pdf viewer c# winform : How to add an image to a pdf in reader control application utility azure web page asp.net visual studio PayingforGreen_PESinpractice4-part2260

42
companies like Volkswagen Leasing GmbH and McDonalds 
Germany Inc., as well as by private individuals, foundations 
and environmental associations. Occasionally, however, the 
project initiators have encountered criticism and acceptance 
problems, particularly among affected farmers and municipal-
ities. They see their existence threatened by the rewetting pro-
grams being enacted so close to their homes and feel left alone 
with the possible hazards of elevated groundwater levels.
Additional services provided through peatland rewetting 
have been recorded as part of a research project that was 
funded by the Bundesamt für Naturschutz (BfN, Federal Agency 
for Nature Conservation) and completed in early 2014. This 
now allows statements for the improvement of biodiversity and 
water quality in particular. Thus, the so called MoorFutures 2.0 
are the first peatland emission certificates that integrate other 
ecosystem services. 
Interview with 
Dr. Thorsten Permien, 
Unit Head of the Ministry of Agriculture, 
Environment and Consumer Protection 
Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania 
For the near future, I would hope that 
the ’peatland states’ of Germany agree to 
band together and develop this interesting 
topic further.
MoorFutures®
A glittering trap for insects: 
sundew in the bog.
How to add an image to a pdf in reader - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
how to add image to pdf file; adding image to pdf in preview
How to add an image to a pdf in reader - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
how to add image to pdf acrobat; add photo to pdf reader
43
highlight on the tourist calendar. It has become a special event, 
and is reported as such by the regional press. In the meantime, 
however, we’ve had numerous companies join the Waldaktie,  
and on the other hand, private individuals have bought 
MoorFutures
®
.
What do you think has brought about the success of the 
MoorFutures
®
?
The success of the MoorFutures® probably stems from the 
fact that it is so far the only emission certificate that’s based on 
the rewetting of peatlands and sold on the voluntary carbon 
market. With this step we’ve moved away from a traditional 
sponsorship approach towards the actual sale of a service: 
emission reduction via rehydration. And there are companies 
who say, man, that’s great! There we are with the first people 
doing this and they’re creating it with us. Another reason is the 
regional implementation. That’s similar to a weekly market, 
which is not like an anonymous market, but one that is charac­
terized by trust. And for this trust­based weekly market we have 
a Ministry that says: You’ll get a government guarantee that 
what we sell will be vouched for.
What were the particular challenges associated with the 
implementation of the project?
Trying to convince people. Generally the communication 
challenge was high, and it’s far from being over. This applies 
to competition for land, for example. We developed the Meck­
lenburg­Western Pomerania peatland protection concept 
from a technical perspective with different objectives, some of 
which will run to 2020. In addition, there was a working group 
in which the farming community, our ministry with its various 
To a certain extent the MoorFutures
®
are based on a differ-
ent project that you initiated – the Waldaktie. What was the 
intention behind that project?
The thinking behind the Waldaktie was: Could we suc­
ceed as a leading tourism destination to create an attractive 
link between tourism, environmental education, education for 
sustainable development and climate change? The Waldaktie 
developed as a result of that, and it was primarily designed 
for the end consumer, or tourists in this case. For 10 euros, 10 
square meters of nearby national forest would be reforested 
in accordance with State Forest Law. This means, among other 
things, that state forest agencies shall be obligated to support 
forest regeneration out of their own resources following an 
emergency like a bush fire, for example. That’s the promise we 
give the forest shareholders: 10 square meters will be reforested 
and sequester carbon, which is a fact! Two important implemen­
tation partners in the Waldaktie are the Tourism Association of 
Mecklenburg­Western Pomerania and the Landesforstanstalt 
(National Forest Institute). Actually, the whole thing started as 
a marketing gimmick for the tourism season in 2008, but then it 
became a great success.
Why is that? 
This definitely has something to do with the fact that Meck­
lenburg­Western Pomerania is viewed very positively in the con­
text of tourism, and also that the Waldaktie is linked with the 
positive cultural connotations associated with forestry. So two 
positive things: tourism and forestry. And I also think that the 
chance to collaborate by planting a tree yourself is extremely 
important. The region where the ‘climate forest’ is located is 
certainly connected with that; but still, the planting in itself is a 
Vikings and Germanic tribes used the 
intensely fragrant Labrador Tea to add 
a bitter note to their beer. Today, the 
evergreen plant is very rare in Germany.
C# Imaging - Scan Barcode Image in C#.NET
RasterEdge Barcode Reader DLL add-in enables developers to add barcode image recognition & types, such as Code 128, EAN-13, QR Code, PDF-417, etc.
pdf insert image; acrobat add image to pdf
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Get image information, such as its location, zonal information, metadata, and so on. Able to edit, add, delete, move, and output PDF document image.
add image pdf; add image to pdf java
44
Were, or are, the political and legal conditions for the 
project more supportive or more obstructive?
I can’t answer that question with a clear yes or no. There is a 
lot that’s new and had to be designed from scratch: There was 
no emission certificate before the MoorFutures® that was based 
on rewetting peatland. There are constantly new developments 
at both the international and federal level that we need to fol­
low and perhaps apply to the MoorFutures®. I have already 
mentioned the competition for land. And then there are the typ­
ical standards: Many people know, for example, the Gold Stand­
ard, which promises high quality even if only because of the 
name. Shouldn’t projects in Germany be at least Gold Standard 
deluxe? These standards were developed primarily for offsetting 
projects on other continents. They should guarantee the quality 
of projects in countries that might not have the same legal infra­
structure that Germany has. If I, for example, have a planning 
approval process related to water rights that’s to form the basis 
of approval for a rewetting project, then there are many things 
already written that I don’t have to additionally regulate in a 
standard. Standards also serve the goal of ‘exporting’ what are 
self­evident security rights in Germany to other countries. We 
left this duplication out when we developed the MoorFutures® 
Standards. That made it possible for us to offer the product for 
less than it would have been otherwise.
departments and of course other academic institutions, were 
all represented. The formulation of the objectives was heavily 
debated there. Secondly, there was and still is the communi­
cational challenge to make clear that peatland protection also 
means protecting the climate. It’s always great when people 
see a tree growing. Forestry has a very positive cultural conno­
tation. The peatlands are different though. Here people in prin­
ciple only see a field being flooded and then nothing more to 
begin with. Nothing grows initially so people think: There’s my 
carbon in there, that’s where the sequestration is taking place. 
Ultimately, the peatlands are primarily there to reduce emis­
sions, and that’s not easy to demonstrate. And the project, just 
like the whole voluntary carbon market, is also pretty controver­
sial, similar to the Waldaktie: There are those who consider it a 
great project with opportunities, and there are others who think 
that we’re giving people a guilty conscience and contributing to 
‘greenwashing’. Which is much easier to respond to with the 
forest than with the peatlands, simply because the forest is 
viewed positively, with this kind of ‘Bambi effect’.
For both projects, I am being increasingly asked whether 
this is a ministerial task. Should we not do without such volun­
tary tasks as a small ministry? After all, we’ve made significant 
staffing cuts in recent years. 
MoorFutures®
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
DLLs for PDF Image Extraction in VB.NET. In order to run the sample code, the following steps would be necessary. Add necessary references:
add image to pdf preview; add image to pdf file acrobat
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
add picture to pdf reader; how to add image to pdf in acrobat
45
How do you see the outlook of the project? What’s your 
best-case scenario?
From my perspective, it would be great if both projects and 
instruments – including the Waldaktie – and perhaps other 
instruments could all contribute to representing and making 
perceptible the ecosystem services provided by the State of 
Mecklenburg­Western Pomerania. In 2007, in a study by the 
magazine GEO, 16 federal states were ranked on the basis of 
who implements the most effective climate protection. Meck­
lenburg­Western Pomerania came out on top because we have 
a sparse population here without the money for big cars or 
long­distance travel, coupled with a weak economy. You’re not 
necessarily going to find allies for climate protection here that 
way. My wish would be that these market­based instruments 
even form the basis for considering nature services, namely 
ecosystem services, in discussions and negotiations about 
economic issues. The service a state like Mecklenburg­West­
ern Pomerania performs at the ecological level for the Federal 
Republic should be recognized as such, i.e. as a service. But 
that’s still a long way off. For the near future, I would hope 
that the ‘peatland states’ of Germany agree to band together 
and develop this interesting topic further. Brandenburg and 
Mecklenburg­Western Pomerania look forward to making more 
partners.
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
how to add a picture to a pdf file; how to add a picture to a pdf document
XImage.Barcode Scanner for .NET, Read, Scan and Recognize barcode
VB.NET Write: Add Image to PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for C#; XDoc.Excel for C#; XDoc.PowerPoint for
attach image to pdf form; adding image to pdf form
46
to woodland carbon projects and offers assurance and clarity 
to customers about the carbon savings that their contributions 
may realistically achieve. It thereby seeks to bolster market con-
fidence in forest carbon projects and increase private invest-
ment in forest creation. 
There are many woodland carbon projects across the UK 
where the WCC is involved. As of December 2013, 63 projects  
were validated under the WCC covering an area of 2,500 hec-
tares, with a projected sequestration of 1.2 million tons of 
carbon dioxide over their lifetime of up to 100 years. A further 
129 projects are registered and not yet validated, with a carbon 
capture potential of another 4.4 million tons of carbon dioxide 
if they pass validation. Most of the 192 registered projects are 
in England (109) and Scotland (74) Very often specialized car-
bon companies act as brokers between landowners and carbon 
buyers. They address potential buyers and landowners, develop 
and coordinate the projects, provide certification, and manage 
ongoing monitoring. 
The first-ever certification under the WCC, in September 
2011, was a project located at Milton of Mathers Farm near 
Montrose, Angus, on the east coast of Scotland. This woodland 
project was developed by Forest Carbon Ltd (www.forestcarbon.
co.uk), the UK’s leading developer of voluntary UK forestry 
N
ative woodland covers around 10 percent of the United 
Kingdom, an amount far below that of other European 
countries. Not surprisingly, various efforts have been made 
to increase this amount up to the UK government target of 12 
percent by 2060 through land afforestation. One such effort is 
the government-backed Woodland Carbon Code (WCC) initia-
tive that started in July 2011 aimed at those operating on the 
voluntary carbon market. The code provides standards for the 
creation of carbon-funded woodland, and is intended to offer 
assurances to businesses looking to invest in such projects as 
part of their carbon mitigation programs. 
The value of forests is becoming increasingly recognized, 
and many private individuals and businesses wish to contri-
bute to tree-planting schemes that help society soak up the 
carbon it emits. Woodland creation is a 
cost-effective way of sequestering carbon 
dioxide. In the process, it also delivers 
significant additional social and environ-
mental benefits. The WCC sets out pro-
ject-design and management requirements 
Woodland Carbon C ode 
The Woodland Carbon Code is the British standard for voluntary 
carbon credits generated through afforestation projects. Busi-
nesses and private individuals can acquire credits to mitigate 
their emissions. The afforestation projects are financed through 
the sale of credits. In addition, they may apply for governmental 
grants. Specialized carbon companies like Forest Carbon Ltd 
act as intermediaries.
C
A
r
B
o
N
S
E
q
U
E
S
T
r
A
T
I
o
N
e
c
o
s
y
s
t
e
m
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
• Certification 
bodies 
• UK Woodland 
Carbon Registry 
Supplier
• Carbon 
Companies 
like Forest  
Carbon Ltd
Financier
• UK Forestry 
Commission
Beneficiary = 
Buyer
• Businesses 
• Private    
individuals
Beneficiary
• General public
Service Provider
• Landowners
INT Er MEDIAr y
MAr K ET
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
Evaluation library and components enable users to annotate PDF without adobe PDF reader control installed. Able to add notes to PDF using C# source code in
add picture to pdf file; add image to pdf reader
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
List<Bitmap> images = new List<Bitmap>(); images.Add(new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.gif")); / Build a PDF document with GIF image.
acrobat insert image into pdf; add photo pdf
47
and the farm owners, J D Reid & Partners. It also conducted the 
estimate of future carbon capture levels and steered the project 
through certification under the WCC. In all their projects, For-
est Carbon Ltd provides ongoing marketing support, arranges 
and hosts site visits, and offers access to its in-house carbon 
buffer stock to insure the projects for credit buyers. Addition-
ally, Forest Carbon Ltd can provide project funding to allow 
schemes to proceed where no carbon buyer is yet identified, 
taking ownership of the carbon credits for later re-sale.
Any private or public landowner who wishes to contribute to 
climate change mitigation can participate. At present, the code 
only covers new woodland creation but it is evolving all the time 
and may extend to improved forest management in the future. 
To meet all requirements, each project must include long-term 
objectives and management plans in its certification documen-
tation. It has to meet national forestry standards and use stand-
ard methods for estimating the amount of carbon sequestered. 
After certification, projects are monitored on a regular basis 
to ensure that woodland establishment is successful, and that 
tree growth rates are consistent with the predictions of the 
project’s carbon sequestration. This also alerts project manag-
ers to take action if growth is not progressing as expected. The 
Carbon Assessment Protocol details five different methods of 
measuring the volume of timber (and therefore mass of carbon) 
in a woodland. Projects employ it as a guide to determine which 
method to use for a particular woodland or situation. Addition-
ally, estimated carbon sequestration is guaranteed through (i) 
UK law that protects forests very stringently and (ii) the creation 
of healthy project buffers as part of the methodology and the 
creation of a pooled buffer, meaning certified projects will all 
insure one another.
carbon credits and accounting for 47 of the 63 validated pro-
jects at December 2013. At the Milton of Mathers site, new 
riparian woodland for wildlife, amenity and recreation was 
planted on 17.4 hectares of land previously used as pasture 
land. The new woods follow the course of two small valleys 
(the Den of Lauriston and the Denfinella) and their brooks that 
meet on the coast at Mill of Mathers. 
The project was cofinanced by The Green Insurance Com-
pany (TGIC) and the grant the farmer received from the Scot-
tish Government to help create the wood. To meet its mitigation 
commitments to its customers, TGIC bought the woodland’s 
lifetime carbon sequestration in advance, and then used this 
to balance its customers’ car emissions as part of their vehicle 
insurance policy.
The new woodland was fenced to keep out cattle from the 
farm, and all the trees and shrubs were protected by shelters so 
that deer and rabbits could not feed on them easily. To ensure 
that the trees establish, weeds were removed and saplings that 
did not grow were replaced. There will be about 1,600 plants per 
hectare by the time the site really resembles woodland and the 
canopy closes. However, plenty of open space has been left to 
allow for walkways around the new forest and an archaeologi-
cal site within the area. The new woodlands are managed with 
a minimal amount of intervention, i.e. by maintaining access 
and removing small amounts of firewood. An estimated 6,662 
tons of carbon dioxide will be sequestered for TGIC’s customers 
over 70 years, and this amount is underwritten by the Woodland 
Carbon Code pooled buffer and Forest Carbon’s own in-house 
buffer. 
Forest Carbon Ltd worked as initiator and broker, and nego-
tiated the contract between The Green Insurance Company 
ode 
(
WCC
)
Woodland Carbon Code (WCC) 
region (area):
Unwooded areas in the United Kingdom (as of
December 2013 about 15,200 ha are covered by
registered projects)
Starting year (stage):
2011 (ongoing)
objective:
Carbon sequestration
Beneficiary:
Businesses and private individuals acting as
buyer as well as the general public represented
by the UK Forestry Commission
Service provider:
Landowners represented by Carbon Companies
(project developers) like Forest Carbon Ltd
(other) Intermediaries:
Accredited certification bodies like SGS and
SFQC, the UK Woodland Carbon Registry hosted
by Markit
Payment arrangement:
Rather output-based; level of payment is based
on opportunity and production costs minus
subsidies
Contact: 
Steve Prior 
sdp@forestcarbon.co.uk
www.forestry.gov.uk/forestry/infd-84hl57
48
All external audits, including initial project certification and 
ongoing periodic verification, are carried out by two independent 
companies – SGS and SFQS – accredited by the United Kingdom 
Accreditation Service. Each carbon unit equals a ton 
of carbon dioxide that has been sequestered during the project’s 
life. Each credit from a forest has a ‘vintage’, a period when the 
carbon is expected to be captured. The carbon units are tradable 
but there can only be one ‘end-user’ for each carbon unit in its life. 
The UK Woodland Carbon Registry, operated by Markit Environ-
mental Registry (www.markit.com), indicates the current owner of 
each carbon unit. The registry also ensures open and transparent 
project registration as well as Woodland Carbon Unit issuance, 
tracking and retirement. 
The price of carbon for purchasing companies and private 
individuals varies according to project type, species mix and 
location, but does not reflect the true costs of woodland 
establishment. Projects that sign up to the WCC can claim a 
woodland creation grant in England, Scotland, Wales and 
Northern Ireland as long as the additionality criteria is satisfied: 
In order to demonstrate additionality, a minimum contribution 
from carbon finance to total project costs is set at 15 percent. 
This element of state cofunding for projects means that the price 
of carbon to the buying company would, on average, be less 
than £ 10 per ton.
Under the Government’s GHG Reporting Guidelines, companies 
can report the carbon sequestration resulting from WCC certified 
projects against their net emissions, and thereby contribute to the 
United Kingdom meeting its greenhouse gas emissions reduction 
commitments. However, the projects do not generate internation-
ally tradable credits that comply with regulatory carbon offsetting 
schemes like the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme. 
Woodland Carbon Code (WCC)
Milton of Mathers near Montrose, Scotland, 
United Kingdom
49
ceeded only with carbon 
funding, and that a project 
doesn’t give rise to some 
counter­balancing emissions 
elsewhere. We also discussed 
the major difference: whereas 
woodland creation is about green­
house gas capture, peatland restoration is primarily about 
avoiding greenhouse gas loss. Forests constantly capture 
carbon dioxide through photosynthesis and store it, whereas 
peatlands have already completed this work and, if healthy, 
keep the carbon locked away (whilst also continuing to cap­
ture it at a very slow rate). Our drying, degrading peatlands are 
reversing this process and releasing their greenhouse gases 
back into the atmosphere, but restoration through rewetting, 
and protection, will prevent this loss. 
This distinction between carbon capture and avoided car­
bon loss could lead to an altogether different type of carbon 
credit for peat projects, based on the concept of permanence.
Carbon dioxide captured by new forests needs to demon­
strate its permanence by guaranteeing the trees will be in place 
for a long (long) time. In the UK, this occurs because we have 
(a) long contracts protecting the trees under the Woodland 
Carbon Code (50 to 100 years), and (b) a UK law that presumes 
against felling and requires replanting if felling is permitted. 
I spent the last week of January in Berlin sharing ideas with 
scientists and policy makers from the UK, Ireland, Germany, the 
Netherlands, Poland and elsewhere. It was all about our peat­
lands. For the three days, there were about forty of us all work­
ing on the next draft of Germany’s MoorFutures standard as well 
as the development of a possible UK Peatland Carbon Code. I 
gained the impression that both the UK and the German codes 
are well on their way to being credible carbon crediting mecha­
nisms for voluntary buyers.
Forest Carbon Ltd was invited to contribute because of our 
experience in the field. As an ‘architect’ of the UK Woodland 
Carbon Code and advisor to the UK’s first private peat carbon 
transaction in 2011, our company is familiar with the demands 
and challenges of the tasks involved. But in Berlin, in the com­
pany of many experts, I learned a great deal more about the 
scientific and policy developments taking place for the restora­
tion and protection of peatlands for carbon capture, biodiversity 
enhancement and water purification. I particularly enjoyed this 
workshop for its relaxed and open atmosphere. In such a set­
ting our debates were allowed to be honest, vigorous and, as a 
result, enlightening. There was a constant sense of progress. 
In comparing a woodland carbon code with a code for peat, 
I talked about common underlying principles, i.e. the need to 
ensure that projects are environmentally sound, that carbon 
estimates are accurate, that projects can be shown to have pro­
A few days in Berlin – January 2013
Steve Prior from Forest Carbon Ltd reports on developing 
a Peatland Carbon Code.
50
I hasten to add that these thoughts are exploratory and any 
initial trial phase of the UK Peatland Code should be founded on 
the sort of permanence that early corporate ‘sponsors’ of peat 
carbon restoration projects would expect, i.e. based on long­
term contracts. 
However, carbon dioxide emissions avoided (as would be the 
case with restored peatlands) are deemed to be permanent at 
the point of avoidance. For example: if you decide to Skype a 
conference call instead of several people traveling to a meet­
ing then, as you can’t go back in time and make the journey, 
the emissions avoided are permanent. The same logic could be 
applied to peat: if you rewet a peatland, you are forever avoid­
ing the emissions that would have taken place, and even if you 
later drain the peat again, you can’t go back and emit what was 
avoided.
The attraction of this line of thought is that it may help to 
solve one of the potential problems faced by peat carbon pro­
jects. With woodland projects it is generally not difficult to get 
landowners to sign up to long­term contracts because new for­
ests offer so many obvious aesthetic, environmental and utility 
benefits to landowner and neighbors. It occurred to me that a 
peat carbon project may not need to demand such long­term 
contracts because its carbon is already stored, and the restora­
tion offers immediate permanently avoided losses. This is help­
ful because, unlike woodland project hosts, the owners of large 
areas of peat are harder to persuade when it comes to signing 
contracts that prohibit them from utilizing their land long­term. 
I believe that shorter contracts – say ten years’ duration or more 
– could have a role to play in the future. If shorter contracts 
lead to an increased willingness of landowners to participate, 
we could see peatland restoration taking place on a much 
larger scale in the short term, which is when it is most urgently 
needed. In the future, as landowners gain confidence in the 
projects and in the market for the arising credits, they may be 
encouraged to renew their contract. 
Woodland Carbon Code (WCC)
51
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested