pdf viewer c# winform : Add picture to pdf form control SDK system web page wpf azure console PayingforGreen_PESinpractice3-part2259

32
In the following we would like to introduce you to some 
examples that come closest to the typical notion of PES. In 
this type of PES, government is neither involved as a key 
financier, nor has it influenced supply or demand through 
legislation. It can, however, play an important role as an inter-
mediary. Thus we are dealing here with voluntary payments 
by non-governmental stakeholders for voluntarily implemen-
ted actions. In the case of the ideal PES, it is the direct bene-
ficiaries of the ecosystem service who pay to have them safe-
guarded or provided.
The UK initiative Upstream Thinking with Westcountry 
Rivers Trust can be interpreted as such an ‘ideal PES’. Here a 
water company pays for measures to improve water quality, 
and directly benefits from it. The situation is different in the 
examples of MoorFutures®
in Germany, the British Woodland 
Carbon Code, WCC for short and the campaign of the German 
Trinkwasserwald® e.V. presented in this book: Here compa-
nies and individuals offset their carbon emissions and water 
consumption voluntarily, but there is no direct link between 
payment for and use of the ecosystem services provided. In 
the two examples of voluntary offsetting of carbon emissions, 
the MoorFutures® and the WCC, government also plays 
an important role as an intermediary by directly or indirectly 
supporting the sale of credits. In the case of the British 
Westcountry Angling Passport it is once again the direct users, 
the recreational anglers, who pay for the provision of the 
eco system benefit, namely experience and relaxation. This, 
incidentally, is the only example where payment is made for 
a cultural ecosystem service. The German PES Blühendes 
Steinburg is concerned with the protection and preservation 
of biodiversity. It is coordinated and funded by a public law 
foundation, so government is indirectly involved. Here we 
come up against the limits of our classification. This is even 
more evident in the last two examples: In the case of the 
Edwards Aquifer Protection Program in the United States 
the residents of a city pay for the security of their drinking 
water supply through an increase in the local sales tax. The 
townspeople voted for the implementation and continuation 
of the program, so basically they are direct beneficiaries as 
well as buyers of the ecosystem service provided. The program 
differs from an ‘ideal PES’ only in that the city acts as the inter-
mediary financier who collects and distributes the money. The 
British Pumlumon Project, finally, focuses on the provision of 
various ecosystem services and the protection of biodiversity 
and receives its funding from a wide range of sources, some 
non-governmental and some governmental. So this PES could 
be assigned to both the first and the second category. However, 
since according to the developers the bulk of the funding 
is covered by charitable foundations, we have assigned it to 
the category of voluntary non-governmental payments.
Voluntary non-governmental payments
Add picture to pdf form - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add a jpg to a pdf; adding an image to a pdf in preview
Add picture to pdf form - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add jpg to pdf file; add jpg signature to pdf
33
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
VB.NET image cropping method to crop picture / photo; size of created cropped image file, add antique effect Public Partial Class Form1 Inherits Form Public Sub
add image to pdf file; add jpg to pdf form
VB.NET Image: Image Scaling SDK to Scale Picture / Photo
VB.NET DLLs to Scale Image / Picture. There are two this VB.NET image scaling control add-on, we RE__Test Public Partial Class Form1 Inherits Form Public Sub New
add an image to a pdf with acrobat; add an image to a pdf in preview
34
34
institutions and universities. The initiative currently funds vari-
ous projects that help improve land management. One of them 
was initiated and implemented by the environmental organiza-
tion Westcountry Rivers Trust (WRT) 
WRT was established in 1995 to secure the preservation, 
protection and improvement of the water bodies in South West 
England, a region traditionally known as the ‘West Country’, 
and to advance the education of the public in the management 
of water. The trust has therefore garnered a lot of expertise in 
the development of watersheds and has a long-term working 
relationship with farmers through the provision of best prac-
tice advice and the administering of grant aid schemes. In the 
Upstream Thinking initiative, WRT also monitors and evaluates 
the scheme in partnership with various academic groups while 
further refining the scheme (see next page). 
WRT’s Upstream Thinking project started in the 90,000 
hectares watershed of the Upper Tamar Lake. The area is pre-
dominantly granite with rolling farmland valleys and heaths 
and therefore relatively impervious. The river water levels can 
rise rapidly and lead to surface runoff and erosion, which in 
turn affects water quality. About 500 farmers work in the region, 
using the land predominantly for dairy, beef and sheep produc-
tion. Most farms have a poor, but legally compliant infrastructure 
that allows soil particles, nutrients and fecal matter to enter 
the water courses. Resulting from those high nutrient inputs a 
S
outh West Water (SWW) provides drinking water and 
waste-water services throughout Cornwall and Devon along 
with small areas of Dorset and Somerset in southern UK – an 
operating area of more than 11,000 km
2
with 1.6 million resi-
dents. Around 90 percent of the drinking water comes from 
reservoirs and rivers. The remainder is obtained from boreholes 
and aquifers. The main reservoirs are Wimbleball in the east, 
Roadford in the center of the region, and Colliford in the west. 
Since 1989, SSW has made substantial investments in environ-
mental improvements to bring the region’s drinking water, 
sewerage systems and bathing waters into line with UK and 
European Union standards.
Those investments include the Upstream Thinking initiative 
with a total budget of £ 9.1 million over five years to manage 
water quantity and improve water quality at its source long 
before it reaches the water treatment plants. SWW started the 
initiative in 2008 with a pilot project to restore mires on 326 
hectares of protected land. Today, Upstream 
Thinking is delivered in partnership with a range 
of organizations, including trusts, governmental 
Upstream Thinking 
A water company finances various projects in South West England 
to improve the water quality in key watersheds. One of the projects 
was initiated and implemented by the environmental organization 
Westcountry Rivers Trust: Farmers receive payments if they reduce 
nutrient and pollutant discharge into waters by improving their 
land management. This in turn reduces the company’s water treat-
ment costs.
Upstream Thinking with Westcountry rivers Trust
• Universities
• Governmental  
institutions
• Other environmental  
organizations
Service Provider
•  Farmers
Beneficiary = 
Buyer
• South West 
Water
Supplier
• Westcountry 
Rivers Trust
INT Er MEDIAr y
MA rK ET
W
A
T
E
r
e
c
o
s
y
s
t
e
m
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
C# TIFF: How to Insert & Burn Picture/Image into TIFF Document
Support adding image or picture to an existing or new new REImage(@"c:\ logo.png"); // add the image powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
adding image to pdf; add png to pdf preview
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we this VB.NET image resizer control add-on, can provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
adding image to pdf file; how to add an image to a pdf
35
There is no direct contact between the beneficiary and the 
service providers, the WRT acts as an intermediary. Accordingly, 
the development of trust between the single buyer, SWW, the 
intermediary and the numerous sellers was crucial to the suc-
cess of the scheme. Another challenge was to understand that 
the Upstream Thinking grants run in competition with other 
grant schemes also available in the same watershed. Some of 
the farmers are concerned about losing valuable farmland and 
limited food production. To mitigate those concerns, the WRT 
works on improving overall farm wide efficiency.
Other projects implemented under the Upstream Thinking  
initiative of SWW are the Dartmoor Mires project, Exmoor Mires 
project, Working Wetlands and the Wild Penwithm project 
in collaboration with other environmental organizations like 
Devon Wildlife Trust, Cornwall Wildlife Trust, Exmoor National 
Park and Dartmoor National Park. The focus of those projects 
is the restoration of wetted peat moorlands and floodplain wet-
lands. In all the Upstream Thinking projects, the main aim is to 
improve the water quality and thus reduce the utility’s water 
treatment costs. Additionally, the initiative provides other posi-
tive impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem services, like the 
reduced risk of flooding. The farmers (to date about 400) also 
benefit from improved farming infrastructure and land manage-
ment. Though the payment is not based on the actual water 
quality (this is under review), it is a cost-effective and environ-
mentally friendly way of dealing with the long-term problems 
confronting the water industry.
severe blue green algae bloom was affecting the water quality 
of the Upper Tamar. To prevent this from happening again, the 
WRT, initially as part of a pilot project, offered interested farm-
ers financial assistance if they changed their farm infrastructure 
and their land management to improve the water quality. Due to 
the success of this pilot project, it was extended to the Wimble-
ball and Roadford lakes, as well as to the major river basins of 
the rivers Exe, Tamar and Fowey. Some £ 4 million are currently 
available for the WRT’s Upstream Thinking project.
The money is used to encourage farmers in these areas to 
improve their land management through capital investment 
in the kind of infrastructure that will reduce the likelihood of 
pollutants from the soil and animals reaching watercourses. 
The payments are based on activities and developments car-
ried out on a specific farm. operations are discussed in per-
son and incorporated into the farm plans. Examples of farm 
infrastructure improvements include fencing to create buffer 
strips and keep the cattle away from the catchment, building a 
slurry pit or a roof over their manure store. Farmers could also 
reduce the livestock or improve their pesticide management 
techniques. 
Farmers are required to cofund the investments, usually by 
50 percent. Additionally, farmers sign a contract detailing the 
restrictions placed on their farming operations, for instance, one 
that restricts the maximum number of livestock. The contracts 
between WRT, SWW and the farmers run either ten years or 
twenty-five years. This is based on the economic life of the farm 
infrastructure improvements. The longer contracts are actually 
covenants that ensure the improved farm infrastructure usage 
and specific land management practices will continue even if 
ownership of the farm changes hands.
Upstream Thinking with Westcountry 
rivers Trust 
region (area):  
Watersheds in South West England, United Kingdom 
(about 100,000 ha)
Starting year (stage):   
2008 (ongoing)
objective:   
Improvement of water quality
Beneficiary:  
South West Water
Service provider:  
Farmers represented by the Westcountry Rivers Trust 
(other) Intermediaries:
Universities like the University of East Anglia, 
governmental institutions, other environmental 
organizations
Budget: 
2010-2015: £ 9.1 million for the whole program; 
£ 4 million for the project of the Westcountry Rivers 
Trust
Payment arrangement: 
Input-based; level of payment is based on opportunity 
and production costs
Contact:    
Laurence Couldrick 
laurence@wrt.org.uk
www.wrt.org.uk
www.southwestwater.co.uk
VB.NET Image: How to Save Image & Print Image Using VB.NET
of saving and printing multi-page document files, like PDF and Word, in assembly with VB.NET web image viewer add-on, you VB.NET Method to Save Image / Picture.
add jpg to pdf acrobat; add picture to pdf online
VB.NET PowerPoint: Add Image to PowerPoint Document Slide/Page
image, clip art or screenshot, the picture will be AddPage", "InsertPage" and "DeletePage" to add, insert or & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
adding images to pdf files; add photo to pdf file
36
WrT, SWW and the University of East Anglia are working 
together on a further improvement of Upstream Thinking. 
The goal is to develop a PES scheme where farmers bid 
for funding from SWW in a ‘River Improvement Auction’. The 
scheme was piloted in the River Fowey watershed in summer 
and fall 2012. SWW provided £ 360,000 for the reverse-auction 
process. About 50 percent of all eligible farmers participated. 
They made bids that were double of what the regular scheme 
made available – therefore there seems to be a significant 
potential for improvements of land management. At the same 
time, the cofinancing of farmers was in the accepted bids for 
only 40 percent, rather than as part of the regular project, 50 
percent of the material costs.
Upstream Thinking with Westcountry rivers Trust
There are a number of other similar water quality programs active in the UK.  
The first PES funded by the British water industry started in 2005 and was called Sustainable Catchment 
Management Project (SCaMP). Here, the United Utilities water company, supported by civic organizations, 
created a PES under which farmers received payments for improving their operational areas; for example, 
by demarcating grazing land from river basins, or by building shelters. The difference to the Upstream 
Thinking initiative is that United Utilities is not only the financier of the PES here, but also the owner 
of the land on which the measures are implemented. The farmers are in effect the tenants of the utility. 
United Utilities provides two-thirds of SCaMP’s financing, which is in turn funded by the end-user via an 
increase in water prices. The remainder is financed through government agri-environmental programs. 
The long-term goal of the utility is to transfer as many farmers as possible to government assistance 
programs, and therefore not be permanently burdened with the costs. 
More information at: www.unitedutilities.com/scamp.aspx.
C# Image: How to Add Antique & Vintage Effect to Image, Photo
function to add antique charm to picture & photo C#.NET antique effect creating control add-on is powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
adding an image to a pdf in acrobat; how to add jpg to pdf file
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Codes to Add Antique Effect to Image with .
mature technology to replace a picture's original colors add the glow and noise, and add a little powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to add a photo to a pdf document; add image in pdf using java
37
The same goes for governmental organizations, like the 
environmental agency. We had to gain their trust by showing 
them we know what we’re doing. It takes a long time. This is 
why, a consultancy, someone coming in overnight, can’t do it 
because they don’t have that trust. If they have enough money 
to circumvent that, so that they can give 100 percent funding 
out, they might not get the service back because the farmers 
will say: We‘ll take your money, but whether I give you the ser­
vice or not you’ll have to come back. And you’ll basically get 
on to that regulation side where you need someone to enforce 
it. 
SWW had the ability to enforce but the reason why we 
spend so much time visiting the farmers and working with 
them is to try to impress on them what they are doing for SWW, 
why they’re putting these things in place. So it’s actually ex pli­
citly the service ‘better water quality’ that they are giving. If 
they are then coming out of it and going: I‘ll thrash everything 
again; then we’d have to go back. And so that’s why, knowing 
the farmer and knowing what they will and won’t do, dictates 
what to advise and not to advise. If we know that they are 
very environmentally savvy, and very switched on and know 
their business, we can advise quite technically detailed things. 
If we don’t, if we think they are sort of having trouble and don’t 
really have the knowledge and ability, we’ll give them very 
basic and easily enforceable things, i.e. don’t farm that, and 
don’t put that into maize. The negativity comes with people 
who don’t like being told what to do on their land. But we don’t 
force them. Nothing’s forced. It is just the fact that what we’re 
saying: Currently you’re doing stuff that degrades the water 
quality, and what we would like to give you is money to try to 
prevent that. Now if you want to carry on, that is up to you.
What do you think is important for a successful PES 
scheme?  
We’ve spent a lot of time studying the global PES examples 
to see where they fall down. This happens when there is no 
trust and when you can’t apportion between multiple services. 
It’s quite clear: You’ve got the uncertainty of providing services, 
which is where trust comes in, and you’ve got the difficulty of 
apportioning between services. So that third sector, that mid­
dle ethical broker, is very important, and it’s fine if you’re pro­
viding a single service. I think Upstream Thinking is a perfect 
example for a PES working and working well but it is a single 
service we are focused on. It brings in other ones as a by­prod­
uct but it is not a multiple PES. 
How did WrT build up this trust?
It’s taken us 15 years to build the relationship with the farm­
ers because we said: We are confidential. So we don’t report 
anything we see to the environmental agency. So they were 
instantly at ease. We are not here to say: Save the fish, save 
the environment. We’re here to help you as a business, make 
you more sustainable, find you grants, so on and so forth. 
Everything we say to you is voluntary, so you can pick it up 
or you can leave it. So that, plus the same people. We’ve had 
advisors who’ve worked with farmers for the last 10 year, the 
same person. 
Interview with Laurence Couldrick 
from Westcountry Rivers Trust, 
Upstream Thinking Project Manager 
and Head of Catchment Management 
38
Do you have a vision for the future of Upstream Thinking or 
PES in general?
I would love to have a genuine multiple PES, with multiple 
buyers, multiple sellers and then us in the middle, being able 
to have the trust and the tools to apportion and the people to 
trust that apportioning. That for me is the future, and to see 
whether we can genuinely get that. I generally believe we can’t 
succeed here with this sort of relationship because we don’t 
have enough scientific certainty over the data to be able to 
prove it out right to everyone. So it’s going to have to be based 
around trust and understanding about what government can 
do and can’t do, and what businesses can do and can’t do. The 
stuff that SWW is doing is not because of the fact that they want 
to save the world. It is because they want to save more money 
and make more money. So if they didn’t think it was going to 
work, they wouldn’t invest in it. On the river Fowey, farmers 
spent about more than 100,000 pounds a year on pesticides in 
there. Yet it is going to cost SWW eight million pounds to set up 
an activated carbon treatment plant down there, and it would 
cost a further, like, I think it’s 250,000 pounds a year to run it. 
Ridiculous!
Given the limited funding, how do you optimize your out-
reach to farmers?
Sometimes we’ll get enough funds to look at the whole area, 
so we see and advise every single landowner. In other areas, 
we’ll prioritize and target them, as we haven’t got enough 
money to see every farmer. We often prioritize based on our 
own knowledge. You do that by looking at the water quality of 
the sub­catchments to see which are worse than others. But 
we’re also looking at tools for targeting. Another thing is to look 
at the sources of some of your pollution, their pathways, how 
they get to the river and the receptor, where they get in, and this 
sort of pollution level mobilization connectivity, to give you pol­
lutant risk. It’s a good way to start modeling that in GIS. You can 
then add that into land use and start saying how risky any land 
use might be, and you can vary this layer, which allows you to 
generate the sort of map that tells you where the risk of having 
soil and sediment getting into the river is higher. It’s a way of 
targeting within a catchment. 
So you talk to farmers about how you can look at the land, 
the areas of erosion risks and why they might be a problem and 
what we can do about solving them. It’s just that way of know­
ing how much money, whether you’re targeting, whether you 
can cover everywhere. But no amount of modeling or mapping 
will show you exactly what happens on the ground. Every case 
is different, and the first thing the advisor talks about isn’t the 
land, the infrastructure, it’s: What’s your business? What are you 
doing? Are you going to retire in the next five years? Where are 
you, what’s your goal? All of those sorts of questions, because 
everything stems out of that discussion. So you’ve got to know 
that first.
Upstream Thinking with Westcountry rivers Trust
39
40
which holidaymakers to Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania 
could offset the greenhouse gases emitted during their trip 
over the long-term by paying for the reforestation of about 
10 m
2
of forest (www.waldaktie.de), was to be extended to 
another form of natural carbon sequestration. The new project 
was to focus mainly on business enterprises and the rehydra-
tion of peatlands in the region. MoorFutures® was the result – 
jointly designed and developed by the Ministry of Agriculture, 
Environ ment and Consumer Protection of Mecklenburg-West-
ern Pomera nia and the University of Greifswald. Following the 
concept’s commissioning in September 2011, the first actual 
rewetting project for Mecklenburg-Vorpommern started in the 
summer of 2012. Cooperation with the State of Brandenburg 
was arranged in May 2012, and in December 2012, that state 
commissioned its first project.
In both states, businesses and private individuals can now 
utilize MoorFutures® to offset the emissions caused by anything 
from single business trips to entire production processes, and 
thereby improve their greenhouse gas balance. The emission 
certificates are offered on the voluntary carbon trading market. 
The PES relies on regional commitment: the funds from the 
certificates help pay for regional rewetting projects on tracts of 
land close to the purchasing businesses.
T
he peatlands of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania have 
been the focal point of the state’s climate protection activ-
ities since the 1990s. Nearly 13 percent of the state’s land, or 
about 300,000 hectares, is comprised of moor soils, espe-
cially low-lying peatlands. Large tracts of these areas were 
intensively drained during the period of industrialization and 
are now used for agricultural and forestry purposes or peat 
extraction. In addition to the negative impact the draining 
had on specialized animal and plant species as well as soil 
and water quality, it also led to an increased release of car-
bon dioxide and nitrous oxide. With the rewetting of peat 
soils, these emissions can be greatly reduced, thus making 
an important contribution to climate protection.
The MoorFutures®
project, initially known as Moor anleihen 
(MoorBonds), was first referred to in 2009 as part of the 
“Konzept zum Schutz und zur Nutzung der Moore” (Concept 
for the Protection and Use of the Moors). The aim 
of the project was to usher in a period of climate 
protection that combined species- and biodiver-
sity protection in the peatlands. The success of 
a previous project, Waldaktie (ForestShares), in 
MoorFutures
®
MoorFutures® is an instrument of the voluntary carbon market 
developed by the University of Greifswald and Agricultural 
and Environment Ministry of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania. 
Businesses or private individuals may offset their carbon 
emissions by purchasing certificates. The certificates are 
generated by rewetting peatlands in the participating federal 
states to reduce carbon loss.
C
A
r
B
o
N
S
E
q
U
E
S
T
r
A
T
I
o
N
e
c
o
s
y
s
t
e
m
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
•  University of  
Greifswald
• LGMV
• Stiftung Umwelt- 
und Naturschutz MV 
• MUGV 
•  HNEE
Service Provider
•  Landowners
•  Service companies
Beneficiary = 
buyer
• Businesses 
• Private    
individuals
Supplier
• Ministry for 
Agriculture, Environ-  
ment and Consumer   
Protection MV
• Flächenagentur      
Brandenburg GmbH
IN TE rMEDIA r IE S
MAr K ET
41
receives payment of an amount that is primarily determined by 
the current local rents and the contractual period.
Information about the location and status of the area as 
well as the calculated emission reductions is available for 
every rewetting project. Registered serial numbers and entries 
in a project registry identify the certificates and clearly assign 
them to specific projects. It is also possible to visit the areas at 
any time to determine whether changes or improvements can 
be made. The buyer is also offered additional services, includ-
ing training seminars and management training courses on the 
peatland.
In Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, the University of 
Greifswald is responsible for the scientific monitoring of land 
development, while the State Ministry is responsible for mar-
keting, public relations and settlement coordination. Another 
important partner is the Stiftung Umwelt- und Naturschutz 
Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, which oversees the peatland funds 
and acts as the contact partner for purchase transactions. The 
Landgesellschaft Mecklenburg-Vorpommern is involved in the 
search for project areas, the approval process, the supervision 
of the areas, and the payment to the landowners. In Branden-
burg, the Eberswalde University for Sustainable Development 
carries out the scientific assessment and monitoring of the 
MoorFutures®
projects, while the professional preparation, 
implementation and long-term management of the land is per-
formed by the Flächenagentur Brandenburg GmbH.
The MoorFutures® program is considered one of 
Germany’s prime examples of a successful PES. The online 
project registry shows that the emission certificates have 
been purchased by regional companies including the energy 
supplier WEMAG AG along with local tourism providers, large 
A MoorFutures® emission certificate equates to a saving of 
one tonne of carbon dioxide, which is achieved over a period of 
30 or 50 years. The price of a certificate currently lies between 
€ 30 and just under € 70, depending on the project area and 
term. The price includes the full cost of the rewetting meas-
ures, as well as the costs for planning, water permit procedures 
and compensation for landowners and tenants. The personnel 
cost for the organization in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, 
namely the staff at the Ministry, the university and the other 
organizations involved, are not factored into the price since 
these expenses are borne by the institutions themselves.
The MoorFutures®
Standard was devised to generate the 
certificates. It was based on the Verified Carbon Standard and 
the provisions of the Kyoto Protocol. The standard defines 
the criteria for generating certificates as well as for validating 
and monitoring the projects. The amount of carbon emissions 
saved compared to conditions before the rewetting is calcu-
lated using the Greenhouse Gas Emission Site Types (GEST) 
approach. The University of Greifswald developed and contin-
ues to refine an indicator model for the greenhouse gas bal-
ance that uses specific plant communities forming due to the 
different water levels on the land.
The area for the projects is permanently secured using two 
methods: Either it is acquired for the benefit of earmarked 
projects carried out under the auspices of the Stiftung Umwelt- 
und Naturschutz Mecklenburg-Vorpommern (MV Foundation 
for the Environment and Nature Conservation). Alternatively, 
if owners do not wish to sell their land, easement agreements 
may be entered in the register of deeds. These easements 
stipu late the water level requirements even when a change 
of ownership takes place. In the second case, the landowner 
MoorFutures®
region (area):  
Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania and Brandenburg, 
Germany (about 55 ha + 13 ha)
Starting year (stage):   
2011 (ongoing)
objective:   
Prevention of carbon loss
Beneficiary:   
Businesses and private individuals acting as buyer
Service provider:   
Private landowners and service companies repre-
sented by the Ministry for Agriculture, Environment 
and Consumer Protection Mecklenburg-Western Po-
merania or the Flächenagentur Brandenburg GmbH 
(other) Intermediaries:
University of Greifswald, Landgesellschaft Mecklen-
burg-Vorpommern mbH (LGMV), Stiftung Um-
welt- und Naturschutz Mecklenburg-Vorpommern; 
Ministry for the Environment, Health and Consumer 
Protection Brandenburg (MUGV), Eberswalde Uni-
versity for Sustainable Development (HNEE)
Budget: 
Currently about €
500,000 in Mecklenburg-
Western Pomerania, € 450,000 in Brandenburg
Payment arrangement: 
Output-based, level of payment is based on the cost 
of securing land and production cost 
Contact:    
Dr. Thorsten Permien
t.permien@lu.mv-regierung.de
Anne Schöps
anne.schoeps@flaechenagentur.de
www.moorfutures.de
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested