pdf viewer c# winform : Add multiple jpg to pdf control application platform web page html winforms web browser pb4book0-part2266

“Lester Brown tells us how to build a more just world and save the plan-
et...in a practical, straightforward way. We should all heed his advice.” 
—President Bill Clinton
“...a far-reaching thinker.” 
—U.S. News & World Report
“It’s exciting ...a masterpiece!”
—Ted Turner
“[Brown’s] ability to make a complicated subject accessible to the general
reader is remarkable...” 
—Katherine Salant, Washington Post
“If the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize had been extended to a third recipient, the
logical candidate would have been Lester Brown.”
—Edward O. Wilson
“Brown is impassioned and convincing when talking about the world’s
ills and what he considers the four great goals to restoring civilization’s
equilibrium...” 
—April Streeter, TreeHugger.com
“In this impressively researched manifesto for change, Brown bluntly
sets out the challenges and offers an achievable road map for solving the
climate change crisis.”
—The Guardian
“In tackling a host of pressing issues in a single book, Plan B 2.0 makes for
an eye-opening read.”
—Times Higher Education Supplement
“The best big-picture summary of our environmental situation—both the
problems and the solutions—I’ve ever read.”
—Grist
“A great book which should wake up humankind!”
—Klaus Schwab, World Economic Forum
“Lester R. Brown, one of the world’s preeminent eco-economists...has a
solution for dealing with the threat ...Plans must be periodically revised
and refined, which Brown has done with insight and foresight in this vol-
ume.”
—Ode  
Praise for Plan B
continued...
Add multiple jpg to pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add png to pdf preview; how to add an image to a pdf
Add multiple jpg to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add image to pdf form; acrobat add image to pdf
“...a highly readable and authoritative account of the problems we face
from global warming to shrinking water resources, fisheries, forests, etc.
The picture is very frightening. But the book also provides a way forward.” 
—Clare Short, British Member of Parliament 
“Lester R. Brown gives concise, but very informative, summaries of what
he regards as  the key issues  facing  civilization as a  consequence of the
stress we put on our environment....a valuable contribution to the ongo-
ing debate.” 
—The Ecologist
“An  enormous  achievement—a  comprehensive  guide  to  what’s  going
wrong with earth’s life support system and how to fix it.”
—Grinning Planet
“Plan B has three parts: restructuring the global economy, working to erad-
icate poverty and reversing environmental destruction. Tall orders, to be
sure: but Plan B is here thoughtfully laid out to achieve the seeming impos-
sible—and with an understanding of world trends and cultures too.” 
—The Midwest Book Review
“Lester  R.  Brown...offers  an  attractive  21st-century  alternative  to  the
unacceptable  business-as-usual  path  that  we  have  been  following  with
regard  to  the  environment  (Plan  A),  which  is  leading  us  to  ‘economic
decline and collapse.’” 
—Thomas F. Malone, American Scientist 
“Brown’s overall action plan is both comprehensive and compelling.” 
—Caroline Lucas, Resurgence
“A  great  book  about  ways  to  improve  the  environment  and  sustain
economic progress.”
—St. Petersburg Times
“Plan B 3.0 is a great wealth of information on the environment unequaled
in any other source of which I am aware.” 
—Walter Youngquist, author of GeoDestinies
“Beautifully written and unimpeachably well-informed.”
—Ross Gelbspan, author of The Heat Is On
“The best single volume on saving the earth, period.”
—Geoffrey Holland, author of The Hydrogen Age
P
LAN
B4.0
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Turn multiple pages PDF into multiple jpg files in VB.NET class. Support of converting from any single one PDF page and multiple pages. Add necessary references:
add jpg to pdf document; add picture to pdf
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
of converting from any single one PDF page and multiple pages. converter library will name the converted JPEG image file Output.jpg. Add necessary references:
add image to pdf acrobat; add picture to pdf document
O
THER
N
ORTON
B
OOKS
BY
L
ESTER
R. B
ROWN
Plan B 3.0: Mobilizing to Save 
Civilization
Plan B 2.0: Rescuing a Planet
Under Stress and a 
Civilization in Trouble
Outgrowing the Earth: The Food 
Security Challenge in an Age 
of Falling Water Tables and 
Rising Temperatures
Plan B: Rescuing a Planet
Under Stress and a 
Civilization in Trouble
The Earth Policy Reader
with Janet Larsen and
Bernie Fischlowitz-Roberts
Eco-Economy: Building an 
Economy for the Earth
State of the World 1984
through 2001 
annual, with others
Vital Signs 1992 through 2001
annual, with others
Beyond Malthus
with Gary Gardner
and Brian Halweil
The World Watch Reader 1998
editor with Ed Ayres
Tough Choices
Who Will Feed China?
Full House
with Hal Kane
Saving the Planet
with Christopher Flavin
and Sandra Postel
Building a Sustainable Society
Running on Empty
with Colin Norman
and Christopher Flavin
The Twenty-Ninth Day
In the Human Interest
Earth Policy Institute® is a nonprofit environmental research organization
providing a plan for building a sustainable future. In addition to the Plan B
series, the Institute issues four-page Plan B Updates that assess progress in
implementing Plan B. All of these plus additional data and graphs can be
downloaded at no charge from the EPI Web site.
Web site: www.earthpolicy.org
P
LAN
B4.0
Mobilizing to Save Civilization
EARTH POLICY INSTITUTE
NEW YORK       LONDON
W
W
NORTON & COMPANY
Lester R. Brown
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
for combining multiple image formats into one or multiple PDF file in C# images.Add(new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")); images.Add(new Bitmap
add photo to pdf in preview; add image to pdf acrobat reader
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
Turn multiple image formats into one or multiple PDF file. 1.bmp")) images.Add(New REImage(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")) images.Add(New REImage
how to add a picture to a pdf document; adding an image to a pdf
Preface
xi
1. Selling Our Future
3
Food: The Weak Link
4
The Emerging Politics of Food Scarcity
9
Our Global Ponzi Economy
14
Mounting Stresses, Failing States
18
Plan B—A Plan to Save Civilization
23
I. THE CHALLENGES
2. Population Pressure: Land and Water
31
Civilization’s Foundation Eroding
32
Water Tables Falling
38
Farmers Losing Water to Cities
41
Land and Water Conflicts
44
Cars and People Compete for Grain
48
The Rising Tide of Environmental  Refugees
51
3. Climate Change and the Energy Transition 
55
Rising Temperature and Its Effects
56
Melting Ice, Rising Seas
61
Melting Glaciers, Shrinking Harvests
66
Rising Temperatures, Falling Yields
69
The Decline of Oil and Coal
71
AChallenge Without Precedent
75
II. THE RESPONSE
4. Stabilizing Climate: An Energy Efficiency Revolution
79
ARevolution in Lighting Technology
81
Energy-Efficient Appliances
84
Zero-Carbon Buildings
87
Copyright © 2009 by Earth Policy Institute
All rights reserved
Printed in the United States of America
First Edition
The  E
ARTH
P
OLICY
I
NSTITUTE
trademark  is  registered  in  the  U.S.  Patent  and 
Trademark Office.
The views expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily represent those
of the Earth Policy Institute; of its directors, officers, or staff; or of any funders.
The text of this book is composed in Sabon. Composition by Elizabeth Doherty;
manufacturing by Courier Westford.
ISBN 978-0-393-07103-0 (cloth) 978-0-393-33719-8 (pbk)
W. W. Norton & Company, Inc., 500 Fifth Avenue, 
New York, N.Y. 10110
www.wwnorton.com
W. W. Norton & Company, Ltd., Castle House, 75/76 Wells Street, 
London W1T 3QT
12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0
This book is printed on recycled paper.
Contents
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. Add Stamp Annotation. Create multiple pages Tiff file from PDF document. quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and
how to add image to pdf; how to add an image to a pdf in reader
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Gratis control for creating PDF from multiple image formats such as tiff, jpg, png, gif this PDF document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
how to add photo to pdf in preview; how to add a picture to a pdf file
Contents
ix
The Localization of Agriculture
230
Strategic Reductions in Demand
233
Action on Many Fronts
236
III. THE GREAT MOBILIZATION
10. Can We Mobilize Fast Enough?
241
Shifting Taxes and Subsidies 
244
Coal: The Beginning of the End 
249
Stabilizing Climate
253
Three Models of Social Change
256
AWartime Mobilization
259
Mobilizing to Save Civilization
261
What You and I Can Do
266
Notes
269
Index
341
Acknowledgments
363
About the Author
369
viii
Contents
Electrifying the Transport System
91
ANew Materials Economy
96
Smarter Grids, Appliances, and Consumers
103
The Energy Savings Potential
106
5. Stabilizing Climate: Shifting to Renewable Energy
109
Turning to the Wind
113
Solar Cells and Thermal Collectors
117
Energy from the Earth
125
Plant-Based Sources of Energy
128
Hydropower: Rivers, Tides, and Waves
132
The World Energy Economy of 2020
135
6. Designing Cities for People
143
The Ecology of Cities
145
Redesigning Urban Transport 
147
The Return of Bicycles
151
Reducing Urban Water Use
154
Farming in the City
158
Upgrading Squatter Settlements
160
Cities for People 
162
7. Eradicating Poverty and Stabilizing Population
168
Educating Everyone
171
Toward a Healthy Future
174
Stabilizing Population
181
Rescuing Failing States
185
APoverty Eradication Agenda and Budget
188
8. Restoring the Earth
192
Protecting and Restoring Forests
193
Planting Trees to Sequester Carbon
198
Conserving and Rebuilding Soils
202
Regenerating Fisheries
206
Protecting Plant and Animal Diversity
209
The Earth Restoration Budget
211
9.  Feeding Eight Billion People Well
216
Raising Land Productivity
217
Raising Water Productivity
222
Producing Protein More Efficiently
226
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
exporting PDF to multiple image forms, including Jpg, Png, Bmp high performance conversions from PDF document to multiple image forms. Add necessary references:
add picture to pdf in preview; adding image to pdf in preview
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Gratis control for creating PDF from multiple image formats such as tiff, jpg, png, gif, bmp, etc. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
pdf insert image; add an image to a pdf acrobat
Several months ago I was reading an article in Newsweek on cli-
mate and energy when a line jumped off the page: “Business as
usual has started to read like the end of the world.”
Although this conclusion may surprise many, it will not sur-
prise the scientists who track global environmental trends such
as deforestation,  soil erosion,  falling water  tables, and  rising
temperature. For some time they have been saying that if these
trends continue we will be in trouble. What was not clear was
what form the trouble would take. 
It looks now as though food is the weak link, just as it was
for many earlier civilizations. We are entering a new food era,
one marked by higher food prices, rapidly growing numbers of
hungry people, and  an  intensifying competition for land  and
water  resources that has now  crossed national  boundaries as
food-importing countries try to buy or lease vast tracts of land
in other countries.
Unlike earlier grain price hikes that were caused by singular
events—a drought in the Soviet Union or a monsoon failure in
India—and  were typically  remedied  by  the next  harvest, this
recent  rise  is  trend-driven.  Among  the trends  responsible  are
population growth, falling water tables, rising temperature, ice
melting, and the use of grain to produce fuel for cars. 
In decades past, when grain prices climbed, the U.S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture simply returned some cropland idled under
farm programs to production, but now that land is all in use.
Suddenly,  food  security  has  become  a  highly  complex  issue.
Preface
Preface
xiii
xii
Preface
Energy policy may affect future food security more than agri-
cultural  policy.  Eradicating  hunger may  depend  more on  the
success of family planners than that of farmers. Raising water
productivity may contribute more to future food security than
expanding the irrigation water supply would. 
In  his  book  The  Collapse  of Complex  Societies, Joseph
Tainter observes that civilizations  become progressively  more
complex as they evolve until eventually they cannot manage the
complexity.  I  was  reminded  of this  as  I  watched  Congress
wrestling with the climate bill, whittling away at its goals as this
book was going to press.
International institutions are also wrestling with complexity.
At this writing, all eyes are on the upcoming Copenhagen cli-
mate  conference  in  early December.  From my  vantage point,
internationally negotiated climate agreements are fast becom-
ing obsolete for two reasons. First, since no government wants
to concede too much  compared  with  other governments,  the
negotiated goals for cutting carbon emissions will almost cer-
tainly be minimalist, not remotely approaching the bold cuts
that are needed. 
And second, since it takes years to negotiate and ratify these
agreements, we may simply run out of time. This is not to say
that  we  should  not  participate  in  the negotiations  and  work
hard to get the best possible result. But we should not rely on
these agreements to save civilization.
Some of the most impressive climate stabilization advances,
such as the powerful U.S. grassroots movement that has led to a
de facto moratorium on new coal-fired power plants, had little
to do with international negotiations. At no point did the lead-
ers of this movement say that they wanted to ban new coal-fired
power plants only if Europe does, if China does, or if the rest of
the world does. They moved ahead unilaterally knowing that if
the  United States does not quickly cut  carbon  emissions,  the
world will be in trouble.
We are in a race between political tipping points and natural
tipping points. Can we cut carbon emissions fast enough to save
the Greenland ice sheet and avoid the resulting rise in sea level?
Can we close coal-fired power plants fast enough to save the gla-
ciers in the Himalayas and on the Tibetan Plateau, the ice melt
of which sustains  the  major  rivers and  irrigation systems of
Asia  during  the  dry season?  Can  we  stabilize  population  by
reducing  fertility  before  nature  takes  over  and  stabilizes  our
numbers by raising mortality?
On the climate front, everything seems to be moving faster.
Only  a  few years  ago summer  sea ice  in  the Arctic  Sea was
shrinking, but it was projected to last for several decades. The
most recent reports indicate that it could disappear in a matter
of years. 
Only a few years have passed since the most recent report by
the  Intergovernmental  Panel  on Climate  Change (IPCC), but
already the rise in carbon dioxide emissions, the rise in temper-
ature, and the rise in sea level are all moving faster than even the
IPCC’s worst-case scenario. 
The good news is that the shift to renewable energy is occur-
ring at a rate and on a scale that we could not imagine even two
years  ago.  Consider  what  is  happening  in  Texas.  The  8,000
megawatts of wind generating capacity in operation, the 1,000
megawatts under construction, and a huge amount in develop-
ment  will  give  it  over  50,000  megawatts  of wind  generating
capacity (think 50 coal-fired power plants).  This will more than
satisfy the residential needs of the state’s 24 million people. 
China, with its Wind Base program, is working on six wind
farm  mega-complexes  with  a  total  generating  capacity  of
105,000 megawatts. And this is in addition to the many smaller
wind farms already in operation and under construction.
Most recently, a consortium of European corporations and
investment banks has announced a proposal to develop a mas-
sive amount  of solar  thermal  generating  capacity  in  North
Africa, much of it for export to Europe. In total, it could easily
exceed 300,000 megawatts—roughly three times the electrical
generating capacity of France.
And we could cite many more examples. The energy transi-
tion from fossil fuels to renewable sources of energy is moving
much faster than most people realize. In the United States, for
example,  generating  capacity  for  wind  increased  by  8,400
megawatts in 2008, while that from coal increased by only 1,400
megawatts.
The question we face is not what we need to do, because that
seems rather clear to those who are analyzing the global situa-
tion. The challenge is how to do it in the time available. Unfor-
xiv
Preface
tunately we don’t know how much time remains. Nature is the
timekeeper but we cannot see the clock. 
Plan B is ambitious simply because this is what it is going to
take to turn things around. Will it be difficult? No question. Are
the stakes high? No question. 
The thinking that got us into this mess is not likely to get us
out. We need a new mindset. Let me paraphrase a comment by
environmentalist  Paul  Hawken  in  a  2009  college  commence-
ment address. In recognizing the enormity of the challenge fac-
ing us, he said: First we need to decide what needs to be done.
Then we do it. And then we ask if it is possible.
Lester R. Brown
July 2009
Earth Policy Institute
1350 Connecticut Ave. NW
Suite 403
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: (202) 496-9290
Fax: (202) 496-9325
E-mail: epi@earthpolicy.org
Web site: www.earthpolicy.org
This book can be downloaded without charge from our Web
site. Permission  for  reprinting  or  excerpting  portions  of the
manuscript  can  be  obtained  from  Reah  Janise  Kauffman  at
Earth Policy Institute. For additional information on the topics
discussed in this book, see www.earthpolicy.org.
P
LAN
B4.0
From time to time I go back and read about earlier civilizations
that declined and collapsed, trying to understand the reasons
for their demise. More often than not shrinking food supplies
were responsible.  For  the  Sumerians, rising  salt  levels  in  the
soil—the result of a  flaw in their irrigation  system—brought
down wheat and  barley  yields  and eventually  the civilization
itself.1
For  the  Mayans, soil  erosion  exacerbated  by  a  series  of
intense droughts apparently undermined their food supply and
their civilization. For other early civilizations that collapsed, it
was often soil erosion and the resulting shrinkage in harvests
that led to their decline.2
Does our civilization face a similar fate? Until recently it did
not seem possible. I resisted the idea that food shortages could
also bring down our early twenty-first century global civiliza-
tion.  But  our continuing failure to  reverse the environmental
trends that are undermining the world food economy forces me
to conclude that if we continue with business as usual such a
collapse is not only possible but likely.
The historic grain price climb in the last few years underlines
Selling Our Future
1
On  the  supply  side,  several  environmental  and  resource
trends are making it more difficult to expand food production
fast enough. Among the ongoing ones are soil erosion, aquifer
depletion, crop-shrinking heat waves, melting ice sheets and ris-
ing sea level, and the melting of the mountain glaciers that feed
major rivers and irrigation systems. In addition, three resource
trends are affecting our  food supply: the  loss of cropland to
non-farm uses, the diversion of irrigation water to cities, and
the coming reduction in oil supplies.
The first  trend  of concern  is population growth. Each year
there are 79 million more people at the dinner table. Unfortunate-
ly, the overwhelming majority of these individuals are being added
in countries where soils are eroding, water tables are falling, and
irrigation wells are going dry. If we cannot get the brakes on pop-
ulation growth, we may not be able to eradicate hunger.5
Even as our numbers are multiplying, some 3 billion people
are trying to move up the food chain, consuming more grain-
intensive livestock products. At the top of the food chain rank-
ing are the United States and Canada, where people consume on
average 800 kilograms of grain per year, most of it indirectly as
beef, pork, poultry,  milk,  and eggs. Near the bottom of this
ranking is India, where people have less than 200 kilograms of
grain each, and thus must consume nearly all of it directly, leav-
ing little for conversion into animal protein.6
Beyond this, the owners of the world’s 910 million automo-
biles want to maintain their mobility, and most are not particu-
larly concerned about whether their fuel comes from an oil well
or a corn field. The orgy of investment in ethanol fuel distiller-
ies that followed the 2005 surge in U.S. gas prices to $3 a gallon
after Hurricane Katrina raised the annual growth in world grain
consumption  from  roughly  20 million tons per  year  to  more
than 40 million tons in both 2007 and 2008, creating an epic
competition between cars and people for grain.7
Turning to the supply-side constraints, soil erosion is cur-
rently lowering the inherent productivity of some 30 percent of
the world’s cropland. In some countries, such as Lesotho and
Mongolia, it has reduced grain production by half or more over
the last three decades. Kazakhstan, the site of the Soviet Virgin
Lands project a half-century ago, has abandoned 40 percent of
its grainland since 1980. Vast dust storms coming out of sub-
Selling Our Future
5
the gravity of the situation. From mid-2006 to mid-2008, world
prices of wheat, rice, corn, and soybeans roughly tripled, reach-
ing historic highs. It was not until the global economic crisis
beginning in 2008 that grain prices receded somewhat. But even
then they were still well above the historical level.
3
The world has experienced several grain price surges over the
last  half-century,  but none  like  this.  These  earlier  trends  were
event-driven—a monsoon failure in India, a severe drought in the
Soviet Union, or a crop-shrinking heat wave in the U.S. Midwest.
The  price  surges  were  temporary,  caused  by  weather-related
events that were usually remedied by the next harvest. The record
2006–08 surge in grain prices is different. It is trend-driven. This
means that working our way out of this tightening food situation
depends on reversing the trends that are causing it, such as soil
erosion, falling water tables, and rising carbon emissions.
As a result of persistently high food prices, hunger is spread-
ing. One of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals
is to reduce hunger and malnutrition. In the mid-1990s, the num-
ber of people  in  this category had  fallen  to 825 million. But
instead of continuing to decline, the number of hungry started
to edge upward, reaching 915 million at the end of 2008. It then
jumped to over 1 billion in 2009. With business as usual, I see a
combination of the projected growth in population, the planned
diversion of grain to produce fuel for cars, spreading shortages
of irrigation  water,  and  other  trends  combining  to  push  the
number of hungry people to 1.2 billion or more by 2015.4
Rising food prices and the swelling ranks of the hungry are
among the early signs of a tightening world food situation. At a
time  when  progress  is  seen  as  almost  inevitable,  this  recent
reversal on the  food front is a disturbing setback. More  and
more, food  is looking like  the  weak  link  in our  civilization,
much as it was for the earlier ones whose archeological sites we
now study.
Food: The Weak Link
As the world struggles to feed all its people, farmers are facing
several trying trends. On the demand side of the food equation
are three consumption-boosting trends: population growth, the
growing consumption of grain-based animal protein, and, most
recently, the massive use of grain to fuel cars. 
4
PLAN B 4.0
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested