that flush and may not pay you off or pay you as much.  
However, a draw like an open-ended straight draw, as we have in 
67 
this example, is pretty disguised.  If an 8 comes on the river, he 
may miss that straight possibility altogether. 
In any case, we know his hand, and he doesn't know ours.  So, 
we're almost certain to get money from his two pair if we make 
our straight.  Now, let's say he has another $20 left on the river.  
We call his $5 bet on the turn even though are immediate odds 
tell us we should fold.  The river is an 8, and he goes all-in for 
his pot size bet of $20.  We happily call.  We made an extra $20 
off our turn call.  So, let's go back to looking at our odds on the 
turn.  If we include his $20 in our odds, instead of getting 15:5 
(3:1) on our turn call, we'd be getting 35:5 which is 7:1.  With 
7:1, we only need to be good 12.5% of the time.  We're going to 
win 16% of the time, so we'd be able to call if we knew we could 
get our opponent's stack when we hit. 
This brings us to another important concept with implied odds.  
The stronger the opponent's hand is, the greater our implied 
odds.  The weaker our opponent's hand is, the weaker our 
implied odds.  Using our example hand, if our opponent held JJ 
instead of AK, it's very unlikely we would get a lot of money 
from him on the river.  Most likely he'd check and fold to a river 
bet, and then you wouldn't get any money from him on the river.  
Your turn call would have lost money.  Figuring out if your 
opponent has a strong hand or not will take time and experience.  
That's part of hand-reading.  We'll get to dealing with the fact 
that we can't see our opponent's cards later in this book.  For 
now, let's get back to figuring out how to calculate implied odds 
at the table. 
When looking at implied odds, we add the amount we think we'll 
win to our odds when we need to make the call.  However, this is 
pretty difficult for me to do at the table.  So, here's a quick way 
for you to estimate how much you need to win in order to justify 
a call. 
68 
Table 6. Multiplication factor to calculate implied odds based on our 
equity. 
Our Equity 
Multiply his bet by: 
35% 
2x 
25% 
3x 
20% 
4x 
15% 
6x 
10% 
9x 
Table 6 shows how much money we need to make when calling 
a bet.  This is based on our equity.  Let's use a quick example to 
show this at work.  Let's say you're in a hand and you have 20% 
equity on the turn.  The pot is $20, and your opponent bets $10.  
Since you have 20% equity, you look at the bet you must call 
and multiply it times 4 (See Table 6).  His bet is $10, so we need 
$40.  Now, there is already $30 in the pot (The $20 plus his 
$10.), so we subtract that from what we need.  
$40 - $30 = $10   
So, we need $10 more to breakeven on this call.  Notice if we 
call, the pot would be $40.  So, we need to be able to get a 1/4 
pot bet on the river. 
Let's look at our 67s versus AK hand again.  Remember, we 
know his hand, he doesn't know ours.  He has $20 left after his 
$5 bet, and we know his hand is very strong.  He bets $5 into a 
$10 pot.  We know we'll catch our straight about 16% of the 
time, but looking only at immediate pot odds, we need to be 
good 25% to call.  So, we consider how much we need to get on 
the river to at least break even.  Looking at our chart, we can 
estimate we need about 6x more (a bit less) than his turn bet.  
His turn bet was $5, so we need $30 (6 x 5) to make the call.  
69 
There's already $15 in the pot, so we subtract that from $30 and 
find out we need $15 more on the river.  He has $20 left and has 
a strong hand, so getting that $15 should be pretty easy.  And 
better yet, we should get more than $15 on the river which is 
what we're really after.  So, if our opponent only had $10 left to 
bet on the river, we would need to fold here. 
Quiz  
(Answers on pg. 176) 
Use estimations to answer the following questions. 
1.  Hero: 9
6
Villain: A
J
Board: 7
8
2♠A♠
The pot was $10.  Villain bet $15.  How much more do 
you need? 
2.  Hero: 9
3
Villain: A
A
Board: 7
8
J♠4
The pot was $10.  Villain bet $10.  How much more do 
you need? 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested