pdf viewer c# winform : Add picture to pdf online control software platform web page winforms .net web browser PayingforGreen_PESinpractice10-part2248

102
develop a system where we are paying for outcomes. And then 
the work of the group would be to help design how it would 
work locally. So, the questions are: What are the water quality 
issues we need to address and how are we going to quantify the 
performance? To just make it clear that it may be an estimated 
performance. But you do need some kind of science­based num­
ber, some kind of quantification. And then the issue of what the 
incentive will be. Are we talking about a financial payment that’s 
directly related to the performance, or are we talking about 
some other kind of incentive?
You have to discuss those things in a series of meetings, 
two meetings, maybe sometimes three meetings over a period 
of a few months. Especially after the first meeting, most people 
at the table are hearing this concept for the first time. It is a lit­
tle hard to wrap your head around the concept of paying for a 
performance vs. paying for practices. It can be confusing. So we 
give them some time to digest what was talked about and then 
come back together. I think ideally, you want to give people 
enough time to think about it and enough time for us or who­
ever the organizers are to do whatever homework that comes 
out of that meeting, such as to investigate prediction models or 
whatever.
So say it was just phosphorus, probably the single biggest 
question is: How are we going to quantify the performance? Are 
we going to try to measure something or are we going to use 
models? Are we going to do it at the mouth of the watershed? 
And almost all of the groups we worked with said we need this 
to be at the farm level. Otherwise there would be a disconnect 
for the farmers. The farmer would always wonder: Well, I could 
do all these changes but if the performance is measured down­
stream, the target may not be achieved. The farmers need to see 
enough, the farmers would say: It’s not us, it’s the people with 
the failed septic tanks, etc. And if there is litigation going on 
related to water quality, then you are probably not going to get 
participation because nobody wants to share information. We 
found this situation in Northwest Arkansas.
But if it is acknowledged and the farmers understand: Okay, 
we do have some impact on this. Then they are willing to talk 
about it. And so in those places we worked with the local 
groups. It might have been a university extension or it might be 
a conservation district, whoever the group was that was mostly 
in the middle of the water quality issue. We worked with them 
and asked them to invite farmers to participate. We would use 
a room for 20­25 people. We would try to get 10 farmers there 
and representatives from all the relevant agencies, someone in 
a decision­making position to actually be there with us, under­
stand what we’re doing and participate in it. The US Department 
of Agriculture is so important, especially in the kind of work 
we’re doing. If we developed this without them, it is very likely 
they would not have bought into it. Also, you have to get sci­
entists in the room, usually from the land grant university, who 
understand the scientific linkages between what’s happening 
on the farm and what’s happening in the water. I think we did a 
really good job of bringing the right group of people together 
from the beginning.  
How did you go on? Could you briefly describe the design 
process?
We would usually have a series of meetings with the same 
group of people in that specific watershed. We’d explain the 
background and the concept and why we think that pay­for­per­
formance is a good idea. We’d ask the question of how we can 
Performance-based Environmental Policies for Agriculture 
Initiative (PEPA)
Add picture to pdf online - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add photo to pdf file; how to add image to pdf reader
Add picture to pdf online - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
acrobat insert image in pdf; add photo to pdf form
103
clearly that their actions affect the outcome and ideally only their 
actions. This means quantifying at the farm level. And there you 
often need to use models because measurement at the edge of 
fields is not practical on every farm. 
We used the models to figure out the level of the payment. 
So, we used the Phosphorus Index on a bunch of farms and ran 
scenarios through the model with farmers that were interested 
in doing something. We calculated the costs of those changes 
and came up with cost­effectiveness, which is the cost in terms 
of dollars per pound of phosphorus loss reduction. And then, 
because we were in a very budget­constrained environment, a 
small grant, we wanted to set that price as low as we could but 
high enough that some of those scenarios would be good busi­
ness decisions for the farm to make. That was it. But to be sure, 
the context that I’m talking about completely ignores the buyer 
side of things because we’re assuming there’s farm bill money. 
There is US conservation program money, and we’re just trying 
to figure out a way to spend that more effectively.
C# TIFF: How to Insert & Burn Picture/Image into TIFF Document
Support adding image or picture to an existing or new new REImage(@"c:\ logo.png"); // add the image powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
add png to pdf preview; how to add image to pdf in acrobat
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
This online tutorial page will illustrate the image VB.NET image cropping method to crop picture / photo; size of created cropped image file, add antique effect
adding image to pdf in preview; how to add image to pdf document
104
face water. In Lower Saxony, water utility companies, industrial 
firms and power plant operators must all pay fees to the state 
of between 
0.0026 and € 0.06 for each cubic meter of water 
taken depending on its origin and intended use. Overall, the 
annual revenue from the levy currently amounts to € 47 million. 
The funds raised are used for measures pertaining to nature 
conservation and water management as well as for the protec-
tion of waterways and water supply levels. A large part of the 
money goes to collaborations associated with protecting drink-
ing water.
The aim of the Niedersächsisches Kooperationsmodell Trink-
wasserschutz is to safeguard and improve the quality of ground-
water, specifically so that nitrate levels are reduced along 
with the amount of pesticide and sulfate pollutants. Funded 
cooperat ions are those where water utility companies work 
on an equal footing with farmers in drinking water abstraction 
areas. The business management of this type of cooperation 
is performed by the water utility company, who signs a grant 
agreement with the State of Lower Saxony. The agreement sets 
down the formal and substantive requirements for the local 
cooperation, and defines targets and the amount of the grant. 
The term of the agreement is usually five years. The water utility 
companies and farmers agree on a work program as well as a 
conservation concept for their individual cooperation. The latter 
includes targets, detailed measures, the amount of payments to 
I
n Lower Saxony, one of the largest and most populous states 
in Germany, some 85 percent of drinking water is supplied 
by groundwater. Over 370 drinking water abstraction areas 
have been established throughout the state. At the same time, 
agriculture plays a highly important role in Lower Saxony, with 
nearly two-thirds of the state consisting of agricultural land. The 
intensive use of nitrogen fertilizers in these areas has a signifi-
cant impact on the groundwater supply and thus the quality of 
drinking water. In a bid to safeguard and improve the quality 
of groundwater, the Kooperationsmodell Trinkwasserschutz 
(cooperation model for drinking water preservation) was 
initiated as part of thIe 1992 Niedersächsisches Wassergesetz 
(water act of Lower Saxony). This act introduced a levy for 
water extraction, and in the process created the basis for an 
organized cooperation between water management and agri-
culture in drinking water abstraction areas.
The levy for water extraction, known colloquially as the 
Wasserpfennig or Wasser-
groschen (water penny), has 
been applied in several Ger-
man federal states for the 
extraction of ground and sur-
Kooperationsmodell Trinkwasserschutz
Within the framework of the program initiated by the State of 
Lower Saxony, water utility companies and farmers are forming 
autonomous cooperations to safeguard and improve the quality 
of groundwater. As equal partners, they agree appropriate 
objectives and measures to be carried out by the farmers in areas 
where drinking water is protected. Water utility companies 
fund the measures via their contributions to the water extraction 
levy scheme.
W
A
T
E
r
e
c
o
s
y
s
t
e
m
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
• Water protection 
advisers
• NLWKN
S TATE
• Nieder   
sächsisches   
Wasser-
gesetz
Supplier
Cooperation 
between local 
water utility 
companies and 
farmers
Financier
• Lower Saxony
• EU
Beneficiary = 
Buyer
• Water utility  
companies
Service Provider
• Farmers
INT Er MEDIAr IES
MA rK ET
Niedersächsisches Kooperationsmodell Trinkwasserschutz
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
NET, please go to the online guide for New RaterEdgeDrawing() drawing.Picture = "RasterEdge" drawing powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to add image to pdf; add a jpeg to a pdf
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Codes to Add Antique Effect to Image with .
mature technology to replace a picture's original colors add the glow and noise, and add a little powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to add an image to a pdf in acrobat; how to add an image to a pdf file
105
support local cooperations by assisting them with their con-
textual and organizational activities. The advisers are pri-
marily agricultural engineers and usually have many years 
of associated engineering experience or are members of 
the state’s Chamber of Agriculture. They are familiar with 
the region and the specific areas, maintain contact with 
the farmers, and have developed a close relationship of 
trust with land management organizations. The Wasser-
schutzzusatzberatung is funded by the State of Lower 
Saxony and the European Agricultural Fund for Rural 
Development (EAFRD).
The Lower Saxony State Department for Waterways, 
Coastal and Nature Conservation, NLWKN for short, speci-
fies the technical framework of the Kooperationsmodell 
Trinkwasserschutz, and is entrusted with the administra-
tive side of processing and evaluating the operations. The 
financial and environmental data converges here, where it 
is then evaluated. The water companies carefully check and 
document the groundwater quality at their own monitoring 
stations and wells. They are also responsible for the annual 
on-site inspections carried out on the farms. If contractual 
irregularities are discovered during this inspection process,  
any amounts previously received by the farmers must be 
repaid, but there are no further sanctions. A financial 
evaluation is performed as part of the annual report on the 
individual cooperations. A yearly budget of € 18 million 
is available to finance the activities carried out within the 
framework of the voluntary agreements and consultation. 
Of this amount, € 15 million comes from the levy for water 
extraction and € 
3 million comes from the European Union. 
The funds are allocated according to a location-specific 
farmers and success parameters for the corresponding region. 
The conservation concept is a central part of the grant agree-
ment, and provides the framework within which the parties 
autonomously carry out their respective duties. Conferences 
and work meetings are held regularly to allow the catalogs of 
measures to be amended and to record long-term developments 
in the area.
The main tool of the Niedersächsisches Kooperations-
modell Trinkwasserschutz is voluntary agreements signed by 
the water company and the farmers. The agreements describe 
contracted and funded agricultural management measures 
which go beyond the regular requirements of traditional agri-
culture. These measures include, for example, the reduction 
of nitrogen fertilization or the use of catch crops. The resulting 
loss of revenue and/or the necessary additional work are 100 
percent financed by the state grant – primarily the levy for water 
extraction. Farmers can receive up to € 250 per hectare if they 
forgo the use of livestock manure, for example. However, these 
payments are explicitly not designed to function as an incentive 
or bonus, but only to compensate farmers for any financial loss. 
Participants choose their form of cooperation from a catalog of 
individual measures, and are then contractually obliged to com-
ply with the agreed conditions for a period of five years.
The second important tool in the Kooperationsmodell Trink-
wasserschutz is known as the Wasserschutzzusatzberatung 
(supplementary water protection consultation). This is a free 
form of consultation that informs farmers about the practi-
cal aspects of groundwater conservation. It includes events, 
newsletters, field trials and tours, group and individual advice, 
and covers aspects such as fertilizer planning. In addition to 
advising on water conservation, the water protection advisers 
Trinkwasserschutz
Niedersächsisches Kooperations-
modell Trinkwasserschutz
region (area):  
Drinking water abstraction areas in Lower Saxony, 
Germany (approximately 300,000 ha)
Starting year (stage):   
1992 (ongoing)
objective:   
Provision of clean drinking water
Beneficiary:  
Water utlity companies represented by the 
federal State of Lower Saxony acting as financier 
by using income from a levy for water extraction 
and the European Union (EU) in the context of 
agri-environmental programs
Service provider:  
Farmers in cooperation with local water utility 
companies
(other) Intermediaries:
Water protection advisers, Lower Saxon State 
Department for Waterway, Coastal and Nature 
Conservation (NLWKN)
Budget: 
Currently approximately 
18 million per year 
Payment arrangement: 
Input-based, level of payment is based on oppor-
tunity and production costs
Contact:    
Dr. Markus Quirin 
markus.quirin@nlwkn-goe.niedersachsen.de
www.nlwkn.niedersachsen.de
VB.NET Image: Image Scaling SDK to Scale Picture / Photo
Framework application; VB.NET sample code for how to scale image / picture; Frequently asked questions about RasterEdge VB.NET image scaling control SDK add-on.
adding image to pdf form; add jpg to pdf form
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we this VB.NET image resizer control add-on, can provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add photo to pdf for; acrobat add image to pdf
106
priority scheme, whereby the individual drinking water abstrac-
tion areas are classified in terms of pedological site conditions 
and the existing ground and untreated water pollution levels, 
along with other technical aspects.
In 2013 there were 73 local collaborations through which 
water-saving management activities were funded on 304,000 
hectares of land. This comprises nearly all the possible crop-
land and pastureland in Lower Saxony. The Niedersächsisches 
Kooperationsmodell Trinkwasserschutz is deemed to be very 
flexible despite the five year contract involved. The catalogs 
of measures of the cooperations can be adjusted every year, 
and existing contracts can be updated within the term of the 
agreement. It is interesting to note that the state only provides 
a general framework concerning the measures and payments. 
This can be put into place at a regional level and, as a result, 
adapted to suit local conditions. The model has been praised 
for its high degree of acceptance among the relevant parties, 
and for the noticeable ecological effect it has had. Nitrate lev-
els in the drinking water abstraction areas have been on the 
decline for many years, as has the total amount of mineral fer-
tilizer purchases and per-holding nitrate surplus levels. General 
agri-environmental measures have also been carried out in the 
water abstraction areas in addition to the voluntary coopera-
tion agreements, which in turn have had a positive effect on 
the safeguarding of and improvement in groundwater quality. 
Those responsible for the Niedersächsisches Kooperations-
modell Trinkwasserschutz have furthermore initiated a pilot 
project to investigate whether farm-specific measures can be 
introduced in addition to the current location-specific measures 
in an effort to create a more output-based approach.
Niedersächsisches Kooperationsmodell Trinkwasserschutz
However, current developments, particularly in the live-
stock-rich regions of Lower Saxony, demonstrate the limits of 
the Kooperationsmodell Trinkwasserschutz: The conversion of 
grassland leads to an increase in groundwater nitrate loads. 
The increasing number of biogas plants or the associated high 
proportion of corn and the increased volume of digestate have 
the same effect. In some regions of Lower Saxony the volun-
tary agreements no longer appear to be competitive due to 
the strong competition from economically attractive forms of 
cultivation, such as energy crops. In these regions voluntary 
agreements seem not to be the right way to reduce negative 
external effects on water ecosystem services. It is in these 
cases that the importance of regulatory law becomes particu-
larly evident.
Where economically attractive kinds of farming such as corn 
cultivation dominate and natural fertilizer is abundant, little 
can be achieved with voluntary agreements.
VB.NET Image: Create Code 11 Barcode on Picture & Document Using
file, apart from above mentioned .NET core imaging SDK and .NET barcode creator add-on, you also need to buy .NET PDF document editor add-on, namely, RasterEdge
adding an image to a pdf in preview; add jpg to pdf
C# Word - Paragraph Processing in C#.NET
Add references: C# users can set paragraph properties and create content such as run, footnote, endnote and picture in a paragraph.
how to add a picture to a pdf document; adding images to pdf forms
107
Where do you see the real challenges for the project?
The greatest difficulties are in the Lower Saxony region with its 
high livestock density, particularly in Weser­Ems. There is a high 
rate of agricultural manure usage there, and digestate accumulates 
quickly due to the promotion of biogas plants. The pressure created 
by organic nitrogen carriers is much higher than in southern Lower 
Saxony, where predominantly cash­crop farms are found. It’s also 
very difficult to improve the situation in this region via voluntary 
agreements. If farmers use a lot of organic manure, then voluntary 
agreements are of little help.
Are voluntary agreements financially attractive for farmers?
No, entering into a voluntary agreement should not have a 
financially positive impact for the farmer, but of course neither 
should it be negative. A farmer who farms his land extensively gets 
compensated for reduced profits and increased overheads. It should 
not have an incentivising effect, nor a deadweight effect either. 
Eco nomically, it’s a zero sum game for the farmer.
Are there any financial risks for the participating farmers?
In general, the risk is low. For more extensive management, 
we take the example of reduced nitrogen fertilization and calcu­
late the amount to be compensated, whereby contribution margin 
calculations are made for income generated under conventional 
and reduced management approaches. Depending on how the year 
turns out for the farmer, it’s possible that the compensation is insuf­
ficient. However, this should be the exception, and usually it’s the 
case that the compensation is somewhat higher than the additional 
expenses or the reduced income. Apart from that, the farmer may 
make several voluntary agreements. He can carefully consider which 
one makes sense to him, and which one he doesn’t want to sign.
Interview with Dr. Markus Quirin 
from the Lower Saxony State Depart-
ment for Water Management, 
Coastal Preservation and Nature 
Conservation, responsible for 
evaluating the overall project
108
been pivotal for the success. Which means there are problems 
when, for various reasons, one adviser replaces another.
How will the model evolve in the future?
The measures are continually adapted in the collaborations 
to reflect actual circumstances as well as local priorities. For 
example, that might mean very intense action is taken only on 
areas that are highly susceptible to inputs. Therefore the avail­
able resources are used as effectively as possible. This is the 
goal of cooperation. From a state perspective, we are trying to 
think of additional measures that might enhance the positive 
aspects. At the moment we’re testing, as part of a pilot project, 
to see if it’s possible to move from location­specific measures 
to farm­specific measures. At the beginning we hoped to reduce 
nitrate fertilization across the board. Now we want to develop 
measures to reduce nitrogen fertilization at an individual farm 
level. The idea is to determine a nominal value for a farm, and 
if the farmer can reduce this value by ten percent, then he gets 
funding of, say, 60 euros per hectare. We have only just started 
down this path, but we’ve already seen progress.
Would you do something differently in the development of 
a new, similar project?
The design of such projects is not easy, and a project has to 
evolve over time. But the situation that we have at the moment 
is quite good and certainly worth pursuing. At the moment we 
are seeing some very similar trends in other areas. The Koopera­
tionsmodell refers only to the drinking water abstraction areas, 
but at the moment we are also taking steps and going through 
consultations related to setting targets for the EU Water 
Framework Directive, which is geographically much larger.  
How is the project perceived by the participants involved 
and the public?
The participants are mostly in favor. Water utility companies 
are very interested because at the end of the day it’s about their 
drinking water, which is what they want to sell. They pay the 
levy for water extraction, and with the Kooperationsmodell, they 
have the chance to get back the money they have paid for their 
area while improving their groundwater. As a result, water util­
ity companies are highly interested in this. It is also perceived 
positively by the farmers. Firstly, because they are protecting 
the drinking water, which they themselves consume, and sec­
ondly perhaps because there is also a lot of public pressure on 
farmers. They want to clearly show that yes, we are doing what 
we can to keep pollution levels low. In some communities and 
towns you realize that there’s yet another kind of pressure. For 
example, if 90 percent of the farmers participate, then there is 
social pressure on the other ten percent to participate. And it is 
certainly perceived very positively by the public because they 
are able to see the resources and commitment that goes into 
protecting the drinking water supply.
What do you see as the main factors that have made the 
project successful?
The success is due to the combination of consultation and 
methodology. The one has required the other for the whole 
thing to be successful. And the relationship of trust between the 
farmers and the advisers has certainly helped. This plays a very 
important role. The advisers have accompanied the project from 
the start; they helped develop it and gained a foothold in the 
drinking water abstraction areas. The levels of trust between 
adviser and farmer have developed as a result, and this has 
Niedersächsisches Kooperationsmodell Trinkwasserschutz
109
The develop ment taking place here is more or less what we 
initially saw in the drinking water catchment areas: Firstly, the 
advisers need to gain a foothold and build trust. Right from 
the beginning we have been more active in our support for 
the evaluation of the measures in setting targets for the Water 
Framework Directive than we were in the past. For this we’re 
using the experience and the methodology from the Koopera­
tionsmodell Trinkwasserschutz. For setting targets in the Water 
Framework Directive, we now have much improved data for 
evaluating the success of a project. This data was not particu­
larly helpful when we started working with the drinking water 
abstraction areas. This was a weak point from which we have 
learned, and over time the data also improved through the 
work we performed in the drinking water abstraction areas.
What we haven’t mentioned yet is the flip side of volun­
tary participation, namely regulatory law and what one can do 
with it. Regulatory law could be implemented much more than 
it has been in the past. There are examples of this in neighbor­
ing countries. Whether they’re positive I wouldn’t like to judge. 
I am thinking of Holland and Denmark, where the regulatory 
legislation has been very intense. Although you can’t really 
transfer those conditions to Lower Saxony, I still think there is 
room for improvement in the field of regulatory law. And not 
necessarily just in the tightening of regulatory legislation, but 
more in the monitoring of the existing regulation, and also in 
the monitoring of compliance with the fertilizer recommenda­
tions set down by official sources. An increase in monitoring 
and more qualified monitoring could further improve the over­
all system of voluntary participation and regulatory legislation.
The fertilizer spreader is checked to verify the 
precise distribution of the fertilizer so as to 
avoid overfertilizing or underfertilizing.
110
and county’s environmental concern, with each determining 
its target amount of land to protect. A specific CREP is usually 
initiated after a state or local governmental, or local non-gov-
ernmental entity has recognized an agriculture-related environ-
mental issue of regional or national importance. In collabora-
tion with the Farm Service Agency (FSA) of the US Department 
of Agriculture (USDA), these parties then develop a proposal to 
overcome these specific environmental problems in certain geo-
graphical regions by using selected practices. To date, CREP has 
been implemented in 33 states in the US.
CREP Vermont combines federal and state obligations of 
$ 2.1 million over 15 years to protect environmentally sensitive 
land. $ 640,000 has come from the State of Vermont, the rest 
from the federal government. The main concern is the establish-
ment of conservation practices to reduce phosphorous loading 
to Lake Champlain by over 48 tons per year. In addition, the ter-
restrial and aquatic habitats of wild species are to be improved. 
The program provides financial incentives to encourage pro-
ducers to voluntarily enroll in CRP-contracts. If farmers decide 
to participate, they stop agricultural production on land near 
water. Then, they plant native grasses, trees, and/or other vege-
tation to create buffer zones to prevent erosion and reduce the 
loss of nutrients and pollutants and, at the same time, to create 
habitats for many different wild species. CREP also supports 
farmers to develop and restore wetlands through the planting of 
appropriate groundcover.
L
ake Champlain is the sixth largest natural lake in the United 
States, covering an area of about 130,000 hectares. It is 
located within the borders of the states of Vermont and New 
York and the Canadian province of Quebec. It provides drinking 
water for about 250,000 people in the region and is a crucial 
link in the Hudson-Saint Lawrence waterway. Apart from this it 
is also considered a world-class fishery for salmonid species 
and bass. A pollution prevention, control, and restoration plan 
for Lake Champlain has been in place since 1996. One of its pri-
mary goals is to reduce excessive phosphorus inputs, resulting 
from agricultural and urban runoff to Lake Champlain. The Con-
servation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) in Vermont is 
one instrument used to achieve this goal. 
CREP is a federal government program and an extension of 
the largest government agri-environmental program in the US, 
the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP, introduced in 1985). 
The specific objective of CREP is to improve the water quality 
of rivers and lakes. Accordingly, the owners of agricultural land 
in environmentally sensitive areas are motivated to maintain or 
set up riparian buffers and filter strips and/or to restore wet-
lands. CREP funding and participation depends on each state 
CREP Vermont
The aim of this government PES is to reduce the amount of phos-
phorus entering several water bodies in the State of Vermont, 
including the important Lake Champlain. Farmers who cease 
production on environmentally sensitive agricultural lands and 
who implement special protection and maintenance practices re-
ceive attractive payments. In addition to federal, state and local 
authorities, environmental organizations are responsible for 
the acquisition and advisory support of farmers.
W
A
T
E
r
e
c
o
s
y
s
t
e
m
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
Conservation reserve Enhancement Program in Vermont
• NRCS
• Local Soil and Water   
Conservation Districts
• Nature conservation   
organizations 
• Other external advisers
Service Provider
• Farmers
• Landowners
Financier
• FSA
• State of 
Vermont
Beneficiary
• Residents of  
Vermont
INT ErM EDIAr y
MAr K ET
111
tion of wetlands. Besides conducting wetland and forest conser-
vation projects, Ducks Unlimited educates farmers and land-
owners and seeks to connect them to funding sources. Against 
this background, the NGO contributes to CREP by identifying 
appropriate sites and personally contacting landowners.
CREP has not been implemented successfully across the 
US, however. In some states, for example, the uptake of money 
available has been minimal. Vermont is considered to be a suc-
cessful example of the implementation of CREP. Here eligible 
farmers take advantage of the program, firstly, because the 
advisors funded by the local government are available for per-
sonal discussions, and potential participants are made aware 
of the funding possibilities, sometimes via handwritten letters. 
Secondly, because CREP Vermont payments are very attractive 
to farmers: Often leaving their land fallow pays at least as well 
as cultivating it. Another benefit of CREP Vermont is that farm-
ers in the supported areas can decide themselves at any time, 
without fixed deadlines, to participate in the program and deter-
mine which areas to include in the program.
CREP Vermont includes all 17 of the state‘s water catchment 
areas, including Lake Champlain and the Connecticut River. The 
aim is to incorporate a total of about 3,035 hectares of sensitive 
land into the program. The land must be cropland or pasture-
land adjacent to streams that lack adequate buffers to protect 
the water quality. To be eligible, the land must have been owned 
by the interested farmer for at least one year before enrolling 
for the program. Cropland must have been managed for four of 
the last six years. It may not be subject to any physical or legal 
usage restrictions. Enrollment for the program is possible at 
any time allowing farmers to join the program at any time rather 
than waiting for specific sign-up periods.
As compensation for setting aside the agricultural land, 
farmers receive an annual payment based on the land’s aver-
age lease price in the respective region. Twice this average 
leasing price is paid for land made available to the program. 
In addition, a fee is paid for specific management practices. 
As well as a one-time payment after signing the contract, the 
FSA grants a 90 percent subsidy for the total cost of establish-
ing riparian buffers and filter strips as well as for installing 
conservation practices, such as implementation of fencing or 
building stream crossings. The contracts run for 10 to 15 years. 
Within this period, the land must be maintained by the farmer 
as agreed.
Like CRP, CREP is administered by the FSA, with technical 
assistance provided by the USDA Natural Resources Conserva-
tion Service (NRCS) and local Soil and Water Conservation Dis-
tricts. States government has supplemented the CREP budget 
with $ 1 million over three years to fund outreach and assistance 
to landowners through third parties. One of them is Ducks 
Unlimited, a non-profit organization dedicated to the conserva-
Conservation reserve Enhancement 
Program (CrEP) in Vermont
region (area):  
Lake Champlain watershed as well as other 
watersheds in Vermont, USA (the goal is to enroll 
up to 3,035 ha of land)
Starting year (stage):   
2004 (ongoing) 
objective:   
Improvement of water quality 
Beneficiary:  
Residents of Vermont represented by the Farm 
Service Agency (FSA) of the US Department of 
Agriculture (USDA) and the State of Vermont 
Service provider:  
Farmers and landowners
(other) Intermediaries:
USDA Natural Resources Conservation Services 
(NRCS), local Soil and Water Conservation 
Districts, environmental organizations like Ducks 
Unlimited and other external advisers
Budget: 
$ 2.1 million over 15 years for payments 
+ $ 1 million for outreach and assistance
Payment arrangement: 
Input-based; level of payment is based on 
regional leasing prices as well as opportunity and 
production costs
Contact:    
Fletcher (Kip) Potter 
Kip.Potter@vt.usda.gov 
www.fsa.usda.gov 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested