pdf viewer c# open source : Add jpg to pdf application SDK tool html wpf .net online pages_5612-part2155

40
41
Priceless or Worthless
Priceless or  Worthless
40
Priceless or Worthless
© Mervyn Lotter
© John Burrows
© John Burrows
Dioscorea strydomiana 
Wild yam
Touted as a cure for cancer in South African 
traditional medicines, the recently discovered 
wild yam (Dioscorea strydomiana) holds the 
unenviable title of the most threatened yam in the 
world. While claims of its healing properties are 
currently unsubstantiated, related species are rich 
in elements which formed the original basis of 
steroidal drugs and the contraceptive pill. 
Unfortunately, the plants purported curative 
attributes may be the cause of its destruction. 
Excessive levels of collection for medicinal use are 
currently the primary threat to this slow-growing 
species. In fact, the most recent survey of the wild 
yam population found over 89 per cent of the plants 
had harvesting scars. Collectors remove large parts 
of the tuber, which protrudes from the ground, often 
leading to the death of the plant. If the species 
continues to be exploited at the current rate, its 
persistence in the wild is highly unlikely. In addition, 
burning, mining, cattle farming and firewood 
collection are threatening the surrounding area, 
adding to the pressure on this valuable species. 
As the primary threat to the wild yam is unsustainable 
levels of collection, developing solutions that will 
alleviate this are essential. Concerned parties, 
including the Mpumalanga Tourism and Parks 
Authority, the South African National Biodiversity 
Institute and the Mpumalanga Plant Specialist 
Group, are currently collaborating to address this. 
These groups will also need to develop conservation 
programmes in conjunction with the community that 
has primary custodianship over the wild yam if they 
are to have any chance of success. 
What needs to be done?
Possible solutions could include substituting other 
similar species in medicinal products or developing 
systems for harvesting the seeds and selling plants 
post-cultivation. The development of a successful 
cultivation project in particular could provide a 
lifeline for the species, alleviating pressure on the 
wild population. Ex-situ cultivation projects have 
been started, but after eight years no plants have 
reached reproductive maturity. Although cultivation 
and the stockpiling of seed may provide an 
emergency parachute of sorts for the species, they 
alone can’t be relied on to save the wild yam. This 
makes immediate protection of the species in the 
wild of paramount importance. 
Population size:
200 individuals
Range:
Oshoek area, Mpumalanga, 
South Africa
Primary threats:
Collection for medicinal use
Action required:
Develop strategy for sustainable 
use and establish ex-situ populations
Text reviewed by the South African Plant Specialist Group
Add jpg to pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
adding a jpg to a pdf; add png to pdf preview
Add jpg to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add an image to a pdf form; how to add a picture to a pdf file
42
43
Priceless or Worthless
Priceless or  Worthless
Eurynorhyncus pygmeus 
Spoon-billed sandpiper
The spoon-billed sandpiper (Eurynorhynchus 
pygmeus) is a weird and wonderful bird, having 
a uniquely shaped bill that resembles a flattened 
spoon. It is also a species in deep trouble and is 
today considered to be one of the most endangered 
birds on the planet. With the global population 
estimated at less than 100 breeding pairs, and an 
annual rate of decline of 26 per cent over the last 
decade, the species could be extinct within the 
next ten years. On leaving its breeding grounds in 
the coastal tundra in far north-eastern Russia, the 
spoon-billed sandpiper undertakes an epic 8,000km 
migration along the East Asian–Australasian Flyway 
to winter in southern and Southeast Asia. 
The most acute cause of the species’ very rapid 
recent decline is believed to be trapping and 
hunting, primarily on the wintering grounds 
including the Bay of Martaban in Myanmar and 
Sonadia Island off the Bangladesh coast. This small 
wader has also undoubtedly been affected by the 
loss of intertidal habitats along its migratory route, 
particularly in the Yellow Sea. This problem also 
affects many other birds and local communities who 
depend on the region’s coastal natural resources. 
The precipitous decline of waterbirds along this 
flyway has been described as the gravest bird 
extinction crisis on Earth.
Many organisations across the conservation 
community have united to attempt to save the 
spoon-billed sandpiper and preliminary results are 
positive. In Myanmar, efforts to reduce trapping 
by providing local communities with livelihood 
alternatives have shown success, and two arduous 
expeditions to far north eastern Russia have 
resulted in a captive population of spoon-billed 
sandpipers, as well as birds being released on the 
breeding grounds after being hatched and reared 
in captivity, which has helped to alleviate the high 
mortality rate of chicks in the wild. 
What needs to be done?
A flagship species for the East Asian–Australasian 
Flyway, the spoon-billed sandpiper’s fate, and that 
of the millions of other waterbirds that migrate 
along the same flyway, hangs on the preservation 
of key staging sites. In addition to the long-term 
measures needed to protect these sites, activities 
such as conservation breeding and a reduction in 
winter trapping pressure are essential. 
It will not be easy to save the spoon-billed 
sandpiper – time is short, funds are limited and the 
logistical problems are considerable. Success is by 
no means guaranteed, but with a huge collaborative 
effort on habitat protection, reduction of trapping 
and conservation breeding, there is still hope for 
this remarkable bird.
Population size:
< 100 breeding pairs
Range: 
Breeds in Russia, migrates along 
the East Asian-Australasian Flyway 
to wintering grounds in Bangladesh 
and Myanmar.
Primary threats:
Trapping on wintering grounds 
and land reclamation.
Actions required:
Maintenance of critical intertidal 
staging posts and reducing 
trapping on wintering grounds.
43
Priceless or Worthless
© Baz Scampion/bazscampionnaturephotography.co.uk
Text contributed by Rebecca Lee and reviewed by the Threatened Waterfowl Specialist Group
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Add necessary references page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(0) ' Convert the first PDF page to page.ConvertToImage(ImageType.JPEG, Program.RootPath + "\\Output.jpg").
how to add an image to a pdf file in acrobat; add picture pdf
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
example, this C#.NET PDF to JPEG converter library will name the converted JPEG image file Output.jpg. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references
add jpg to pdf online; acrobat insert image into pdf
44
45
Priceless or Worthless
Priceless or  Worthless
44
Priceless or Worthless
© Paul Donald
Heteromirafa sidamoensis
Liben lark
Perfectly camouflaged amongst the sunburnt 
Ethiopian grassland, the cryptic Liben lark 
(Heteromirafra sidamoensis) resides solely in the 
open, tall grass habitat of the Liben Plains. Sadly 
this enigmatic species looks as though it could 
become mainland Africa’s first recorded bird 
extinction. Between 2007 and 2009 the number 
of Liben larks dropped by 40 per cent with the 
population now numbering between 90 and 256 
individuals. Unless current trends of habitat loss are 
reversed, there seems little hope for the species 
survival. 
While as insidious and disastrous for the 
biodiversity they contain, the degradation of 
rangelands globally attracts far less attention 
than the destruction of tropical forests. It is this 
destruction of rangelands that is pushing the Liben 
lark to the edge. The loss of habitat in this area has 
been driven by crop planting, overgrazing and scrub 
encroachment, a result of both excessive grazing 
and fire suppression. Modelling suggests that apart 
from a small, politically insecure area near Somalia, 
there is no other suitable habitat for the species 
anywhere in the Horn of Africa. This makes the 
protection of remaining patches in the Liben Plains 
critically important. 
As well as threatening the Liben lark, the decline 
in pasture quality is impacting the livelihoods of 
the local Borana pastoralists. Deteriorating pasture 
quality has transformed the homelands of the 
Borana from some of the most productive in Africa 
to a landscape overrun with famine and ethnic 
hostilities. Regeneration of these once productive 
areas is urgently required. 
What needs to be done?
As the Liben lark avoids woody vegetation, very short 
grass, and bare ground, regeneration of the open, 
tall grass habitat on which it depends will be pivotal 
to any recovery programme. The establishment 
of cattle exclosures could facilitate this. In 
addition, implementing sustainable management 
practices, including clearing scrub and abolishing 
fire suppression policies, is necessary to ensure 
the species long-term survival. By reinvigorating 
traditional land and water management strategies 
and increasing the appeal and sustainability of 
pastoralism, both the livelihoods of the local people 
and their biodiversity may yet be saved. 
Population size:
90 - 256 individuals
Range:
< 36km
2
in the Liben Plains, 
southern Ethiopia
Threats:
Habitat loss and degradation due 
to agricultural expansion, over-
grazing and fire suppression
Action required:
Restoration of grasslands, including 
establishing sustainable land 
management practices, clearing 
scrub and reinstating fire regime
Text reviewed by the Bird Red List Authority
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
Add necessary references to your C# project: String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
add image to pdf preview; add jpg to pdf document
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
Add necessary references to your C# project: RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. inputFilePath = @"C:\input.tif"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert tiff
adding a jpeg to a pdf; add an image to a pdf acrobat
46
47
Priceless or Worthless
Priceless or  Worthless
Johora singaporensis 
Singapore freshwater crab
Hiding under rocks and dank leaf litter in just two or 
three streams in central Singapore can be found the 
Singapore freshwater crab, Johora singaporensis. 
One of only three endemic freshwater crabs in this 
highly developed island city state, for over half a 
century it had been assumed to be a population of 
the Malaysian species Johora johorensis. However, 
morphological and genetic studies have since 
confirmed it to be a distinct species, and it was 
formally named in 1986 – underlining the need 
to conduct careful analysis of taxonomy when 
developing conservation strategies. This tiny (up to 
30 mm in size), mainly nocturnal creature feeds on 
detritus and worms found in the stream bed. 
Until recently the Singapore freshwater crab was 
assumed to be relatively well protected with one of 
its two populations occurring in a stream drainage 
within the country’s oldest and best protected national 
park, Bukit Timah Nature Reserve. However, studies 
in 2008 surprisingly found that it had completely 
disappeared from this particular stream within the 
reserve. Acid rain was suspected to be one of the 
culprits as the water in this stream had become 
too acidic for the crabs to persist. Most recently, 
however, follow-up surveys revealed the presence 
of a hitherto unknown population in another part 
of the reserve but in a different drainage, which 
fortunately does not appear to be experiencing 
similar problems of stream acidification.
The survival of this freshwater species now hinges 
on this stream in the reserve and a small drainage 
canal near Bukit Batok within five kilometres of 
this stronghold. Worryingly, the latter site remains 
unprotected, and lowering of the water-table that 
sustains the stream, pesticide use, and urban 
development could all result in the loss of this species 
from it altogether. However, the National Parks Board 
of Singapore is working with other government 
agencies in an urgent bid to prevent impacts to this 
unprotected site and help to prevent the impending 
extinction of one of the country’s iconic species. 
What needs to be done?
Protection of the crabs’ habitat and the surrounding 
stream systems offers the only chance to ensure the 
long-term survival of this species in the wild. In 
addition to in-situ conservation by protecting the 
species’ habitat, the establishment of an ex-situ 
population is being explored; as this could provide 
some insurance in the short term against the sudden 
disappearance of the Singapore freshwater crab. 
Without the rapid implementation of these measures, 
the loss of this species seems almost inevitable.
Population size:
Unknown
Range: 
Bukit Timah Nature Reserve 
and streamlet near Bukit Batok, 
Singapore
Primary threats:
Habitat degradation – reduction in 
water quality and quantity
Actions required:
Protection of remaining habitat 
and establishment of ex-situ 
populations
47
Priceless or Worthless
© Choy Heng Wah
Text reviewed by the Freshwater Crab and Crayfish Specialist Group
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
1.bmp")); images.Add(new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")); images.Add(new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.png")); / Build a PDF document with
add image pdf; adding images to pdf forms
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
1.bmp")) images.Add(New REImage(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")) images.Add(New REImage(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.png")) ' Build a PDF document with
add photo to pdf in preview; add a jpeg to a pdf
48
49
Priceless or Worthless
Priceless or  Worthless
48
Priceless or Worthless
© Tom Friedel / BirdPhotos.com
Lophura edwardsi
Edwards’s pheasant
Since proper records began 400 years ago, no 
pheasant species has been lost from the wild in 
Asia. It now looks as though Edwards’s pheasant 
(Lophura edwardsi) from central Viet Nam may 
succumb to this fate, leaving its shimmering blue 
and black plumage and bright red wattles to adorn 
only display cases and zoo exhibits. 
Rediscovered in 1996 after a 70year gap in records, 
there have been no confirmed sightings of this species 
in the wild since 2000 despite intensive surveys in 
previously known areas. Deforestation has left the 
species’ historical range almost completely devoid 
of the original tree cover. The spraying of herbicide 
during the Viet Nam war, and logging and clearance 
for agriculture have driven this loss which has left 
only fragments standing. In addition, indiscriminate 
hunting practices have pushed Edwards’s pheasant 
to what may be a point of no return. 
Previous experience with highly threatened bird 
species gives us reason to hope that this seemingly 
desperate situation could be reversed. Intensive 
surveys may yet uncover small remnant populations, 
and attempts to find these survivors should be 
continued. Critically though, the key to the survival 
of this striking species in the wild lies in effective 
law enforcement, coupled with awareness raising 
within local communities. Although current hunting 
practices do not specifically target Edwards’s 
pheasants, the random nature of the activity still 
results in bird deaths.
What needs to be done?
Complete cessation of hunting is necessary in 
any protected areas found to hold Edwards’s 
pheasant, as will increased control of hunting in the 
surrounding habitat. In addition, habitat restoration 
and management will need to be incorporated into a 
comprehensive conservation plan that includes the 
full establishment of protected areas in the known 
range. Phong Dien and Dakrong have already been 
classified as nature reserves, but their status needs 
to be confirmed without delay. 
Fortunately, there are a large number of individuals 
held in captivity around the globe, although the genetic 
purity of this population is uncertain and requires 
investigation. If this captive population is deemed 
suitable for a breeding programme, then this could 
be considered as part of a long-term management 
strategy to save the species. Habitat restoration and 
management, coupled with conservation breeding 
and reintroduction within the historical range of the 
Edwards’s pheasant, could provide a much-needed 
reprieve for this enigmatic bird.
Population size:
Unknown
Range:
Quang Binh, Quang Tri and Thua 
Thien-Hue, Viet Nam
Threats:
Hunting and habitat loss 
Action required:
Effective law enforcement, habitat 
restoration and development of a 
captive breeding programme
Text reviewed by the Galliforme Specialist Group and the World Pheasant Association
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. Add Stamp Annotation. image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and
add photo to pdf form; add jpeg signature to pdf
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and
add png to pdf acrobat; add image field to pdf form
50
51
Priceless or Worthless
Priceless or  Worthless
Nepenthes attenboroughii 
Attenborough’s pitcher plant
Named after one of the world’s most famous 
broadcasters and naturalists, Sir David Attenborough, 
Attenborough’s pitcher plant (Nepenthes 
attenboroughii) is one of the world’s largest, with traps 
reaching up to 30cm in height. This spectacular, 
colourful species was discovered by science in 
2007 and three colonies have since been found on 
the uppermost slopes of the Mount Victoria Massif. 
The location of Attenborough’s pitcher plant is 
currently relatively inaccessible, meaning that habitat 
degradation and destruction do not yet pose a major 
threat. Instead, the primary risk is that of over-collection 
by locals and visitors. The monetary and curiosity 
value of this species is high, particularly in Asian 
markets and if unregulated, could drive this fascinating 
and iconic plant towards extinction. Elsewhere in 
the Philippines, the locals have noted the interest 
of foreigners in rare plants and may occasionally 
respond by collecting plants from the wild and selling 
them at roadside stalls. As the profile of this species 
continues to rise, this practice may escalate in 
Palawan, especially in the absence of an enforced 
protected status. Another potential threat to 
Attenborough’s pitcher plant relates to mining 
expansion. Though operations are currently suspended 
at the nickel mine at the base of Mount Victoria, the 
soils in the area are rich in heavy metals and have 
been prospected for future mining operations. 
Such expansion would result in habitat destruction 
and open up the area, facilitating poaching.
Had Attenborough’s pitcher plant been discovered 
any later, attempts to protect the plant and its 
species-rich habitat may have been too late. 
Fortunately, governments, scientists and the local 
inhabitants have been given an early opportunity 
to safeguard this remarkable pitcher plant and 
Palawan’s unique biological heritage for the benefit 
of future generations.
What needs to be done?
Attenborough’s pitcher plant currently has little 
monetary value, apart from that gained through 
its collection and sale - a practice that is ultimately 
futile since harvested plants are unlikely to survive. 
An education programme focusing on developing 
responsible eco-tourism, coupled with better 
enforcement of existing laws prohibiting wild 
collection of the species, could ensure the plant’s 
continued existence. Designation of the species’ 
habitat as a protected area under Philippine law 
would also assist in ensuring its long-term survival, 
as would escalating cultivation efforts with the aim 
of reducing demand for wild-collected plants while 
potentially facilitating future reintroductions.
Population size:
Unknown
Range: 
< 1km
2
on either side of the 
summit of Mount Victoria, 
Palawan, Philippines
Primary threats:
Poaching
Actions required:
Creation of a protected area 
and enforcement of current 
legal protection
“This project is clearly a most 
valuable initiative, focussing 
attention as it does on species that 
are particularly endangered. I was 
greatly flattered when a pitcher plant 
with perhaps the biggest pitchers 
yet discovered was given my name, 
but aware too that such a potential 
record-breaker could attract the 
attention of unscrupulous collectors. 
So it is good to know that the 
Zoological Society of London and 
IUCN SSC have decided to include 
it among the species to be given 
special attention”
Sir David Attenborough
OM, CH, CVO, CBE, FRS, FZS, FSA
51
Priceless or Worthless
© Stewart McPherson
Text reviewed by members of the Carnivorous Plant Specialist Group
52
53
Priceless or Worthless
Priceless or  Worthless
52
Priceless or Worthless
© R D Bartlett
Neurergus kaiseri 
Luristan newt
Restricted to only three fast-flowing streams in the 
southern Zagros mountains of Lorestan in Iran, the 
stunning Luristan newt (Neurergus kaiseri) was 
described relatively recently in 1952. Spending the 
winter hibernating in arid shrub land under stones, the 
species then returns to spring-fed streams to breed. 
The males of the species perform an intricate courtship 
dance prior to mating, but after expending all that 
effort the pair don’t even touch. Instead the male 
deposits a sperm packet for the female to retrieve. 
Cloaked in black, white and flashes of bright orange, 
this handsome amphibian has experienced a 
dramatic decline in its population over the last ten 
years with numbers now estimated to be less than 
1,000 mature individuals. A significant threat to the 
survival of the Luristan newt is the growing demand 
from the international pet trade. Prized for their 
distinctive colouring, a warning of their toxic skin 
secretions, some individuals have been spotted for 
sale in markets in Tehran. Wood collection, together 
with the effects of severe droughts in the region, is 
severely limiting the suitable habitat available for the 
species. Finally, damming of the streams in which 
the species lives, and the spread of non-native 
cyprinid species that predate on larvae and eggs, 
may be the final nail in the coffin for the species.
The Luristan newt is protected by Iranian national 
legislation and was listed on CITES Appendix I in 2010. 
This listing renders all trade in the species illegal, 
unless in exceptional circumstances which require a 
licence. However, enforcement of this legislation is 
currently insufficient and needs to be strengthened 
to respond to increasing international demand. 
What needs to be done?
Monitoring movement of the species both locally and 
internationally should be an important component 
of any management plan, in order to map the illegal 
trade flows. In addition, the expansion of the Zagros 
Oak Forest to include the range of the Luristan 
newt would provide a strong legal framework for 
tackling current levels of habitat destruction. Finally, 
a habitat restoration project should be initiated to 
connect the remaining fragments and to ensure 
that genetic isolation of the remaining populations 
does not further threaten the chances of survival for 
this colourful amphibian. 
Population size:
< 1,000 mature individuals
Range:
< 10km
2
area of occupancy in 
Zagros Mountains, Lorestan, Iran
Primary threats:
Illegal collection for pet trade
Action required:
Enforcement of protection
Text reviewed by the Amphibian Specialist Group
54
55
Priceless or Worthless
Priceless or  Worthless
Phocoena sinus 
Vaquita
During the last decades of the twentieth century, 
the population of baijis, China’s endemic Yangtze 
River dolphins, declined from several hundred to 
nothing. Sadly, the global attention and political 
will needed to save this charismatic species was 
too little and arrived too late. The world’s smallest 
porpoise, a beautiful desert species known as 
vaquita (Phocoena sinus), is now facing a similar 
fate. 
The only immediate threat to the vaquita’s existence 
is accidental drowning in gillnets deployed by 
artisanal fishermen. This makes saving the species 
as simple as removing these nets from its small 
range. However, doing that presents an economic 
and socially complex problem as fishing is one of 
the primary sources of income in the region. The 
government of Mexico has taken important steps 
to reduce fishing effort in the upper Gulf, and has 
banned gillnets and other fishing gear from central 
parts of the vaquita’s range. However, models indicate 
that the current levels of protection have only slowed, 
not stopped, this species decline. Winning the 
race to alter human behavior in time to save this 
desert porpoise will require a complex mixture of 
governmental will, genuine economic alternatives 
for local people (including access to alternative 
fishing gear), and the funds for implementing and 
enforcing some difficult changes to the status quo. 
Creation of the Upper Gulf of California and 
Colorado River Delta Biosphere Reserve in 1993 
and the Vaquita Refuge in 2005 gave cause for 
optimism that protection for this species was on its 
way, but these initiatives proved far from adequate. 
Initial implementation of the 2008 ‘Action Plan to 
Protect the Vaquita’ was designed to reduce fishing 
pressure through a voluntary buy-out programme 
and there was a strong effort to enforce the refuge 
boundaries. Today, however, fishing effort, although 
reduced, is still higher than in the early 1990s 
and while fishing is banned in the Refuge, both 
gillnetting and trawling continue to occur there. 
What needs to be done?
Gillnets will need to be removed from the vaquita’s 
entire range immediately. Alternative ‘vaquita-safe’ 
shrimp gear has been developed, but 
its adoption by local fishermen awaits governmental 
approval, training in its use, and initiatives to support 
gear replacement. Alternative gear for catching finfish 
still needs to be developed. Only with the wide-
scale adoption of ‘vaquita-safe’ fishing methods 
will it be possible to ensure the species’ survival. 
International support of gear-switching efforts and 
a mandatory timetable for gillnet phase-out will be 
critically important.
Population size:
< 200 individuals and declining
Range: 
core area of approximately 
2,500km
2
in Northern Gulf 
of California, Mexico
Primary threats:
Incidental capture in gillnets
Actions required:
Ban on use of gillnets throughout 
the species’ range
The government of Mexico has taken important 
steps to reduce fishing effort in the upper Gulf, 
and has banned gillnets and other fishing gear 
from central parts of the vaquita’s range.
55
Priceless or Worthless
© T.A. Jefferson
© T.A. Jefferson
© P. Olson
Text contributed by the Cetacean Specialist Group
56
57
Priceless or Worthless
Priceless or  Worthless
56
Priceless or Worthless
© Noel Rowe
Prolemur simus 
Greater bamboo lemur
Possessing powerful jaws that can crack through 
the tough bamboo that makes up the majority 
of its diet, the greater bamboo lemur (Prolemur 
simus) has returned from supposed extinction 
once before. Discovered in 1870, the species 
was believed extinct for almost fifty years before 
being rediscovered in 1972. Since that date there 
has been a near constant struggle to protect the 
species’ last remaining strongholds. 
The greater bamboo lemur was once widespread 
throughout Madagascar but now survives in only 
about 1 - 4 per cent of its historical range. In fact, it 
may have the smallest population size of any lemur 
in Madagascar, and hence the world. The major 
threat to this species is habitat destruction as a 
result of slash-and-burn agriculture, mining and illegal 
logging. 
The establishment of the Ranomafana National Park 
in 1991 and the Andringitra National Park in 1999 
provided legal protection for large chunks of the 
greater bamboo lemur’s habitat, throwing a lifeline 
to populations in this area. However, there may also 
be additional groups that are clinging to existence 
in the Ivato and Karlanaga regions, where their 
home range is completely unprotected and severely 
threatened by slash-and-burn agriculture. Without 
immediate protection the habitat and populations in 
these areas may be lost, significantly undermining 
the genetic viability of the species.
Encouragingly, positive collaboration between 
national and international non-governmental 
organisations and local communities provides hope 
that this species will continue to chew through 
stocks of bamboo well into the future.
What needs to be done?
Protection of suitable habitat in the Ivato and 
Karlanaga regions should be implemented 
immediately. In addition, to reduce the impact of 
continuing destruction outside reserve areas, the 
development of a reforestation programme to create 
corridors between the forest fragments needs urgent 
consideration. This would also facilitate movement, 
and therefore the transfer of genes, between 
populations. If the survival of the greater bamboo 
lemur is to be ensured, as well as that of many 
other Malagasy species, community education and 
the development of more sustainable agricultural 
practices, which drives large amounts of habitat 
destruction, will be of paramount importance. 
Population size:
100-160 individuals
Range:
Southeastern and southcentral 
rainforests of Madagascar
Primary threats:
Habitat destruction due to 
slash-and-burn agriculture, 
mining and illegal logging
Action required:
Habitat protection and 
reforestation in the Ivato and 
Karlanaga regions
Text reviewed by the Primate Specialist Group
58
59
Priceless or Worthless
Priceless or  Worthless
Pseudoryx nghetinhensis
Saola
The saola (Pseudoryx nghetinhensis) is such 
a distinctive species that no general English 
descriptor, such as cat or dog, can be applied to it. 
It is simply a saola – a relative of cows and goats- 
and its name represents the only Lao word in the 
English language. Despite its recent and remarkable 
discovery in 1992, this modern day unicorn remains 
under immediate threat of extinction. Residing in 
the dense rainforests that cloak the steep Annamite 
Mountains along the Viet Nam-Laos PDR border the 
saola has yet to be seen in the wild by a scientist. 
Intensive hunting in the species habitat is the 
greatest threat to the saola’s survival, with 
ubiquitous and uncontrolled snaring to supply the 
illegal trade in wildlife products being the principle 
driver. Although hunters are not targeting saola, 
their incidental capture results in a similar outcome. 
The failure to address this, due to a lack of control 
of hunting in both Viet Nam and Laos PDR, is 
driving the declines in populations of numerous 
threatened species. The lack of enforcement of 
national laws that govern the sale and trafficking of 
wildlife products only adds to the difficult situation. 
Finally, habitat loss and fragmentation, driven by 
agricultural expansion, infrastructure development 
and extractive industries is increasing the extreme 
pressures currently facing saola populations. Though 
researchers are unable to provide any confident 
estimates of numbers, they are aware that the 
species has only been found in less than 15 patches 
of forest. 
To have any hope of stemming the unsustainable 
loss of species throughout Asia national and 
international groups must collaborate to stem the 
illegal wildlife trade. Preventing the sale of illegally 
caught wildlife in restaurants across the area would 
help to save species, but demand in other sectors 
will also need to be addressed. Finally, reducing 
the rate of forest loss in the saola’s habitat and 
improving protected area management will be 
critical. The situation seems dismal, but if local, 
national and international support can be mustered 
there is still hope that the saola can be saved. 
What needs to be done?
A reduction in snaring effort in the areas where 
saola are thought to still survive will be an essential 
conservation measure for this species and could 
be achieved with an increase in both the number 
of rangers and their operational budgets. A pilot 
programme in Thua-Thien Hien Saola Reserve in Viet 
Nam was extremely successful with 12,000 snares 
removed in the first year it was implemented. 
Financial and operational support from the 
international community is urgently needed to 
expand this programme to other areas in which the 
saola may still roam. 
Population size:
Unknown
Range:
Annamite mountains, on the Viet 
Nam - PDR Laos border 
Threats:
Hunting and habitat destruction
Action required:
Increase enforcement efforts 
and habitat protection 
To have any hope of 
stemming the loss of 
species throughout Asia 
national and international 
groups must work 
together to stem the 
illegal wildlife trade.
59
Priceless or Worthless
© W Robichaud/ Ban Vangban village/ WCS/ IUCN
© W Robichaud
© Toon Fey/ WWF
Text contributed by Barney Long and reviewed by the Asian Wild Cattle Specialist Group
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested