pdf viewer c# open source : Add an image to a pdf in preview software SDK dll windows wpf html web forms pages_5611-part2154

20
21
Priceless or Worthless
Priceless or  Worthless
“There’s no better 
designer than nature”
Alexander McQueen
Add an image to a pdf in preview - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add photo pdf; adding jpg to pdf
Add an image to a pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
adding image to pdf file; add image to pdf acrobat
22
23
Priceless or Worthless
Priceless or  Worthless
Species at 
a tipping 
point
Chapter 2
22
Priceless or Worthless
23
Priceless or Worthless
The species featured here represent the 
100 most critically endangered species in 
the world. If we don’t rapidly increase the 
amount of conservation attention that 
they receive they may soon be lost forever. 
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Convert PDF to Tiff image (.tif, .tiff). • Convert PDF to HTML (.htm, .html). PDF Annotation. • Add sticky notes to PDF document in preview.
how to add image to pdf; add signature image to pdf acrobat
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
PDF to Tiff image (.tif, .tiff). • Convert PDF to HTML (.htm, .html). PDF Annotation. • Add sticky notes to PDF document. • Highlight PDF text in preview.
how to add a jpeg to a pdf file; add picture to pdf preview
24
25
Priceless or Worthless
Priceless or  Worthless
24
Priceless or Worthless
© Peter Paul van Dijk
Astrochelys yniphora 
Ploughshare tortoise, Angonoka
Often referred to as the most endangered tortoise 
in the world, the ploughshare tortoise (Astrochelys 
yniphora) is named after the plough-like projection 
that protrudes between its front legs. Having 
narrowly survived hunting pressure and habitat 
destruction by fire in the past, this species’ good 
looks may be its ultimate downfall as illegal 
collection for the international pet trade is likely to 
push it to extinction in the wild in the near future. 
Baly Bay, the location of the single remaining 
metapopulation of the ploughshare tortoise, was 
gazetted as a national park in 1997 by the Malagasy 
government to protect the remaining fragments 
of the species’ habitat. Another layer of security 
for this attractive reptile is accorded by its listing in 
CITES Appendix I, outlawing its international trade. 
However, poor enforcement undermines these 
legal protections, with illegal trade and collection 
escalating in recent years. In 1996, 73 individuals 
were stolen from the Durrell Wildlife Conservation 
Trust’s offsite captive breeding facility, while in 
May 2009 four tortoises were stolen from their 
onsite quarantine facility, where they were being 
monitored prior to their planned release into the 
wild. Many wild animals have been poached off 
national park lands and appeared in the illegal pet 
trade, especially in Southeast Asia and China. 
Relying only on the current levels of legal protection 
to save this species has an extremely poor chance 
of success.
The illegal trade of ploughshare tortoises is 
undermining the otherwise laudable attempts of 
local conservationists and organizations to protect 
this species. There have been concerted efforts 
to stop illegal collection with the presence of the 
Madagascar National Parks Authority in the town 
of Saolala, close to the species’ habitat, and the 
establishment of a small network of village 
para-rangers. These para-rangers monitor for 
possible smugglers and outbreaks of fire. 
What needs to be done?
Expansion of the current network of para-rangers, 
along with an increase in the level of protection 
provided by government authorities, would go a 
considerable way toward ensuring the survival of 
ploughshare tortoises in the wild. These efforts 
need to be coupled with ongoing monitoring of the 
species’ presence in the illegal global pet trade, 
along with effective repatriation of confiscated 
animals. Unless these measures are implemented 
rapidly, human desire to own one of these 
fascinating creatures will rob future generations of 
the opportunity to ever see them in the wild.
Population size:
440 - 770 individuals
Range:
25-60km
2
in Baly Bay region, 
northwestern Madagascar
Primary threats:
Illegal collection for international 
pet trade
Action required:
Enforcement of legal protection 
and protected area management
Text reviewed by the Tortoise and Freshwater Turtle Specialist Group
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
C# DLLs for Word File Preview. Add references: Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Word file in C#.net.
add image to pdf file; adding images to pdf
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
Add necessary XDoc.PowerPoint DLL libraries into your created C# application as You may get document preview image from an existing PowerPoint file in C#.net.
how to add image to pdf acrobat; how to add jpg to pdf file
26
27
Priceless or Worthless
Priceless or  Worthless
Atelopus balios
Rio Pescado stubfoot toad
Drawing its name from the Greek word for dappled 
or spotted, ‘balios’, the beautiful Rio Pescado 
stubfoot toad (Atelopus balios) is clinging to 
existence in a fragment of habitat in the pacific 
lowlands of south-western Ecuador. Unseen since 
1995, the rediscovery of this species in 2010 was 
one of few high points in the ‘Search for Lost 
Frogs’. Launched in August 2010 by the IUCN SSC 
Amphibian Specialist Group and Conservation 
International, with support from Global Wildlife 
Conservation, this campaign resulted in expeditions 
by 26 researchers in 21 countries. Sadly only four of 
the high priority ‘lost amphibians’ were found, only 
one of which featured in the ‘top ten’. This was the 
Rio Pescado stubfoot toad. 
Only a tip-off from the local community led 
researchers to find a single adult toad by a 
river during their search in 2010. This discovery 
partially allayed fears that the species had already 
succumbed to chytridiomycosis. However, the 
spot where it was found was not under any form 
of protection. As habitat degradation and loss due 
to agriculture, logging and pollution also severely 
threaten the survival of this species, protection of 
the last remaining fragments of the toad’s habitat 
is needed without delay. 
Also known as harlequin toads, the rediscovery of 
this species was a rare moment of celebration in 
an otherwise sobering search for ‘lost’ amphibians. 
However, amphibian lovers should draw hope from 
the fact that they now have a rare opportunity to 
rescue a member of a group that has been hit 
particularly hard by amphibian declines. 
What needs to be done?
The immediate protection of this species’ habitat 
in the Pacific lowlands of south-western Ecuador, 
coupled with further intensive searches for other 
individuals that could be used for captive breeding, 
may yet save the Rio Pescado stubfoot toad. 
Ecuadorians must take rapid, decisive action if this 
beautiful piece of their natural heritage is to be saved. 
Population size:
Unknown
Range:
Azuay, Cañar and Guyas provinces, 
south-western Ecuador 
Threats:
Chytridiomycosis and habitat 
destruction due to logging and 
agricultural expansion
Action required:
Protection of last remaining habitat 
27
Priceless or Worthless
© Eduardo Toral Contreras
Text reviewed by the Amphibian Specialist Group 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
enables compressing and decompressing in preview in ASP.NET to reduce or minimize original PDF document size Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or
adding a png to a pdf; how to add picture to pdf
How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word following steps below, you can create an image viewer WinForm Open or create a new WinForms application, add necessary dll
add image to pdf reader; add image to pdf acrobat reader
28
29
Priceless or Worthless
Priceless or  Worthless
28
Priceless or Worthless
© Andrew Young
Brachyteles hypoxanthus 
Northern Muriqui, Wooly Spider Monkey
The long-limbed northern muriqui (Brachyteles 
hypoxanthus), or wooly spider monkey, is found 
exclusively in the Atlantic forest of south-eastern 
Brazil. This peaceful primate is quite peculiar as, 
instead of fighting to monopolize fertile females, 
males wait patiently for their turn to copulate. It is 
not unusual for an ovulating female to mate with 
multiple males in close succession. These low 
levels of aggression give females the opportunity 
to choose their own mates without the risk of 
violence that other female primates may face. 
Revelations about the northern muriqui’s egalitarian 
social relationships and promiscuous sex lives have 
captured attention both in Brazil and internationally, 
leading to the proposal for it to be a flagship species 
for the upcoming (2016) Olympic Games in Brazil.
Large-scale deforestation in the past and selective 
logging has reduced the northern muriqui’s unique 
ecosystem to a fraction of its original extent, and 
hunting pressures have taken their toll on local 
populations. Today, fewer than 1,000 northern 
muriquis are known to survive, distributed among 
about a dozen private and government owned 
forests in the states of Minas Gerais, Espírito 
Santos and Bahia. Habitat fragmentation has 
isolated these populations from one another 
and most of the remaining populations are now 
alarmingly small.
To address these threats, current conservation 
tactics are aimed at the preservation and expansion 
of remaining habitats and at the protection and 
management of existing populations. This often 
requires delicately balancing research, ecotourism, 
and environmental education programs, with both 
the well-being of the animals and environmental 
impact concerns. 
What needs to be done?
With the formation of an advisory committee of 
experts and the recent completion of a national 
action plan for the muriquis (O Plano de Ação 
Nacional para a Conservação dos Muriquis), 
the Brazilian government has taken impressive 
steps in demonstrating its commitment to the 
development of informed conservation policies for 
its endangered and critically endangered species. 
The success of these policies now depends upon 
the appropriate allocation of global resources for 
conservation initiatives. 
Population size:
< 1,000 individuals
Range:
Atlantic forest, south-eastern Brazil
Primary threats:
Habitat loss and fragmentation 
due to large-scale deforestation 
and selective logging
Action required:
Habitat protection and 
commitment of resources to 
support the implementation 
of the national action plan
Text contributed by Karen B. Strier, Primate Specialist Group
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Excel file in C#.net.
add image pdf document; add a picture to a pdf file
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Generally speaking, using well-designed APIs, C# developers can do following things. Remove Image from PDF Page Using C#. Add necessary references:
adding an image to a pdf; adding image to pdf
30
31
Priceless or Worthless
Priceless or  Worthless
Bradypus pygmaeus
Pygmy three-toed sloth
Less than half the size of its mainland cousin – the 
brown-throated sloth (Bradypus variegatus) – the 
pygmy three-toed sloth (Bradypus pygmaeus) lives 
almost exclusively in the red mangrove forests 
which cover between 1.3km
2
to 1.5km
2
of the Isla 
Escudo de Veraguas, off the Caribbean coast of 
Panama. This small sloth has blotchy, pale grey-
brown fur with a slight greenish tinge. This green 
hue is actually a cunning camouflage created by a 
coat of algae, helping the sloths to blend in with 
their habitat. 
Although the island is uninhabited, seasonal visitors 
pose an increasing threat with reports of fishermen 
and lobster divers opportunistically hunting the 
sloths. There is also evidence of clearance of their 
mangrove habitat for use as firewood and in local 
construction, endangering the survival of this tiny 
creature. Anecdotal observations from researchers 
visiting the island have estimated the population 
of the pygmy three-toed sloths to be around 200 
individuals. The small size of the population and the 
limited extent of their habitat increase the species 
vulnerability to unexpected environmental events, 
and reduce their ability to withstand continued and 
increasing anthropogenic pressure. 
Isla Escudo de Veraguas is already gazetted as a 
protected nature sanctuary. However, enforcement 
of this status is currently nonexistent, leading 
to the exploitation of both the sloths and their 
habitat. Though there is currently some evidence 
of local indigenous governance, this needs better 
coordination and enforcement, via engagement of 
all the stakeholders.
The pygmy three-toed sloth is a quintessential 
charismatic species. The willingness of humanity 
to save such species is well documented and if this 
little sloth could be elevated to flagship status in the 
minds of Panamanians and the global community, 
it could become a valuable ambassador for the 
conservation of the mangrove ecosystem on which 
it depends. 
What needs to be done?
As the primary threat to this species is of human 
origin, transforming the current perception of 
the species is of paramount importance. Local 
awareness programmes could improve its profile of 
and, when coupled with increased law enforcement 
to protect the nature sanctuary, could help to reduce 
the myriad of pressures that these little sloths face. 
Furthermore, the use of the pygmy three-toed 
sloth as a flagship species for both its mangrove 
habitat and Panama could increase its value to the 
Panamanian people and their government. 
Population size:
< 500 individuals
Range:
Approximately 1.3km
– 1.5km
2
on 
Isla Escudo de Veraguas, Panama 
Threats:
Habitat loss due to illegal logging 
of mangrove forests for firewood 
and construction and hunting of 
the sloths
Action required:
Enforcement of protection of the 
Isla Escudo de Veraguas nature 
sanctuary and raising awareness 
31
Priceless or Worthless
© Craig Turner/ZSL
Text reviewed by the Anteater, Sloth and Armadillo Specialist Group
32
33
Priceless or Worthless
Priceless or  Worthless
32
Priceless or Worthless
© Frank Glaw
Calumma tarzan 
Tarzan’s chameleon
Named in the hope that it would be a clarion ‘Tarzan’ 
call for conservation, the arresting Tarzan’s chameleon 
(Calumma tarzan) was discovered in a small, and 
shrinking, patch of rain forest close to the village 
formerly known as Tarzanville (now Ambodimeloka) in 
eastern Madagascar. Madagascar has rich chameleon 
diversity with numerous strikingly beautiful species 
occurring throughout its remaining forests. The bright 
green and yellow Tarzan’s chameleon is a spectacular 
species, with the yellow stripes that males display 
when agitated being particularly eye-catching. 
Sadly, habitat destruction as a result of slash-and-burn 
agriculture is threatening the survival of this recently 
discovered species. Currently only known from three 
small rainforest fragments, covering an area less 
than 10km
2
, the species faces an uncertain future.
Thankfully there are some legal restrictions in place 
and forest clearance, enforced by local community 
associations, is prohibited in two of the small 
fragments in which the species is found. However, 
during a recent visit to Ampotaka Forest, a provisional 
protected area, researchers found evidence of forest 
clearance for the creation of trails for logging. 
Community conservation efforts, including the 
establishment of new protected areas, are underway 
in two of the sites where this species occurs. These 
tiny patches of rainforest harbour a variety of endemic 
plants and animals, and their value to the local 
economy and environment is well understood locally. 
Communities that use these forests are strongly 
supportive of conservation efforts that focus on 
sustainable use.
The preservation of tiny fragments of forest, while 
seemingly less important for the conservation of 
larger animals such as lemurs, play a critical role 
in plant, amphibian and reptile conservation on 
Madagascar. In light of the current rapid rates of 
habitat degradation and destruction, the protection 
of these refugia is of utmost importance. While the 
situation may seem dire, prior experience shows 
us that the ‘Tarzan’ calls of species such as this 
charismatic chameleon can inspire communities to 
overcome seemingly insurmountable obstacles to 
preserve their heritage. 
What needs to be done?
Local community organisations require support, as 
well as the promotion of economic activities that 
don’t require forest clearance, to effectively manage 
the remaining fragments of forest. One such activity 
could be the development of a basic infrastructure 
for ecotourism as a partial alternative to destructive 
agricultural practices. Eco-tourism that rests on the 
survival of Tarzan’s chameleon, coupled with the 
provision of better education and health services, 
could provide the impetus needed for locals to 
protect this valuable habitat.
Population size:
Unknown
Range:
< 10km
2
in Anosibe An’Ala region, 
eastern Madagascar
Primary threats:
Habitat destruction for agriculture
Action required:
Support for nascent community 
conservation initiatives and 
protection of habitat
Text reviewed by the Chameleon Specialist Group 
34
35
Priceless or Worthless
Priceless or  Worthless
Coleura seychellensis
Seychelles sheath-tailed bat
A member of an ancient family, the tiny Seychelles 
sheath-tailed bat (Coleura seychellensis) owes its 
name to the membrane stretched between its hind 
legs. The bat’s aerial acrobatics are facilitated by 
the presence of this membrane - by shifting its hind 
legs the bat can adjust the length of the membrane, 
enabling it to rapidly duck and dive whilst in flight. 
Sadly, this winged aerialist is now flying ever closer 
to the edge of existence and may soon be lost for 
good. 
Already extinct on the islands of La Digue and 
Praslin, this captivating species is now clinging to 
life in several caves on the islands of Sihouette and 
Mahé. However, even these caves are no longer 
safe havens as the world’s most endangered 
bat is beset from all sides. The most significant 
declines of this species were probably driven by 
lowland forest clearance and the extensive use 
of horticultural pesticides in the late 1800s and 
early 1900s. Now however, the proliferation of 
invasive species, such as the Kudzu vine (Pueraria 
phaseoloides), seems to be the primary factor 
imperilling the species’ survival due to damage to 
forest habitat and the entrances to roosts. Human 
disturbance to the bat’s roosts in well lit boulder 
caves, coupled with predation by voracious feral 
cats, rats, and introduced barn owls may seal the 
fate of this aerial acrobat. 
What needs to be done?
Aggressive control of invasive vegetation and 
predators, drawing from international experience 
in the eradication of these threats, could assist 
this little bat’s recovery. These activities should 
be coupled with the restoration of the bats’ 
lowland forest home which should increase the 
bats’ invertebrate prey and augment the currently 
limited habitat available to the species. Finally, legal 
protection of habitat and roosting sites, combined 
with the initiatives mentioned above, could secure 
the persistence of this species into the future.
Text reviewed by the Bat Specialist Group 
Population size:
< 100 mature individuals
Range:
Two small caves on Silhouette and 
Mahé, Seychelles 
Threats:
Habitat degradation and predation 
by invasive species
Action required:
Removal of invasive vegetation and 
control of introduced predators, 
coupled with legal protection of 
habitat and roosting sites 
Aggressive control of invasive 
vegetation and predators, drawing 
from international experience in the 
eradication of these threats, could 
assist this little bats recovery.
35
Priceless or Worthless
© Justin Gerlach
36
37
Priceless or Worthless
Priceless or  Worthless
36
Priceless or Worthless
© Jaclyn Woods/Fort Worth Zoo
Cyclura collei 
Jamaican iguana, Jamaican rock iguana
Believed to be extinct for much of the last century 
following its disappearance from the Goat Islands, 
two small islands off the Jamaican coast, the 
Jamaican iguana (Cyclura collei) was re-discovered 
on the mainland in 1970. Hanging on in a remote 
section of the harsh Hellshire Hills, this large lizard 
seems determined to fight on. When cornered the 
species will strike out with its front claws, and there 
are reports of it putting out the eye of hunter’s dogs 
when attacked. 
Once common on the southern coast of Jamaica, 
the introduction of invasive predators (particularly 
the Indian mongoose in 1872) coupled with 
changing land-use patterns and human population 
growth, have driven the rapid decline of this 
species. In the absence of reintroductions from 
a head-starting programme run from Hope Zoo in 
Kingston, and extensive predator control managed 
by the University of the West Indies, the species 
would probably have vanished entirely from its 
refuge in the Hellshire Hills. As it is, they persist 
only within a 10km
2
core zone that is protected 
from predators by a series of traps. 
The iguana’s forest habitat is protected under the 
Forest Act of 1996, but a lack of enforcement has 
meant that the area continues to be exploited 
for wood used in charcoal production. If this 
destruction is not controlled within the near future, 
there is a real risk that forest users will enter the 
remaining iguana habitat and destroy it, wiping 
out the species within it. The Hellshire Hills is also 
within the Portland Bight Protected Area, which 
was declared in 1999, and should provide further 
legal weight to stop current levels of abuse. 
These legal instruments could also be used to 
limit the expansion of development projects into 
the area that would open up the forest to further 
exploitation. 
What needs to be done?
The reintroduction of the Jamaican iguana to the 
offshore Goat Island cays, which also fall within 
the Portland Bight Protected Area, should proceed 
without delay. The establishment of a dry forest 
biodiversity reserve on these islands, and the 
eradication of predators, would provide the iguanas 
with a safe haven and is critical in ensuring the 
species long-term survival. The head-starting 
programme, which has released over 174 iguanas 
back into the wild since 1996, could then be used 
to boost populations in these sanctuaries. The 
establishment of populations on these offshore 
islands would provide a lifeline for the iguanas and 
secure their future. 
Population size:
Unknown
Range:
< 10km
2
core area in Hellshire Hills, 
Jamaica
Primary threats:
Predation by introduced species 
and habitat destruction
Action required:
Translocation to predator-free 
islands and control of deforestation
Text reviewed by the Iguana Specialist Group
38
39
Priceless or Worthless
Priceless or  Worthless
Dendrophylax fawcettii
Cayman Islands ghost orchid
Known only from Grand Cayman Island, the ethereal 
ghost orchid (Dendrophylax fawcettii) grows on 
the trunks of trees and bare rocky limestone karst 
pinnacles. A leafless, spider-like network of roots for 
most of the year, delicate pale cream flowers bloom 
between April and June, decorating the moist forest 
adjoining the wetlands. Sadly, this beautiful orchid 
faces an uncertain future. The Ironwood Forest, 
the last remaining fragment of old-growth forest in 
George Town, is bounded on all sides by the urban 
development of the nation’s capital. The forest 
extends to just 46 acres; of this, the ghost orchids 
are confined to an area of just some six acres. 
Development of the west side of Grand Cayman 
has been voracious in recent years. In 2008, 
government plans to construct a bypass through 
the forest, and through the portion occupied by the 
orchids, provoked outcry from both the public and 
the owners of the privately-held Ironwood Forest 
land. The forest won a stay of execution thanks to 
the campaign by the protestors and the bypass 
plans were shelved. However, this temporary 
reprieve will be insufficient to ensure the long-
term survival of the enchanting ghost orchid as 
the Ironwood Forest continues to remain without 
any formal protection. The successful protection of 
the forest would also preserve (among numerous 
other native species) four additional Cayman Islands 
endemics of cultural as well as natural significance 
(Ironwood: Chionanthus caymanensis, Thatch 
palm: Coccothrinax proctorii, the Banana orchid: 
Myrmecophila thomsoniana (Cayman’s National 
Flower), and Hohenbergia caymanensis). The latter, 
a giant bromeliad nick-named “Old George”, is 
known naturally only from this area. 
What needs to be done?
The Cayman Islands currently lack the comprehensive 
conservation legislation necessary to establish 
national protected areas, and only five per cent is 
under the protection of the National Trust for the 
Cayman Islands. With appropriate legislation, protection 
of the Ironwood Forest would be possible, either 
by purchase or through establishing management 
agreements with the private landowners. This would 
benefit the landowners by enabling them to maintain 
their land in its natural state, as they have done for 
generations. All that is required to enable this is the 
political will. 
Population size:
Unknown
Range:
6 acres in Ironwood Forest, George 
Town, Grand Cayman 
Threats:
Habitat destruction due to 
infrastructure development
Action required:
Development of legislation that 
will facilitate the protection of 
the Ironwood Forests
39
Priceless or Worthless
© Christine Rose-Smyth, Stuart Mailer
Text reviewed by the Orchid Specialist Group
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested