pdf viewer c# winform : Add image to pdf acrobat control SDK system azure winforms web page console PayingforGreen_PESinpractice7-part2263

72
Could you please value the success of the project on an 
ecological and social basis?
We have restored hundreds of hectares of wetland habitat 
over the last few years. Before this project, we were restoring 
one or two hectares in a similar period. We have improved the 
quality of the habitat and actually increased species such as red 
grouse. I think we have made quite a difference in that respect. 
The societal question is a different one. We have an issue here 
with the small population within quite a large county: We have 
got 40,000 hectares but there are only 200 or so people who 
live in there. So we can be impacting a significant proportion of 
those people because we are changing the attitudes of those 
we have worked with and still have a very small footprint in 
terms of the societal impact. That is one of our next steps. It is 
funny that we make more of an ecological impact than a societal 
impact, considering the genesis of the project was about a soci­
etal sustainability. But we had to have the ecological delivery 
first, because now we can say: Look, this is how it works, this is 
what it is for, this is what happens and this is not scary, this is 
deliverable. Now we have got a story to go to tell people, and 
that is a difference.
idea and properly valuing these ES and getting farmers to rec­
ognize that they receive payments for the provision of ES and 
not necessarily for not having this many cattle or sheep. It is our 
perspective on the future of CAP that farmers are paid directly 
via the entitlement system for the delivery of ES. If the EU starts 
telling the private industry to find their solutions through ES 
production instead of engineered solutions, if the EU would 
force the private sector to recognize the financial viability of 
what we are doing, that would make it easier. And for sub­
sidy payments to be a formalized channeling of money back to 
organizations like ourselves or farmers directly, or whomever, to 
do this work. Not just agri­environment payments. The mind­
shift from it being a wildlife trust­funded project or government 
agri­environment scheme to actually becoming part of the eco­
nomic system is really necessary. 
Who should be responsible for paying for the new products, 
the ecosystem services?
Obviously, us paying the farmers is not the ideal solution, 
because that in itself is not sustainable. We are relying on 
grant funding. And that grant funding isn‘t necessarily targeted 
towards ecosystem service payments. That’s why we would like 
to involve the private sector like water companies or floodwater 
insurance companies. That might take time. Making the con­
nection between people is hard enough but actually business is 
going to be even harder in some respects. The best we can do is 
to provide evidence and do scientifically validated monitoring 
of the services.  This is an emerging industry. But to have some­
one paying for goods and services, you have to have hard data 
to prove that what you have done actually had an impact on a 
good or a service.
Pumlumon Project
Add image to pdf acrobat - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
how to add photo to pdf in preview; how to add a jpg to a pdf
Add image to pdf acrobat - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add image to pdf; add image to pdf form
73
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Convert image files to PDF. File & Page Process. Annotate & Comment. Add, insert PDF native annotations to PDF file. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF
add png to pdf acrobat; add picture to pdf document
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. you can easily perform file conversion from PDF document to image or document
add picture to pdf in preview; add jpeg signature to pdf
74
Florida ranchlands Environmental Services 
Project (FrESP), United States
The pilot project was launched by the World 
Wildlife Fund, Resources For the Future and local 
ranchers. Supported by federal and state funding, 
a PES for effective water management on agri   -
cultural land was developed and tested. Building on 
the successful implementation in demonstration 
ranches, a state agency PES program was 
introduced in 2011 to promote output-
based payments and regulate the 
selection of participating ranchers 
through a solicitation process.
Niedersächsisches Kooperationsmodell Trinkwasserschutz, Germany
Within the framework of the program initiated by the State of Lower Saxony, water utility companies 
and farmers are forming autonomous cooperations to safeguard and improve the quality of ground-
water. As equal partners, they agree appropriate objectives and measures to be carried out by the 
farmers in areas where drinking water is protected. Water utility companies fund the measures via their 
contributions to the water extraction levy scheme.
Gemeinschaftlicher Wiesenvogelschutz, Germany
The program for the protection of meadow birds was 
initiated by a regional environmental association and 
subsequently taken over by the federal State of 
Schleswig-Holstein. Farmers are paid output-based 
for adapting their management of the land so that 
it does not harm meadow birds and their young. 
Voluntary site supervisors play a pivotal role by 
cooperating closely with the farmers.
Voluntary governmen tal payments           
The following are examples of government-funded PES. 
The sources of financing are governmental agri-
environmental or conservation programs. These programs 
emerged in connection with the major subsidy programs 
in the field of agriculture. 
W
A
T
E
r
e
c
o
s
y
s
t
e
m
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
W
A
T
E
r
e
c
o
s
y
s
t
e
m
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
B
I
o
D
I
V
E
r
S
I
T
y
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Image and Document Conversion Supported by Windows Viewer. Convert to PDF.
how to add image to pdf form; adding an image to a pdf file
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. SDK to convert PowerPoint document to PDF document code for PowerPoint to TIFF image conversion
how to add a jpeg to a pdf; add image pdf acrobat
75
tal payments           
Naturschutzgerechte Bewirtschaftung von Grünland in 
der nordrhein-westfälischen Eifel, Germany 
Since the mid-1980s, farmers in the Eifel region of 
North Rhine-Westphalia have been paid to maintain and 
extensively cultivate environmentally valuable land. The 
first German project for contractual nature conservation 
was initiated by a committed university professor. It has 
now been in operation for 30 years, and is today a govern-
mental program coordinated by the biological stations in 
cooperation with the district landscape agencies.
Conservation reserve Enhancement Program (CrEP) in Vermont, 
United States 
The aim of this government PES is to reduce the amount of phosphorus 
entering several water bodies in the State of Vermont, including the important 
Lake Champlain. Farmers who cease production on environmentally sensitive 
agricultural lands and who implement special protection and maintenance 
practices receive attractive payments. In addition to federal, state and local 
authorities, environmental organizations are responsible for the acquisition and 
advisory support of farmers.
Performance-based Environmental Policies for Agriculture Initiative (PEPA), 
United States 
PEPA was initiated by the environmental organization Winrock International in collaboration with 
several universities. Its aim is to improve the cost- effectiveness of agri-environmental programs. To 
this end, the initiative is developing and implementing different output-based payments approaches 
that motivate participating farmers to link farm management decisions more closely to environmental 
outcomes.
W
A
T
E
r
e
c
o
s
y
s
t
e
m
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
W
A
T
E
r
e
c
o
s
y
s
t
e
m
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
B
I
o
D
I
V
E
r
S
I
T
y
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word SDK to convert Word document to PDF document. demo code for Word to TIFF image conversion
add jpg to pdf preview; add image to pdf acrobat reader
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Using this VB.NET Imaging PDF Watermark Add-on, you can a watermark that consists of text or image (such as And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no
add picture to pdf form; add photo to pdf preview
76
non-governmental financiers in addition to the govern mental 
financiers. In our classification quadrant, therefore, there is not 
much distance between them and voluntary non-governmental 
payments. Much the same thing applies to the Niedersäch­
sisches Kooperationsmodell Trinkwasserschutz: Measures 
to protect the quality of drinking water are supported in the 
framework of the statewide program, funded in large part 
from the water withdrawal fee paid by the water utilities. The 
regional companies are obliged by law to make such payments, 
however, and the revenues are not invested exclusively in 
the PES. Therefore this approach – in contrast to the Edwards 
Aquifer Protection Program – is more similar to a tax-funded 
governmental agri-environmental program than to examples of 
the voluntary non-governmental payments type. The example 
also shows that government has the authority to oblige the 
beneficiaries of the ecosystem service by means of levies to 
pay for its use – and does not charge those responsible for 
externalities as in our examples of the mandatory polluter-
funded payments type. And finally we describe the American 
Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program example, CREP 
for short, in Vermont, which also has improving the quality of 
the water as its objective. Due to its clear financial structure, 
it explicitly fits into the category of voluntary governmental 
payments. 
In the following examples we are dealing with govern-
ment-funded PES. The sources of funding are governmen-
tal agri-environmental or nature conservation programs like 
contractual nature conservation. Programs with this approach 
have been around for a long time. They emerged in connec-
tion with the major subsidy programs in the field of agricul-
ture. In recent years, part of the subsidies has been increas-
ingly targeted towards the payments we are discussing these 
days in relation to PES. only part of our successful examples, 
however, are successful nationwide PES. often it is regional 
PES that use these programs. In the case of governmental 
payments, the money for service transfer is voluntary for both 
parties. So in this regard at least they correspond to the typi-
cal principle of a PES. Government, however, acts as financier, 
standing in, as it were, for society‘s demand. 
The two German examples, Naturschutzgerechte 
Bewirtschaftung von Grünland in der nordrhein­westfälischen 
Eifel and Gemeinschaftlicher Wiesenvogelschutz, are dedicated 
to the conservation of biodiversity and started many years ago 
as small, partly privately funded projects. After a promising 
start on a small scale, the government took over the funding 
and expanded it. In the course of time, they have evolved into 
trend-setting governmental PES. The American example Florida 
Ranchlands Environmental Services Project, or FRESP for short, 
is a pilot project, and a government-run program was intro-
duced based on its findings. And the Performance­based Envi­
ronmental Policies for Agriculture Initiative, PEPA for short, from 
the United States was explicitly started with the aim of improv-
ing the national agri-environmental programs by testing new 
approaches. Both American examples are dedicated to ecosys-
tem services related to water quality and have attracted a few 
Voluntary governmental payments
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
as a kind of compensation for limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS VB.NET PPT: VB Code to Add Embedded Image Object to
add image to pdf in preview; how to add an image to a pdf file in acrobat
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
Also designed to be used add-on for .NET Image SDK, RasterEdge Bitmap to PDF Converter can Powerful image converter for Bitmap and PDF files; No need for
add jpg to pdf acrobat; adding a jpg to a pdf
77
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
add jpeg signature to pdf; how to add an image to a pdf in preview
PDF to WORD Converter | Convert PDF to Word, Convert Word to PDF
out transformation between different kinds of image files and Word Converter has accurate output, and PDF to Word need the support of Adobe Acrobat & Microsoft
how to add image to pdf document; how to add a photo to a pdf document
78
sive management by farmers. He initially attempted to combine 
agricultural use with biodiversity conservation on small areas of 
10, 20 or sometimes 50 hectares of land. The regional govern-
ment of North Rhine-Westphalia financed a pilot project from 
1985 to 1987 during which time the concept was transferred 
to larger plots of land. Schumacher and his colleagues from 
the Landesanstalt für Ökologie and the Chamber of Agriculture 
wanted, in particular, to explore whether and to what extent 
farmers can maintain the habitat of ecologically valuable and 
protected areas, and what costs arise in doing so.
A total of 40 farmers on 200 hectares of land consented to 
take part in this first nationwide project for contractual nature 
conservation. This figure was to double in the following two 
years. Participants committed themselves to manage fields, 
pastureland, alkaline grassland and heathland according to con-
servation criteria and to maintaining and/or restoring species 
diversity. In return for this work, they received a fee. The spe-
cific challenge was to define the necessary work and require-
ments in such a way that it would be a success from the nature 
conservation point of view. At the same time, the work was 
also to be financially rewarding for the farmers. In addition, it 
was important to the initiators that the general public be made 
aware of the concept and its success through good publicity. 
While this pilot project was being implemented, a region-
wide contractual nature conservation program was created 
O
ver the centuries the widespread use of traditional, exten-
sive forms of agriculture in Germany led to a wide biologi-
cal diversity across the country’s open fields and grasslands. 
With increasing mechanization and changing land usage in the 
1960s, the meadows and pastures that were once flower- and 
species-rich became increasingly replaced by highly productive 
but species-poor types of grass. Other grasslands were left fal-
low, converted into cropland or reforested. Flower-rich grass-
land is not just aesthetically pleasing and an important part of 
the cultural landscape, however. Above all it plays a key role in 
conserving central Europe’s biodiversity. Around 30 percent of 
the ferns and flowering plants native to Germany grow on mead-
ows, pastures, alkaline grasslands and heaths. Many animal 
species, especially birds, small mammals and insects are also 
reliant on these types of land. Today, the biodiversity of grass-
land is considered endangered in many places. 
In the district of Euskirchen in the Eifel region of North 
Rhine-Westphalia, geobotanist Professor Wolfgang Schumacher 
recognized in the mid-1970s that biological and flower diversity 
can only be maintained on cultural landscapes through exten-
Since the mid-1980s, farmers in the Eifel region of North Rhine-
Westphalia have been paid to maintain and extensively cultivate 
environmentally valuable land. The first German project for 
contractual nature conservation was initiated by a committed 
university professor. It has now been in operation for 30 years, 
and is today a governmental program coordinated by the 
biological stations in cooperation with the district landscape 
agencies.
Naturschutzgerechte
•  Biological Stations
•  NRW-Stiftung
•  The district landscape  
authorities 
•  The Chamber of  
Agriculture
•  LANUV NRW
•  University of Bonn
Service Provider
• Farmers
• Shepherds
Financier
• EU
• NRW
• Districts
Beneficiary
• General Public
INT Er MEDIAr IES
MA r KE T
B
I
o
D
I
V
E
r
S
I
T
y
Naturschutzgerechte Bewirtschaftung von 
Grünland in der nordrhein-westfälischen Eifel
79
and homeland and cultural maintenance. It leases its land on 
favorable terms to the farmers (usually for €  50 per hectare 
per annum) under the condition that these areas are managed 
according to the nature conservation program and optimized. 
If the requirements of contractual nature conservation are 
breached (which rarely occurs), the contracts can be dissolved 
and/or the lease is not extended. In some cases, farmers also 
include their own land in the program. But this land is often dif-
ficult to cultivate and often contains steep slopes or areas that 
are moist, low-lying or protected. 
The biological stations, founded in the 1990s as nonprofit 
associations, are responsible for acquiring the land. The staff 
of the biological stations, partly volunteers, acts as both 
advisers and the point of contact for the farmers. They also 
monitor the areas and give the farmers feedback on the suc-
cess of their maintenance measures. The scientific monitoring, 
control and evaluation of the program was initially conducted 
by Wolfgang Schumacher and the Agricultural Faculty of the 
University of Bonn. Since 1993, however, this task has been 
carried out by the biological stations as well. 
Today, the district of Euskirchen alone has nearly 400 farms 
on approximately 3,500 hectares of land under the contractual 
nature conservation program, with some farms having been 
involved for nearly three decades. The annual volume of grants 
totals € 1.5 million for the three districts mentioned above. The 
individual farmer can receive up to € 600 or € 700 per hectare 
in the highlands and mountainous areas of the Eifel region 
through land payments and contractual conservation pay-
ments, which is financially attractive for many farmers. 
The program‘s nature conservation and ecological success 
is undisputed: The populations of many rare plant species on 
in North Rhine-Westphalia to protect the meadows and pas-
tures in the lowland and upland areas. In 1988, this generated 
favorable conditions for the expansion of the pilot project to a 
program for the entire Eifel region of North Rhine-Westphalia. 
That program is now called Programm zur naturschutzgerech-
ten Bewirtschaftung von Grünland (program for the conserva-
tion-oriented management of grassland) and is financed by the 
European Union, the federal State of North Rhine-Westphalia, 
and the participating districts. 
Major agricultural and ancillary businesses (most dairy 
farms and nomadic shepherds) cultivate the land according to 
the requirements of nature conservation. Depending on the type 
of habitat, for example, participants no longer use fertilizers 
and plant protection products and have agreed to late mow-
ings or to keeping a smaller number of grazing cattle. In return, 
they receive € 260 to € 390 per hectare per annum. The money 
is financial compensation for income losses resulting from the 
altered form of management. The exact amount depends on the 
maintenance measures implemented. The premium is paid out 
at the end of the cultivation year. The dairy farms can also use 
the hay of the conservation areas instead of straw for young ani-
mals and dry cows, or as structurized feed in the daily rations of 
dairy cattle.
Participation in the program is voluntary for farmers. The 
corresponding contracts have a term of five years and are regu-
larly renewed. Land under nature conservation, FFH areas and 
legally protected habitats are given preference. Many of these 
areas are owned by regional, local and municipal governments, 
foundations and churches. Around 600 hectares are owned by 
the North-Rhine Westphalia foundation set up in 1986 by the 
regional government for the purpose of nature conservation 
Naturschutzgerechte Bewirtschaftung 
von Grünland in der nordrhein-west-
fälischen Eifel
Die region (area):  
The districts of Euskirchen, Düren and Aachen in 
the Eifel region of Germany (currently approxima-
tely 5,000 ha of promoted land)
Starting year (stage):   
1988 (ongoing)
objective:   
Protection and enhancement of biodiversity
Beneficiary:  
General public represented by the European 
Union (EU), the State of North Rhine-Westphalia 
(NRW) and the districts mentioned above in the 
context of a special contractual nature conserva-
tion program as part of the Kulturlandschaftspro-
gramm of North Rhine-Westphalia 
Service provider:  
Farmers, shepherds 
(other) Intermediaries:
Biological Stations in Euskirchen, Düren and 
Aachen in cooperation with the Nordrhein-West-
falen-Stiftung Naturschutz, Heimat- und Kultur-
pflege (NRW-Stiftung), the district landscape 
agencies, the Chamber of Agriculture, the 
Landesamt für Natur- Umwelt- und Verbraucher-
schutz (LANUV NRW) and the Agricultural Faculty 
of the University of Bonn
Budget: 
Currently about  1.5 million per year 
Payment arrangement: 
Input-based, level of payment is based on oppor-
tunity and production costs, plus in many cases a 
reduced lease payment for the area
Contact:    
Prof. Dr. em. Wolfgang Schumacher 
dr.wolfgang.schumacher@web.de  
Stefan Meisberger 
s.meisberger@biostationeuskirchen.de
www.biostationeuskirchen.de 
www.bs-aachen.de
www.biostation-dueren.de
www.nrw-stiftung.de
Grünlandbewirtschaftung
80
the extensively cultivated meadows, pastures, and alkaline 
grasslands have increased significantly. Arnica, antennaria, 
gentian, cowslip, wild narcissus and many orchids are growing 
in large numbers again throughout the region. Overall, the 
biodiversity of the areas has increased significantly. Today, 
contractual nature conservation is an important tool for retain-
ing the biological diversity of cultural landscapes, not only in 
the Eifel region of North Rhine-Westphalia but also in other 
regions of North Rhine-Westphalia and various German states. 
Interview with 
Professor Wolfgang Schumacher, 
Initiator of the program
Farmers must have the feeling the 
project planners and stakeholders are 
interested in us, but also know that we 
must run our businesses economically 
and that we cannot do everything 
we would like from a conservation 
perspective, perhaps.
Naturschutzgerechte Bewirtschaftung von 
Grünland in der nordrhein-westfälischen Eifel
Dandelions bloom on semi-intensive pastureland – 
an important pasture for bees in the spring.
81
uses in highland and mountainous regions, and therefore con­
flicts, such as in corn­growing regions or the Börde landscapes, 
are not particularly significant. Since the land is either under 
protection and/or owned by the government, there is no com­
petition for land use from biogas plants. This is very important 
because it would be very bad for nature and the environment if, 
after decades of highly efficient conservation, it were all to end 
overnight. To my knowledge, that hasn’t happened on any 
significant area of land in the region. We have the favorable 
situation that many of the larger dairy farms in the Eifel have 
been involved in the contractual nature conservation program 
for a long time and they are the ones that urgently need the 
predominantly public spaces. Today, of course, it is difficult to 
get new land because the competition, especially from biogas 
plants, is very strong.
The crucial question is the same today as it was back then: 
Can a successful dairy farm sensibly utilize the hay from con­
tractual nature conservation areas? We have long known that 
this is possible with young animals or dry cows. High­yield 
animals certainly need sufficient structurized material in their 
feed. Straw is normally used for this, and it might have to be 
purchased. But hay from the contractual nature conservation 
program is always better than straw and is successfully used by 
companies with milk production volumes of between 9,000 and 
10,500 liters per cow per year. 
Assuming you were thinking of developing a new program, 
what would you do differently? 
I think I would do it the same way, in principle. Certainly, 
the inclusion of other stakeholders could be done earlier and 
more efficiently. At the time, I thought it was enough to first 
you have been involved in and promoted contractual nature 
conservation in the Eifel region of North rhine-Westphalia 
from the outset. Could you briefly describe specifically 
what your tasks were in the pilot project?
At the beginning, together with the Chamber of Agriculture 
of North Rhine­Westphalia, the Rhineland Agricultural Asso­
ciation and the Landesanstalt für Ökologie, I selected around 
40 farmers who were ready and able to extensively cultivate 
ecologically valuable areas. More farmers then registered their 
interest in the following years. The farmers were firstly briefed 
onsite about the areas and the work involved. Then, as part of 
the pilot project, a feasibility study was conducted, many meas­
ures were recorded photographically and the first results docu­
mented with the help of employees and assistants. My task was 
to motivate farmers and to check whether and to what extent 
the measures had been implemented in line with nature conser­
vation guidelines, or if they had to be modified or diversified. 
Since I knew a lot of the participating farmers from previous 
projects, there was a good basis of trust from the outset. The 
aim was to implement high­level nature conservation measures, 
as well as to get to understand the farmers and their businesses 
as partners. At the same time, these were favorable conditions 
for winning over new farmers for the project.
What were or are the typical conflicts you had to consider in 
designing and launching the program?
There have not been any real conflicts, as such, perhaps 
because in this region the relationship between nature conser­
vation and agriculture has always been significantly better than 
in other districts. On the contrary: the project has improved the 
image of agriculture. Of course, there aren’t many alternative 
A sea of fragrant cowslips on mown grassland.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested