pdf viewer c# winform : Adding images to pdf forms control Library platform web page .net html web browser PayingforGreen_PESinpractice9-part2265

92
The Northern Everglades Payment for Environmental 
Services (NE-PES) Program
The Northern Everglades Payment for Environmental Ser-
vices Program (NE-PES) has its origin in FRESP but has adapted 
the PES design in some areas: It includes a solicitation process 
and a model-based, output-based payment scheme. 
As part of the solicitation process, the NE-PES Program 
encourages eligible cattle ranchers in the Northern Everglades 
to promote water management alternatives on their lands in 
order to provide ecosystem services, such as water retention 
or nutrient (specifically phosphorus or nitrogen) reduction. 
Interested ranchers submit a draft of their proposed manage-
ment alternative along with a corresponding payment claim. The 
offers are compared based on prescribed criteria, which also 
include the unit price for providing the service. Direct negotia-
tions are then held between the buyer and the potential seller 
according to the resulting ranking.
On January 2011 the responsible agency, the South Florida 
Water Management District, issued the first tender. In total, 14 
offers were submitted, each with a two-part payment structure: 
(a) the estimate of expected costs for the planning and imple-
mentation of the management alternatives, which are to be 
reimbursed as actually incurred costs, and (b) the annual ser-
vice payment expected as part of a 10-year contract for service 
provision. Eight of these offers were selected and implemented. 
The budget for the eight 10-year contracts with participating 
ranchers came to a total of around $ 7 million. The expected 
ecosystem services are calculated with the aid of a water 
resource model based on site-specific assessments of the pro-
posed management alternatives and its operations. Ranchers 
must document the measures implemented and the ecosystem 
ities were responsible for the processing and administration of 
the contracts with participating ranchers. All experiences with 
FRESP participants were incorporated into the development and 
improvement of the PES design. In addition, scientists examined 
possible tradeoffs and enhancements with other ecosystem 
services.
Getting FRESP up and running was made possible thanks to 
funding provided by two National Resource Conservation Ser-
vice grants and support from the South Florida Water Manage-
ment District, the Florida Department of Agriculture and Con-
sumer Services and the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. This money 
was used to install the water management infrastructure on 
the ranches and to collect and analyze data from each site. The 
project was managed by a dedicated WWF staff member, Sarah 
Lynch, supported by the non-profit research institute Resources 
for the Future.
The Northern Everglades Payment for Environmental Ser-
vices Program (NE-PES) (see info box), which started in January 
2011, was based on the ecological success of FRESP and the 
‘learning-by-doing’ experiences of the participating ranchers. 
Those responsible for the NE-PES believe that the opportunities 
for a program accepted by both buyers and sellers equally have 
been significantly increased through FRESP. They now hope for 
greater public support for the PES approach in which ranchers 
are paid for providing water-related ecosystem services. 
FrESP differs from other PES examples in that it had suf-
ficient resources and broad support. Therefore, a detailed 
analysis of hard-to-measure ecosystem services was possible, 
as was testing the different possibilities and action options. 
This helped significantly minimize the transaction costs of the 
NE-PES Program based on FrESP.
Florida ranchlands Environmental Services Project (FrESP)
Many reptiles (including snakes and alligators) 
and amphibians (such as the green tree frog) 
find their home in the unique wetlands of the 
Everglades.
Adding images to pdf forms - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add multiple jpg to pdf; add image to pdf
Adding images to pdf forms - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add jpg to pdf file; how to add image to pdf reader
93
services provided in order to receive their annual payment. In 
addition, they must demonstrate compliance with their contrac-
tual obligations each year on the basis of on-site checks. 
As a PES program on a watershed scale the NE-PES com-
mits to maintaining a working landscape. Ranchers are thereby 
encouraged to use and modify any existing system to produce 
the desired services in the most efficient and effective man-
ner for their lands. The provision of these ecosystem services 
also enhances and increases the habitat for watershed wildlife. 
Besides, payments for provision of these services create income 
for ranchers providing incentive to continue their cow-calf oper-
ations, thereby forestalling conversion to more intensive agri-
cultural and urban land uses.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
NET PDF document page inserting & adding component from PDF page(s) to current target PDF document in server-side application and Windows Forms project using a
adding an image to a pdf file; add jpg to pdf online
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Feel free to define text or images on PDF document and extract accordingly. Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB.NET program.
how to add an image to a pdf file; add image field to pdf form
94
so that when issues or topics came up on how to move forward, 
everyone was able to give their input. That FRESP framework 
then helped the SFWMD actually develop and implement an 
agency of the state buyer PES program. Two state agencies 
actually had the FRESP pilot project contracts with the ranchers 
that participated but they weren’t PES contracts yet, as FRESP’s 
purpose was to develop the components of a PES program.
So the intention was there before the pilot started to make 
a state program out of it?
The agencies all had various programs of working with 
landowners to improve water resource issues but not specifi­
cally payment for services. I don’t think very many PES projects 
worldwide have actually developed in the manner that NE­PES 
did. The intention of FRESP was to see if an effective PES pro­
gram could be developed in the Northern Everglades. But the 
entire effort was taking a market­based program theory and 
turning it into an actual working program, which, at the time 
this was initiated, there weren’t a lot of working programs, 
especially on the water resources perspective. FRESP was the 
investigation, the pilot implementation, monitoring, the stake­
holders getting together, identifying key issues, to formulate 
and kind of prove the idea that water resources services could 
be obtained. And then NE­PES is the actual program to solicit 
market­based water retention and nutrient retention services 
in the Northern Everglades. That being a part of the process, 
taking what was learned in FRESP and using that as a foun­
dation for NE­PES made it more acceptable, giving the stake­
holders the comfort that the pieces that they identified during 
the FRESP pilot project were included within the NE­PES. But 
whoever is the buyer, as an agency of the state, there are certain 
What were the main reasons for creating the Northern Ever-
glades Payment for Ecosystem Services Program (NE-PES) 
and what was your specific role in that?
The main reason for creating the NE­PES was to implement 
a cost­effective water resources improvement program that 
returned more water to the landscape and was also benefi­
cial to the landowners in the watershed. I developed the South 
Florida Water Management District’s (SFWMD) Dispersed Water 
Management Program which included participating in the col­
laborative FRESP initiative and was responsible for the develop­
ment and implementation of the NE­PES Program. My role was 
to take what we learned and developed from FRESP and turn it 
into an SFWMD agency PES program. FRESP was a pilot project 
which was successful in obtaining federal and state funding to 
develop and prove the idea that the services of water retention 
and water quality improvement could be provided by ranch­
ers in the Northern Everglades. So the FRESP ranchers weren’t 
getting paid to provide services but instead to participate in 
a research PES development project: to design, construct and 
monitor water management facilities to help in the develop­
ment of a PES program. It was crucial though that all the col­
laborating agencies and entities, all of our diverse stakeholder 
interests in Florida participated during that pilot project period 
Interview with Benita Whalen, 
Former head of the Department Agricultural Water 
Programs in the South Florida Water Management District 
and responsible for NE-PES 
Florida ranchlands Environmental Services Project (FrESP)
VB.NET Image: Adding Line Annotation to Images with VB.NET Doc
full sample codes for printing line annotation on images. Basic .NET sample codes for adding a line System.Text Imports System.Windows.Forms Imports RasterEdge
how to add a jpg to a pdf; attach image to pdf form
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Create new page to PDF document in both ASP.NET web server-side application and .NET Windows Forms. Support adding PDF page number.
adding images to pdf forms; acrobat insert image in pdf
95
solicitation that the SFWMD released received 19 responses 
and discussions are ongoing regarding the amount of funding 
that is available for those projects. The SFWMD has a governing 
board which makes the policy and budgetary decisions for the 
agency. The governing board initially identified two million dol­
lars to start discussions and negotiations with the top­ranked 
project. Additional funds are in the process of being identified, 
and then it will be determined how many contracts are actually 
going to be awarded.
How does the future of NE-PES look? What do you hope to 
see? 
There is still very much widespread support for the program. 
I believe there is continued evaluation being conducted as far 
as the more detailed cost­benefit type of evaluation because 
PES is not similar to the typical state/regional public facili­
ties approach. I think any program or process should always be 
looking for ways to improve and continue to streamline, imple­
ment lessons learned, evaluate and update, which is what we 
did after the first solicitation, before releasing the second. There 
were revisions to some of the tools; there were changes to the 
requirements that have to be followed. So in order to be fair and 
competitive, the SFWMD had to develop a solicitation. FRESP 
didn’t have a formal procurement solicitation; FRESP was for­
tunate to have innovative ranchers that were willing to be pilot 
projects. 
Why do you think FrESP was such a successful 
pilot-project?
The collaboration I think was the key. It was the variety 
of stakeholders with different interests that were engaged in 
the process that ensured that everyone’s concerns would be 
addressed. So we had all the individuals and organizations 
that needed to participate participating, and all of them were 
of the mindset and fortitude to really make this effort work 
and be successful. All the stakeholders need to be comfortable 
and confident with what is being developed and the approach. 
There were several memorandums of understanding or agree­
ments developed and I think that’s another key component to 
any process. At the onset, everyone gets together and agrees 
that they will participate, which provides some level of commit­
ment and defines their various roles.
Since the start of NE-PES, two solicitations have been 
released. What was the response? 
We had, under the first solicitation, received 14 proposals.  
And eight water retention projects were awarded under the 
November 2011 solicitation. So eight NE­PES projects have 
been implemented or are near construction completion. There­
fore, the projects are in year one or year two of their operation 
depending upon how long it took for permitting, construction, 
and getting the monitoring equipment in place. The second 
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
What's more, you can also protect created PDF file by adding digital signature (watermark) on PDF using C# code. Create PDF from Jpeg, png, images.
add picture to pdf online; how to add image to pdf in acrobat
VB.NET PDF: VB Code to Create PDF Windows Viewer Using DocImage
PDF page in many ways, like adding rectangle, line view, annotate, process, save and scan images (supporting JPEG and BMP) and document files (TIFF, PDF and Word
adding jpg to pdf; add photo to pdf preview
96
solicitation documents. The program needs to continually be 
in that cycle of self­improvement. With any of these programs, 
there needs to be a conscious effort to try to keep the adminis­
trative costs and any other costs, even monitoring, to a mini­
mum so the program can implement more projects, maximize 
the funds towards the implementation and the service being 
provided.
Can NE-PES be used as a model for other PES programs?
I think it can be a model for other programs but I don’t 
believe there are very many watersheds that you could just 
take the program as is and apply it. I was with the SFWMD 
for 21 years and had an additional five years with the federal 
government. I’ve always been involved in landowner initia­
tives, working with the people actually living in the watershed 
to get the results. I believe that is an important component of 
any program. Public facilities, big regional public facilities are 
necessary.
But I believe that you need to have the landowners within 
the watersheds engaged and participating to be able to meet 
watershed goals. So to apply a program like NE­PES, there is a 
lot of trust building, collaboration, discussions, data gathering, 
benchmarking, that needs to be done, so when you do go to 
put the program in place, it is positively received by all stake­
holders. If the program process doesn’t include engagement 
upfront, there is a much greater risk that it contains a flaw and 
therefore may not be successful. 
Florida ranchlands Environmental Services Project (FrESP)
“NE-PES was successful because it went through the FRESP project and made 
sure that any question or concern was addressed. If you leave anything out, if 
people don‘t think you have adequately addressed it, you are not going to get 
the participation from either the ranchers or the stakeholder groups.“
C# Image: Document Image Ellipse Annotation Creating and Adding
on color, bitional and black & white images; annotation shape to image - support adding rubber stamp powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
add photo to pdf for; add photo to pdf
C# PDF: PDF Document Viewer & Reader SDK for Windows Forms
After adding WinViewer DLL into Visual Studio Toolbox, you link to see more C# PDF imaging project converting, compressing and stroing images, documents and
add picture to pdf file; add photo pdf
97
VB.NET Image: How to Draw Annotation on Doc Images with Image SDK
other image annotating tutorials besides adding annotation using PDF document, image to pdf files and converting, compressing and stroing images, documents and
adding image to pdf; add image pdf document
VB.NET TIFF: Read, Edit & Process TIFF with VB.NET Image Document
at the page level, like TIFF page adding & deleting controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and converting, compressing and stroing images, documents and more
add picture pdf; add a jpg to a pdf
98
obstacles facing the implementation of effective, output-based 
PES to reduce water pollution from non-point sources were pre-
sented and discussed. Breakout sessions focused on developing 
usable strategies for output-based incentives which would then 
be tested. To this end, Winrock International received a Conser-
vation Innovation Grant from the US Department of Agriculture 
(USDA) Natural Resources Conservation Service. In 2006, the 
pilot projects started in small watersheds of the Upper Missis-
sippi River and Lake Champlain in Iowa and Vermont. Two dif-
ferent approaches were implemented under which the partic-
ipating farmers received flexible, output-based payments. The 
different implementation strategies and cost effectiveness of the 
approaches were then assessed.
Approach 1 attempted to incorporate environmental outcomes 
into farm business decision-making. Therefore a specific payment 
was offered to participating farmers for meeting environmental 
targets. Payments were not tied to implementing any specific 
action or practice but were made for: (i) the estimated reduction 
of phosphorus loss from the farm, (ii) achieving total phospho-
rus loss below three pounds per acre (model-based estimation 
by the state’s phosphorus index as a reference, with which most 
farmers are familiar), and (iii) demonstrating adequate nitrogen 
management (determined by measuring the nitrogen values via 
the end-of-season cornstalk nitrate test). Interested farmers ini-
tially met with project staff or a crop advisor to create or update 
the phosphorus index. Different scenarios were then identified 
I
n the United States, as in many other countries, agriculture 
is the leading contributor of non-point source pollution in 
waterways. The current government programs to control agri-
cultural pollution are focused on cost-sharing best-manage-
ment practices and compensating farmers for idling selected 
tracts of working land. The payments are tied to specific land 
use practices and may not always provide a strong link between 
farm management and environmental outcomes. Therefore, the 
programs’ effectiveness and efficiency are sometimes ques-
tioned. In 2001, Jonathan Winsten, an agricultural economist at 
the environmental organization Winrock International, started 
an initiative to help improve the cost-effectiveness of federal 
and state agri-environmental programs by enabling the develop-
ment and use of output-based incentives. 
A national workshop, funded by the Farm Foundation, kicked 
off the Performance-based Environmental Policies for Agri-
culture Initiative, PEPA, in 2003. The event brought together 
farmers from selected watersheds, representatives of federal 
and state agencies, scientists, staff of environmental 
organizations and policy makers. The opportunities and 
PEPA
PEPA was initiated by the environmental organization Winrock 
International in collaboration with several universities. Its aim is 
to improve the cost- effectiveness of agri-environmental programs. 
To this end, the initiative is developing and implementing 
different output-based payments approaches that motivate 
participating farmers to link farm management decisions more 
closely to environmental outcomes.  
W
A
T
E
r
e
c
o
s
y
s
t
e
m
s
e
r
v
i
c
e
s
Performance-based Environmental Policies for Agriculture 
Initiative 
• Winrock International
• Universities and other  
local partners 
• Farm Foundation
Service Provider
• Farmers
Financier
• USDA
Beneficiary
• General 
public
INT ErMEDIA ry
MAr K ET
99
the farmer was linked to the achievement of a specified target, 
and calculated based on a combination of actions and out-
comes. The payments for the reduction of phosphorus, nitrogen 
and/or sediment loss ranged from between $ 2.72 to $ 3.20 per 
acre (= about 0.40 ha). Approach 2 was pilot-tested in Iowa’s 
Coldwater-Palmer, Lime Creek, and Hewitt Creek watersheds. 
Just over 100 farms participated.
The results of the PEPA pilot projects were thoroughly 
evaluated and documented. They show large variation in 
cost-effectiveness among and within the categories of actions 
in approach 1 depending on the participating farm and varying 
greatly even from field to field. Not always the most cost- 
effective action was taken by the farmer. Choices have been 
based on farmer preferences, the specifics of any given farm-
ing operation and the varying levels of risk aversion. Among 
other conclusions, the PEPA team determined from this that a 
flexible, field-based PES approach was required. Moreover, the 
results showed that flexible, output-based payments motivated 
farmers to carefully consider environmental concerns in their 
business decision-making, and to implement the most effective 
actions specific to their farms. In the long term, this can also 
help to improve the viability of farms. The concept also gener-
ates participation, farmer enthusiasm, and leadership, which is 
particularly evident in the watershed councils used in approach 
2. This seems to be particularly valuable in getting broader par-
ticipation by farmers in environmental protection activities.
The PEPA initiative has done extensive education and out-
reach across the US on this subject. Winrock International is 
now conducting applied research projects on pay-for-perfor-
mance conservation in Maryland and Puerto Rico that combine 
payments for greenhouse gas emissions reductions with
using one or more actions to reduce the expected phosphorus 
loss. For the time required to participate in this first phase the 
farmer received an expense allowance of $ 400 to $ 800. In the 
second phase, the various costs associated with each action to 
be taken by the farmer were calculated, including the cost for 
each pound of reduced phosphorus discharge and the resulting 
gain or loss from each scenario. Through this the farmer could 
gauge which actions are good business decisions. Phosphorus 
reduction actions included crop rotation strategies, manure/fer-
tilizer management, sediment traps, as well as the renovation or 
replanting of riparian buffers. Actions that cost the farmer less 
than the incentive payment are considered to be good business 
decisions for the farm to implement. Due to the observation that 
initial phosphorus reductions were less costly to farmers in Iowa 
than to farmers in Vermont two different payment levels were 
defined: In Iowa, a farm received $ 10 per pound of phosphorus 
loss reduced, in Vermont $ 25. Approach 1 was tested in North 
Fork Headwaters in eastern Iowa, and the Hungerford Brook and 
Rock River watersheds in northwestern Vermont. Between 2007 
and 2009, 27 farms participated in the project.
As part of approach 2 watershed councils met to make 
group decisions on program rules and payment levels. These 
councils were led by farmers and supported by advisors. The 
participating farms were paid on the basis of how much they 
reduced phosphorus, nitrogen and sediment loss. The pay-
ments were deposited into an account and made available to 
each council for distribution. Each farmer could opt for different 
reduction targets and select the appropriate actions to meet 
them. The reduction targets and requisite actions were com-
piled in a simple matrix. All or just a few of the listed points 
could be selected and paid for. The specific payment made to 
Performance-based Environmental 
Policies for Agriculture Initiative 
(PEPA)
region (area):  
Watersheds in Iowa, Vermont, Maryland, Wis-
consin USA and in Puerto Rico (the watersheds 
usually entail an area of about 13,000 ha)
Starting year (stage):   
2003 (ongoing, today: Pay-for-Performance 
Conservation Initiative)
objective:   
Improvement of water quality 
Beneficiary:  
General public represented by the US Depart-
ment of Agriculture (USDA) 
Service provider:  
Farmers
(other) Intermediaries:
Winrock International financially supported by 
Farm Foundation; local partners like universities, 
conservation districts and other 
Budget: 
$ 3.5 million (across numerous projects)
Payment arrangement: 
Output-based; level of payment is based on 
opportunity and production costs
Contact:    
Jonathan R. Winsten 
jwinsten@winrock.org  
www.uvm.edu/~pepa/  
100
nutrient loss reductions. PEPA has also prompted the USDA 
to test output-based PES in selected small watersheds. This 
is scheduled to begin in 2014 and may well prove to be an 
important step towards firmly establishing the concept in 
agri-environmental programs.
Performance-based Environmental Policies for Agriculture 
Initiative (PEPA)
“The farmers need to see clearly that their 
actions affect the outcome and ideally only 
their actions. This means quantifying at the 
farm level. And there you often need to use 
models because measurement at the edge of 
fields is not practical on every farm.“
101
What in your experience gets the idea of starting a new PES 
project going?
The first thing that comes to mind for me is the opportunity. 
If people are looking for a way to best deal with an environmen­
tal issue, I think that’s probably what gets them thinking about 
PES as an option. For example, people working for a conserva­
tion district who are struggling with an environmental issue, 
looking to solve a nutrient issue, and somebody suggests PES, 
they might say: Okay, let’s look at that. And then there are peo­
ple who are PES people, people like me. I’m more a person with 
a tool in mind looking for applications of it. I’m not attached to 
place in that way. I have worked on this issue in a lot of different 
places and quite frankly I think I’ve been overly single­minded 
on this issue of paying for performance. But I haven‘t really 
been thinking of it as much as a PES system because for me it’s 
more how can we improve the five billion dollars per year that 
we, the US, spend on agricultural non­point source pollution 
issues, and improve the outcomes. Currently, we pay for prac­
tices, and we don’ have any real sense of what the outcome is. 
That to me is a little ludicrous. 
Do you think you need to include the target group, the farm-
ers, right from the start of a new PES?
I think it is always better to include all the stakeholders from 
the beginning. And the farmers are probably the most impor­
tant group of stakeholders. However, I don’t think that if you 
were to go ahead and design something without their input that 
means that the PES scheme wouldn’t work. But the way that we 
did it in our work was we found some places where there were 
acknowledged agriculturally related water­quality problems. 
For us, that was really important. If it is not acknowledged well 
Interview with Jonathan R. Winsten, 
Project Leader for the PEPA Initiative
I think it is always better to include 
all the stakeholders from the beginning. 
And the farmers are probably the most 
important group of stakeholders. How-
ever, I don’t think that if you were to 
go ahead and design something without 
their input that means that the PES 
scheme wouldn’t work. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested