pdf viewer c# winform : Add image to pdf preview application control utility azure html .net visual studio PayingforGreen_PESinpractice6-part2262

62
What were some important considerations 
and steps taken when designing the project?
I first attended an event where the different 
approaches to output­based payment were presented, and lis­
tened carefully to learn what worked well and what didn’t work 
so well. Our idea was not to create something new, but to com­
bine existing approaches so that only a minimum amount of 
administrative effort was involved, and that farmers didn’t have 
to invest a lot of time to make a bid. We simply wanted to keep 
the design lean, and we definitely wanted to include the con­
cept of tendering.
We were then uncertain which method we wanted to use – 
either the concept employed by the University of Göttingen with 
Schles wig-Holstein. In a bid to help this process, EU fund-
ing was applied for and approved. The EU commission also 
took up the idea and is currently looking at the possibility of 
extending the project to all EU Member States. Although the 
initial preparatory steps have been taken in that direction, 
a final decision has yet to be made.
Interview with Tobias Meier, 
Stiftung Naturschutz Schleswig-Holstein, 
Employee responsible for the project
I believe that the farmer is approached 
from a different direction with this 
project. He doesn’t feel like a service 
provider for nature conservation, 
but instead like a producer of nature 
conservation.
Blühendes Steinburg
The Maiden Pink likes poor, 
lime deficient soils.
Add image to pdf preview - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add photo to pdf in preview; how to add picture to pdf
Add image to pdf preview - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add a picture to a pdf file; how to add an image to a pdf file
63
the ‘continuous circles’, or the transect method that was applied 
in Lower Saxony. We tried both in a preliminary study with four 
farmers and biologists. Both the biologists and farmers subse­
quently reported that the transect method was easier and faster. 
Apart from that, we also needed to find out which plants met 
the criteria of being an indicator species for Schleswig­Holstein. 
With the aid of the indicator species list for Lower Saxony, we 
used the transect method to inspect 100 areas in different parts 
of the state, and on the basis of that investigation, compiled a 
list together with the regional agencies.
And then there came the subject of payment, which we made 
relatively easy for ourselves. Ultimately we only had a limited 
budget to work with, and we wanted to receive bids from the 
farmers. So we simply said, “If your field has four species, what 
kind of price are you looking to receive? If your field has six 
kinds or more, what price would you be looking at then?” And in 
this way the bidding form could be filled out relatively quickly. 
The farmer only has to say which area he wants to offer, and 
how much money he wants to offer it for. But he doesn’t have 
to indicate that he expects fee level two for area X at 100 euros, 
or fee level one for area Y at 50 euros. We wanted to have fee 
levels, and for that we created partial budgets of 6,000 euros 
for fee level one and 4,000 euros for fee level two in advance. 
We then waited to see which areas came in at which fee level. 
We allocated the funds to the cheapest until the budget was 
used up. It’s of course obvious that farmers with areas at fee 
level two, namely those with six indicator species, wanted more 
for the surfaces than those with just fee level one areas. If we 
hadn’t set a partial budget, then those with fee level two areas 
would have been at a disadvantage because level one areas 
would have always been allocated first.
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Convert PDF to Tiff image (.tif, .tiff). • Convert PDF to HTML (.htm, .html). PDF Annotation. • Add sticky notes to PDF document in preview.
add image to pdf in preview; how to add image to pdf
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
PDF to Tiff image (.tif, .tiff). • Convert PDF to HTML (.htm, .html). PDF Annotation. • Add sticky notes to PDF document. • Highlight PDF text in preview.
how to add an image to a pdf in acrobat; adding a jpg to a pdf
64
areas with the highest potential. It was only important to test 
the method and to make it more widely known, and then to see 
if it was a viable addition to the already existing options in con­
tractual nature conservation. 
In your opinion, what was it about the project that made it 
so successful?
Simple design, little effort for farmers, and certainly also 
that the results are visible. You can go to the area and say ‘it’s 
in place or it isn’t’. And the farmers are not directly restricted in 
its management. Indirectly yes, since the plants can only take 
a certain amount of cultivation. Perhaps it is also the curiosity 
about being involved in such a project with its output­based 
payment and tendering process. It’s something completely new 
for the farmers to decide on how much money they want to 
receive for it. At first they were unsure, since they were used to 
doing things differently. But it also made them curious.
It is often said that an individual or organization needs to 
actively commit to a project for it to be successful. Was that 
or is that the case with you as well?
I wouldn’t say so. The project itself is relatively extensive; I 
wouldn’t say that has come about incidentally, but it hasn’t cost 
us a huge amount of manpower either. Therefore, you can’t say, 
‘If the foundation or the Local Farmers‘ Association hadn’t stood 
behind us, then the project wouldn’t have got off the ground’. I 
think at the beginning we came to a consensus relatively quickly 
that we wanted to try this project out. And we also had a repre­
sentative from the Local Farmers‘ Association who is well net­
worked in Steinburg and who spread the word here and there. 
From time to time we also considered whether to offer it nation­
Is participation in the project financially attractive to 
participants?
There have been repeated statements by the farmers that 
it was not about the money, but that they thought it was a 
good idea, and they had the feeling that, ‘while I won’t get rich 
doing this, I will in some way bring attention to the fact that 
I am extensively managing my land – particularly in an area 
where there is no chance of receiving any other additional fund­
ing’. This was more the motivation. No farmer that I talked to 
assigned production costs for this. They just said this area is 
worth 50 euros and that one 100 euros. And if I am not success­
ful, and still think the project is exciting, then I’ll try next year 
with a slightly lower bid. Most areas that were proposed were 
marginal land anyway, which farmers generally cultivate a bit 
more extensively, or where they say, for historical reasons, 
‘I always picked cuckoo flowers here for Mother‘s Day when 
I was a Iad, and that’s how it should be in the future too’. So 
there are other motives at play than just economic ones.
Do you feel that you will reach the areas with the highest 
potential using this method?
We never intended to find the areas with the highest poten­
tial. One concern during the whole discussion with the farmers 
was that high­level or valuable areas prime for nature con­
servation would be identified as a result of the project. If the 
farmers in the next few years, let‘s say for economic reasons, 
then decide to convert or intensify the area, then a local agency 
could step in and say, ‘No, you can’t do that’. It was a great con­
cern that they‘d then have problems. We had to alleviate these 
fears. Therefore, we did not prescribe how the areas were to be 
farmed, and so for us it wasn’t all that important to discover the 
Blühendes Steinburg
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
C# DLLs for Word File Preview. Add references: Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Word file in C#.net.
add image pdf document; add jpg to pdf document
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
Add necessary XDoc.PowerPoint DLL libraries into your created C# application as You may get document preview image from an existing PowerPoint file in C#.net.
add an image to a pdf; adding an image to a pdf form
65
sive factor is the result. This changes how one views this, and 
that could, to my mind, be quite beneficial in one or two areas 
of nature conservation.
wide or to suggest it to other associations, but we didn’t have 
the financial resources for that. To my mind there is no one who 
has really spearheaded this project. But once or twice a year we 
did hold talks with local conservation agency representatives 
from the Steinburg district, the Chairs of the District Farmers‘ 
Association, the State Office, the Ministry and the foundation.
Would you say your experience with the project has been 
enjoyable or not?
Enjoyable! I believe that the farmer is approached from a 
different direction with this project. He doesn’t feel like a service 
provider for nature conservation, but instead like a producer of 
nature conservation. They are not regulated by nature conser­
vation. You can see individuals motivated by this. It‘s also nice 
when one of them comes and says, ‘I have too little experience 
in managing such a species­rich area – have you got any ideas? 
How can I further exploit my field in terms of nature conserva­
tion, and what methods are there to do that?’ We have actually 
reached that point. There was even deliberation as to whether 
one could develop methods to optimize areas with the trans­
ference of grass cuttings, field seedings or similar ideas. We 
sat together with the State Office and discussed how you could 
build and structure such a development. There were also some 
farmers who wanted to try out various methods and take part 
for free, simply because they had fun doing it. But unfortunately 
that failed due to my limited time capacity. Nevertheless, it’s still 
motivating and a great result to discover that there are farm­
ers who are intensively occupying themselves with biodiversity 
and nature conservation in principle, and who want to get more 
out of it. They are approached differently and are not regulated. 
They can do what they like on their land. Really the only deci­
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
enables compressing and decompressing in preview in ASP.NET to reduce or minimize original PDF document size Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or
add an image to a pdf acrobat; add jpg to pdf
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Excel file in C#.net.
how to add a jpeg to a pdf file; add photo to pdf form
66
the aquifer to replenish groundwater levels. The agency respon-
sible for the aquifer, the Edwards Aquifer Authority, must there-
fore pay close attention to these replenishment areas.
The first regulations to protect the aquifer were introduced 
in the 1970s in response to the rising water demands of a grow-
ing population and industry. However, many of the enacted 
restrictions affected landowners who did not use the aquifer’s 
groundwater, resulting in some hostile opposition to the gov-
ernment-specified usage restrictions implemented to protect 
the aquifer. Consequently scientists, conservationists, city resi-
dents and landowners jointly developed the Edwards Aquifer 
Protection Program (also known as the San Antonio Aquifer 
Protection Initiative).
The idea was to increase the local sales tax by one eighth 
of a cent to finance the protection of essential sections within 
the aquifer’s catchment zone. In 2000, the population of San 
Antonio voted in favor of this 1/8-cent sales tax increase.       
By the beginning of 2005, this ‘green tax’ had raised $ 45 mil-
lion. The bulk of the money was used to purchase nearly 2,600 
hectares of land in the water catchment and replenishment 
zones. In 2005 and 2010 residents voted to continue the pro-
gram, with large turnouts on both occasions. The aim was to 
generate $ 90 million. Today, the program protects over 45,000 
hectares of land in the aquifer’s catchment zone.
In the first phase of the program, the land was permanently 
protected by being purchased directly or being donated. Since 
2005, however, the land has been acquired through conserva-
Edwards Aquifer Pr otection Program
The City of San Antonio obtains its drinking water primarily 
from an artesian aquifer. In order to protect this source, land 
owners in sensitive areas refrain permanently from imple-
menting specific forms of land use. In return, they receive 
attractive payments financed by an increase in the local sales 
tax. Residents themselves voted to introduce and continue the 
program.
T
he Edwards Aquifer is one of the most important water 
resources in Texas and one of the biggest artesian aqui-
fers in the world. It serves as the primary source of drinking 
water for nearly two million inhabitants in the City of San 
Antonio and the surrounding communities. The water from 
the aquifer supplies regional rivers and lakes that contain a 
diverse range of fauna and flora, including a number of pro-
tected species. The Edwards Aquifer is a karst aquifer con-
sisting of porous lime-stone, and its water catchment area 
covers a region of approximately 10,000 km
2
. Rainwater can 
seep through its pores, cracks and crevices into underground 
caves and rivers. Karst aquifers are unable to efficiently purify 
themselves, meaning contaminants may spread rapidly, with 
subsequent difficulties in filtering them out again. The karst 
groundwater and its aquifer are therefore highly sensitive, 
especially to the introduction of pollutants. The aquifer is also 
being threatened by building developments that are in the 
process of sealing off nearby areas. The quantity and quality 
of the groundwater are very closely related to the specific 
area where rainwater collects and eventually seeps into 
W
A
T
E
r
e
c
o
s
y
s
t
e
m
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
• Edwards Aquifer    
Authority 
• The Nature Conservancy 
• Green Spaces Alliance 
• Private-sector partners
Service Provider
• Landowners
• Farmers
Financier
• City of 
San Antonio
Beneficiary = 
Buyer 
• Residents of 
San Antonio
INTE rMEDIA ry
MAr K ET
How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word following steps below, you can create an image viewer WinForm Open or create a new WinForms application, add necessary dll
adding images to a pdf document; add signature image to pdf
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Generally speaking, using well-designed APIs, C# developers can do following things. Remove Image from PDF Page Using C#. Add necessary references:
adding images to pdf forms; add image to pdf online
67
The city acts as an intermediary. The sales tax surcharge is a 
stable and comprehensive method of financing. Protecting the 
land around the sensitive areas of the aquifer – supplemented 
by additional measures such as consumption savings – is con-
sidered much cheaper than diverting water from other, more 
remote areas and the technical solutions required to clean the 
water from the resulting contamination. The government and 
the City of San Antonio play the crucial roles of initiator and 
organizer, while NGOs and other partners support the process. 
One positive knock-on effect of the program is the protection of 
endangered animal and plant species, whose habitat is threat-
ened by a declining water level and the pollution of the Edwards 
Aquifer.
tion easements, which are legally valid agreements whereby 
landowners, mostly cattle farmers, permanently forgo certain 
usage rights for the benefit of nature conservation. In most 
cases this means the areas in question are not subject to inten-
sive agriculture, construction or sealing. Traditional agricultural 
activities such as grazing, hunting and fishing continue to be 
permitted in the area along with biking and hiking. The pay-
ment is negotiated individually and depends on the original 
property values and the loss of land value brought about by the 
restrictions.
The land is monitored and evaluated annually to ensure 
compliance with the individually agreed management require-
ments made to protect the groundwater. This monitoring activ-
ity is also funded solely from the sales tax surcharge. At the 
beginning of the second part of the program, launched in 2005, 
scientists developed geological, biological and hydrological 
criteria with the aid of GIS modeling to identify the parcels of 
land most likely to achieve the stated aims of the scheme. The 
City of San Antonio is responsible for the long-term oversight 
of the program. The City monitors the individual parcels of 
land and enforces the stipulations contained in the easements. 
The non-profit land trusts The Nature Conservancy and Green 
Spaces Alliance support the city by identifying suitable sites 
and negotiating with private landowners. Private partners are 
also involved, including conservation attorneys and real estate 
brokers, who sometimes advise landowners on their options.
The Edwards Aquifer Protection Program is characterized 
by the fact that those paying for the ecosystem services are, 
for the most part, also those that benefit from them. residents 
voted to introduce and continue the program and, therefore, 
more or less voluntarily, to pay for the services themselves. 
otection Program
Edwards Aquifer Protection Program 
region (area):  
San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas, USA (in total 
79,000 ha; currently about 45,000 ha protected)
Starting year (stage):   
2000 (ongoing)
objective:   
Provision of clean drinking water
Beneficiary:  
Residents of San Antonio represented by the City 
of San Antonio through revenues from the local 
sales tax
Service provider:  
Landowners and farmers
(other) Intermediaries:  
Edwards Aquifer Authority, The Nature Conser-
vancy, Green Spaces Alliance, lawyers, estate 
agents and other private-sector partners
Budget: 
2000-2005: $ 45 million
2005-2010: $ 90 million
2010-2015: $ 90 million
Payment arrangement: 
Input-based; level of payment is based on land 
value and opportunity costs for assigned usage 
rights
Contact:    
Grant Ellis 
grant.ellis@sanantonio.gov
www.sanantonio.gov/EdwardsAquifer
68
The Pumlumon Project was developed in order to change 
the current practices of land management in the Uplands and to 
create a healthy and species-rich environment. It is part of the 
conservation program Living Landscape organized by the British 
Wildlife Trusts (http://www.wildlifetrusts.org/living-landscape), 
which seeks to create sustainable and livable landscapes for 
people, animals and plants. Hence, the Pumlumon Project is not 
just a simple conservation project: It is aimed at reconnecting 
the local population with their environment, and through this, to 
familiarize people with nature ‘on the doorstep’ – a process that 
will thereby create new skills, jobs, and a safer, better future for 
the local communities.
The Montgomeryshire Wildlife Trust (MWT) is one of six indi-
vidual Wildlife Trusts in Wales, which formed a close partnership 
called Wildlife Trusts Wales. On behalf of Wildlife Trusts Wales, 
MWT started developing the Pumlumon Project in recognition 
of the fact that farmers can provide more than just food, namely 
also biodiversity gain and ecosystem services like sustainable 
soils, water and wildlife management. The organization sur-
veyed all farmers to determine whether they would be interested 
in taking part in such a new scheme. The team began working 
with interested landowners by helping them restructure their 
land management and farm new products. After discussing 
T
he Pumlumon is a massif located in central Wales. Like 
most of the uplands across Wales, ecological conditions in 
the Pumlumon area have deteriorated after decades of inten-
sive land use activities. Sheep farming, being the main agricul-
tural activity in Wales, has partly contributed to this situation. 
The results are widespread loss of heather moorland and bog 
along with dwindling numbers of species, such as red grouse 
and hen harrier. Bog draining and logging not only resulted in 
the disappearance of wildlife and supporting habitats, but also 
in soil quality deterioration and erosion that brought about 
an increased risk in flash flooding across the area. Uplands 
drainage dries out the peat soils, causing the release of locked 
carbon into the atmosphere and the soil erosion affects the 
water quality. This is a major concern, since the Pumlumon 
area is the largest watershed in Wales and the source of five 
rivers supplying water to four million people. At the same time, 
Wales’ sheep farms are struggling with falling incomes, rising 
fuel prices and declining subsidies from 
the European Union. As a result, help is 
needed for both the environment and the 
farmers.
Pumlumon Project
Initiated by the Montgomeryshire Wildlife Trust the PES aims 
to provide ecosystem services in combination with social and 
economic benefits. Farmers are encouraged to change their 
current land management to provide ecosystem services. In order 
to avoid double funding with government agri-environmental 
programs, the farmers are paid to maintain the infrastructure 
that the Trust has implemented.
M
U
L
T
I
P
L
E
e
c
o
s
y
s
te
m
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
+
B
I
o
D
I
V
E
r
S
I
T
y
 .
• Universities 
• Schools 
• Other local 
partners
Supplier
• Montgomery-
shire    
Wildlife Trust
Financier
• Charitable trusts
• Natural Resources  
Wales and  
other agencies 
• Landfill operators
Beneficiary 
• General public
Service Provider
• Landowners
• Farmers
INT Er MEDIAr y
MA rK ET
69
implemented by MWT. MWT assumes responsibility for the clo-
sure of the drainage ditches, but also offers training to farmers 
to help them obtain these skills. If the farmer also decides to 
plant one hectare of trees, he will receive an additional £ 50 per 
year for such an initiative. During the term of the agreement the 
farm is inspected once a year by project managers. Scientific 
monitoring of the impacts on hydrology and habitats ensures 
that any change in the provision of the ecosystem service can 
be quantified.
The Pumlumon Project is supported by the Countryside 
Council for Wales, Environment Agency Wales and Forestry 
Commission Wales which are now jointly known as Natural 
Resource Wales. The project is financed by a range of chari-
table trusts and through the Landfill Tax. The tax encompasses 
a credit scheme where landfill operators can contribute a per-
centage of their landfill tax liability to environmental bodies to 
carry out projects in the region. MWT acts as broker and under-
takes all monitoring and evaluation within the project area. It 
has developed partnerships with farmers and landowners, and 
deals directly with them when negotiating plans, possibilities 
and contracts. The range of the voluntary arrangements is con-
tinually expanding. A key factor in the successful outreach to 
farmers can be traced back to the employment of a local farmer 
at the project’s beginning. As MWT’s Farm Liaison Officer, the 
farmer was able to help to cremove barriers and persuade 
other farmers in the region. 
The biggest challenge of the project was to convince 
farmers as well as the conservation movement of the viability 
of ecosystem based business models, demonstrating that eco-
system service delivery was the primary mechanism for pro-
tecting biodiversity in the future. In the first five years following 
the possibilities and agreeing on the areas of land the farm-
ers wished to offer up to the scheme, six pilot projects started 
focusing on three restoration approaches and management 
changes respectively:
 Blocking drainage ditches in the peatland to restore the 
peat-forming mosses and thereby restore the carbon locking 
capacity
➜ Planting willow, birch and rowan trees to create connecting 
woodland scrub between upland habitats and lowland wood-
land and, in the process, improve floodwater management
➜ Changing grazing management to low density cattle grazing 
which should improve habitat quality and therefore biodiversity.
The projects are site specific and therefore require different 
contracts depending on the individual farm. The contracts con-
sist of two parts: one part focused on the element of changing 
land management and the second part aimed at ensuring con-
tinued management over the entire funding period. Currently 
this period is no longer than five years, but shall be extended to 
up to 30 years in the future.
To avoid the problem of double funding in cases where the 
farmer participates in government agri-environmental pro-
grams or may wish to do so in the future, the MWT does not 
pay the farmer for the activity itself, but for maintaining the 
infrastructure MWT has implemented on the respective farm. 
MTW ensures all investment costs and expenses for their 
implementation. Farmers are paid annually for the provision of 
the ecosystem service, each with £ 50 per hectare. This value 
is determined using the Welsh government valuation methods 
as a guideline. If a farmer decides to block 10 hectares of peat 
land for rewetting he will gain £ 500 per year for the provision 
of the land and the maintenance of the infrastructure measures 
Pumlumon Project
region (area):  
Wales, United Kingdom (about 40,000 ha)
Starting year (stage):   
2007 (ongoing)
objective:   
Provision of multiple ecosystem services and 
biodiversity
Beneficiary:  
General public represented by charitable trusts 
like the Waterloo Foundation, national and 
regional agencies like Natural Resources Wales, 
as well as operators of landfill sites (through the 
Landfill Tax Credit Scheme) 
Service provider:  
Landowners and farmers represented by the 
Montgomeryshire Wildlife Trust on behalf of 
Wildlife Trusts Wales
(other) Intermediaries:  
Local Partners like universities and schools
Budget: 
2008-2013: £ 625,000
Payment arrangement: 
Input-based; level of payment is based on the 
payments of government agri-environmental 
programs and total available budget
Contact:    
Liz Lewis-Reddy 
liz@montwt.co.uk
www.montwt.co.uk/pumlumon.html 
70
its start, the project was successfully piloted with 13 farmers on 
a total area of 500 hectares of land. The average cost for imple-
menting the measures and paying the farmers has been £ 265 
per hectare per year. Hydrological monitoring showed that in 
one area the ditch blocking had raised the water table by 5 cm. 
Red grouse levels at this site were the highest recorded in Wales 
in 2011. Now, companies, organizations and private individuals 
are invited to help WRT restore the remaining project area over 
the next ten years.
Pumlumon Project
The area of the Pumlumon Project is 
about the size of the city of Birmingham. 
The Severn, Wye and Rheidol rivers 
have their sources here (pilot projects 
highlighted in red).
71
on a much larger scale to stand any chance of getting any pos­
sible gain for wildlife. Most NGOs here aren’t doing this because 
within the Higher Level Schemes in Wales and England, there 
isn‘t that demarcation yet of ES. A lot of it is driven just around 
wildlife with no recognition of other sources of provisioning 
services e.g. water and carbon. Producing those new products 
can actually be more valuable than traditional sources and give 
more economic stability to farmers as the vagaries of the tra­
ditional markets often vary farmers’ incomes from year to year. 
It makes economic sense for farmers to value these products, 
change their land management and see their land from a more 
multifunctional perspective if farmers are paid properly for 
them. This partly increases acceptance of the scheme.
Do you think there is a general acceptance in the area or an 
understanding of this sort of approach?
Partly! We own land up in that area anyway. So we had quite 
a large presence which did actually help. We got in touch with 
the local landowners to see if there was any appetite, basically, 
for looking at these sorts of bigger scale projects. And we found 
that there was. We did actually target a few key people up there, 
some more friendly ones, who already had the link with us. That 
really worked actually, and it sort of built up a snowball effect, 
really. You know when people see their neighbor is getting in to 
doing something, they think: Okay, you know they are getting 
paid for that as well. So we want that, too.
Is there anything you would like to change?
The way agri­environment subsidy payment takes place, as 
this would make our job much easier. That is obviously an EU 
issue, but that is the main thing. Get rid of the profit forgone 
How did you get the project to move forward at the 
beginning?
Traditionally, agri­environment schemes have looked at 
that ‘profit forgone’ idea. The way we approached it was about 
farming new things. We knew we needed to be able to provide 
the farmers with a financial justification for what we wanted 
because that was the only rational way forward. It is all about 
the economic stability of their family business, and they often 
have a strong connection with their ground and the history of 
their holding. They want to continue, and they want something 
for their children to engage in. So looking for a way to make 
farming in the uplands more economically and ecologically 
viable was one of our main drivers.
Why is the scheme of importance to farmers?
We recognized that it is the only way to get people to think 
differently. We recognized the answer is economic. Our core 
business is biodiversity and wildlife conservation, which actu­
ally has failed. We have to adopt this approach and address it 
Interview with Clive Faulkner, 
Pumlumon Project Ecologist, 
Montgomeryshire Wildlife Trust
... getting farmers to recognize 
that they receive payments for the 
provision of ES and not necessarily 
for not having this many cattle or 
sheep.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested