pdf viewer c# winform : Add a jpg to a pdf SDK software API .net windows web page sharepoint pb4book1-part2267

combined with thermal expansion of the oceans could raise sea
level by up to 6 feet during this century. Every rice-growing river
delta in Asia is threatened by the melting of these ice sheets.
Even  a  3-foot  rise  would  devastate  the  rice  harvest  in  the
Mekong Delta, which produces more than half the rice in Viet
Nam, the world’s number two rice exporter. A World Bank map
shows that a 3-foot rise in sea level would inundate half the rice-
land in Bangladesh, home to 160 million people. The fate of the
hundreds of millions who depend on the harvests in the rice-
growing  river  deltas  and  floodplains  of Asia  is  inextricably
linked to the fate of these major ice sheets.12
As  pressures  on  land-based  food  sources  mounted  after
World War II, the world turned to the oceans for animal pro-
tein. From 1950 to 1996 the world fish catch climbed from 19
million to 94 million tons. But then growth came to a halt. We
had reached the limits of the oceans before those of the land.
Since 1996, growth in the world seafood supply has come almost
entirely  from fish farms. The  spiraling  demand for fish feed,
most of it in the form of grain and soybean meal, is further
intensifying pressure on the earth’s land and water resources.
13
Advancing deserts—the result of overgrazing, overplowing,
and  deforestation—are encroaching  on  cropland  in  Saharan
Africa, the Middle East, Central Asia, and China. Advancing
deserts in northern and western China have forced the complete
or partial abandonment of some 24,000 villages and the crop-
land surrounding them. In Africa, the Sahara is moving south-
ward,  engulfing  cropland  in  Nigeria.  It  is  also  moving
northward, invading wheat fields in Algeria and Morocco.14
Farmers  are losing cropland  and  irrigation  water  to  non-
farm uses. The conversion of cropland to other uses looms large
in China, India, and the United States. China, with its massive
industrial and residential construction and its paving of roads,
highways, and parking lots for a fast-growing automobile fleet,
may be the world leader in cropland loss. In the United States,
suburban sprawl is consuming large tracts of farmland.
With additional water no longer available in many countries,
growing urban thirst can be satisfied only by taking irrigation
water from farmers. Thousands of farmers in thirsty California
find it more profitable to sell their irrigation water to Los Ange-
les and San Diego and leave their land idle. In India, villages are
Selling Our Future
7
Saharan Africa, northern China, western Mongolia, and Cen-
tral Asia remind us that the loss of topsoil is not only continu-
ing but expanding.8
In contrast to the loss of topsoil that began with the first
wheat and barley plantings, falling water tables are historically
quite recent, simply because the pumping capacity to deplete
aquifers has evolved only in recent decades. As a result, water
tables are now falling in countries that together contain half the
world’s people. As overpumping spreads and as aquifer deple-
tion continues, the wells are starting to go dry. Saudi Arabia has
announced that because its major aquifer, a fossil (non-replen-
ishable) aquifer, is largely depleted, it will be phasing out wheat
production entirely by 2016. A World Bank study shows that
175  million  people  in  India  are  being  fed  by  overpumping
aquifers. In China, this problem affects 130 million people.9
Climate change also threatens food security. After a certain
point, rising temperatures reduce crop yields. For each 1 degree
Celsius rise in temperature above the norm during the growing
season, farmers can expect a 10-percent decline in wheat, rice,
and corn yields. Since 1970, the earth’s average surface temper-
ature has increased by 0.6 degrees Celsius, or roughly 1 degree
Fahrenheit.  And  the  Intergovernmental  Panel  on  Climate
Change projects that the temperature will rise by up to 6 degrees
Celsius (11 degrees Fahrenheit) during this century.10
As the earth’s temperature continues to rise, mountain gla-
ciers are melting throughout the world. Nowhere is this of more
concern  than  in  Asia.  It  is the  ice  melt  from  glaciers in  the
Himalayas and on the Tibetan Plateau that sustain the major
rivers  of India  and  China,  and  the  irrigation  systems  that
depend on them, during the dry season. In Asia, both wheat and
rice fields depend on this water. China is the world’s leading
wheat  producer. India  is  number  two.  (The  United  States  is
third.) These two countries also dominate the world rice har-
vest. Whatever happens to the wheat and rice harvests in these
two  population  giants  will  affect  food  prices  everywhere.
Indeed, the projected melting of the glaciers on which these two
countries depend presents the most massive threat to food secu-
rity humanity has ever faced.11
According to the latest information on the accelerating melt-
ing  of the  Greenland and West Antarctic ice  sheets, ice melt
6
PLAN B 4.0
Add a jpg to a pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add jpg to pdf preview; adding images to a pdf document
Add a jpg to a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
adding an image to a pdf in preview; add an image to a pdf in preview
trends  that  negatively  affect  production  are  partly  offsetting
advances in technology. The question now is, Could the envi-
ronmental damage to world agriculture at some point entirely
offset the gains from advancing technology, as it has already in
Saudi Arabia and Yemen, where water shortages are shrinking
grain harvests, or in Lesotho and Mongolia, where soil erosion
is reducing harvests?20
The question—at least for now—is not will the world grain
harvest continue to expand, but will it expand fast enough to
keep pace with steadily growing demand.
Business as usual is no longer a viable option. Food security
will  deteriorate  further  unless  leading  countries  collectively
mobilize  to  stabilize  population,  stabilize  climate,  stabilize
aquifers, conserve soils, protect cropland, and restrict the use of
grain to produce fuel for cars. 
The Emerging Politics of Food Scarcity
As world food security deteriorates, a dangerous geopolitics of
food scarcity is emerging in which individual countries, acting
in  their  narrowly  defined  self-interest,  reinforce  the  negative
trends. This began in late 2007 when wheat-exporting countries
such as Russia and Argentina limited or banned exports in an
attempt to counter domestic food price rises. Viet Nam banned
rice  exports  for  several  months  for  the same  reason.  Several
other minor exporters also banned or restricted exports. While
these moves reassured those living in the exporting countries,
they created panic in the scores of countries that import grain.
21
At that point, as grain and soybean prices were tripling, gov-
ernments in grain-importing countries suddenly  realized  that
they  could  no  longer  rely  on  the  market  for  supplies.  In
response, some countries tried to nail down long-term bilateral
trade agreements that would lock up future grain supplies. The
Philippines, a leading rice importer, negotiated a three-year deal
with Viet Nam for a guaranteed 1.5 million tons of rice each
year. A delegation from Yemen, which now imports most of its
wheat, traveled to Australia with the hope of negotiating a long-
term wheat import deal. Egypt has reached a long-term agree-
ment with Russia for more than 3 million tons of wheat each
year. Other  importers sought  similar  arrangements. But  in a
seller’s market, few were successful.22
Selling Our Future
9
selling  the  water from their  irrigation  wells  to  nearby  cities.
China’s farmers are also losing irrigation water to the country’s
fast-growing cities.15
Lingering in the background is the prospect of declining oil
use as a result of either declining production or efforts to cut car-
bon emissions—or, more likely, some combination of the two.
The tripling of the world grain harvest over the last half-century
is closely tied to oil. Today oil figures prominently in the farm
economy, used in tillage, irrigation, and harvesting. Once oil pro-
duction turns downward, countries will compete for a shrinking
supply as they try to keep their agriculture producing at a high
level.  It  was relatively  easy  to  expand  world  food  production
when oil was cheap and abundant. It will be far more difficult
when the price of oil is rising and the supply is declining.16
Despite the growing need for new techniques to expand pro-
duction,  the  backlog  of unused  agricultural  technology  is
shrinking. In the more agriculturally advanced countries, farm-
ers are using virtually all the available technology to raise land
productivity. And agricultural scientists are not finding many
new ways to raise yields. In Japan, the first country to launch a
sustained rise in grain yield per hectare, rice yield increases have
stalled, with little gain over the last 14 years. In China, the rapid
rise  in  rice  yields  is now history.  In  both  France  and  Egypt,
wheat yields, which are among the world’s highest, have been
flat for roughly a decade. For the world as a whole, the rise in
grainland productivity dropped from  2.1 percent a year from
1950 to 1990 to 1.3 percent from 1990 to 2008.
17
Some commentators point to genetically modified crops as a
way  out  of this  predicament.  Unfortunately,  no  genetically
modified grains have dramatically raised yields. Nor are they
likely  to  do  so.  Scientists  using  conventional  plant  breeding
techniques have already exploited most of the genetic potential
for raising crop yields.18
The  bottom  line  is  that  harvest-expanding  scientific
advances are ever more difficult to come by as crop yields move
closer to the inherent limits of photosynthetic efficiency. This
limit in turn establishes the upper bounds of the earth’s biolog-
ical productivity, which ultimately will determine its human car-
rying capacity.19
As the world’s farmers attempt to expand the harvest, the
8
PLAN B 4.0
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
example, this C#.NET PDF to JPEG converter library will name the converted JPEG image file Output.jpg. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references
add jpg to pdf form; how to add image to pdf form
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Add necessary references page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(0) ' Convert the first PDF page to page.ConvertToImage(ImageType.JPEG, Program.RootPath + "\\Output.jpg").
how to add image to pdf file; acrobat insert image into pdf
the Saudis celebrated the arrival of the first shipment of rice
produced  on  land  they  had  acquired  in  Ethiopia,  a  country
where the WFP is currently working to feed 4.6 million people.
Another major acquisition site for the Saudis and several other
grain-importing countries is  the  Sudan—ironically the site of
the WFP’s largest famine relief effort.26
Indonesia has agreed to give Saudi investors access to 2 mil-
lion hectares (4.9 million acres) of land, much of it to grow rice.
The Saudi Binladin Group was negotiating to develop 500,000
hectares  of land  for  rice  production  in  Indonesia’s  Papua
province, but this has apparently been put on hold because of
financial constraints.
27
For sheer size of investment, China stands out. The Chinese
firm  ZTE  International  has  secured  rights  to  2.8  million
hectares (6.9 million acres) in the Democratic Republic of the
Congo on which to produce palm oil, which can be used either
for cooking or to  produce biodiesel  fuel—indicating that the
competition between food and fuel is also showing up in land
acquisitions. This compares with the 1.9 million hectares used
by the Congo’s 66 million people to produce corn, their food
staple. Like Ethiopia and Sudan, the Congo also depends on a
WFP lifeline. China is also negotiating for 2 million hectares in
Zambia  on  which  to  produce  jatropha,  an  oilseed-bearing
perennial.  Among  the  other  countries  in  which China  has
acquired land or has plans to do so are Australia, Russia, Brazil,
Kazakhstan, Myanmar, and Mozambique.28
South  Korea,  a  leading  world  corn  importer,  is  a  major
investor in several countries. With deals signed for some 690,000
hectares  (1.7  million  acres)  in  the Sudan  for  growing  wheat,
South Korea is one of the leaders in this food security push. For
perspective, this land acquisition is nearly three fourths the size
of the 930,000 hectares South Korea now uses at home to pro-
duce rice, its staple food. The Koreans are also looking at the
Russian Far East, where they plan to grow corn and soybeans.29
One of the little noticed characteristics of land acquisitions
is that they are also water acquisitions. Whether the land is rain-
fed or irrigated, it represents a claim on the water resources in
the host country. Land acquisitions in the Sudan that tap water
from the Nile, which is already fully utilized, may simply mean
that Egypt will get less water from the river—making it even
Selling Our Future
11
The inability to negotiate long-term trade agreements was
accompanied by an entirely new genre of responses among the
more affluent food-importing countries as they sought to buy or
lease for the long term large blocks of land to farm in other
countries.  As  food  supplies  tighten,  we  are  witnessing  an
unprecedented scramble for land that crosses national bound-
aries.  Libya,  importing  90  percent  of its  grain  and  worried
about access to supplies, was one of the first to look abroad for
land. After more than a year of negotiations it reached an agree-
ment to farm 100,000  hectares (250,000 acres) of land in the
Ukraine to grow wheat for its own people. This land acquisition
is typical of the many that have introduced a new chapter in the
geopolitics of food.23
What is so surprising is the sheer number of land acquisition
agreements that have been negotiated or are under considera-
tion. The International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
has compiled a list of nearly 50 agreements, based largely on a
worldwide  review  of press  reports.  Since  there  is  no  official
point of registry of such transactions, no one knows for sure
how many such agreements there are. Nor does anyone know
how many there will eventually be. This massive acquisition of
land to grow food in other countries is one of the largest geopo-
litical experiments ever conducted.24
The role of government in land acquisition varies. In some
cases, government-owned corporations are acquiring the land.
In others, private entities are the buyers, with the government of
the investing country using its diplomatic resources to achieve
an agreement favorable to the investors.
The land-buying countries are mostly those whose popula-
tions have outrun their own land and water resources. Among
them  are Saudi  Arabia,  South  Korea,  China,  Kuwait,  Libya,
India,  Egypt,  Jordan,  the  United  Arab  Emirates,  and  Qatar.
Saudi Arabia is looking to buy or lease land in at least 11 coun-
tries, including Ethiopia, Turkey, Ukraine, Sudan, Kazakhstan,
the Philippines, Viet Nam, and Brazil.
25
In contrast, countries selling or leasing their land are often
low-income  countries and, more  often than not, those  where
chronic  hunger  and  malnutrition  are  commonplace.  Some
depend on the World Food Programme (WFP) for part of their
food supply. The Financial Times reported in March 2009 that
10
PLAN B 4.0
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
Add necessary references to your C# project: String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
adding a png to a pdf; adding image to pdf file
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Add necessary references to your C# project: String inputFilePath = @"**jpg"; String outputFilePath = @"**pdf"; // Convert Jpeg to PDF and show
add a jpeg to a pdf; add an image to a pdf
Will it be hungry Pakistanis? Or perhaps farmers whose land
was confiscated to make the massive land sale to the investors?33
Another disturbing dimension of many land investments is
that they are taking place in countries like Indonesia, Brazil,
and the Democratic Republic of the Congo where expanding
cropland  typically  means  clearing  tropical  rainforests  that
sequester  large  quantities  of carbon.  This  could  measurably
raise global carbon emissions, increasing the climate threat to
world food security.
The Japanese government, IFPRI, and others have suggested
the need for an investment code that would govern these land
acquisition agreements, a code that would respect the rights of
those living in the countries of land acquisition as well as the
rights of investors. The World Bank, the U.N. Food and Agri-
culture  Organization,  and  the  African  Union  are  apparently
each drafting codes of conduct.
34
Growing world food  insecurity  is  thus  ushering  in  a new
geopolitics of food scarcity, one where the competition for land
and water resources is crossing national boundaries. Many of
the  land acquisitions are in hunger-ridden,  land-scarce coun-
tries, leaving less land to produce food for the people who live
there. The  risk is  that  this will increase hunger  and political
instability, leading to even more failing states. 
No country is immune to the effects of tightening world food
supplies, not even the United States, the world’s breadbasket.
For example, if China turns to the world market for massive
quantities of grain, as it recently has done for soybeans, it will
necessarily look to the United States, which dominates world
grain exports. For U.S. consumers, the prospect of competing
for the U.S. grain harvest with 1.3 billion Chinese consumers
with fast-rising incomes is a nightmare scenario.
35
In such a situation, it would be tempting for the United States
to restrict exports—as it did, for example, with grain and soy-
beans in the 1970s when domestic food prices soared. But this is
not an option with China, which now holds well over $1 trillion in
U.S. debt. It is often the leading international buyer at the month-
ly auctions of U.S. Treasury securities that finance the growing
U.S. fiscal deficit. In effect, China has become banker to the Unit-
ed States.Like it or not, U.S. consumers will share their grain with
Chinese consumers, regardless of how high food prices rise.36
Selling Our Future
13
more dependent on imported grain.30
These bilateral land acquisitions raise many questions. To
begin with, these negotiations and the agreements they lead to
lack transparency. Typically only a few high-ranking officials
are involved and the terms are confidential. Not only are many
stakeholders such as farmers not at the table when the agree-
ments are negotiated, they do not even learn about the deals
until after they have been signed. And since there is rarely idle
productive land in the countries where the land is being pur-
chased or leased, the agreements suggest that many local farm-
ers will simply be displaced. Their land may be confiscated or it
may be bought from them at a price over which they have little
say. This helps explain the public hostility that often arises with-
in host countries.
China, for example, signed an agreement with the Philippine
government to lease over a million hectares of land on which to
produce crops that would be shipped home. Once word leaked
out,  the  public  outcry—much of it  from  Filipino  farmers—
forced the government to suspend the agreement. A similar sit-
uation developed in Madagascar, where South Korea’s Daewoo
Logistics had pursued rights to more than 1 million hectares of
land, an area half the size of Belgium. This helped stoke the
political furor that led to a change in government and cancella-
tion of the agreement. China is also running into on-the-ground
opposition over its quest for 2 million hectares in Zambia.31
This  new  approach  to  achieving  food  security  also  raises
questions about the effects on employment. At least two coun-
tries, China and South Korea, are planning in some  cases to
bring in their own farm workers. Beyond this, is the introduc-
tion  of large-scale  commercial,  heavily  mechanized  farming
operations  what  is  needed  by  the  recipient  countries,  where
unemployment is widespread?32
If food prices are rising in the host country, will the investing
country actually be able to remove the grain it has produced on
acquired land? Or will it have to hire security forces to ensure
that the harvests can be brought home? Aware of this potential
problem, the government of Pakistan, which is trying to sell or
lease 400,000 hectares, is offering to provide a security force of
100,000 men to protect the land and assets of investors. Who
will these security forces be protecting the invested assets from?
12
PLAN B 4.0
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
1.bmp")); images.Add(new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")); images.Add(new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.png")); / Build a PDF document with
add image pdf acrobat; adding a jpeg to a pdf
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
1.bmp")) images.Add(New REImage(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")) images.Add(New REImage(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.png")) ' Build a PDF document with
add photo to pdf file; add signature image to pdf acrobat
started. But after a point, as smaller glaciers disappear and larg-
er ones shrink, the amount of ice melt declines and the river
flow diminishes. Thus we have two water-based Ponzi schemes
running in parallel in agriculture. 
And there are more such schemes. As human and livestock
populations grow more or less apace, the rising demand for for-
age eventually exceeds the sustainable yield of grasslands. As a
result, the grass deteriorates, leaving the land bare, allowing it
to turn to desert. At some point the herds of ultimately emaci-
ated cattle also collapse. In this Ponzi scheme, herders are forced
to rely on food aid or they migrate to cities.
Three fourths of oceanic fisheries are now being fished at or
beyond capacity or are recovering from overexploitation. If we
continue with business as usual, many of these fisheries will col-
lapse. Overfishing,  simply  defined,  means we  are  taking fish
from the oceans faster than they can reproduce. The cod fishery
off the coast of Newfoundland in Canada is a prime example of
what can happen. Long one of the world’s most productive fish-
eries, it collapsed in the early 1990s and may never recover.40 
Paul Hawken, author of Blessed Unrest, puts it well: “At pres-
ent we are stealing the future, selling it in the present, and calling
it gross domestic product. We can just as easily have an economy
that is based on healing the future instead of stealing it. We can
either create assets for the future or take the assets of the future.
One is called restoration and the other exploitation.”41
The larger question is, If we continue with business as usual—
with  overpumping,  overgrazing,  overplowing,  overfishing,  and
overloading the atmosphere with carbon dioxide—how long will
it be before the Ponzi economy unravels and collapses? No one
knows. Our industrial civilization has not been here before. 
Unlike Bernard Madoff’s  Ponzi scheme, which was set up
with  the  knowledge that  it  would  eventually  fall  apart,  our
global Ponzi economy was not intended to collapse. It is on a
collision path because of market forces, perverse incentives, and
poorly chosen measures of progress. We rely heavily on the mar-
ket because it is in so many ways such an incredible institution.
It allocates resources with an efficiency that no central planning
body can match, and it easily balances supply and demand. 
The market does, however, have some fundamental, poten-
tially fatal, weaknesses. It does not respect the sustainable yield
Selling Our Future
15
Our Global Ponzi Economy
Our mismanaged world economy today has many of the char-
acteristics of a Ponzi scheme. A Ponzi scheme takes payments
from a broad base of investors and uses these to pay off returns.
It creates the illusion that it is providing a highly attractive rate
of return on investment as a result of savvy investment decisions
when in fact these irresistibly high earnings are in part the result
of consuming the asset base itself. A Ponzi scheme investment
fund can last only as long as the flow of new investments is suf-
ficient to sustain the high rates of return paid out to previous
investors. When this is no longer possible, the scheme collaps-
es—just as Bernard Madoff’s $65-billion investment fund did in
December 2008.37
Although the functioning of the global economy and a Ponzi
investment scheme are not entirely analogous, there are some
disturbing parallels. As recently as 1950 or so, the world econo-
my was living more or less within its means, consuming only the
sustainable yield, the interest of the natural systems that sup-
port it. But then as the economy doubled, and doubled again,
and yet again, multiplying eightfold, it began to outrun sustain-
able yields and to consume the asset base itself. In a 2002 study
published by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, a team of
scientists led by Mathis Wackernagel concluded that humanity’s
collective  demands  first  surpassed  the  earth’s  regenerative
capacity around 1980. As of 2009 global demands on natural
systems exceed their sustainable yield capacity by nearly 30 per-
cent. This means we are meeting current demands in part by
consuming the  earth’s  natural assets, setting the stage for an
eventual Ponzi-type collapse when these assets are depleted.38
As of mid-2009, nearly all the world’s major aquifers were
being overpumped. We have more irrigation water than before
the overpumping began, in true Ponzi fashion. We get the feel-
ing that we’re doing very well in agriculture—but the reality is
that  an  estimated 400 million  people  are today being  fed by
overpumping, a process that is by definition short-term. With
aquifers being depleted, this water-based food bubble is about
to burst.39
Asimilar situation exists with the melting of mountain gla-
ciers. When glaciers first start to melt, flows in the rivers and the
irrigation canals they  feed are larger  than before the melting
14
PLAN B 4.0
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. Add Stamp Annotation. image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and
how to add image to pdf in preview; add picture to pdf preview
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and
add image to pdf java; add photo to pdf online
the oil industry (such as the U.S. oil depletion allowance), the
burgeoning military costs of protecting access to oil in the polit-
ically unstable Middle East, and the health care costs of treat-
ing respiratory illnesses from breathing polluted air.44
Based on a study by the International Center for Technology
Assessment, these costs now total nearly $12 per gallon ($3.17
per liter) of gasoline burned in the United States. If these were
added to the $3 direct cost of the gasoline, motorists would pay
$15 a gallon for gas at the pump. In reality, burning gasoline is
very costly, but the market tells us it is cheap, thus grossly dis-
torting the structure of the economy.45
Asimilar situation exists with food. If we paid the full cost
of producing it—including the true cost of the oil used in pro-
ducing it, the future costs of overpumping aquifers, the destruc-
tion of land through erosion, and the carbon dioxide emissions
from land clearing—food would cost far more than we now pay
for it in the supermarket.
In addition to ignoring indirect costs, the market does not
value  nature’s  services.  This  became  abundantly  clear  in  the
summer of 1998 when China’s Yangtze River valley, home to
nearly 400 million people, was wracked by some of the worst
flooding  in  history. The  resulting  damages  of $30  billion
equaled the value of the country’s annual rice harvest.46
After several weeks of flooding, Beijing announced a ban on
tree cutting in the Yangtze River basin. It justified this by noting
that trees standing are worth three times as much as trees cut—
the  flood  control  services  provided  by  forests  were  far  more
valuable than the lumber they contained. In effect, the market
price had been off by a factor of three.47
The market does not respect the carrying capacity of natural
systems. For example, if a fishery is being continuously over-
fished, the catch eventually will begin to shrink and prices will
rise, encouraging even more investment in fishing trawlers. The
inevitable result is a precipitous decline in the catch and the col-
lapse of the fishery. 
Today  we  need  a  realistic  view  about  the  relationship
between the economy and the environment. We also need, more
than ever before, political leaders who can see the big picture.
And since the principal advisors to government are economists,
we need either economists who can think like ecologists—Sir
Selling Our Future
17
thresholds of natural systems. It also favors the near term over
the long term, showing little concern for future generations. It
does not incorporate into the prices of goods the indirect costs
of producing them. As a result, it cannot provide the signals
telling us that we are caught up in a Ponzi scheme.
In  addition  to  consuming  our  asset  base,  we  have  also
devised some clever techniques for leaving costs off the books—
much like the disgraced and bankrupt Texas-based energy com-
pany  Enron  did  some  years  ago.  For  example, when  we  use
electricity from a coal-fired power plant we get a monthly bill
from the local utility. It includes the cost of mining coal, trans-
porting it to the power plant, burning it, generating the elec-
tricity, and  delivering  electricity  to  our  homes.  It  does  not,
however,  include  any  costs  of the  climate  change  caused  by
burning coal. That bill will come later—and it  will likely be
delivered to our children. Unfortunately for them, their bill for
our coal use will be even larger than ours.42
When  Sir  Nicholas  Stern,  former  chief economist  at  the
World  Bank,  released  his groundbreaking  2006 study  on  the
future costs of climate change, he talked about a massive mar-
ket  failure.  He  was  referring  to  the  failure  of the  market to
incorporate the costs of climate  change in the price of fossil
fuels. According to Stern, the costs are measured in the trillions
of dollars. The difference between the market prices for fossil
fuels and an honest price that also incorporates their environ-
mental costs to society is huge.43
As  economic  decisionmakers—whether consumers,  corpo-
rate  planners,  government  policymakers,  or  investment
bankers—we all depend on the market for information to guide
us. In order for markets to work over the long term and for eco-
nomic actors to make sound decisions, the markets must pro-
vide reliable information, including the full cost of products.
But the market is giving us incomplete information, and as a
result we are making bad decisions.
One of the best examples of this massive market failure can
be seen in the United States, where the gasoline pump price was
around $3 per gallon in mid-2009. This reflects only the cost of
finding the oil, pumping it to the surface, refining it into gaso-
line, and delivering the gas to service stations. It overlooks the
costs of climate change as well as the costs of tax subsidies to
16
PLAN B 4.0
flict has claimed more than 5 million lives since 1998. The vast
majority of these deaths in the Congo are nonviolent, most of
them due to hunger, respiratory illnesses, diarrhea, and other
diseases as millions have been driven from their homes. Within
the Sudan, the killings in Darfur quickly spread into Chad. As
The Economist observes, “like a severely disturbed individual, a
failed state is a danger not just to itself, but to those around it
and beyond.”50
Failing states can also provide possible training grounds for
international terrorist groups, as in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Pak-
istan, or as a base for pirates, as in Somalia. They may become
sources  of drugs,  as  in  Myanmar  (formerly  Burma)  or
Afghanistan,  which  accounted  for  92  percent  of the  world’s
opium  supply  in  2008,  much  of which  is  made  into  heroin.
Because they lack functioning health  care services, weakened
states can become a source of infectious disease, as Nigeria and
Pakistan have for polio, derailing efforts to eradicate this dread-
ed disease.51
Among the most conspicuous indications of state failure is a
breakdown in law and order and a related loss of personal secu-
rity. In Haiti, armed gangs ruled the streets until a U.N. peace-
keeping force arrived in 2004. While the security situation has
improved somewhat since then, kidnappings for ransom of local
people who are lucky enough to be among the 30 percent of the
labor force that is employed are commonplace. In Afghanistan
the  local  warlords,  not  the  central  government,  control  the
country outside of Kabul. Somalia, which now exists only on
maps, is ruled by tribal leaders, each claiming a piece of what
was once a country. In Mexico, drug cartels are taking over, sig-
naling the prospect of a failed state on the U.S. border.52
Various national and international organizations maintain
their own lists of failing, weak, or failed states. The most sys-
tematic ongoing effort to analyze failed and failing states is one
undertaken  jointly  by the Fund  for  Peace  and Foreign  Policy
magazine, in an index that is updated annually and published in
each July/August issue of Foreign Policy. This invaluable serv-
ice, which draws on thousands of information sources world-
wide, is rich with insights into the changes that are under way
in the world and, in a broad sense, where the world is heading.53
This analysis identifies 60 countries, ranking them according
Selling Our Future
19
Nicholas Stern and Herman Daly, a pioneer in ecological eco-
nomics, are rare examples of this—or more ecological advisors.
Market behavior—including its failure to include the indi-
rect costs of goods and services, to value nature’s services, and
to  respect  sustainable-yield  thresholds—is  leading  to  the
destruction of the economy’s natural support systems, our own
version of a Ponzi scheme. At some point the deteriorating rela-
tionship between the economy and its natural supports begins
to take a political toll, contributing to state failure.
Mounting Stresses, Failing States
After a half-century of forming new states from former colonies
and  from the  breakup  of the  Soviet Union, the international
community  is  today focusing on the  disintegration  of states.
The term “failing state”  has entered our working vocabulary
only during the last decade or so, but these countries are now an
integral part of the international political landscape. As an arti-
cle  in  Foreign  Policy observes,  “Failed  states  have  made  a
remarkable  odyssey  from  the periphery to the very  center of
global politics.”
48
In the past, governments have been concerned by the con-
centration of too much power in one state, as in Nazi Germany,
Imperial Japan, and  the Soviet  Union. But today  it is  failing
states that provide the greatest threat to global order and sta-
bility.  As  Foreign  Policy notes,  “World  leaders  once  worried
about  who  was  amassing  power;  now  they  worry  about  the
absence of it.”
49
States fail when national governments lose control of part or
all of their territory and can no longer ensure the personal secu-
rity of their people. When governments lose their monopoly on
power, the rule of law begins to disintegrate. When they can no
longer provide basic services such as education, health care, and
food security, they lose their legitimacy. A government in this
position may no longer  be able to collect enough  revenue to
finance effective governance. Societies can become so fragment-
ed that they lack the cohesion to make decisions.
Failing  states often  degenerate into  civil  war as  opposing
groups vie for power. Conflicts can easily spread to neighboring
countries, as when the genocide in Rwanda spilled over into the
Democratic Republic of the Congo, where an ongoing civil con-
18
PLAN B 4.0
pressure,  Sudan—like scores  of other  countries—is breaking
down.58
All but 3 of the 20 countries that lead the list of failed states
are caught in this demographic trap. Realistically, they probably
cannot  break out  of it on their  own. They will need outside
help—and  not  just  a  scattering  of aid  projects  but  systemic
assistance in rebuilding—or the political situation will simply
continue to deteriorate.59
Among the top 20 countries on the failing state list, all but a
few are losing the race between food production and population
growth. Close to half of these states depend on a food lifeline
from the WFP.60
Food shortages can put intense pressures on governments. In
many countries the social order began showing signs of stress in
Selling Our Future
21
to “their vulnerability to violent internal conflict and societal
deterioration.” Based on 12 social, economic, political, and mil-
itary indicators, it puts Somalia at the top of the list of failed
states for 2008, followed by Zimbabwe, Sudan, Chad, and the
Democratic Republic of the Congo. Three oil-exporting coun-
tries are among the top 20 failed states—Sudan, Iraq, and Nige-
ria. Pakistan, now ranking number 10 on the list, is the only
failing state with a nuclear arsenal. North Korea, seventeenth
on the list, is developing a nuclear capability. (See Table 1–1.)54
Scores for each of the 12 indicators, ranging from 1 to 10, are
aggregated  into  a  single  country  indicator:  the  Failed  States
Index. A score of 120, the maximum, means that a society is
failing totally by every measure. In the first Foreign Policy list-
ing, based on data for 2004, just 7 countries had scores of 100
or more. In 2005 this increased to 9. By 2008 it was 14—dou-
bling in four years. This short trend is far from definitive, but
higher scores for countries at the top and the doubling of coun-
tries with scores of 100 or higher suggest that state failure is
both spreading and deepening.55
Ranking on the Failed States Index is closely linked with key
demographic and environmental indicators. Of the top 20 failed
states, 17 have rapid rates of population growth, several of them
expanding at close to 3 percent a year or 20-fold per century. In
5of these 17 countries, women have on average more than six
children each. In all but 6 of the top 20 failed states, at least 40
percent of the population is under 15, a demographic statistic
that often signals future political instability. Young men, lacking
employment opportunities, often become disaffected, making
them ready recruits for insurgency movements.56
In many of the countries with several decades of rapid pop-
ulation growth,  governments are  suffering from demographic
fatigue, unable to cope with the steady shrinkage in cropland
and  freshwater  supplies  per  person  or  to  build  schools  fast
enough for the swelling ranks of children.57
Sudan  is a classic case  of a  country  caught in the  demo-
graphic  trap.  It  has  developed  far  enough  economically  and
socially  to  reduce  mortality,  but  not  far  enough  to  quickly
reduce fertility. As a result, women on average have four chil-
dren, double the two needed for replacement, and the popula-
tion of 41 million is growing by over 2,000 per day. Under this
20
PLAN B 4.0
Table 1–1. Top 20 Failing States, 2008
Rank
Country
Score
1
Somalia
114.7
2
Zimbabwe
114.0
3
Sudan
112.4
4
Chad
112.2
5
Democratic Republic of the Congo
108.7
6
Iraq
108.6
7
Afghanistan
108.2
8
Central African Republic
105.4
9
Guinea
104.6
10
Pakistan
104.1
11
Côte d’Ivoire
102.5
12
Haiti
101.8
13
Burma
101.5
14
Kenya
101.4
15
Nigeria
99.8
16
Ethiopia
98.9
17
North Korea
98.3
18
Yemen
98.1
19
Bangladesh
98.1
20
Timor-Leste
97.2
Source: See endnote 54.
nation states. When governments lose their capacity to govern,
they can no longer collect taxes, much less be responsible for
their international debts. More failing states means more bad
debt. Efforts to control international terrorism depend on coop-
eration  among  functioning  nation  states,  and  these  efforts
weaken as more states fail.
In  addition,  protecting  endangered  species  almost  always
requires  close international cooperation. In countries such as
the  Democratic  Republic  of the  Congo,  where  government
agencies  have  collapsed,  hunger  is  widespread,  and  chaos
reigns, the population of mountain gorillas has dropped precip-
itously.  This  story  is  being  repeated  over  and  over  again  in
Africa, where so many of the world’s remaining large mammal
species are concentrated.65
As the number of failing states grows, dealing with various
international crises becomes more difficult. Actions that may be
relatively simple in a healthy world order, such as maintaining
monetary  stability  or  controlling  an  infectious  disease  out-
break, could  become  difficult or impossible  in a  world with
numerous disintegrating states. Even maintaining international
flows  of raw  materials  could  become  a  challenge.  At  some
point, spreading political instability could disrupt global eco-
nomic progress, suggesting that we need to address the causes of
state failure with a heightened sense of urgency.
Plan B—A Plan to Save Civilization
Plan B is the alternative to business as usual. Its goal is to move
the world from the current decline and collapse path onto a new
path where food security can be restored and civilization can be
sustained. Just as the trends that are behind the current deterio-
ration in the food situation go far beyond agriculture itself, so
too must the response. In times past it was the Ministry of Agri-
culture  that held the  key  to  expanding  agricultural  research,
expanding credit to farmers, and all the other obvious things
that fall within its province, but securing future food supplies
now depends on the mobilization of our entire society. 
For these reasons Plan B is far more ambitious than anything
the world has ever undertaken, an initiative that has no prece-
dent in either scale or urgency. It has four components: cutting
net  carbon  dioxide  emissions 80  percent  by  2020,  stabilizing
Selling Our Future
23
2007 in the face of soaring food prices and spreading hunger.
Food  riots  and  unrest  continued in  2008 in dozens  of coun-
tries—from the tortilla riots in Mexico to breadline fights in
Egypt and tempeh protests in Indonesia—and signaled the des-
peration of consumers trapped between low incomes and rising
food prices. In Haiti, soaring food prices helped bring down the
government.61
In Pakistan, where wheat flour prices had doubled, an armed
soldier escorted each grain truck lest it be stolen or used to ille-
gally haul scarce wheat across the border into Afghanistan. In
Kandahar,  Afghanistan, market  vendors were robbed  at  gun-
point by thieves who made off with sacks of grain. In Sudan,
110 grain-laden trucks delivering food for the World Food Pro-
gramme were hijacked during 2008 before reaching the Darfur
relief camps.62
Another characteristic of failing states is a deterioration of
the  physical  infrastructure—roads  and  power,  water,  and
sewage systems. Care for natural systems is also neglected as
people struggle to survive. Forests,  grasslands,  and croplands
deteriorate, generating a downward economic spiral. A drying
up of foreign investment and a resultant rise in unemployment
are also part of the decline syndrome.
In many countries, the United Nations or other internation-
al  bodies  are  trying  to  keep  the  peace,  often  unsuccessfully.
Among  the  countries  where  U.N.  peacekeeping  forces  are
deployed are Chad, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and
Côte  d’Ivoire.  Other  countries  supplied  with  multinational
peacekeeping forces include Afghanistan, Haiti, and Sudan. All
too often these are token forces, large enough to avoid immedi-
ate collapse but not large enough to ensure the stability needed
for long-term development.
63
Countries like Haiti and Afghanistan are surviving because
they are on international life-support systems. Economic assis-
tance, including food lifelines, is helping to sustain them. But
there  is  not  enough  assistance  to  overcome  the  reinforcing
trends of deterioration they are experiencing and replace them
with the demographic and political stability need to sustain eco-
nomic progress.64
In an age of increasing globalization, the functioning of the
global system depends on a cooperative network of functioning
22
PLAN B 4.0
to protect aquifers by raising water productivity. Unless we can
reverse  the deterioration  of these systems  we are  unlikely to
reverse the rise in hunger.
Plan B is an integrated  program with four  interdependent
goals. We are not, for example,  likely to stabilize population
unless  we  can  also  eradicate  poverty.  Conversely,  we  cannot
restore the earth’s natural systems without stabilizing popula-
tion and climate, and we are not likely to stabilize climate unless
we  also  stabilize  population.  Nor  can  we  eradicate  poverty
without restoring the earth’s natural systems. 
The  ambitiousness  of this  save-our-civilization  plan  is
matched by the urgency with which it must be implemented.
Success depends on moving at wartime speed, restructuring the
world energy economy at a pace reminiscent of the restructur-
ing of the U.S. industrial economy in 1942 following the attack
on Pearl Harbor. The United States shifted from producing cars
to  turning  out  planes,  tanks,  and  ships  within  a  matter  of
months. The current restructuring cannot be achieved without
a fundamental  reordering  of priorities.  And  it  will  not  be
accomplished  without  sacrifice.  For  example,  the  key  to  the
1942 industrial restructuring was a ban on the sale of new cars,
aban that lasted nearly three years.67
We face an extraordinary challenge, but there is much to be
upbeat about. All the problems we face can be dealt with using
existing technologies. And almost everything we need to do to
move the world economy off the collapse path and back onto an
environmentally sustainable path has already been done in one
or more countries. For example, more than 30 countries have
essentially stabilized their population size.68
We see the components of Plan B in technologies already on
the market. On the energy front, for example, we can get more
energy from  an  advanced-design  wind  turbine  than  from  an
aging oil well. The new plug-in gas-electric hybrids coming to
market, like the Chevrolet Volt, can get up to 150 miles per gal-
lon. In the Plan B energy economy of 2020, most of the U.S. fleet
will be plug-in hybrids and all-electric cars, and they will be
running largely on wind-generated electricity for the equivalent
of less than $1 a gallon of gasoline.69
The world is in the early stages of a revolution in lighting
technology. Some time ago we learned that a compact fluores-
Selling Our Future
25
population at 8 billion or lower, eradicating poverty, and restor-
ing  the  earth’s  natural  systems,  including  its  soils,  aquifers,
forests, grasslands, and fisheries. The ambitiousness of this plan
is not driven by perceived political feasibility but by scientific
reality.
The plan to cut carbon emissions involves dramatically rais-
ing energy efficiency worldwide, investing in the massive devel-
opment  of the  earth’s  renewable  energy  resources,  banning
deforestation, and planting trees by the billion. Plan B essen-
tially outlines a transition from an economy powered mainly by
oil, coal, and natural gas to one powered largely by wind, solar,
and geothermal energy. 
The Plan B goal of stabilizing population is set at 8 billion or
lower simply because I do not think world population will ever
reach the 9.2 billion projected by U.N. demographers for 2050.
To begin with, the vast majority of the 2.4 billion people pro-
jected to be added by 2050 will be born in developing coun-
tries—countries  where  the  land  and  water  resource  base  is
deteriorating and hunger is spreading. Simply put, many sup-
port systems in these countries are already in decline, and some
are collapsing. The question is not whether population growth
will come to a halt before reaching 9.2 billion but whether it will
do so because the  world shifts quickly to smaller families  or
because it fails to do so—and population growth is checked by
rising mortality. Plan B embraces the reduced fertility option.66
Eradicating poverty is a priority goal for three reasons. One,
in combination with giving women everywhere access to repro-
ductive health care and family planning services, it is the key to
accelerating the global shift  to smaller families. It also helps
bring impoverished nations into the international community,
giving them a stake in such matters as stabilizing climate. When
people are not sure where their next meal is coming from, it is
difficult  for  them  to get excited  about trying to stabilize  the
earth’s climate. And third, eradicating poverty is the humane
thing to do. One of the hallmarks of a civilized society is the
capacity to care about others.
The fourth component of Plan B involves repairing and pro-
tecting  the  natural  systems  that  support  humankind.  This
includes  conserving  soil,  banning  deforestation,  promoting
reforestation, restoring fisheries, and making a worldwide effort
24
PLAN B 4.0
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested