pdf viewer c# winform : Acrobat insert image into pdf software control cloud windows azure winforms class Paradis-rdebuts_en4-part2209

X11 X11 pdf
2
3
4
The gures displayed are the device numbers which must be used to change
the active device. To know what is the active device:
> dev.cur()
pdf
4
and to change the active device:
> dev.set(3)
X11
3
The function dev.off() closes a device: by default the active device is
closed, otherwise this is the one which number is given as argument to the
function. R then displays the number of the new active device:
> dev.off(2)
X11
3
> dev.off()
pdf
4
Two specic features of the Windows version of R are worth mentioning:
aWindows Metale device can be open with the function win.metafile, and
amenu \History" displayed when the graphical window is selected allowing
recording of all graphs drawnduringa session (by default, therecording system
is o, the user switches it on by clicking on \Recording" in this menu).
4.1.2
Partitioning a graphic
The function split.screen partitions the active graphical device. For exam-
ple:
> split.screen(c(1, 2))
divides the device into two parts which can be selected with screen(1) or
screen(2); erase.screen() deletes the last drawn graph. A part of the
device can itself be divided with split.screen() leading to the possibility to
make complex arrangements.
These functions are incompatible with others (such as layout or coplot)
and must not be used with multiple graphical devices. Their use should be
limited, for instance, to graphical exploration of data.
The function layout partitions the active graphic window in several parts
where the graphs will be displayed successively. Its main argument is a ma-
trix with integer numbers indicating the numbers of the \sub-windows". For
example, to divide the device into four equal parts:
37
Acrobat insert image into pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
how to add image to pdf in acrobat; add jpg signature to pdf
Acrobat insert image into pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add image to pdf online; add jpeg to pdf
> layout(matrix(1:4, 2, 2))
It is of course possible to create this matrix previously allowing to better
visualize how the device is divided:
> mat <- matrix(1:4, 2, 2)
> mat
[,1] [,2]
[1,]
1
3
[2,]
2
4
> layout(mat)
To actually visualizethe partition created,onecanuse thefunction layout.show
with the number of sub-windows as argument (here 4). In this example, we
will have:
> layout.show(4)
1
2
3
4
The following examples show some of the possibilities oered by layout().
> layout(matrix(1:6, 3, 2))
> layout.show(6)
1
2
3
4
5
6
> layout(matrix(1:6, 2, 3))
> layout.show(6)
1
2
3
4
5
6
> m <- matrix(c(1:3, 3), 2, 2)
> layout(m)
> layout.show(3)
1
2
3
In all these examples, we have not used the option byrow of matrix(), the
sub-windowsare thus numberedcolumn-wise; onecanjustspecify matrix(...,
byrow=TRUE) so that the sub-windows are numbered row-wise. The numbers
38
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Convert image files to PDF. File & Page Process. Annotate & Comment. Add, insert PDF native annotations to PDF file. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF
add image to pdf acrobat; add image to pdf
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. demo code for PDF to TIFF image conversion may directly copy and paste it into your C#
add png to pdf acrobat; add picture to pdf file
in the matrix may also be given in any order, for example, matrix(c(2, 1,
4, 3), 2, 2).
By default, layout()partitions the device withregular heights andwidths:
this can be modied with the options widths and heights. These dimensions
are given relatively
12
. Examples:
> m <- matrix(1:4, 2, 2)
> layout(m, widths=c(1, 3),
heights=c(3, 1))
> layout.show(4)
1
2
3
4
> m <- matrix(c(1,1,2,1),2,2)
> layout(m, widths=c(2, 1),
heights=c(1, 2))
> layout.show(2)
1
2
Finally, the numbers in the matrix can include zeros giving the possibility
to make complex (or even esoterical) partitions.
> m <- matrix(0:3, 2, 2)
> layout(m, c(1, 3), c(1, 3))
> layout.show(3)
1
2
3
> m <- matrix(scan(), 5, 5)
1: 0 0 3 3 3 1 1 3 3 3
11: 0 0 3 3 3 0 2 2 0 5
21: 4 2 2 0 5
26:
Read 25 items
> layout(m)
> layout.show(5)
1
2
3
4
5
12
They can be given in centimetres, see ?layout.
39
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. demo code for PowerPoint to TIFF image conversion may directly copy and paste it into your C#
how to add image to pdf file; adding images to pdf
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. C# demo code for Word to TIFF image conversion You may directly copy and paste it into your C#
add jpg to pdf preview; how to add an image to a pdf in preview
4.2 Graphical functions
Here is an overview of the high-level graphical functions in R.
plot(x)
plot of the values of x (on the y-axis) ordered on the x-axis
plot(x, y)
bivariate plot of x (on the x-axis) and y (on the y-axis)
sunflowerplot(x,
y)
id. but the points with similar coordinates are drawn as a ower
which petal number represents the number of points
pie(x)
circular pie-chart
boxplot(x)
\box-and-whiskers" plot
stripchart(x)
plot of the values of x on aline (an alternative to boxplot() for
small sample sizes)
coplot(x~y j z)
bivariate plot of x and y for each value (or interval of values) of
z
interaction.plot
(f1, f2, y)
if f1and f2arefactors, plots themeans of y (on the y-axis) with
respect to the values of f1 (on the x-axis) and of f2 (dierent
curves); the option fun allows to choose the summary statistic
of y (by default fun=mean)
matplot(x,y)
bivariate plot of the rst column of x vs. the rst one of y, the
second one of x vs. the second one of y, etc.
dotchart(x)
if x is a data frame, plots a Cleveland dot plot (stacked plots
line-by-line and column-by-column)
fourfoldplot(x)
visualizes, with quarters of circles, the association between two
dichotomous variables for dierent populations (x must be an
array with dim=c(2, 2, k), or a matrix with dim=c(2, 2) if
k= 1)
assocplot(x)
Cohen{Friendly graph showing the deviations from indepen-
dence of rows and columns in a two dimensional contingency
table
mosaicplot(x)
‘mosaic’ graph of the residuals from a log-linear regression of a
contingency table
pairs(x)
if xis amatrixor adataframe, draws allpossible bivariate plots
between the columns of x
plot.ts(x)
if x is an object of class "ts", plot of x with respect to time, x
maybemultivariate buttheseries musthave the samefrequency
and dates
ts.plot(x)
id. but if x is multivariate the series may have dierent dates
and must have the same frequency
hist(x)
histogram of the frequencies of x
barplot(x)
histogram of the values of x
qqnorm(x)
quantilesof xwith respect tothevalues expected underanormal
law
qqplot(x, y)
quantiles of y with respect to the quantiles of x
contour(x, y, z)
contour plot (data are interpolated to draw the curves), x
and y must be vectors and z must be a matrix so that
dim(z)=c(length(x), length(y)) (x and y may be omitted)
filled.contour (x,
y, z)
id.but theareas betweenthecontours arecoloured, and alegend
of the colours is drawn as well
image(x, y, z)
id. but the actual data are represented with colours
persp(x, y, z)
id. but in perspective
stars(x)
if x is a matrix or a data frame, draws a graph with segments
or a star where each row of x is represented by a star and the
columns are the lengths of the segments
40
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Image and Document Conversion Supported by Windows Viewer. Convert to PDF.
adding an image to a pdf; add a picture to a pdf
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
PDF Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat. to PDF. Besides text, users also can insert a target image, like company
add an image to a pdf form; how to add image to pdf document
symbols(x, y, ...)
draws, at the coordinates given by x and y, symbols (circles,
squares, rectangles, stars, thermometres or \boxplots") which
sizes, colours, etc, are specied by supplementary arguments
termplot(mod.obj)
plot of the (partial) eects of a regression model (mod.obj)
For each function, the options may be found with the on-line help in R.
Some of these options are identical for several graphical functions; here are
the main ones (with their possible default values):
add=FALSE
if TRUE superposes the plot on the previous one (if it
exists)
axes=TRUE
if FALSE does not draw the axes and the box
type="p"
species the type of plot, "p": points, "l": lines, "b":
points connected by lines, "o": id. but the lines are over
the points, "h": vertical lines, "s": steps, the data are
represented by the top of the vertical lines, "S": id. but
the data are represented by the bottom of the vertical
lines
xlim=, ylim= species the lower and upper limits of the axes, for ex-
ample with xlim=c(1, 10) or xlim=range(x)
xlab=, ylab= annotates the axes, must be variables of mode character
main=
main title, must be a variable of mode character
sub=
sub-title (written in a smaller font)
4.3 Low-level plotting commands
Rhas a set of graphical functions which aect an already existing graph: they
are called low-level plotting commands. Here are the main ones:
points(x, y)
adds points (the option type= can be used)
lines(x, y)
id. but with lines
text(x, y, labels,
...)
adds text given by labels at coordinates (x,y); a typical use is:
plot(x, y, type="n"); text(x, y, names)
mtext(text,
side=3, line=0,
...)
adds text given by text in the margin specied by side (see
axis() below); line species the line from the plotting area
segments(x0, y0,
x1, y1)
draws lines from points (x0,y0) to points (x1,y1)
arrows(x0, y0,
x1, y1, angle= 30,
code=2)
id. with arrows at points (x0,y0) if code=2, at points (x1,y1) if
code=1, or both if code=3; angle controls the angle from the
shaft of the arrow to the edge of the arrow head
abline(a,b)
draws a line of slope b and intercept a
abline(h=y)
draws a horizontal line at ordinate y
abline(v=x)
draws a vertical line at abcissa x
abline(lm.obj)
draws the regression line given by lm.obj (see section 5)
41
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. of C# demo code for Excel to TIFF image conversion may directly copy and paste it into your C#
add jpg to pdf file; how to add a picture to a pdf document
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
with no more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe VB.NET PPT: VB Code to Add Embedded Image Object to VB.NET PPT: Insert and Customize Text Annotation on PPT
adding image to pdf file; adding an image to a pdf form
rect(x1, y1, x2,
y2)
draws a rectangle which left, right, bottom, and top limits are
x1, x2, y1, and y2, respectively
polygon(x, y)
draws a polygon linking the points with coordinates given by x
and y
legend(x, y,
legend)
adds the legend at the point (x,y) with the symbols given by
legend
title()
adds a title and optionally a sub-title
axis(side, vect)
adds an axis at the bottom (side=1), on the left (2), at the top
(3), or on the right (4); vect (optional) gives the abcissa (or
ordinates) where tick-marks are drawn
box()
adds a box around the current plot
rug(x)
draws the data x on the x-axis as small vertical lines
locator(n,
type="n", ...)
returns the coordinates (x;y) after the user has clicked n times
on the plot with the mouse; also draws symbols (type="p") or
lines (type="l") with respect to optional graphic parameters
(...); by default nothing is drawn (type="n")
Note the possibility to addmathematical expressions ona plot with text(x,
y, expression(...)), where the function expression transforms its argu-
ment in a mathematical equation. For example,
> text(x, y, expression(p == over(1, 1+e^-(beta*x+alpha))))
will display, on the plot, the following equation at the point of coordinates
(x;y):
p=
1
1+ e (
x
+)
To include in an expression a variable we can use the functions substitute
and as.expression; for example to include a value of R
2
(previously com-
puted and stored in an object named Rsquared):
> text(x, y, as.expression(substitute(R^2==r, list(r=Rsquared))))
will display on the plot at the point of coordinates (x;y):
R
2
=0:9856298
To display only three decimals, we can modify the code as follows:
> text(x, y, as.expression(substitute(R^2==r,
+
list(r=round(Rsquared, 3)))))
will display:
R
2
=0:986
Finally, to write the R in italics:
> text(x, y, as.expression(substitute(italic(R)^2==r,
+
list(r=round(Rsquared, 3)))))
R
2
=0:986
42
4.4 Graphical parameters
In addition to low-level plotting commands, the presentation of graphics can
be improved with graphical parameters. They can be used either as options
of graphic functions (but it does not work for all), or with the function par to
change permanently the graphical parameters, i.e. the subsequent plots will
be drawn with respect to the parameters specied by the user. For instance,
the following command:
> par(bg="yellow")
will result in all subsequent plots drawn with a yellow background. There
are 73 graphical parameters, some of them have very similar functions. The
exhaustive list of these parameters can be read with ?par; I will limit the
following table to the most usual ones.
adj
controls text justication with respect to the left border of the text so that
0is left-justied, 0.5 is centred, 1 is right-justied, values > 1 move the text
further to the left, and negative values further to the right; if two values are
given (e.g., c(0, 0)) the second one controls vertical justication with respect
to the text baseline
bg
species the colour of the background (e.g., bg="red", bg="blue"; the list of
the 657 available colours is displayed with colors())
bty
controls the type of box drawn around the plot, allowed values are: "o",
"l", "7", "c", "u" ou "]" (the box looks like the corresponding character); if
bty="n" the box is not drawn
cex
avalue controllingthe size of texts and symbols with respecttothe default;the
following parameters havethesamecontrolfor numberson theaxes, cex.axis,
the axis labels, cex.lab, the title, cex.main, and the sub-title, cex.sub
col
controls the colour of symbols; as for cex there are: col.axis, col.lab,
col.main, col.sub
font
an integer which controls the style of text (1: normal, 2: italics, 3: bold, 4:
bold italics); as for cex there are: font.axis, font.lab, font.main, font.sub
las
an integer which controls the orientation of the axis labels (0: parallel to the
axes, 1: horizontal, 2: perpendicular to the axes, 3: vertical)
lty
controls the type of lines, can be an integer (1: solid, 2: dashed, 3: dotted,
4: dotdash, 5: longdash, 6: twodash), or a string of up to eight characters
(between "0" and "9") which species alternatively the length, in points or
pixels, of the drawn elements and the blanks, for example lty="44" will have
the same eet than lty=2
lwd
anumeric which controls the width of lines
mar
avector of 4 numeric values which control the space between the axes and the
border of the graph of the form c(bottom, left, top, right), the default
values are c(5.1, 4.1, 4.1, 2.1)
mfcol
avector of the form c(nr,nc) which partitions the graphic window as a ma-
trix of nr lines and nc columns, the plots are then drawn in columns (see
section4.1.2)
mfrow
id. but the plots are then drawn in line (see section 4.1.2)
pch
controls the type of symbol, either an integer between 1 and 25, or any single
character within "" (Fig.2)
ps
an integer which controls the size in points of texts and symbols
43
*
?
X
a
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14 15 16 17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24 25
"*"
"?" "." "X" "a"
Figure 2: The plotting symbols in R (pch=1:25). The colours were obtained
with the options col="blue", bg="yellow", the second option has an eect
only for the symbols 21{25. Any character can be used (pch="*", "?", ".",
...).
pty
acharacter which species the type of the plotting region, "s": square, "m":
maximal
tck
avalue which species the length of tick-marks on the axes as a fraction of
the smallest of the width or height of the plot; if tck=1 a grid is drawn
tcl
id. but as a fraction of the height of a line of text (by default tcl=-0.5)
xaxt
if xaxt="n" the x-axis is set but not drawn (useful in conjunction with
axis(side=1, ...))
yaxt
if yaxt="n" the y-axis is set but not drawn (useful in conjunction with
axis(side=2, ...))
4.5 A practical example
In order to illustrate R’s graphical functionalities, let us consider a simple
example of a bivariate graph of 10 pairs of random variates. These values
were generated with:
> x <- rnorm(10)
> y <- rnorm(10)
The wanted graph will be obtained with plot(); one will type the command:
> plot(x, y)
and the graph will be plotted on the active graphical device. The result
is shown on Fig. 3. By default, R makes graphs in an \intelligent" way:
44
−0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
−1.0
−0.5
0.0
0.5
x
y
Figure 3: The function plot used without options.
the spaces between tick-marks on the axes, the placement of labels, etc, are
calculated so that the resulting graph is as intelligible as possible.
The user may, nevertheless, change the way a graph is presented, for in-
stance, to conform to a pre-dened editorial style, or to give it a personal
touch for a talk. The simplest way to change the presentation of a graph is to
add options which will modify the default arguments. In our example, we can
modify signicantly the gure in the following way:
plot(x, y, xlab="Ten random values", ylab="Ten other values",
xlim=c(-2, 2), ylim=c(-2, 2), pch=22, col="red",
bg="yellow", bty="l", tcl=0.4,
main="How to customize a plot with R", las=1, cex=1.5)
The result is on Fig. 4. Let us detail each of the used options. First,
xlab and ylab change the axis labels which, by default, were the names of the
variables. Then, xlim and ylim allow us to dene the limits on both axes
13
.
The graphical parameter pch is used here as an option: pch=22 species a
square which contour and background colours may be dierent and are given
by, respectively, col and bg. The table of graphical parameters gives the
meaning of the modications done by bty, tcl, las and cex. Finally, a title
is added with the option main.
The graphical parameters and the low-level plotting functions allow us to
go further in the presentation of a graph. As we have seen previously, some
graphical parameters cannot be passed as arguments to a function like plot.
13
By default, R adds 4% on each side of the axis limit. This behaviour may be altered by
setting the graphical parameters xaxs="i" and yaxs="i" (they can be passed as options to
plot()).
45
−2
−1
0
1
2
−2
−1
0
1
2
How to customize a plot with R
Ten random values
Ten other values
Figure 4: The function plot used with options.
We will now modify some of these parameters with par(), it is thus necessary
to type several commands. When the graphical parameters are changed, it
is useful to save their initial values beforehand to be able to restore them
afterwards. Here are the commands used to obtain Fig.5.
opar <- par()
par(bg="lightyellow", col.axis="blue", mar=c(4, 4, 2.5, 0.25))
plot(x, y, xlab="Ten random values", ylab="Ten other values",
xlim=c(-2, 2), ylim=c(-2, 2), pch=22, col="red", bg="yellow",
bty="l", tcl=-.25, las=1, cex=1.5)
title("How to customize a plot with R (bis)", font.main=3, adj=1)
par(opar)
Let us detail the actions resulting from these commands. First, the default
graphical parameters are copied in a list called here opar. Three parameters
will be then modied: bg for the colour of the background, col.axis for the
colour of the numbers on the axes, and mar for the sizes of the margins around
the plotting region. The graph is drawn in a nearly similar way to Fig.4. The
modications of the margins allowed to use the space around the plotting area.
The title here is added with the low-level plotting function title which allows
to give some parameters as arguments without altering the rest of the graph.
Finally, the initial graphical parameters are restored with the last command.
Now, total control! On Fig. 5, R still determines a few things such as
the number of tick marks on the axes, or the space between the title and the
plotting area. We will see now how to totally control the presentation of the
graph. The approach used here is to plot a \blank" graph with plot(...,
type="n"), then to add points, axes, labels, etc, with low-level plotting func-
46
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested