pdf viewer c# open source : Adding an image to a pdf in acrobat Library software class asp.net winforms .net ajax papa-francesco_20150524_enciclica-laudato-si_en14-part2189

141
intelligently, boldly and responsibly to promote 
a sustainable and equitable development within 
the context of a broader concept of quality of 
life. On the other hand, to find ever new ways 
of despoiling nature, purely for the sake of new 
consumer items and quick profit, would be, in 
human terms, less worthy and creative, and more 
superficial. 
193.  In any event, if in some cases sustaina-
ble development were to involve new forms of 
growth, in other cases, given the insatiable and 
irresponsible growth produced over many dec-
ades, we need also to think of containing growth 
by setting some reasonable limits and even re-
tracing our steps before it is too late. We know 
how unsustainable is the behaviour of those who 
constantly consume and destroy, while others are 
not yet able to live in a way worthy of their human 
dignity. That is why the time has come to accept 
decreased growth in some parts of the world, in 
order to provide resources for other places to ex-
perience healthy growth. Benedict XVI has said 
that  “technologically  advanced  societies  must 
be prepared to encourage more sober lifestyles, 
while  reducing  their  energy  consumption  and 
improving its efficiency”.
135
194.  For new models of progress to arise, there 
is a need to change “models of global develop-
135
Message for the 2010 World Day of Peace, 9: AAS 102 
(2010), 46.
Adding an image to a pdf in acrobat - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add multiple jpg to pdf; add picture to pdf document
Adding an image to a pdf in acrobat - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
acrobat add image to pdf; add image to pdf file acrobat
142
ment”;
136
this will entail a responsible reflection 
on “the meaning of the economy and its goals 
with an eye to correcting its malfunctions and 
misapplications”.
137
It is not enough to balance, 
in the medium term, the protection  of nature 
with financial gain, or the preservation of the en-
vironment with progress. Halfway measures sim-
ply delay the inevitable disaster. Put simply, it is 
a matter of redefining our notion of progress. A 
technological and economic development which 
does not leave in its wake a better world and an 
integrally higher quality of life cannot be consid-
ered progress. Frequently, in fact, people’s quality 
of life actually diminishes – by the deterioration 
of the environment, the low quality of food or 
the depletion of resources – in the midst of eco-
nomic growth. In this context, talk of sustaina-
ble growth usually becomes a way of distracting 
attention  and  offering  excuses.  It  absorbs  the 
language and values of ecology into the catego-
ries of finance and technocracy, and the social 
and environmental responsibility of businesses 
often gets reduced to a series of marketing and 
image-enhancing measures. 
195.  The  principle  of  the  maximization  of 
profits, frequently isolated from other consider-
ations, reflects a misunderstanding of the very 
concept of the economy. As long as production 
136
Ibid.
137
Ibid., 5: p. 43.
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
simply create a watermark that consists of text or image (such as project that is available for implementing .NET Imaging PDF Watermark Adding toolkit
add jpg to pdf preview; add jpg to pdf file
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS in offering full options on adding and creating hand, rubber stamp, callout, embedded image, and ellipse
adding images to pdf forms; acrobat insert image in pdf
143
is increased, little concern is given to whether it 
is at the cost of future resources or the health of 
the environment; as long as the clearing of a for-
est increases production, no one calculates the 
losses entailed in the desertification of the land, 
the harm done to biodiversity or the increased 
pollution. In a word, businesses profit by calcu-
lating and paying only a fraction of the costs in-
volved. Yet only when “the economic and social 
costs of using up shared environmental resourc-
es  are  recognized  with  transparency  and  fully 
borne by those who incur them, not by  other 
peoples or future generations”,
138
can those ac-
tions be considered ethical. An instrumental way 
of reasoning, which provides a purely static anal-
ysis of realities in the service of present needs, 
is at work whether resources are allocated by the 
market or by state central planning.
196.  What happens with politics? Let us keep 
in  mind  the  principle  of  subsidiarity,  which 
grants freedom to develop the capabilities pres-
ent at every level of society, while also demand-
ing a greater sense of responsibility for the com-
mon good from those who wield greater power. 
Today, it is the case that some economic sectors 
exercise more power than states themselves. But 
economics without politics cannot be justified, 
since this would  make  it impossible  to  favour 
138
B
enediCt
XVI, Encyclical Letter Caritas in Veritate (29 
June 2009), 50: AAS 101 (2009), 686.
144
other ways of handling the various aspects of 
the present crisis. The mindset which leaves no 
room for sincere concern for the environment is 
the same mindset which lacks concern for the in-
clusion of the most vulnerable members of so-
ciety. For “the current model, with its emphasis 
on success and self-reliance, does not appear to 
favour an investment in efforts to help the slow, 
the weak or the less talented to find opportuni-
ties in life”.
139
197.  What is needed is a politics which is far-
sighted and capable of a new, integral and inter-
disciplinary approach  to handling the different 
aspects of the crisis. Often, politics itself is re-
sponsible for the disrepute in which it is held, 
on account of corruption and the failure to en-
act sound public policies. If in a given region the 
state does not carry out its responsibilities, some 
business groups can come forward in the guise 
of benefactors, wield real power, and consider 
themselves  exempt  from  certain  rules,  to  the 
point of tolerating different forms of organized 
crime, human trafficking, the drug trade and vio-
lence, all of which become very difficult to erad-
icate. If politics shows itself incapable of break-
ing such a perverse logic, and remains caught up 
in inconsequential discussions, we will continue 
to avoid facing the major problems of humani-
139
Apostolic Exhortation Evangelii Gaudium (24 Novem-
ber 2013), 209: AAS 105 (2013), 1107.
145
ty. A strategy for real change calls for rethinking 
processes in their entirety, for it is not enough 
to include a few superficial ecological consider-
ations while failing to question the logic which 
underlies present-day culture. A healthy politics 
needs to be able to take up this challenge.
198.  Politics and the economy tend to blame 
each other when it comes to poverty and envi-
ronmental  degradation.  It is to  be hoped that 
they can  acknowledge  their own  mistakes  and 
find forms of interaction directed to the com-
mon good. While some are concerned only with 
financial gain, and others with holding on to or 
increasing their power, what we are left with are 
conflicts or spurious agreements where the last 
thing either party is concerned about is caring for 
the environment and protecting those who are 
most vulnerable. Here too, we see how true it is 
that “unity is greater than conflict”.
140
v.  r
eligions
in
dialogue
With
sCienCe
199.  It cannot be maintained that empirical sci-
ence provides a complete explanation of life, the 
interplay of all creatures and the whole of reality. 
This would be to breach the limits imposed by 
its own methodology. If we reason only within 
the confines of the latter, little room would be 
left for aesthetic sensibility, poetry, or even rea-
140
Ibid., 228: AAS 105 (2013), 1113.
146
son’s ability to grasp the ultimate meaning and 
purpose of things.
141
I would add that “religious 
classics can prove meaningful in every age; they 
have an enduring power to open new horizons… 
Is it reasonable and enlightened to dismiss cer-
tain writings simply  because  they arose in  the 
context of religious belief?”
142
It would be quite 
simplistic to think that ethical principles present 
themselves purely in the abstract, detached from 
any context. Nor does the fact that they may be 
couched in religious language detract from their 
value in public debate. The ethical principles ca-
pable of being apprehended by reason can al-
ways reappear in different guise and find expres-
sion in a variety of languages, including religious 
language.
200.  Any  technical  solution  which  science 
claims to offer will be powerless to solve the se-
141
Cf. Encyclical Letter Lumen Fidei (29 June 2013), 34: 
AAS 105 (2013), 577: “Nor is the light of faith, joined to the 
truth of love, extraneous to the material world, for love is al-
ways lived out in body and spirit; the light of faith is an incar-
nate light radiating from the luminous life of Jesus.  It also illu-
mines the material world, trusts its inherent order, and knows 
that it calls us to an ever widening path of harmony and under-
standing.  The gaze of science thus benefits from faith: faith 
encourages the scientist to remain constantly open to reality in 
all its inexhaustible richness.  Faith awakens the critical sense by 
preventing research from being satisfied with its own formulae 
and helps it to realize that nature is always greater.  By stimu-
lating wonder before the profound mystery of creation, faith 
broadens the horizons of reason to shed greater light on the 
world which discloses itself to scientific investigation”.
142
Apostolic Exhortation Evangelii Gaudium (24 Novem-
ber 2013), 256: AAS 105 (2013), 1123.
147
rious problems of our world if humanity loses 
its compass, if we lose sight of the great motiva-
tions which make it possible for us to live in har-
mony, to make sacrifices and to treat others well. 
Believers themselves must constantly feel chal-
lenged to live in a way consonant with their faith 
and not to contradict it by their actions. They 
need to be encouraged to be ever open to God’s 
grace and to draw constantly from their deep-
est convictions about love, justice and peace. If 
a mistaken understanding of our own principles 
has at times led us to justify mistreating nature, 
to exercise tyranny over creation, to engage in 
war, injustice and acts of violence, we believers 
should acknowledge that by so doing we were 
not faithful to the treasures of wisdom which we 
have been called to protect and preserve. Cultur-
al limitations in different eras often affected the 
perception  of  these ethical and spiritual treas-
ures, yet by constantly returning to their sources, 
religions will be better equipped to respond to 
today’s needs.
201.  The  majority  of  people  living  on  our 
planet profess to be believers. This should spur 
religions to dialogue among themselves for the 
sake of protecting nature, defending the poor, 
and building networks of respect and fraternity. 
Dialogue among the various sciences is likewise 
needed, since each can tend to become enclosed 
in its own language, while specialization leads to a 
certain isolation and the absolutization of its own 
148
field of knowledge. This prevents us from con-
fronting environmental problems effectively. An 
open and respectful dialogue is also needed be-
tween the various ecological movements, among 
which ideological conflicts are not infrequently 
encountered. The gravity of the ecological crisis 
demands that we all look to the common good, 
embarking on a path of dialogue which requires 
patience,  self-discipline  and  generosity,  always 
keeping in mind that “realities are greater than 
ideas”.
143
143
Ibid., 231: p. 1114.
149
CHAPTER SIX
eCologiCal  eduCation  
and  sPirituality
202.  Many things have to change course, but 
it  is  we  human  beings above  all who  need to 
change. We lack an awareness of our common 
origin, of our mutual belonging, and of a future 
to be shared with everyone. This basic awareness 
would enable the development of new convic-
tions, attitudes and forms of life. A great cultur-
al, spiritual and educational challenge stands be-
fore us, and it will demand that we set out on the 
long path of renewal. 
i.  t
oWards
a
neW
lifestyle
203.  Since  the  market  tends  to  promote  ex-
treme  consumerism  in  an  effort  to  sell  its 
products, people can easily get caught up in a 
whirlwind  of  needless  buying  and  spending. 
Compulsive  consumerism  is  one  example  of 
how the techno-economic paradigm affects indi-
viduals. Romano Guardini had already foreseen 
this: “The gadgets and technics forced upon him 
by the patterns of machine production and of 
abstract planning mass man accepts quite simply; 
they are the forms of life itself. To either a great-
er or lesser degree mass man is convinced that 
150
his conformity is both reasonable and just”.
144
This paradigm leads people to believe that they 
are free as long as they have the supposed free-
dom to consume. But those really free are the mi-
nority who wield economic and financial power. 
Amid this confusion, postmodern humanity has 
not yet achieved a new self-awareness capable of 
offering guidance and direction, and this lack of 
identity is a source of anxiety. We have too many 
means and only a few insubstantial ends. 
204.  The current global situation engenders a 
feeling  of instability  and  uncertainty, which in 
turn becomes “a seedbed for collective selfish-
ness”.
145
When people become self-centred and 
self-enclosed, their greed increases. The empti-
er a person’s heart is, the more he or she needs 
things to buy, own and consume. It becomes al-
most impossible to accept the limits imposed by 
reality. In this horizon, a genuine sense of the 
common good also disappears. As these attitudes 
become more widespread, social norms are re-
spected only to the extent that they do not clash 
with personal needs. So our concern cannot be 
limited merely to the threat of extreme weather 
events, but must also extend to the catastrophic 
consequences of social unrest. Obsession with a 
144
r
omano
g
uardini
, Das Ende der Neuzeit, 9
th
edition, 
Würzburg, 1965, 66-67 (English: The End of the Modern World,  
Wilmington, 1998, 60).
145
J
ohn
P
aul
II, Message for the 1990 World Day of Peace, 1: 
AAS 82 (1990), 147.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested