pdf viewer c# winform : Adding an image to a pdf Library SDK class asp.net .net azure ajax Paradis-rdebuts_en2-part2207

Finally, expand.grid()creates a data framewith all combinations of vec-
tors or factors given as arguments:
> expand.grid(h=c(60,80), w=c(100, 300), sex=c("Male", "Female"))
h
w
sex
1 60 100
Male
2 80 100
Male
3 60 300
Male
4 80 300
Male
5 60 100 Female
6 80 100 Female
7 60 300 Female
8 80 300 Female
3.4.2
Random sequences
law
function
Gaussian (normal)
rnorm(n, mean=0, sd=1)
exponential
rexp(n, rate=1)
gamma
rgamma(n, shape, scale=1)
Poisson
rpois(n, lambda)
Weibull
rweibull(n, shape, scale=1)
Cauchy
rcauchy(n, location=0, scale=1)
beta
rbeta(n, shape1, shape2)
‘Student’ (t)
rt(n, df)
Fisher{Snedecor (F) rf(n, df1, df2)
Pearson (
2
)
rchisq(n, df)
binomial
rbinom(n, size, prob)
multinomial
rmultinom(n, size, prob)
geometric
rgeom(n, prob)
hypergeometric
rhyper(nn, m, n, k)
logistic
rlogis(n, location=0, scale=1)
lognormal
rlnorm(n, meanlog=0, sdlog=1)
negative binomial
rnbinom(n, size, prob)
uniform
runif(n, min=0, max=1)
Wilcoxon’s statistics rwilcox(nn, m, n), rsignrank(nn, n)
It is useful in statistics to be able to generate random data, and R can
do it for a large number of probability density functions. These functions are
of the form rfunc(n, p1, p2, ...), where func indicates the probability
distribution, n thenumberofdata generated, and p1, p2, ... are the values of
the parameters of the distribution. The above table gives the details for each
distribution, and the possibledefaultvalues (if none defaultvalueis indicated,
this means that the parameter must be specied by the user).
Most of thesefunctions have counterparts obtained by replacing the letter
rwith d, p or qto get, respectively, the probabilitydensity (dfunc(x, ...)),
17
Adding an image to a pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add an image to a pdf with acrobat; how to add a picture to a pdf file
Adding an image to a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
how to add an image to a pdf in preview; add image to pdf file
thecumulativeprobability density(pfunc(x, ...)),andthevalueofquantile
(qfunc(p, ...), with 0 < p < 1). The last two series of functions can be
used to nd critical values or P-values of statistical tests. For instance, the
critical values for a two-tailed test following a normal distribution at the 5%
threshold are:
> qnorm(0.025)
[1] -1.959964
> qnorm(0.975)
[1] 1.959964
For the one-tailed version of the same test, either qnorm(0.05) or 1 -
qnorm(0.95)willbeused depending on theform ofthealternativehypothesis.
The P-value of a test, say 
2
=3:84 with df = 1, is:
> 1 - pchisq(3.84, 1)
[1] 0.05004352
3.5 Manipulating objects
3.5.1
Creating objects
We have seen previously dierent ways to create objects using the assign op-
erator; the mode and the type of objects so created are generally determined
implicitly. It is possible to create an object and specifying its mode, length,
type, etc. This approach is interesting in the perspective of manipulating ob-
jects. One can, for instance, create an ‘empty’ object and then modify its
elements successively which is more ecient than putting all its elements to-
gether with c(). The indexing system could be used here, as we will see later
(p.26).
It can also be very convenient to create objects from others. For example,
if one wants to t a series of models, it is simple to put the formulae in a list,
and then to extract the elements successively to insert them in the function
lm.
At this stage of our learning of R, the interest in learning the following
functionalitiesis notonlypracticalbutalso didactic. Theexplicit construction
of objects gives a better understanding of their structure, and allows us to go
further in some notions previously mentioned.
Vector. The function vector, which has two arguments mode and length,
creates a vector which elements have a value depending on the mode
specied as argument: 0 if numeric, FALSE if logical, or "" if charac-
ter. The following functions have exactly the same eect and have for
single argument the length of the vector: numeric(), logical(), and
character().
18
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
adding images to pdf; how to add an image to a pdf in reader
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
PDF document to/from supported document and image forms. to define text or images on PDF document and Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB
add multiple jpg to pdf; add png to pdf acrobat
Factor. A factor includesnot only thevaluesof thecorresponding categorical
variable, butalso thedierentpossiblelevelsofthatvariable(evenifthey
are not present in the data). The function factor creates a factor with
the following options:
factor(x, levels = sort(unique(x), na.last = TRUE),
labels = levels, exclude = NA, ordered = is.ordered(x))
levels species the possible levels of the factor (by default the unique
values of the vector x), labels denes the names of the levels, exclude
the values of x to exclude from the levels, and ordered is a logical
argument specifying whether the levels of the factor are ordered. Recall
that x is of mode numeric or character. Some examples follow.
> factor(1:3)
[1] 1 2 3
Levels: 1 2 3
> factor(1:3, levels=1:5)
[1] 1 2 3
Levels: 1 2 3 4 5
> factor(1:3, labels=c("A", "B", "C"))
[1] A B C
Levels: A B C
> factor(1:5, exclude=4)
[1] 1 2 3 NA 5
Levels: 1 2 3 5
The function levels extracts the possible levels of a factor:
> ff <- factor(c(2, 4), levels=2:5)
> ff
[1] 2 4
Levels: 2 3 4 5
> levels(ff)
[1] "2" "3" "4" "5"
Matrix. A matrix is actually a vector with an additional attribute (dim)
which is itself a numeric vector with length 2, and denes the numbers
of rows and columns of the matrix. A matrix can be created with the
function matrix:
matrix(data = NA, nrow = 1, ncol = 1, byrow = FALSE,
dimnames = NULL)
19
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
add jpg signature to pdf; add a jpg to a pdf
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Supports adding text to PDF in preview without adobe reader installed in ASP.NET. Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text.
add image to pdf form; add picture to pdf document
The option byrow indicates whether the values given by data must ll
successively the columns (the default) or the rows (if TRUE). The option
dimnames allows to give names to the rows and columns.
> matrix(data=5, nr=2, nc=2)
[,1] [,2]
[1,]
5
5
[2,]
5
5
> matrix(1:6, 2, 3)
[,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]
1
3
5
[2,]
2
4
6
> matrix(1:6, 2, 3, byrow=TRUE)
[,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]
1
2
3
[2,]
4
5
6
Another way to create a matrix is to give the appropriate values to the
dim attribute (which is initially NULL):
> x <- 1:15
> x
[1] 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
> dim(x)
NULL
> dim(x) <- c(5, 3)
> x
[,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]
1
6
11
[2,]
2
7
12
[3,]
3
8
13
[4,]
4
9
14
[5,]
5
10
15
Data frame. We have seen that a data frame is created implicitly by the
function read.table; it is also possible to create a data frame with the
function data.frame. The vectors so included in the data frame must
be of the same length, or if one of the them is shorter, it is \recycled" a
whole number of times:
> x <- 1:4; n <- 10; M <- c(10, 35); y <- 2:4
> data.frame(x, n)
x n
1 1 10
2 2 10
20
VB.NET Image: How to Draw Annotation on Doc Images with Image SDK
multi-page TIFF, Microsoft Office Word and PDF file programmer, you might need some other image annotating tutorials besides adding annotation using VB
add picture pdf; how to add an image to a pdf in acrobat
VB.NET TIFF: Add New Image to TIFF File in Visual Basic .NET
NET TIFF image processing SDK and its TIFF image adding function at this section, the following parts will describe the sample method for adding image to TIFF
add image to pdf acrobat; adding an image to a pdf form
3 3 10
4 4 10
> data.frame(x, M)
x M
1 1 10
2 2 35
3 3 10
4 4 35
> data.frame(x, y)
Error in data.frame(x, y) :
arguments imply differing number of rows: 4, 3
If a factoris included in a data frame, it must beofthesame length than
the vector(s). It is possible to change the names of the columns with,
for instance, data.frame(A1=x, A2=n). One can also give names to the
rows with the option row.names which must be, of course, a vector of
mode character and of length equal to the number of lines of the data
frame. Finally, note that data frames have an attribute dim similarly to
matrices.
List. A list is created in a way similar to data frames with thefunction list.
There is no constraint on the objects that can be included. In contrast
to data.frame(), the names of the objects are not taken by default;
taking the vectors x and y of the previous example:
> L1 <- list(x, y); L2 <- list(A=x, B=y)
> L1
[[1]]
[1] 1 2 3 4
[[2]]
[1] 2 3 4
> L2
$A
[1] 1 2 3 4
$B
[1] 2 3 4
> names(L1)
NULL
> names(L2)
[1] "A" "B"
Time-series. The function ts creates an object of class "ts" from a vector
(single time-series) or a matrix (multivariate time-series), and some op-
21
VB.NET Image: Adding Line Annotation to Images with VB.NET Doc
Codes for Line Annotation on Image. Displayed below are the complete Visual Basic .NET sample codes for adding a line annotation on your image (supporting png
acrobat insert image into pdf; how to add picture to pdf
VB.NET Word: Word Image Adding Guide in VB.NET
Developed in .NET Framework, this Word image adding toolkit also allows provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and
adding image to pdf in preview; add an image to a pdf form
tions which characterize theseries. The options, with the default values,
are:
ts(data = NA, start = 1, end = numeric(0), frequency = 1,
deltat = 1, ts.eps = getOption("ts.eps"), class, names)
data
avector or a matrix
start
the time of the rst observation, either a number, or a
vector of two integers (see the examples below)
end
the timeof thelast observation specied in the sameway
than start
frequency the number of observations per time unit
deltat
the fraction of the sampling period between successive
observations (ex. 1/12 for monthly data); only one of
frequency or deltat must be given
ts.eps
tolerance for the comparison of series. The frequencies
areconsidered equal if theirdierenceis lessthan ts.eps
class
class to give to the object; the default is "ts"for a single
series, and c("mts", "ts") for a multivariate series
names
avector ofmodecharacter with thenamesoftheindivid-
ual series in the case of a multivariate series; by default
the names of the columns of data, or Series 1, Series
2, ...
Afew examples of time-series created with ts:
> ts(1:10, start = 1959)
Time Series:
Start = 1959
End = 1968
Frequency = 1
[1] 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
> ts(1:47, frequency = 12, start = c(1959, 2))
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
1959
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10 11
1960 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
1961 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35
1962 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47
> ts(1:10, frequency = 4, start = c(1959, 2))
Qtr1 Qtr2 Qtr3 Qtr4
1959
1
2
3
1960
4
5
6
7
1961
8
9
10
> ts(matrix(rpois(36, 5), 12, 3), start=c(1961, 1), frequency=12)
Series 1 Series 2 Series 3
22
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
VB.NET PDF - Insert Text to PDF Document in VB.NET. Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program.
add photo to pdf for; add picture to pdf
Jan 1961
8
5
4
Feb 1961
6
6
9
Mar 1961
2
3
3
Apr 1961
8
5
4
May 1961
4
9
3
Jun 1961
4
6
13
Jul 1961
4
2
6
Aug 1961
11
6
4
Sep 1961
6
5
7
Oct 1961
6
5
7
Nov 1961
5
5
7
Dec 1961
8
5
2
Expression. The objects of mode expression have a fundamental role in R.
An expression is a series of characters which makes sensefor R. All valid
commands are expressions. When a command is typed directly on the
keyboard, it is then evaluated by R and executed if it is valid. In many
circumstances, it is useful to construct an expression without evaluating
it: this is what the function expression is made for. It is, of course,
possible to evaluate the expression subsequently with eval().
> x <- 3; y <- 2.5; z <- 1
> exp1 <- expression(x / (y + exp(z)))
> exp1
expression(x/(y + exp(z)))
> eval(exp1)
[1] 0.5749019
Expressions can be used, among other things, to include equations in
graphs (p.42). An expression can be created from a variable of mode
character. Some functions take expressions as arguments, for example D
which returns partial derivatives:
> D(exp1, "x")
1/(y + exp(z))
> D(exp1, "y")
-x/(y + exp(z))^2
> D(exp1, "z")
-x * exp(z)/(y + exp(z))^2
3.5.2
Converting objects
The reader has surely realized that the dierences between some types of
objects aresmall; it is thus logical that it is possible to convert an objectfrom
atypeto another by changing someof its attributes. Such a conversion will be
done with a function of the type as.something. R (version 2.1.0) has, in the
23
packages base and utils, 98 of such functions, so we will not go in the deepest
details here.
The result of a conversion depends obviously of the attributes of the con-
verted object. Genrally, conversion follows intuitive rules. For the conversion
of modes, the following table summarizes the situation.
Conversion to Function
Rules
numeric
as.numeric
FALSE ! 0
TRUE ! 1
"1", "2", ... ! 1, 2, ...
"A", ... ! NA
logical
as.logical
0! FALSE
other numbers ! TRUE
"FALSE", "F" ! FALSE
"TRUE", "T" ! TRUE
other characters ! NA
character
as.character
1, 2, ... ! "1", "2", ...
FALSE ! "FALSE"
TRUE ! "TRUE"
There are functions to convert the types of objects (as.matrix, as.ts,
as.data.frame, as.expression, ...). These functions will aect attributes
other than the modes during the conversion. The results are, again, generally
intuitive. A situation frequently encountered is the conversion of factors into
numeric values. In this case, R does the conversion with the numeric coding
of the levels of the factor:
> fac <- factor(c(1, 10))
> fac
[1] 1 10
Levels: 1 10
> as.numeric(fac)
[1] 1 2
This makes sense when considering a factor of mode character:
> fac2 <- factor(c("Male", "Female"))
> fac2
[1] Male
Female
Levels: Female Male
> as.numeric(fac2)
[1] 2 1
Note that the result is not NA as may have been expected from the table
above.
24
To convert a factor of modenumeric into a numericvector butkeeping the
levels as they are originally specied, one must rst convert into character,
then into numeric.
> as.numeric(as.character(fac))
[1] 1 10
This procedure is very useful if in a le a numeric variable has also non-
numeric values. We have seen that read.table() in such a situation will, by
default, read this column as a factor.
3.5.3
Operators
We have seen previously that there are three main types of operators in R
10
.
Here is the list.
Operators
Arithmetic
Comparison
Logical
+
addition
<
lesser than
! x
logical NOT
-
subtraction
>
greater than
x & y
logical AND
*
multiplication
<=
lesser than or equal to
x && y
id.
/
division
>=
greater thanor equal to
x j y
logical OR
^
power
==
equal
x jj y
id.
%%
modulo
!=
dierent
xor(x, y)
exclusive OR
%/%
integer division
The arithmetic and comparison operators act on two elements (x + y, a
< b). The arithmetic operators act not only on variables of mode numeric or
complex, but also on logical variables; in this latter case, the logical values
are coerced into numeric. The comparison operators may be applied to any
mode: they return one or several logical values.
Thelogical operators areapplied to one (!) or two objects of mode logical,
and return one (or several) logical values. The operators \AND" and \OR"
exist in two forms: thesingle one operates on each elements ofthe objects and
returns as many logical values as comparisons done; the double one operates
on the rst element of the objects.
It is necessary to use the operator \AND" to specify an inequality of the
type 0 < x < 1 which will be coded with: 0 < x & x < 1. The expression 0
< x < 1 is valid, but will not return theexpected result: since both operators
arethesame,theyareexecutedsuccessivelyfrom leftto right. Thecomparison
0 < x is rst done and returns a logical value which is then compared to 1
(TRUE or FALSE < 1): in this situation, the logical value is implicitly coerced
into numeric (1 or 0 < 1).
10
The following characters are also operators for R: $, @, [, [[, :, ?, <-, <<-, =, ::. A
tableof operators describing precedence rules can be found with ?Syntax.
25
> x <- 0.5
> 0 < x < 1
[1] FALSE
The comparison operators operate on each element of the two objects
being compared (recycling the values of the shortest one if necessary), and
thus returns an object ofthe same size. To compare ‘wholly’ two objects, two
functions are available: identical and all.equal.
> x <- 1:3; y <- 1:3
> x == y
[1] TRUE TRUE TRUE
> identical(x, y)
[1] TRUE
> all.equal(x, y)
[1] TRUE
identical compares the internal representation of the data and returns
TRUE if the objects are strictly identical, and FALSE otherwise. all.equal
compares the \near equality" of two objects, and returns TRUE or display a
summary of the dierences. The latter function takes the approximation of
the computing process into account when comparing numeric values. The
comparison of numeric values on a computer is sometimes surprising!
> 0.9 == (1 - 0.1)
[1] TRUE
> identical(0.9, 1 - 0.1)
[1] TRUE
> all.equal(0.9, 1 - 0.1)
[1] TRUE
> 0.9 == (1.1 - 0.2)
[1] FALSE
> identical(0.9, 1.1 - 0.2)
[1] FALSE
> all.equal(0.9, 1.1 - 0.2)
[1] TRUE
> all.equal(0.9, 1.1 - 0.2, tolerance = 1e-16)
[1] "Mean relative difference: 1.233581e-16"
3.5.4
Accessing the values of an object: the indexing system
The indexing system is an ecient and  exible way to access selectively the
elements of an object; it can be either numeric or logical. To access, for
example, the third value of a vector x, we just type x[3] which can be used
either to extract or to change this value:
> x <- 1:5
26
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested