pdf viewer c# winform : Add jpg to pdf Library SDK component asp.net .net web page mvc PayingforGreen_PESinpractice12-part2250

122
CWS operates their trading program internally. There are staff 
members dedicated to the water quality trading program’s 
development and implementation at CWS. Medford’s program, 
on the other hand, uses The Freshwater Trust as an intermedi-
ary for all aspects of the trading program from credit estima-
tion to implementation and registration.
Today, other cities and utilities are exploring the possibili-
ties of adopting water quality trading systems that use riparian 
restoration as an innovative approach to meeting state and fed-
eral standards for water temperature or, prospectively, nutrient 
reduction. Programs similar to Medford’s or CWS’ are a viable 
alternative for cities to avoid costly technological solutions 
and provide other significant benefits: In addition to enhanc-
ing wildlife habitat and riverside improvements, restoration 
programs result in landowner and community engagement as 
well as economic benefits for the local community. Thus, the 
Medford Water Quality Trading Program could be held up as 
an example of a win-win situation for business, community and 
the environment.
The Willamette Partnership, a neutral third party, is another 
non-profit organization involved in the program. It certifies the 
riparian restoration and registers the credits. The Willamette 
Partnership (http://willamettepartnership.org/) is a coalition 
of leading environmental organizations, city, county, busi-
nesses, farm and scientist leaders who have come together in 
recent years to improve environmental protection in the Wil-
lamette Basin in Northwestern Oregon. Among other things, 
the organization develops market-driven tools for farmers to 
evaluate and participate in emerging ecosystem markets, to 
set priorities for restoration actions and maintain access to 
appropriate payments. Since the Willamette Partnership has 
developed and established new protocols and standards for 
offset credits in Oregon, the organization now acts as a moni-
toring body in the Medford Water Quality Trading Program. It 
ensures that the restoration actions, through which credits are 
generated, are sufficiently and thoroughly implemented. Other 
stakeholders, such as Craft3 and the Meyer Memorial Trust, 
have financially supported the Freshwater Trust, particularly in 
expanding capacities with which the organization successfully 
bid for the City of Medford‘s tender and was able to start imple-
mentation. However, all activities carried out as part of the 
trading program are financed by the City of Medford through 
the purchase of credits.
The Medford Water quality Trading Program is not the first 
of its kind. Clean Water Services (CWS) launched a program 
in 2004 and have since planted more than four million native 
plants and shrubs along about 48.3 km of the Tualatin river 
and its tributaries. The framework of both Medford and CWS 
water quality trading programs were developed and approved 
by oregon DEq. However, CWS uses a different model in that 
Medford Water quality Trading Program
Add jpg to pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
how to add a jpeg to a pdf; add an image to a pdf with acrobat
Add jpg to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add picture to pdf form; add an image to a pdf acrobat
123
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Add necessary references page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(0) ' Convert the first PDF page to page.ConvertToImage(ImageType.JPEG, Program.RootPath + "\\Output.jpg").
adding jpg to pdf; add picture to pdf in preview
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
example, this C#.NET PDF to JPEG converter library will name the converted JPEG image file Output.jpg. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references
add an image to a pdf; how to add a jpg to a pdf
124
For what purpose do you use modeling 
tools like the Shade-A-Lator?
The current trading programs in Ore­
gon estimate thermal offset credits using a 
heat model for watersheds, the Oregon Heat 
Source Model. It has been used by Oregon 
DEQ for over a decade and it has proven 
very effective. Heat Source takes in all differ­
ent types of factors that affect a water body 
and Shade­A­Lator is basically a part of that 
model that measures effective shade, or solar load blocked, 
on a water body. It uses either manual input in one of the ear­
lier versions or now light and radar data that is taken from an 
airplane using reflected lasers. When you are looking at a site 
that you’re about to plant a riparian zone on to offset the solar 
loading, with Shade­a­Lator you are able to model existing solar 
loading and calculate the improvement. The model tells you 
how many kilocalories per day of heat (via sunlight) are reach­
ing that water body during the specific time period that you’re 
looking at currently. And then you use the model to say: Alright, 
given what we’re planting, this is the type of riparian zone that 
will exist 20 years from now and that improvement is the credit 
value.
Is it about the combination of trees or also the spatial 
analysis, and where you should put the riparian buffer? 
Where it is most effective?
The actual trading area is defined by the TMDL. If you’re 
a point source in Oregon, you basically find out through the 
TMDL process where you can plant a project to create an offset, 
a thermal load reduction credit. With the model, you describe 
Can you tell me a bit about the planning process of the 
program? 
CWS started the first trade of its kind but, because it was 
seven years ago, the standards were different from today. They 
kick­started a lot of other interests especially from other regu­
lated entities but also from a non­profit organization like the 
Willamette Partnership that said: Let‘s put in the effort to con­
vene everybody that needs to agree on how these programs 
should develop. It took six years to get agreement on all the 
different pieces that create this credit. The Willamette Partner­
ship established the standards, but they are not implementers. 
However, The Freshwater Trust as an implementer understood 
that the City of Medford didn’t have the capacity or the interest 
to go out and do all this watershed analysis, contract with land­
owners, nurseries, etc. and monitor the project. All those things 
are so far outside of the normal scope of work for a wastewa­
ter treatment plant manager that it’s not practical for many 
facilities. 
Interview with Alex Johnson, 
Director of the Ecosystem Credit Programs at The Freshwater Trust
How are we ever going to get enough money and focus, enough scale to 
actually do anything on that scope? The way you do that is create the 
standards, you create the incentives correctly and then you invite everybody 
into the market.
Medford Water quality Trading Program
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
Add necessary references to your C# project: String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
how to add photo to pdf in preview; adding a jpg to a pdf
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
Add necessary references to your C# project: RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. inputFilePath = @"C:\input.tif"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert tiff
add photo to pdf preview; add photo pdf
125
been around for 30 years now doing restoration projects that 
entire time, but it was in a grant world. You get grant dollars, 
philanthropic dollars, and you go out and do the best you can 
and the money runs out and you have to walk away from the 
project. That is how restoration has happened in a lot of ways 
for the past couple decades. But that doesn‘t work for compli­
ance; this is an entirely different way to look at it. If you are a 
point source, you need something that is a lot more rigorous, 
that can be easily proven for the next 20 years that it exists. So 
that is kind of how we use the models.
Is the modeling part crucial for success?
I think it is very necessary for success, because I think for 
PES to work long­term, you need to be able to pay for out­
comes rather than actions, right? But there needs to be a 
good amount of thought going into what outputs you want 
to pay for. My background is economics, I think of everything 
as incentivizing whichever action. So, with the Clean Water 
Act and regulations we have had in America for the last forty 
years, they’ve incentivized extremely risk averse point sources 
to go after the least risky thing that is going to get them 
in compliance, which has been the engineering solution, in 
the case of temperature the cooling tower or chiller. That is 
what they’ve been incentivized to do. But when setting up 
a PES trading program, there needs to be a lot of thought 
about what specifically is being incentivized. Models are very 
important for the success of these things because you should 
be incentivizing the functions, the outputs that come out of 
a good restoration action. But there is a balance; it’s kind of 
everything in moderation. You don’t want to put the whole 
program into the hands of the modeler, and you shouldn’t be 
the future canopy; this is the height it will be in 20 years, and 
this is the percent of shade it will create. So we use it to model 
how much sunlight will still reach that water body 20 years from 
now when that riparian zone is more matured. And then the dif­
ference between the future vegetation and the current base­
line is what we can trade to a regulated entity to use for NPDES 
permit compliance. On this basis, those credits are valid to be 
traded and used in a compliance zone as soon as the plants are 
planted. So you don’t have to wait 20 years until that riparian 
zone is tall and creating a bunch of shade. That was one of the 
key agreements that the regulators have agreed upon. As soon 
as the plants are in the ground, the project has been verified by 
a third­party verifier, and the credits have been registered on 
a registry, then those are ready to be used in the permits. The 
whole thing would be impossible without it. If you are a com­
pliance buyer you simply cannot wait five, 10 or 15 years to buy 
credits. You need them now. 
Internally, we use the Shade­A­Lator model to basically do 
broad watershed assessments to make sure, before we sign a 
contract for credit delivery, that the watershed that we’re look­
ing at, the service area, has enough restoration potential to 
generate those credits. With the Medford contract it was many 
times more than what we would need to generate. If it was a 
close thing, then we wouldn’t feel so comfortable, we proba­
bly wouldn’t have taken on a lot of the liability that we did. So 
certainly, building up to that contract, we’d do a lot of internal 
analysis, using those tools with a different mindset saying: Can 
we create these credits? What are these credits going to cost? 
How much is it going to cost for a mile of restoration under this 
new method of credit generation, because obviously this is very 
different than what we had been doing? The Freshwater Trust has 
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
1.bmp")); images.Add(new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")); images.Add(new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.png")); / Build a PDF document with
how to add image to pdf document; how to add a photo to a pdf document
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
1.bmp")) images.Add(New REImage(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")) images.Add(New REImage(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.png")) ' Build a PDF document with
add image to pdf java; add picture to pdf document
126
relying on models to a point where it slows down and blocks the 
processes from happening.
How do you think these trading programs can be scaled up?
To see this thing scale up, we need more market participants 
and they don’t have to be non­profits. If you set the standards 
sufficiently high, then it could be a purely profit­motivated 
actor. It doesn’t matter what their motives are as long as the 
restoration actions are real and the benefits are quantifiable 
and there is sufficient monitoring over time to make sure that 
they exist over time. We want competition because that is the 
only way really that you’re able to scale it up to actually equal 
the magnitude of the problem. In Oregon, 100 miles of stream 
may be restored each year. With 30,000 miles of streams that 
are impaired, and that’s only for temperature, 100 is so very, 
very small. How are we ever going to get enough money and 
focus, enough scale to actually do anything on that scope? The 
way you do that is create the standards, you create the incen­
tives correctly and then you invite everybody into the market.
Medford Water quality Trading Program
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. Add Stamp Annotation. image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and
add a jpg to a pdf; add signature image to pdf
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and
pdf insert image; how to add a jpeg to a pdf file
127
128
elsewhere, or buy offset from a commercial wetland mitigation 
bank and/or from an endangered species bank, also known 
as a conservation bank. Mitigation banks are typically large 
wetlands, also consisting of several interconnected areas, that 
have been enhanced or newly created and are permanently pro-
tected. In contrast, the owners of a conservation bank create 
and maintain habitats for endangered species. The clear inten-
tion of both forms (also known collectively as ‘habitat banks’ in 
Europe) must be to provide mitigation for unavoidable project 
impacts.
These banks can be established by nonprofit organizations, 
government agencies or private individuals. The projects must 
meet certain financial and environmental requirements before 
credits are released to the bank for subsequent sale. The cred-
its are defined as the ecological value associated with one acre 
(about 0.40 hectare) of the area. The price range is very high: 
In 2008, prices were between $ 3,000 and $ 653,000, with an 
average price of $ 112,449. Buyers are basically persons or 
groups planning a project that will have negative impacts on 
wetlands or the habitats of endangered species. These include, 
for example, builders of residential and commercial real estate, 
power generation and distribution companies, governmental 
transport agencies, cities, the Department of Defense and other 
federal agencies.
The Silvergate Mitigation Bank was established in 1991 as 
the ‘Wildlands Mitigation Bank’ from Wildlands, Inc., one of the 
first companies to specialize in the development of mitigation 
I
n accordance with the Clean Water Act (CWA) and the Endan-
gered Species Act (ESA), American legislation requires the 
prevention, mitigation or compensation of activities through 
which existing wetlands are altered or harmed, or the habitats 
of ESA-listed species are put at risk. Project developers plan-
ning an operation that would endanger a wetland or listed spe-
cies must apply for a permit. They receive this permit once they 
have done as much as possible to reduce the negative effects 
on-site and offset any unavoidable impacts off-site. The goal 
is to replace the exact function, that is to evenly offset the pro-
ject’s negative impact(s) on the respective natural environment 
and its ecological value. Hence, offsets for activities carried out 
in wetlands must be located within the same watershed as the 
harmful impact. 
To compensate unavoidable impacts on wetlands or the 
habitats of endangered species, project developers can create 
their own offsets. They can also 
pay a Fee In Lieu to an environ-
mental organization which will 
finance future restoration work 
Silvergate Mitigatio n Bank
The Silvergate Mitigation Bank was the first commercial miti-
gation bank west of the Mississippi entitled to sell compensatory 
mitigation credits beginning in 1994. Together with the central, re-
gional and local government authorities, the initiators created the 
institutional basis for the establishment of private habitat banks 
as a sound market mechanism to protect and enhance wetlands 
and habitats of endangered species.
B
I
o
D
I
V
E
r
S
I
T
y
• USFWS
• USACE
• EPA
• CDFW 
• DWR
• Local authorities 
S TAT E
• Clean
Water
Act
• Endangered  
Species    
Act
Service Provider
• Wildlands, Inc.&    
Restoration  
Resources
Financier
• Project    
developers
Beneficiary
• General public
INT ErM EDIAr y
MAr K ET
129
endowment contributions, and the need to make a profit to 
fund future projects. Later it was adjusted to reflect market 
forces. The notion was that a credit should cost the buyer an 
amount equivalent to the value of the land freed from mitiga-
tion obligations on a per acre basis.
The credits are purchased from the Wildlands, Inc. sales 
office with a price per acre that is fixed for particular types 
of wetland area or endangered species. The seller – the bank 
– is given all the relevant information concerning the com-
pensation required by the agency or agencies. A sales agree-
ment is then drawn up and enforced. Once payment has been 
made, the buyer receives a receipt which he or she submits 
to the appropriate agency to meet the permit requirement for 
compensation. 
There are several state and federal agencies involved, such 
as the US Fish and Wildlife Service and US Department of the 
Army Corps of Engineers, the California Department of Fish and 
Game as well as the California Department of Water Resources. 
At the local level, the County of Placer Planning Department is 
involved. These agencies regularly visited the site during the 
first five years of establishment to verify that the habitat was 
taking shape in accordance with written performance stand-
ards. Additionally, the bank submitted annual reports to these 
agencies for a minimum of five years after the habitat construc-
tion of each phase was completed. To date, monitoring reports 
have been submitted to the state and federal agencies as well 
as the Wildlife Heritage Foundation – the holder of the perpet-
ual conservation easement. The Wildlife Heritage Foundation 
holds easements encompassing more than 13,000 hectares in 
California – most of which are habitat conservation easements 
resulting from some form of mitigation for protected resources. 
banks. Wildland co-founder and President, Riley Swift, had wit-
nessed for years vernal pool lands – typical for the region and 
vital for many species – being replaced by housing and com-
mercial development. As a result, he came up with the idea of 
relocating these pools to replace those lost to development. He 
came to know of the term ‘mitigation banking’, a concept that 
had been tested over some years by government authorities. 
This provided both the name and the validation for the concept, 
thereby encouraging him to develop it further. Together with 
his partner and hunting colleague, Steve Morgan, Riley Swift 
began designing, planning and developing a wetland mitigation 
bank.
Historically, the Silvergate Mitigation Bank site in the north 
of California was a rolling grassland landscape containing a 
network of vernal pools and swales that drained into the Bear 
River. Wheat and barley had been grown here during the 1930s 
and possibly into the late 1940s. Agricultural production then 
shifted to rice and livestock grazing; more intensive farming 
practices were adopted. When Wildlands, Inc. bought the site, 
the land use was mainly rice production and irrigated pasture.
The planning process included the preparation of baseline 
technical studies, the identification of goals, objectives, and 
specifications for habitat creation. Once this was in place, Wild-
lands, Inc. could design the restoration plan, work with govern-
mental agencies to obtain permits, draft agency agreements, 
and lastly, coordinate earthwork and revegetation. The initial 
costs for the bank were borne by Wildlands, Inc. followed by 
income from credit sales. The value of each credit set ini-
tially was based on the company’s experience in constructing, 
maintaining and monitoring various habitat types in addition 
to land, design and permit costs, plus long-term management 
n Bank
Silvergate Mitigation Bank
region (area):  
About 2 km west of Sheridan, California, USA 
(265 ha)
Starting year (stage):   
1991, sale started 1994 (ongoing)
objective:   
Protection and enhancement of biodiversity
Beneficiary:  
General public represented by developers who 
are required to compensate for the negative 
impact on wetlands and wildlife habitats
Service provider:  
Wildlands, Inc. in partnership with Restoration 
Resources 
(other) Intermediaries:  
Wildlife Heritage Foundation, US Fish and Wildlife 
Service (USFWS), US Army Corps of Engineers 
(USACE), US Environmental Protection Agency 
(EPA), California Department of Fish and Wildlife 
(CDFW), California Department of Water Resourc-
es (DWR), local authorities
Budget: 
Land costs: $ 2,000,000
Project design and permitting: $ 350,000
Construction costs, approx.: $ 3,750,000
Initial maintenance, monitoring and reporting 
costs: $ 900,000
On-going habitat management costs: $ 50,000 
per year.
Payment arrangement: 
Input- or output-based, depending on the type of 
credit; the level of payment is based on produc-
tion costs, intended profit and demand
Contact:    
Riley Swift 
r.swift@restoration-resources.net 
www.restoration-resources.net/projects/
showcase.php#project1 
130
After Riley Swift left Wildlands, Inc., the Wildlands Mitiga-
tion Bank became the ‘Silvergate Mitigation Bank’ managed 
by Sierra View Landscape, Inc., which now operates under the 
name Restoration Resources, Inc. Presently it is not only a mit-
igation bank but also an endangered species bank and sup-
ports more than 23 hectares of created vernal pool habitats, 87 
hectares of swampland, 14 hectares of wetlands and woodland 
areas near rivers, 26 hectares of habitat for the Valley Elder-
berry Longhorn Beetle and 126 hectares of restored single- and 
multi-year grassland. The site provides a habitat for a variety 
of native plants and wildlife. This includes 19 species listed at 
state and federal level. The areas are also used for the outdoor 
education program of the Wildlife Heritage Foundation.
The Silvergate Mitigation Bank was the first commercial 
mitigation bank in California. The bank created many of the 
institutional prerequisites for national, state and local agen-
cies to establish and use such banks. In 2006, the number of 
mitigation banks in the US was estimated at around 500. For 
its implementation, the organizers of the Silvergate (Wild-
lands) Mitgation Bank were named ‘Environmentalists of the 
year 1996’ by the California Environmental Protection Agency.
Silvergate Mitigation Bank
131
time, we decided that this bank needed to be a spectacular suc­
cess as a habitat creation site in order to develop a market for 
mitigation credit sales and achieve full regulatory agency buy­in 
to the concept of mitigation banking. 
Today, mitigation bank credits are the first choice of federal 
agencies for compensatory mitigation by project proponents. 
And Wildlands Mitigation Bank is extraordinarily successful as 
measured by maturing, sustainable, native habitats and their 
occupancy by numerous rare, threatened and endangered 
plant and animal species appropriate to our region. Wildlands 
Mitigation Bank was also a very successful financial enterprise 
and Wildlands, Inc. became a very successful business known 
throughout the US for its many successful mitigation banks.
Excerpt from an email from 
Riley Swift, President of Restoration 
Resources and initiator of the 
Silvergate Mitigation Bank in 
Sheridan, about the founding of 
the Wildlands Mitigation Bank 
At the time the Wildlands Mitigation Bank (today: Silver­
gate) was established, there were ‘no rules’ because mitigation 
banking was only an idea and no actual banks existed. Being 
a trained wildlife biologist and landscape contractor and not 
knowing any better, I decided in 1989 that I could relocate wet­
lands slated for destruction to another site where the plants 
and animals displaced could live out their lives, have lots of 
progeny, and be protected in perpetuity. It was a simple thought 
based upon the fact that the federal Clean Water Act had 
become the law of the land in 1986 providing protection for all 
‘waters of the US and wetlands’ but no one was actually doing 
much about it in California. I believed that I could do the work 
mandated by the government as a private business and serve 
other private businesses and public agencies that needed to 
provide viable mitigation for unavoidable impacts to protected 
resources. In doing so, I found a partner with a true entrepre­
neurial spirit and we formed Wildlands, Inc. in 1991.
It took several years to get the regulatory agencies to agree 
to give mitigation banking a chance and, after my partner found 
a suitable plot of land, I designed a habitat restoration/crea­
tion project that would yield the kinds of credits that the mar­
ket in our growing region needed. In the fall of 1994, we finally 
secured agency acceptance and were permitted to build the first 
phase of the plan and begin selling mitigation credits. At that 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested