pdf viewer c# winform : Adding images to pdf files Library application component .net windows winforms mvc PayingforGreen_PESinpractice2-part2258

22
One might of course ask whether such payments have any-
thing at all to do with the PES approach and whether adherence 
to regulatory legislation should be rewarded. In real life, how-
ever, we see hazy boundaries between these and the voluntary 
governmental payments for voluntary inputs (Type 2): If we look, 
for example, at some of the programs known as PES in China or 
even Costa Rica, we see that payments are made there for ser-
vices that are actually already required by law. It is often difficult 
to enforce that law, however, and the payments are an additional 
option for achieving the goals set. Such payments are used in 
Europe as well, for example to compensate for requirements in 
Natura 2000 sites or in connection with the implementation of 
the framework water directive. Hence there is much in favor of 
considering such payments in connection with the PES discus-
sion as well. In this book, however, this type is only taken up 
once again in the final chapter, because none of our successful 
examples correspond to this type.
The question that arises here, as in the ideal case of user-  
financed payments, is to what extent the stakeholders on the 
supplier or buyer side have a real interest in having the promi-
sed ecosystem services actually provided in exchange for the 
payments: Those who cause damage (in particular commercial 
enterprises), and are liable for compensation will limit their 
interest to the regulated area for which they are liable. If in 
addition this limited interest in the actual provision of services 
encounters suppliers who are motivated exclusively by commer-
cial interest, it is important to have a third player (a watchdog) 
verify that ecosystem services and biodiversity are actually pro-
vided in exchange for payments.
Type 4. Voluntary and mandatory governmental payments 
for involuntary actions
In PES of the fourth type, government uses its sovereign 
power to require the provision of ecosystem services. Here we 
have a situation in which government prohibits the perpetra-
tors of negative impacts on ecosystem services and biodiver-
sity from committing certain acts and allows no flexibility with 
regard to the implementation of these guidelines. Restrictions 
on agricultural use in protected areas are a classic example 
from Germany. Specific requirements can be laid down in the 
protected area regulations regarding mineral fertilization or live-
stock densities. Farmers have the social obligation to comply 
with such requirements. On the other hand, such restrictions 
can have major economic implications. For that reason there are 
a number of examples of government paying for the economic 
impacts of regulatory requirements, that is, compensating for 
them financially. 
Types of PES
Adding images to pdf files - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
how to add an image to a pdf; adding images to pdf
Adding images to pdf files - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add a jpg to a pdf; how to add a jpeg to a pdf
23
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB to or from multiple supported images and documents. merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete
adding a png to a pdf; adding images to pdf forms
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code PDF document pages and how to split PDF document in APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting
add photo to pdf reader; add picture to pdf reader
24
Practice Examples. 
How is it done and who 
makes it possible? 
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
On this VB.NET PDF document page modifying page, you will find detailed guidance on creating, loading, merge and splitting PDF pages and Files, adding a page
how to add image to pdf acrobat; add picture to pdf
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & PDF to two and four new PDF files are offered Provides you with examples for adding an (empty) page
add photo to pdf online; add photo to pdf in preview
25
often linked with an extensively used landscape, the cultural 
landscape. Accordingly, efforts are made to harmonize commer-
cial exploitation and the provision of ecosystem services on the 
same land. In the United States, however, there is greater sepa-
ration between cultivated landscapes and mostly unexploited 
natural landscapes such as the large national parks. 
In the course of our research we were able to glean many 
exciting examples of PES. We would now like to offer you 19 
such examples and their stories; 19 examples of how complex 
social ecological problems have been successfully tackled with 
the help of PES. 
Our success stories have been selected primarily on the 
basis of two workshops – one in the United States and one in 
Germany – as well as a series of interviews carried out during a 
trip to the UK. The two workshops each brought together rep-
resentatives of governmental and non-governmental organi-
zations who were and still are heavily involved in the imple-
mentation and further development of PES in their respective 
countries – as initiators, public administrators, consultants and 
the like. These experienced practitioners were asked to desig-
nate successful PES in their home countries and then to explain 
why they considered these examples to be successful. How do 
they determine that these are examples of success? 
The discussion that unfolded on this topic was primarily 
about the environmental objectives as well as the effective-
ness and efficiency of the instrument: A successful PES would 
achieve a clearly defined environmental objective effectively 
and efficiently. But a problem soon appeared in the course of 
the discussion: Many of the identified examples of success 
have only been initiated in the last few years. The oldest are 30 
years old at the most. Can the effects of an instrument already 
Successful examples of PES from Germany, the United 
Kingdom and the United States
T
he preceding examination of the PES approach has made 
one thing clear: It is a complex subject! The environmental 
problems are multilayered and do not allow linear solutions. On 
top of that there are issues of property rights, regulatory limits 
and the importance of information, to name only those. At the 
same time, several players with different motives and capabili-
ties are involved. How do these actors work together? What are 
their motives in getting involved? What capacities do they bring 
to the table? For what environmental problems have successful 
PES been developed, who was involved and in what way? 
We selected three industrialized countries for our empirical 
studies. They were supposed to have basic commonalities, 
such as a democratic, constitutional form of government, full-
scale environmental legislation and a history of application 
of governmental agri-environmental programs. At the same 
time, the selection was made on the assumption that different 
concepts of the role of government and civil society as well as 
differences in detail in the design of the environmental regula-
tory frameworks had produced a wide range of different PES. 
Another question was whether the differences in principle in the 
concepts of nature conservation, a more inclusive one in Europe 
and a more segregative one in the United States, had resulted 
in differences in the use of PES as well. For while the European 
cultural landscape is in large measure densely populated and 
has been cultivated by man for centuries, there is a signifi-
cantly greater separation between a heavily used and an almost 
unused landscape in the United States. In Europe, the socially 
desirable biodiversity and the cultural ecosystem services are 
Die PES-Praxis
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
What's more, you can also protect created PDF file by adding digital signature (watermark Create PDF from Jpeg, png, images. Create PDF from Open Office files.
acrobat insert image into pdf; add jpg to pdf preview
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
text character and text string to PDF files using online text to PDF page using .NET XDoc.PDF component in Supports adding text to PDF in preview without adobe
add picture to pdf file; add photo pdf
26
organizations, dedicated researchers and interested citizens as 
well as private sector stakeholders. 
Apart from the fact that there is at least one non-govern-
mental stakeholder involved in each example, the individual 
PES differ widely from one another. To classify them for this 
book, we have fallen back on the types listed in the first chap-
ter and assigned each example to one of those four types. As 
is so often the case in research, one or the other example will 
resist being assigned unequivocally to one category. One PES, 
for example, is financed by both governmental and non-govern-
mental stakeholders and cannot be assigned uniquely to one 
category. Often, the stakeholders at the local level are creative  
and take advantage of the range of options to the greatest 
possible extent to fund the provision of ecosystem services 
and biodiversity. The border between regulatory and voluntary 
measures is also often less clear in reality, making it difficult 
to classify the individual examples. In the end we assigned all 
those ambiguous PES cases to the type with which we felt there 
was the most common ground. Where appropriate we indicate 
the concrete problems encountered in categorizing a specific 
example.
On the basis of the current type assignments, the situa-
tion presents itself as follows: Eight PES are of the “volun-
tary non-governmental payments“ type. Among them are four 
examples from the UK, three from Germany and one from the 
United States. We have classified six examples as „voluntary 
governmental payments“, three German and three American. 
And we interpret five of the 19 examples to be “mandatory pol-
luter-funded payments“, ones in which the demand is govern-
ment-motivated. Three of those are American and two are Ger-
man PES.
be seriously assessed on the basis of such a short period for 
ecosystems? On the basis of some ecological objectives, yes, 
but not for all of them and not for newer, potentially innova-
tive examples, which should certainly be counted among the 
successful ones as well. For that reason, additional aspects 
of the definition of success for PES were discussed together 
with the experts and the stakeholders in the examples cited. 
It was found that in addition to high expectations regarding 
the ecological impact, social and institutional criteria were 
relevant: that the PES is supported by a large number of stake-
holders on both sides, sellers and buyers; that the stakehold-
ers as well as the regional public stand behind the PES; that it 
inspires other stakeholders to initiate similar projects, or even 
that it finds ‘real’ imitators. And finally, successful PES should 
not be a flash in the pan either but should assert themselves 
as a long-term approach. Not every example meets all of these 
criteria for success; but most of these aspects apply to all of 
them.
The examples of successful PES in our book were chosen 
subjectively, by experienced practitioners and researchers as 
long-time observers of the scene. And because the issue is so 
complex and the paths to a solution are so diverse, this selec-
tion includes nationwide, in some cases long-standing pro-
grams as well as regional projects and small local, very young 
PES, even some that are just pilot projects. Since the issue of 
the stakeholders involved was always in the foreground for 
CIVILand, they are above all examples that are exciting from 
an institutional perspective and therefore ones in which we 
see different organizations and stakeholders, governmental 
and non-governmental, working together. We count among 
the non-governmental stakeholders non-profit environmental 
Ökosystemleistungen
Practice  – Examples
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky Help to Improve the Security of Your PDF File by Adding Digital Signatures.
how to add an image to a pdf in preview; add picture to pdf in preview
C# PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file for C#
Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your C# to or from multiple supported images and documents. merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete
add signature image to pdf acrobat; adding images to pdf
27
Figure 1
include individuals, communities, churches and rural develop-
ment associations as well as environmental associations and 
foundations. 
We do not find such a direct liaison between final benefi-
ciaries and providers, however, in any of our examples. In all 
cases, there are players involved who mediate the interchange 
between the two sides, the buyers and the sellers. We call 
these players intermediaries. They play a number of different 
roles: They coordinate the process, advise and recruit provid-
ers, are responsible for certifying certain inputs or for monitor-
ing  (Figure 1). Also, in many cases intermediaries act as proxy 
on behalf of the final beneficiaries or on behalf of the service 
providers: Government agencies, for example, may act as the 
actual buyer or financier in response to a social demand in the 
context of agri-environmental programs. We refer to the player 
who finances the provision of a service on behalf of the final 
beneficiary and acts as the contracting party in dealings with 
the supplier as the financier. Apart from the government in the 
form of an agency, this can be, for example, an environmen-
tal organization or a philanthropist. The financier quite often 
obtains the necessary budget from taxes or levies on the final 
beneficiary. Intermediaries can also act as representatives of the 
supply side. In that case we call them suppliers. A supplier rep-
resents several service providers, so he bundles the offer, and 
acts as a direct contact and contract partner for the buyer or the 
financier. (Figure 2) 
There is another aspect that is important to us in connection 
with buyers and financiers: The demand for ecosystem ser-
vices can be fostered by governmental incentives. For one thing, 
Apart from the PES type, we were of course interested 
in knowing which ecosystem service(s) each example was 
aiming at, irrespective of any other ancillary benefits. The 
ecosystem services concerned are pragmatically identified by 
different colors. The classification always depends on what 
is formulated in the projects and programs themselves as the 
specific target:
 protecting and enhancing biodiversity (green),
● providing clean drinking water and/or improving the quality  
of surface waters (blue),
  carbon sequestration or prevention of carbon loss (brown),
 providing cultural ecosystem services, especially the  
chance to enjoy the natural environment and relax 
(yellow) or
 enhancing multiple ecosystem services and biodiversity   
(purple).
To clarify the constellation of the stakeholders we use an 
illustration in each example that provides a quick overview 
of the relevant stakeholders and their role in the context of 
the PES. In this illustration, the final beneficiaries of the eco-
system services are on the left, the service providers on the 
right. As described in our introductory chapter, ideally the final 
bene ficiaries pay an amount X to the providers for ensuring or 
restoring ecosystem services and biodiversity by implementing 
specific measures or providing land. So in a case like this the 
beneficiaries are the buyers. The service providers are farmers 
who cultivate their own or leased land and/or landowners, who 
This color coding is reflected in the description 
of the respective PES.
M
U
L
T
I
P
L
E
e
c
o
s
ys
t
e
m
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
+
B
I
o
D
I
V
E
r
S
I
T
y
.
r
E
C
r
E
A
T
I
o
N
A
L
 e
c
o
s
y
s
t
e
m
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
W
A
T
E
r
e
c
o
s
y
s
t
e
m
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
C
A
r
B
o
N
S
E
q
U
E
S
T
r
A
T
I
o
N
e
c
o
s
y
s
t
e
m
 s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
B
I
o
D
I
V
E
r
S
I
T
y
n
• Coordination
• Advisory services
• Recruiting
• Monitoring
• Validation
Beneficiary  
=
Buyer
Service 
provider  = 
Supplier
INT Er MEDIAr IES
MAr K ET
Benefi-
ciary
Financier
Service
provider
Supplier
• Coordination
• Advisory services
• Recruiting
• Monitoring
• Validation
INT Er MEDIAr IES
MA rK ET
Figure 2
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
Multifunctional Visual Studio .NET PDF SDK library supports adding text content to adobe PDF to add a single text character and text string to PDF files in VB
how to add an image to a pdf file in acrobat; acrobat insert image in pdf
28
the stakeholders pursuing with the PES and what important 
steps were taken in implementing it? How does the mechanism 
work, how is payment made, what for, and how is the amount 
of payment calculated? And which stakeholders were or are 
involved with what tasks and how does their interaction work? 
The descriptions are supplemented in almost every case by 
interviews or a personal statement. These interviews with the 
PES managers or people closely involved in them took place 
between 2011 and 2013. We conducted them either directly on 
site in the course of our research or by telephone for this book. 
At this point we would like to express our gratitude once 
again to everyone involved for the time they invested and 
the impressions they shared, some of them very personal. 
They enrich our texts tremendously and clearly show what is 
behind every single PES: people with ideas and a high level   
of commitment.
regulatory requirements can mean that a 
business uses the services of particular 
ecosystems (for example, the filter func-
tion of wetlands) instead of machinery to 
reduce its negative environmental impact. 
In that case the business is the beneficiary 
and buyer of the services provided by the 
PES  (Figure 3). On the other hand, the government may pass 
legislation requiring compensation for negative impacts on eco-
system services and biodiversity. Thus a business that damages 
ecosystems and biodiversity and hence reduces the benefit to 
third parties must ensure that activities take place to provide 
additional ecosystem services and biodiversity elsewhere. In 
such a case the business acts as financier for a PES (Figure 4). 
In addition to this chart showing the relevant stakehold-
ers, there is a short fact sheet providing data on the relevant 
example. Here the stakeholders are summed up once again, 
while on the other hand the fact sheet contains information on 
the region, on the size of the areas addressed by means of the 
instrument, and on the time frame and financial resources. In 
addition, we have endeavored to provide a short summary of 
the key element of the PES concerned: the design of the pay-
ment, that is, whether the approach is output-based or input-
based and how the amount of payment is determined. 
At the heart of the following pages, however, are the 
detailed descriptions of the examples, in the drafting of which 
we asked ourselves the following questions: What are the eco-
logical and social backgrounds, what ideas and objectives were 
Figure 3
Service 
provider
Benefi-
ciary  =
Buyer
Supplier 
• Coordination
• Advisory services
• Recruiting
• Monitoring
• Validation
GoVErN-
MENT
motivates 
demand
MA r K ET
INT E r M ED IA r I ES
Service 
provider
Benefi-
ciary 
Supplier
Financier
• Coordination
• Advisory services
• Recruiting
• Monitoring
• Validation
GoVErN-
MENT
compels 
financing
MA r K E T
IN T E r M E D I A r I E S
Figure 4
Practice  – Examples
29
 Woodland
Carbon Code (WCC)
(nationwide)
 Pumlumon Project
 Westcountry Angling Passport
  Upstream Thinking
with Westcountry rivers Trust
 Gemeinschaftlicher Wiesenvogelschutz 
 Blühendes Steinburg
 MoorFutures®
 MoorFutures®
  Flächenagentur   
Brandenburg GmbH
 100 Äcker für die Viefalt 
(nationwide)
 Naturschutzgerechte  
Bewirtschaftung von  
Grünland in der nord- 
rhein-westfälischen  
Eifel
 Niedersächsisches   
Kooperationsmodell 
Trinkwasserschutz 
 Medford Water quality Trading Program
 Silvergate Mitigation Bank
 Edwards Aquifer 
Protection Program
 PEPA
 CrEP Vermont
 FrESP
 PEPA
  Forest Mitigation 
Banking in Maryland
PES in the United States 
● Edwards Aquifer Protection Program
● Florida Ranchlands Environmental Services Project (FRESP)
● Performance-based Environmental Policies for Agriculture 
Initiative (PEPA)
● Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) in Vermont
● Medford Water Quality Trading Program
● Silvergate Mitigation Bank 
● Forest Mitigation Banking in Maryland 
PES in Germany 
● MoorFutures®
● Trinkwasserwald® e.V.
● Blühendes Steinburg
● Naturschutzgerechte Bewirtschaftung von 
Grünland in der nordrhein-westfälischen Eifel
● Gemeinschaftlicher Wiesenvogelschutz
● Niedersächsisches Kooperationsmodell 
Trinkwasserschutz
 Flächenagentur Brandenburg GmbH
● 100 Äcker für die Vielfalt
PES in the United Kingdom
● Upstream Thinking with 
Westcountry Rivers Trust
● Woodland Carbon Code (WCC)
 Westcountry Angling Passport
  Pumlumon Project
objective of the PES presented 
 protecting and enhancing biodiversity
● providing clean drinking water and/or improving the quality of surface waters
  carbon sequestration or prevention of carbon loss
 providing cultural ecosystem services, especially the chance to enjoy the natural environment and relax
 enhancing multiple ecosystem services and biodiversity
Overview
 Trinkwasserwald® e.V.
(nationwide)
30
The following examples come closest to the typical notion of PES. 
In this type of PES, government is neither involved as a key finan-
cier nor has it regulated supply or demand. Ideally, it is the direct 
beneficiaries of the ecosystem service who pay to have them safe-
guarded or provided.
Edwards Aquifer Protection Program, United States 
The City of San Antonio obtains its drinking water pri-
marily from an artesian aquifer. In 
order to protect this source, 
land owners in sensitive 
areas refrain permanently 
from  implementing spe-
cific forms of land use. 
In return, they receive 
attractive payments finan-
ced by an increase in the 
local sales tax. Residents 
themselves voted to introduce 
and continue the program.
Upstream Thinking with Westcountry 
rivers Trust, United Kingdom 
A water company finances various 
projects in South West England 
to improve the water quality in 
key watersheds. One of the projects 
was initiated and implemented by the environ-
mental organization Westcountry Rivers Trust: 
Farmers receive payments if they reduce 
nutrient and pollutant discharge into waters by 
improving their land management. This in turn 
reduces the company’s water treatment costs.
Westcountry Angling 
Passport, United Kingdom 
The PES was initiated by the 
environmental organization 
Westcountry Rivers Trust 
and private landowners. 
Recreational anglers are granted  
access to private fishing grounds for 
a fee. Beforehand, the owners invested in the 
upkeep of the waters and the riparian zones to 
increase the recreational value for the paying 
guests. Alongside, the overall ecological 
condition of the water bodies is 
being improved. Tokens which 
can be purchased and 
redeemed through 
the environmental 
organization serve 
as a means of 
payment.
Trinkwasserwald® e.V., Germany 
The association converts privately and publicly owned areas 
of forest to increase the natural benefits of groundwater 
recharge in forests. The planting is financed partly by 
companies wishing to offset their use of water 
during production activities.
Voluntary non-go vernmental payments
W
A
T
E
r
e
c
o
s
y
s
t
e
m
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
r
E
C
r
E
A
T
I
o
N
A
L
 e
c
o
s
y
s
t
e
m
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
W
A
T
E
r
e
c
o
s
y
s
t
e
m
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
W
A
T
E
r
e
c
o
s
y
s
t
e
m
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
31
Woodland Carbon Code (WCC), 
United Kingdom 
The Woodland Carbon Code is the British 
standard for voluntary carbon credits 
generated through afforestation projects. 
Businesses and private individuals can 
acquire credits to mitigate their emissions. 
The afforestation projects are financed through 
the sale of credits. In addition, they may apply for 
governmental grants. Specialized carbon companies like Forest 
Carbon Ltd act as intermediaries. 
MoorFutures®, Germany 
MoorFutures® is an instrument of the 
voluntary carbon market developed 
by the University of Greifswald and 
Agri cultural and Environment Ministry 
of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania. 
Businesses or private individuals 
may offset their carbon emissions by 
purchasing certificates. The certificates 
are generated by rewetting peatlands in the 
participating federal states to reduce carbon loss.
Blühendes Steinburg, Germany 
The Stiftung Naturschutz Schleswig-Holstein and the Local Farmers‘ Association 
are testing two innovative  mechanisms for PES as part of the pilot project. 
Farmers are paid output-based for the extensive management of grassland, 
whereby they must show evidence of indicator species on their fields. The 
farmers themselves determine the amount of the payment to be received in 
advance following a tendering process.
Pumlumon Project, United Kingdom 
Initiated by the Montgomeryshire Wildlife Trust the PES aims to provide ecosystem 
services in combination with social and economic benefits. Farmers are encouraged 
to change their current land management to provide ecosystem services. In order to avoid double 
funding with government agri-environmental programs, the farmers are paid to maintain the 
infrastructure that the Trust has implemented.
vernmental payments
C
A
r
B
o
N
S
E
q
U
E
S
T
r
A
T
I
o
N
e
c
o
s
y
s
t
e
m
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
C
A
r
B
o
N
S
E
q
U
E
S
T
r
A
T
I
o
N
e
c
o
s
y
s
t
e
m
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
M
U
L
T
I
P
L
E
e
c
o
s
y
s
te
m
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
+
B
I
o
D
I
V
E
r
S
I
T
y
 .
B
I
o
D
I
V
E
r
S
I
T
y
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested