pdf viewer c# winform : Add picture to pdf software SDK dll windows wpf asp.net web forms PayingforGreen_PESinpractice11-part2249

112
Interview with Fletcher (Kip) Potter,
Natural Resources Conservation Service 
(NRCS) Colchester, Vermont, 
Responsible, among other things,for 
CREP Vermont
We only work with farmers and 
land-owners that are interested in 
participating. Many of them have 
secondary values around wildlife, 
they may be hunters themselves, but 
to be honest, the payments are a big 
reason why they are interested 
in participating.
Conservation reserve Enhancement Program (CrEP) 
in Vermont
Add picture to pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add jpg to pdf acrobat; how to add image to pdf in preview
Add picture to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add image to pdf file; add image to pdf online
113
know that if they give up say 10 acres of this highly productive 
corn land along the river and put it into CREP, into a buffer, that 
they probably won’t be able to replace that with other land any­
where. So they will actually have to reduce the number of cows 
they have, because they are not going to have as much feed 
as they need, or need to buy more from the feed dealer to feed 
their cows. And then there are some folks out there, they just 
see it as a sort of charity payment and they just don’t feel like 
they should be taking that money. They think if they’re going 
to do those things, they should be doing them themselves. 
Some of our programs also require conservation compliance, for 
example. If you are going to participate in such a program, you 
have to control erosion from your highly erodible field, and you 
can’t convert wetlands. And some people just don’t want to be 
held to those requirements. 
Are there farmers who feel that it is socially right that they 
are paid for these ecological provisions to society?
Certainly. Quite a number of farmers we do have participat­
ing in programs have come to the conclusion that they deserve 
to get paid for these practices. Certainly they benefit from some 
of the practices they implement. You know, it is improving soil 
quality in the long term, it is maintaining productivity of their 
fields, but there are some practices that really aren’t providing 
the farmer any real benefit, like a filter along the stream. But it 
certainly is providing the public a very real benefit.  
Who consults farmers on what they should do?
Well, we try to, regardless of who’s out there, whether it is 
an NRCS employee or a state employee or a private contractor 
that is working with them as a consultant. Regardless who is 
I know some landowners are reluctant to work with the gov-
ernment. Can you tell me a bit about how that is working 
with the landowners in CrEP? 
We certainly have landowners that don’t like to work with 
the government. We have some farmers out there that have 
never worked with any state or federal agency. And they have 
no intention of doing it in the future. But they are a fairly small 
percentage of the farmers. Some of it is just this general fear 
of the government, that farmers are just afraid to have govern­
ment people on their land. They are afraid that these people 
may see something that they do not like, and that they would 
report them to other government agencies, and they are going 
to be told to do something because it is a regulated activity or 
something. So a lot is just this general fear of having govern­
ment employees on your land and what may happen as a result 
of that. Most of it’s not founded on any sort of fact. 
But sometimes it is more complex, with CREP for instance: 
We have been quite successful in getting farmers to sign up and 
use the programs for creating a buffer and fencing the cows 
out of the stream. What has been more difficult for us is to get 
farmers to enroll cropland that is adjacent to streams into the 
program, even though we pay more for that. Often that cropland 
in the floodplains along the streams and rivers is the most pro­
ductive land on their farm and they can remember when their 
father or their grandfather cleared all the trees out there so they 
could use it for crop production. These farmers are very reluc­
tant to give up that land even though we offer very good rental 
rates and incentives for it.
Another part of the problem is that in some parts of the 
state, the available agricultural land is very limited, and it is 
very competitive for the farmers to get additional land. So they 
C# TIFF: How to Insert & Burn Picture/Image into TIFF Document
Support adding image or picture to an existing or new new REImage(@"c:\ logo.png"); // add the image powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to add a photo to a pdf document; adding jpg to pdf
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
VB.NET image cropper control SDK; VB.NET image cropping method to crop picture / photo; you can adjust the size of created cropped image file, add antique effect
how to add a jpeg to a pdf file; add jpeg signature to pdf
114
working out there with the farmers, we try to keep everybody 
informed of everybody else’s programs. You try to sort of work 
that out with the farmers, let them know what their options are, 
then let them decide which of these best fits, what they want to 
do and need.  
What do you think of the social justice and environmental 
effectiveness of conservation programs in general?
The whole package of the farm bill programs has had a tre­
mendous impact on the environment here in the US for the last 
20 years. Just for an example: the wildlife compliance program, 
commonly called Swampbuster. Part of that being initialized in 
1985, the principle source of wetland conversion in the United 
States was agriculture. Agriculture was responsible for 60 to 
70 percent of all the wetlands being converted. Since then, the 
matter of wetland conversion on agricultural lands has dropped 
significantly to the point that the urban sector is now the pri­
mary source of continued wetland conversions in the US. This 
is just one example, and you can go down the list as far as to 
the Wildlife Program or CRP, which has both water quality and 
wildlife benefits. Most of those programs have been very effec­
tive because of the very significant support of other organiza­
tions across the country. A lot of non­profits and groups that are 
environmental in orientation have recognized the importance 
of these programs, like Ducks Unlimited. We have been work­
ing closely with them. They are partnering with us at local levels 
and are also supporting the programs here at the national level.
Conservation reserve Enhancement Program (CrEP) 
in Vermont
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
drawing As RaterEdgeDrawing = New RaterEdgeDrawing() drawing.Picture = "RasterEdge" drawing provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
adding an image to a pdf; add photo to pdf preview
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Codes to Add Antique Effect to Image with .
mature technology to replace a picture's original colors add the glow and noise, and add a little powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add a picture to a pdf file; add image to pdf acrobat
115
VB.NET Image: Image Scaling SDK to Scale Picture / Photo
Framework application; VB.NET sample code for how to scale image / picture; Frequently asked questions about RasterEdge VB.NET image scaling control SDK add-on.
add photo to pdf; how to add an image to a pdf
VB.NET Image: Create Code 11 Barcode on Picture & Document Using
file, apart from above mentioned .NET core imaging SDK and .NET barcode creator add-on, you also need to buy .NET PDF document editor add-on, namely, RasterEdge
how to add image to pdf acrobat; add image field to pdf form
116
Silvergate Mitigation Bank, United States
The Silvergate Mitigation Bank was the first commercial 
mitigation bank west of the Mississippi entitled to sell 
compensatory mitigation credits beginning in 1994. Together 
with the central, regional and local government  authorities, the 
initiators created the institutional basis for the establishment of 
private habitat banks as a sound market mechanism to protect 
and enhance wetlands and habitats of endangered species.
Medford Water quality Trading Program, United States
The City of Medford finances riparian restoration projects 
to shade the Rogue River and thereby reduce stream warming 
caused by solar loading. Credits generated by the projects are 
used to meet thermal limits for influent wastewater set by a 
governmental permit for the City’s Regional Water Reclamation 
Facility. The program is fully implemented by the environmental
organization The Freshwater Trust, which leases the land, 
commissions the planting and sells the credits to the city.
Mandatory polluter-fund ed payments
W
A
T
E
r
e
c
o
s
y
s
t
e
m
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
§
$
B
I
o
D
I
V
E
r
S
I
T
y
On the following pages we deal with successful 
PES examples in which demand results from regulatory 
requirements. The demand is forced either by mandatory 
environmental standards or by the legally established 
obligations to compensate negative impacts. The perpetra-
tors of negative effects, and with it the buyers or financiers 
of these PES, are private individuals, companies or even 
local authorities.
C# Word - Paragraph Processing in C#.NET
Add references: C# users can set paragraph properties and create content such as run, footnote, endnote and picture in a paragraph.
how to add a picture to a pdf document; how to add image to pdf
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we this VB.NET image resizer control add-on, can provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add picture to pdf file; add picture pdf
117
ed payments
Forest Mitigation Banking, United States
The State of Maryland requires the replacement of trees 
cut during development. By voluntarily planting trees and 
permanently protecting woodlands, private landowners 
can create credits and deposit them in a forest mitiga-
tion bank. Project developers can then purchase these 
credits to meet their compensation obligations. Local 
authorities regulate and administer the program. An 
environmental organization supports it with innovative 
web-based tools.
100 Äcker für die Vielfalt, Germany
The goal of the project, initiated by scientists, landscape 
conservationists and a nature protection foundation, is to establish a 
national network of conservation fields for wild arable plant species. Funds for 
financing land purchases and for paying farmers tending the land are acquired 
through a regionally specific mix of payments for compensation measures, 
agrienvironmental programs, and state and foundation resources.
Flächenagentur Brandenburg GmbH, Germany
Investors legally obliged to compensate for impacting on nature and landscapes pay 
the Flächenagentur for areas held in reserve and any compensation measures 
implemented. The agency obtains the required land from private landowners. 
Long-term compensation measures are  often implemented by farmers who are 
paid for doing so. The agency acts as initiator,  facilitator and supplier.
M
U
L
T
I
P
L
E
e
c
o
s
y
s
te
m
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
+
B
I
o
D
I
V
E
r
S
I
T
y
 .
M
U
L
T
I
P
L
E
e
c
o
s
y
s
te
m
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
+
B
I
o
D
I
V
E
r
S
I
T
y
 .
B
I
o
D
I
V
E
r
S
I
T
y
118
dedicated to the conservation of biodiversity on German agri-
cultural land, also uses the compensation payments flowing 
on the basis of this arrangement. The payments by project 
developers are, however, only one financing component among 
several other non-governmental and governmental payments. 
So the project could just as easily be included under voluntary 
non-governmental payments as under voluntary governmental 
payments and is a case for ‘the middle’, the group of special 
cases, if we had such a category. Solely on the basis of the 
testimony of the developers, according to whom the financial 
resources connected with the Eingriffs-Ausgleichsregelung 
make up the bulk of the available budget, we are presenting 
this example under the heading of mandatory polluter-funded 
payments. 
on the next few pages, you will find successful examples 
of PES in which ‘demand’ is the result of regulatory require-
ments. The demand is forced either by mandatory environ-
mental standards or by the legally established obligations 
to compensate negative impacts. The perpetrators of nega-
tive effects, and with it the buyers or financiers of these PES, 
are private individuals, companies or even local authorities. 
The main thing is that the perpetrators are given options for 
action they can take in order to comply with their obligations. 
In addition to other options, they can, for example, pay land-
owners for offsetting the loss of function of the affected eco-
system services. But they can also consciously use ecosystem 
services to comply with environmental standards.
One very exciting example of this type is the Medford Water 
Quality Trading Program, in which a municipal waste water com-
pany achieves compliance with legally prescribed standards by 
paying for a land use variant that fosters natural water cooling. 
Examples of US habitat banking and its German counterpart are 
also included in this category: These include the story of one of 
the first commercial mitigation banks in the United States, the 
Silvergate Mitigation Bank, as well as the successful Flächen­
agentur Brandenburg GmbH in Germany and a description of 
Forest Mitigation Banking in Maryland. In all three cases, pro-
ject developers required to undertake compensatory measures 
are given the opportunity to purchase offset measures to pro-
tect and develop biodiversity or to provide ecosystem services. 
In the United States, the compensation obligations relate to 
wetlands, to the habitats of endangered species, or to forests of 
a certain size. In Germany, on the other hand, every unavoidable 
negative influence on nature and landscape must be offset. The 
fifth example included in this category, 100 Äcker für die Vielfalt, 
Mandatory polluter-funded payments
119
120
(NPDES) permits for the City of Medford’s Regional Water Recla-
mation Facility (RWRF) came up for renewal, a new effluent load 
limit was set for temperature that reduces over time, in order 
to achieve compliance with the thermal limits set in the permit. 
The Medford RWRF releases up to 76,000 m3 of treated, clean 
but warm water per day into the Rogue River. There is potential 
for the effluent discharge to exceed its thermal load limit espe-
cially during low-flow periods in the fall. Downstream, this could 
contribute to temperatures increasing at the point of maximum 
impact for the water body beyond the water quality criteria set 
by the TMDL. 
In order to meet the NPDES temperature limits at all times 
of the year, treated water must be cooled before it can be dis-
charged into the river. The City considered three methods for 
reducing thermal loading: (i) the storage in ponds or basins 
for discharge later in the year, (ii) mechanical chillers and (iii) 
riparian restoration and shading. The last option, riparian res-
toration, involves planting native plants and shrubs on private 
lands along the banks of a river to create shade and block solar 
loading on the Rogue River and its tributaries. In addition 
to reducing heat loading, riparian restoration offers ancillary 
environmental benefits such as habitat creation (e.g. trees for 
birds), increased complexity instream (e.g. woody debris falling 
into the water), and bank stabilization (e.g. reduced erosion and 
nutrient filtration from agricultural runoff). Riparian restoration 
creates jobs and supports the local economy while avoiding 
T
he City of Medford in Southern Oregon has a population of 
more than 76,000 in the metropolitan area. In the whole of 
Jackson County, nearly 170,000 residents are supplied by the 
city’s water treatment plant. Medford is located near the Rogue 
River, which is protected as a National Wild and Scenic River 
and known for its wild scenery, whitewater rafting and salmon 
runs. As part of the Clean Water Act, however, many streams 
and lakes in the Rogue basin were placed on the state list of 
impaired water bodies and the Oregon Department of Environ-
mental Quality (DEQ) was required to implement restrictions 
also known as Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDL). A TMDL is a 
calculation of the maximum amount of one or more pollutants 
that a water body can receive and still meet water quality 
standards. In the Rogue Basin TMDLs are designed to address 
bacterial contamination and thermal load. The second, the 
temperature TMDL, is intended to protect salmon, rainbow 
trout and other cold-water fish. 
When the National Pollutant 
Discharge Elimination System 
Medford Water Qua lity Trading Program
The City of Medford finances riparian restoration projects to 
shade the Rogue River and thereby reduce stream warming 
caused by solar loading. Credits generated by the projects are 
used to meet thermal limits for influent wastewater set by a 
governmental permit for the City’s Regional Water Reclamation 
Facility. The program is fully implemented by the environmental 
organization The Freshwater Trust, which leases the land,
commissions the planting and sells the credits to the city.
W
A
T
E
r
e
c
o
s
y
s
t
e
m
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
• Willamette 
Partnership
• Oregon DEQ
S TATE
• Clean   
Water   
Act
Supplier
• The Fresh-
water Trust
Beneficiary = 
Buyer
• Medford RWRF
Service Provider
• Land owners
• Local companies
INT Er MEDIA ry
MA rK ET
121
uses GIS indicators and field observations to calculate base-
line solar radiation flux and associated effective shade based 
on the geographic and vegetative characteristics of the stream 
channel. Due to the time it takes for planted riparian vegeta-
tion to achieve mature heights and full canopy cover (to block 
incoming solar radiation) DEQ established a 2-to-1 trading ratio. 
That means there is a safeguard against any project’s failure to 
deliver the shade for which it was credited.
The aim of the Medford Water quality Trading Program is 
to reduce 620,000,000 kilocalories of solar loading per day by 
restoring riparian shade in the rogue river basin over the next 
10 years of project implementation. During these ten years, 
the city of Medford will buy this daily reduction in the form 
of credits from the Trust. The agreed price per credit includes 
all costs for for implementing, continuously maintaining and 
monitoring the program as well as the annual lease payments 
to the landowners for a period of 20 years. The estimated 
capi tal costs to restore a river can be up to $ 100,000 per  mile 
plus overhead costs, project management costs, annual oper-
ation and maintenance costs, payments to landowners and 
other activities relating to the credits, such as verification and 
certification.  
The Freshwater Trust plays a vital role in the success of this 
program. As the supplier, implementer and broker, the Trust is 
integral to the development of the water-quality trading pro-
gram – the first to operate under new quality standards estab-
lished by a collaborative group of government agencies and 
non-profit organizations. The Trust contractually assumes some 
financial liability if the program fails, saying that it will share 
the fines that the Medford RWRF faces if it doesn’t fulfill its 
obligations. 
the associated energy and greenhouse gas emissions linked to 
large chillers. But it was not primarily the ancillary benefits that 
convinced the City of Medford to choose the third, ecological 
approach. The City chose the more cost and energy effective 
solution: At an estimated capital cost of six to $ 8 million, the 
restoration program will cost almost one-half of what it would 
have cost to install large chillers.
The Freshwater Trust was contracted to develop and 
implement the water quality trading program. The Trust has 
30 years’ experience in river restoration and entered into a 
20-year renewable contract with the City of Medford. The Trust 
now oversees Medford’s trading program, including prelimi-
nary modeling of thermal uplift (improvements to the riparian 
zone) and all credit generating activities – from site selection 
to implementation through long-term monitoring and mainte-
nance, third party verification, certification and credit regis-
tration procedures. Hence, the Trust (i) identifies and contacts 
individual landowners, (ii) secures lease agreements and then 
(iii) contracts with local nurseries and companies to perform 
riparian restoration work. The Trust also engages a neutral 
third party to oversee credit verification and certification before 
registering the credits online. The Trust maintains the restora-
tion projects for the life of the credits (20 years). The registered 
credits for completed projects are sold following implementa-
tion and verification to the City of Medford. Thus, the contract 
with The Freshwater Trust allows the Medford RWRF engage 
in water-quality trading without hiring staff to implement and 
oversee the program.
Thermal credits are estimated using an innovative mod-
eling tool that was developed by the Oregon DEQ, called 
Shade-A-Lator. This Microsoft Excel-based, solar routing model 
lity Trading Program
Medford Water quality Trading Program
region (area):  
Rogue River basin near Medford, Oregon, USA 
(48.3 km of streambank restoration) 
Starting year (stage):   
2011 (ongoing)
objective:   
Improvement of water quality
Beneficiary:  
Medford Regional Water Reclamation Facility (RWRF)
Service provider:  
Land owners, local nurseries and companies repre-
sented by The Freshwater Trust
(other) Intermediaries:  
Willamette Partnership, Oregon Department of 
Environmental Quality (Oregon DEQ)
Budget: 
$ 6 - $ 8 million
Payment arrangement: 
Output-based; the level of payment is based on 
the prices for leasing the land, the production and 
management costs 
Contact:    
Alex Johnson 
alex@thefreshwatertrust.org
www.thefreshwatertrust.org/conservation/
water-quality-trading
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested