pdf viewer c# winform : Add an image to a pdf in preview application software tool html windows web page online pb4book13-part2271

III
T
HE
G
REAT
M
OBILIZATION
Add an image to a pdf in preview - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
adding image to pdf form; how to add an image to a pdf file in acrobat
Add an image to a pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add png to pdf acrobat; how to add image to pdf acrobat
There is much that we do not know about the future. But one
thing we do know is that business as usual will not continue for
much longer. Massive change is inevitable. “The death ofour
civilization is no longer a theoryor an academic possibility; it is
the road we’re on,” says Peter Goldmark, former Rockefeller
Foundation president and current director of the climate pro-
gram at the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF). Can we find
another road beforetime runs out?1
The notion that our civilization is approaching its demise is
not an easy concept to grasp or accept. It is difficult to imagine
something we have not previously experienced. We hardly have
the vocabulary, much less  the experience, to discuss  this
prospect. We know which economic indicators to watch for
signs ofan economic recession, such as declining industrial out-
put, rising unemployment, or falling consumer confidence, but
we do not follow a similar set ofindicators that signal civiliza-
tional collapse.
Given the role of food shortages in earlier civilizational
declines, we obviously should watch food price and hunger
trends closely. The growing number ofhungry people, the pro-
Can We Mobilize
Fast Enough?
10
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Convert PDF to Tiff image (.tif, .tiff). • Convert PDF to HTML (.htm, .html). PDF Annotation. • Add sticky notes to PDF document in preview.
add picture to pdf online; add photo to pdf for
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
PDF to Tiff image (.tif, .tiff). • Convert PDF to HTML (.htm, .html). PDF Annotation. • Add sticky notes to PDF document. • Highlight PDF text in preview.
add picture to pdf; add photo to pdf preview
afinite planet, where we are pushing the earth beyond its limits,
every country should have a population stabilization policy.
As noted in Chapter 7, international assistance programs
require a special initiative, a unique component, to rescue fail-
ing states. Just as hospitals have intensive care units that give
special attention to the most seriously ill, so too international
assistance programs need a special facility to deal with serious-
ly ill nation states.  
We know from our analysis of climate change, from the
accelerating deterioration of the economy’s ecological sup-
ports, and from our projections offuture resource use that the
western economic model—the fossil-fuel-based, automobile-
centered, throwaway economy—will not last much longer. We
need to build a new economy, one that will be powered by
renewable sources of energy, that will have a diversified trans-
port system, and that will reuse and recycle everything.
We can describe this new economy in some detail. The ques-
tion is, How do we get from here to there before time runs out?
In effect, we are in a race between political tipping points and
natural tipping points.Can wereachthe political tipping point
that will enable us to cut carbon emissions before we reach the
point wherethe melting ofthe Himalayan glaciers becomes irre-
versible? Will we be able to halt the deforestation ofthe Ama-
zon beforeit dries out, becomes vulnerable to fire from natural
causes, and turns into wasteland?
The key to building a global economy that can sustain eco-
nomic progress is the creation of an honest market, one that
tells the ecological truth. To create an honest market, we need
to restructure the tax system by reducing taxes on work and
raising those on carbon emissions and other environmentally
destructive activities, thus incorporating indirect costs into the
market price. 
Ifwe can get the market to tell the truth, then we can avoid
being blindsided by a faulty accounting system that leads to
bankruptcy. As Øystein Dahle, former Vice President ofExxon
for Norway and the North Sea, has observed: “Socialism col-
lapsed because it did not allow the market to tell the economic
truth. Capitalism may collapse because it does not allow the
market to tell the ecological truth.”4
Some countries are recognizing the need for bold dramatic
Can We Mobilize Fast Enough?
243
jected continuation of this trend, and the lack of a plan to
reverse it should be a matter of concern to political leaders
everywhere.2
Neither spreading hunger nor the threat of it unfolds in a
political vacuum. Affluent grain-importing countries are buying
large tracts of land in poorer countries in the emerging cross-
border competition for control of land and water resources.
This opens a new chapter in the geopolitics of food scarcity.
Where ultimately does this lead? We do not know. We have not
been here before. 
In many ways, the most basic indicator ofour plight is the
number offailing states. Each year this list grows longer. How
many states must fail before our global civilization begins to
unravel? Again, we do not know the answer because we have not
been here before. 
Our future depends on reversing both the spread ofhunger
and the growing number offailing states, but this will not hap-
pen ifwe continue with business as usual. Turning this situation
around will take a worldwide, wartime-like mobilization. We
call it Plan B.This plan, or something similar to it, is our only
way out.
Plan B embraces a massive mobilization to restructure the
world economy—and at wartime speed. The closest analogy is
the belated U.S. mobilization during World War II. But unlike
that chapter in history, in which one country totally restructured
its industrial economy in a matter ofmonths, the Plan B mobi-
lization requires decisive action on a global scale.
The four mutually dependent Plan B goals—stabilizing cli-
mate, stabilizing population, eradicating poverty, and restoring
the economy’s natural support systems—are all essential to
restoring food security. It’s unlikely that we can reach any one
without reaching the others.
Eradicating poverty is not only the key to population stabi-
lization, political stabilization, and a better life, it also provides
hope. As Nobel laureate Mohammed Yunus, founder of the
Grameen Bank for micro-credit in Bangladesh, has pointed out,
“Poverty leads to hopelessness, which provokes people to des-
perate acts.”3
Stabilizing population not only helps eradicate poverty, it
makes it easier to reach almost every other goal that we seek. On
242
PLANB4.0
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
C# DLLs for Word File Preview. Add references: Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Word file in C#.net.
add jpg to pdf file; how to add a photo to a pdf document
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
Add necessary XDoc.PowerPoint DLL libraries into your created C# application as You may get document preview image from an existing PowerPoint file in C#.net.
add image in pdf using java; add image to pdf form
$3.66 per pack. Among states, Rhode Island has the highest tax
at $3.46 per pack. Since a 10-percent price rise typically reduces
smoking by 4 percent, the health benefits of tax increases are
substantial.9
For a gasoline tax, the most detailed analysis available of
indirect costs is found in The Real Price ofGasolineby the Inter-
national Center for Technology Assessment. The many indirect
costs to society—including climate change, oil industry tax
breaks, oil supply protection, oil industry subsidies, and treat-
ment ofauto exhaust-related respiratory illnesses—total around
$12 per gallon ($3.17 per liter), marginally more than the cost to
society ofsmoking a pack ofcigarettes. Ifthis external or social
cost is added to the roughly $3 per gallon average price ofgaso-
line in the United States, a gallon would cost $15. These are real
costs. Someone bears them. Ifnot us, our children.10
Gasoline’s indirect cost of$12 a gallon provides a reference
point for raising taxes to where the price reflects the environ-
mental truth. Gasoline taxes in Italy, France, Germany, and the
United Kingdom—averaging $4 per gallon—are a good start.
The average U.S. gas tax of 46¢ per gallon, scarcely one tenth
that in Europe, helps explain why the United States uses more
gasoline than the next 20 countries combined. The high gaso-
line taxes in Europe have contributed to an oil-efficient econo-
my and to far  greater  investment in high-quality public
transportation over the decades, making it less vulnerable to oil
supply disruptions.11 
Phasing in an incremental gasoline tax rising by 40¢ per gal-
lon per year for the next 10 years and offsetting it with a reduc-
tion in income taxes would raise the U.S. gas tax to the $4 per
gallon tax prevailing today in Europe. This will still fall short of
the $12 ofindirect costs currently associated with burning a gal-
lon ofgasoline, but combined with the rising price ofproduc-
ing gasoline and the far smaller carbon tax discussed earlier, it
should be enough to encouragemotorists to use improved pub-
lic transport and to buy the plug-in hybrid and all-electric cars
as they come to market, starting in 2010.
These carbon and gasoline taxes may seem high, but again
we look to smoking for at least one dramatic precedent. A series
oflawsuits led the U.S.tobacco industryin November of1998
to agree to reimburse state governments with a cumulative sum
Can We Mobilize Fast Enough?
245
change. Several governments have announced that they plan to
become carbon-neutral, including Norway, Costa Rica, and the
Maldives. They have formally joined the Climate Neutral Net-
work launched by the U.N. Environment Programme (UNEP) in
2008. The Maldives, a low-lying island country of385,000 peo-
ple that is threatened by rising seas, is on a fast track, planning
to systematically develop its wind and solar resources to replace
fossil fuels and reach carbon neutrality by 2019. Costa Rica is
shooting for 2021. The Maldives and Costa Rica are the first
countries to adopt a carbon reduction goal more ambitious
than that ofPlan B.5
Achim Steiner, Executive Director of UNEP, describes cli-
mate neutrality as “an idea whose time has come, driven by the
urgent need to address climate change but also the abundant
economic opportunities emerging for those willing to embrace
atransition to a Green Economy.” By far the most effective pol-
icy tool in striving for carbon neutrality is restructuring taxes
and subsidies.6
Shifting Taxes and Subsidies
The need for tax shifting—lowering taxes on income while rais-
ing those on environmentally destructive activities—has been
widely endorsed by economists. For example, a tax on coal that
incorporates the increased health care costs associated with
mining it and breathing the air it pollutes, the costs ofdamage
from acid rain, and the costs of climate disruption would
encourage investment in clean renewable sources ofenergy such
as wind and solar.7
Amarket that is allowed to ignore the indirect costs in pric-
ing goods and services is irrational, wasteful, and self-destruc-
tive The first step in creating an honest market is to calculate
indirect costs.Perhaps the best model for this is a U.S. govern-
ment study on smoking from the Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention (CDC). In 2006 the CDC calculated the cost to
society ofsmoking cigarettes—including both the cost oftreat-
ing smoking-related illnesses and the lost worker productivity
from these illnesses—at $10.47 per pack.8
This calculation provides a framework for raising taxes on
cigarettes.InNewYorkCity, smokers now pay $4.25 per pack
in state and local cigarette taxes. Chicago is not far behind at
244
PLANB4.0
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
enables compressing and decompressing in preview in ASP.NET to reduce or minimize original PDF document size Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or
add picture to pdf form; add picture to pdf in preview
How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word following steps below, you can create an image viewer WinForm Open or create a new WinForms application, add necessary dll
add image to pdf file acrobat; how to add a picture to a pdf file
cent. A new car that sells for $20,000 costs the buyer $56,000. In
Singapore, the tax on a $14,200 Ford Focus, for example, more
than triples the price, pushing it to $45,500. Other governments
are moving in this direction. In Shanghai, the registration fee in
2009 averaged $4,500 per car.
16
Cap-and-trade systems using tradable permits are sometimes
an alternative to environmental tax restructuring. The principal
difference between them is that with permits, governments set
the amount ofa given activity that is allowed, such as the har-
vest from a fishery, and let the market set the price ofthe per-
mits as they are auctioned off. With environmental taxes, in
contrast, the price ofthe environmentally destructive activity is
incorporated in the tax rate, and the market determines the
amount ofthe activity that will occur at that price. Both eco-
nomic instruments can be used to discourage environmentally
irresponsible behavior.
The use of cap-and-trade systems with marketable permits
has been effective at the national level, ranging from restricting
the catch in an Australian fishery to reducing sulfur emissions in
the United States. For example, the government of Australia,
concerned about lobster overharvesting, estimated the sustain-
able yield of lobsters and issued catch permits totaling that
amount. Fishers could then bid for these permits. In effect, the
government decided howmany lobsters could be taken each year
and let the market decide what the permits were worth. Since the
permit trading system was adopted in 1992, the fishery has sta-
bilized and appears to be operating on a sustainable basis.
17
Although tradable permits are popular in the business com-
munity, permits are administratively more complicated and not
as well understood as taxes. Edwin Clark, former senior econo-
mist with the White House Council on Environmental Quality,
observes that tradable permits “require establishing complex
regulatory frameworks, defining the permits, establishing the
rules for trades,and preventing people from acting without per-
mits.” In contrast to paying taxes, something with which there
is wide familiarity, tradable permits are a concept not widely
understood by the public, making it more difficult to generate
broad public support.18
The other side of the tax shifting coin is subsidy shifting.
Each year the world’s taxpayers provide an estimated $700 bil-
Can We Mobilize Fast Enough?
247
of$251 billion for the Medicare costs oftreating smoking-relat-
ed illnesses—nearly $1,000 for every person in the United States.
This landmark agreement was, in effect, a retroactive tax on cig-
arettes smoked in the past, one designed to cover indirect costs.
To pay this enormous bill, companies raised cigarette prices,
bringing them closer to their true costs and further discourag-
ing smoking.12
Tax shifting is not new in Europe. A four-year plan adopted
in Germany in 1999 systematically shifted taxes from labor to
energy. By 2003, this plan had reduced annual carbon dioxide
(CO
2
)emissions by 20 million tons and helped to create approx-
imately 250,000 additional jobs. It also accelerated growth in
the renewable energy sector; by 2006 there were 82,100 jobs in
the wind industry alone, a number that is projected to rise by
another 60,000 jobs by 2010.13
Between 2001 and 2006, Sweden shifted an estimated $2 bil-
lion oftaxes from income to environmentally destructive activ-
ities. Much ofthis shift of$500 or so per household was levied
on road transport, including hikes in vehicle and fuel taxes.
France, Italy, Norway, Spain, and the United Kingdom are
among the countries also using this policy instrument. In
Europe and the United States,polls indicate that at least 70 per-
cent of voters support environmental tax shifting once it is
explained to them.14
Some 2,500 economists, including nine Nobel Prize winners
in economics, have endorsed the concept oftax shifts. Harvard
economics professor and former chairman ofGeorge W. Bush’s
Council of Economic Advisors N. Gregory Mankiw wrote in
Fortune magazine: “Cutting income taxes while increasing
gasoline taxes would lead to more rapid economic growth, less
traffic congestion, safer roads, and reduced risk of global
warming—all without jeopardizing long-term fiscal solvency.
This may be the closest thing to a free lunch that economics has
to offer.”15
Environmental taxes are now being used for several purpos-
es. Landfill taxes that discourage waste and encourage recycling
are becoming more common. A number ofcities are now taxing
cars that enter the city. Others are simply imposing a tax on
automobile ownership.In Denmark, the registration tax on the
purchase ofa new car exceeds the price ofthe car by 180 per-
246
PLANB4.0
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Excel file in C#.net.
acrobat insert image into pdf; add image pdf document
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Generally speaking, using well-designed APIs, C# developers can do following things. Remove Image from PDF Page Using C#. Add necessary references:
acrobat add image to pdf; adding images to pdf files
rupting ofall fuels—the United States has increased its support
for the fossil fuel and nuclear industries. Doug Koplow, founder
ofEarth Track, calculated in a 2006 study that annual U.S. fed-
eral energy subsidies have a total value to the industry of$74
billion. Ofthis, the oil and gas industry gets $39 billion, coal $8
billion, and nuclear $9 billion. He notes that since 2006 these
numbers “would likely be a good deal higher.” At a time when
there is a need to conserve oil resources, U.S. taxpayers are sub-
sidizing their depletion.23
Aworld facing economically disruptive climate change can
no longer justify subsidies to expand the burning of coal and
oil. Shifting these subsidies to the development of climate-
benign energy sources such as wind, solar, biomass, and geot-
hermal power will help stabilize the earth’s climate. Shifting
subsidies from road construction to rail construction could
increase mobility in many situations while reducing carbon
emissions. And shifting the $22 billion in annual fishing indus-
try subsidies, which encourage destructive overfishing, to the
creation ofmarine parks to regenerate fisheries would be a giant
step in restoring oceanic fisheries.
24
In a troubled world economy, where many governments are
facing fiscal deficits,these proposed tax and subsidy shifts can
help balance the books, create additional jobs, and save the
economy’s eco-supports. Tax and subsidy shifting promises
greater energy efficiency, cuts in carbon emissions, and reduc-
tions in environmental destruction—a win-win-win situation.
Acarbon tax on coal, for example, that fully incorporated the
climate and health costs of burning it would lead to a quick
phaseout.
Coal: The Beginning ofthe End
The past twoyears have witnessed the emergence ofa powerful
movement opposing the construction ofnew coal-fired power
plants in the United States. Initially led by environmental
groups, both national and local, it has since been joined by
prominent national political leaders and many state governors.
The principal reason for opposing coal plants is that they are
changing the earth’s climate. There is also the effect ofmercury
emissions on health and the 23,600 U.S.deaths eachyear from
power plant air pollution.25
Can We Mobilize Fast Enough?
249
lion ofsubsidies for environmentally destructive activities, such
as fossil  fuel burning, overpumping aquifers, clearcutting
forests, and overfishing. An Earth Council study, Subsidizing
Unsustainable Development,observes that “there is something
unbelievable about the world spending hundreds ofbillions of
dollars annually to subsidize its own destruction.”19
Carbon emissions could be cut in scores ofcountries by sim-
ply eliminating fossil fuel subsidies. Iran provides a classic exam-
ple ofextreme subsidies when it prices oil for internal use at one
tenth the world price, strongly encouraging car ownership and
gas consumption. Ifits $37-billion annual subsidy were phased
out, the World Bank reports, Iran’s carbon emissions would drop
byastaggering 49 percent. This move would also strengthen the
economy by freeing up public revenues for investment in the
country’s economic development. Iran is not alone. The Bank
reports that removing energy subsidies would reduce carbon
emissions in India by 14 percent, in Indonesia by 11 percent, in
Russia by 17 percent, and in Venezuela by 26 percent.20
Some countries are already doing this. Belgium, France, and
Japan havephased out all subsidies for coal. Germany reduced
its coal subsidy from a high of6.7 billion euros in 1996 to 2.5
billion euros in 2007. Coal use dropped by34 percent between
1991 and 2006. Germany plans to phase out this support entire-
ly by 2018. As oil prices have climbed, a number ofcountries
have greatly reduced or eliminated subsidies that held fuel
prices well below world market prices because ofthe heavy fis-
cal cost. Among these are China, Indonesia, and Nigeria.
21
A study by the U.K. Green Party, Aviation’s Economic
Downside,describes subsidies to the U.K. airline industry. The
giveaway begins with $18 billion in tax breaks, including a total
exemption from the national tax. External or indirect costs that
arenot paid, suchas treating illness from breathing the air pol-
luted by planes, the costs ofclimate change, and so forth, add
nearly $7.5 billion to the tab.The subsidy in the United King-
dom totals $426 per resident. This is also an inherently regres-
sive tax policy simply because a part of the U.K. population
cannot afford to fly, yet they help subsidize this high-cost travel
for their more affluent compatriots.22
While some leading industrial countries havebeen reducing
subsidies to fossil fuels—notably coal, the most climate-dis-
248
PLANB4.0
expressed public opposition to any more coal-fired power plants
in Florida, led to the quiet withdrawal offour other coal plant
proposals in the state.29
Coal’s future is also suffering as Wall Street turns its back on
the industry. In July 2007, Citigroup downgraded coal company
stocks across the board and recommended that its clients switch
to other energy stocks. In January 2008, Merrill Lynch also
downgraded coal stocks. In early February 2008, investment
banks Morgan Stanley, Citi, and J.P. Morgan Chase announced
that any future lending for coal-fired power would be contin-
gent on the utilities demonstrating that the plants would be eco-
nomically viable with the higher costs associated with future
federal restrictions on carbon emissions. Later that month,
Bank ofAmerica announced it would follow suit.30
In August 2007, coal took a heavy political hit when U.S. Sen-
ate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada, who had been
opposing three coal-fired power  plants in his  own state,
announced that he was now against building coal-fired power
plants anywhere in the world. Former Vice President Al Gore
has also voiced strong opposition to building any coal-fired
power plants. So too have many state governors, including those
in California, Florida, Michigan, Washington, and Wisconsin.31
In her 2009 State of the State address, Governor Jennifer
Granholm of Michigan argued that the state should not be
importing coal from Montana and Wyoming but instead should
be investing in technologies to improve energy efficiency and to
tap the renewable resources within Michigan, including wind
and solar. This, she said, would create thousands ofjobs in the
state, helping offset those lost in the automobile industry.32
December 2008 brought another major coal industry set-
back. One of the unresolved burdens haunting this sector, in
addition to the emissions ofCO
2
,is what to do with the coal
ash—the remnant ofburning coal—that is accumulating in 194
landfills and 161 holding ponds in 47 states.This ash is not an
easy material to dispose of since it is laced with arsenic, lead,
mercury, and many other toxic materials. The industry’s dirty
secret came into full public view just before Christmas 2008
when the containment wall ofa coal ash pond in eastern Ten-
nessee released a billion gallons oftoxic brew.33
Unfortunately, the industry does not have a plan for safely
Can We Mobilize Fast Enough?
251
Over the last few years the coal industry has suffered one set-
back after another. The Sierra Club, which has kept a tally of
proposed coal-fired power plants and their fates since 2000,
reports that 101 plants have been defeated, with another 59 fac-
ing opposition in the courts. Ofthe 229 plants being tracked,
only 23 currently have a chance at gaining the permits necessary
to begin construction and eventually come online. Building a
coal plant may soon be impossible.26
What began as a few local ripples ofresistance to coal-fired
power quickly evolved into a national tidal wave of grassroots
opposition from environmental, health, farm, and community
organizations. In a national poll by the Opinion Research Cor-
poration that asked which electricity source people would prefer,
only 3 percent chose coal. Despite a heavily funded ad campaign
to promote so-called clean coal (one reminiscent ofthe tobacco
industry’s earlier efforts to convince people that cigarettes were
not unhealthy), the American public is turning against coal.27
One ofthe first major industry setbacks came in early 2007
when a grassroots movement took on Texas-based utility TXU.
Acoalition headed bythe Environmental Defense Fund led a
damaging public campaign against plans for 11 new coal-fired
power plants.Aquickdrop in the utility’s stock price caused by
the media stormprompted a $45-billion buyout offer from the
private equity firms Kohlberg Kravis Roberts and Company and
Texas Pacific Group. Only after negotiating a ceasefire with
EDF and the Natural Resources Defense Council and reducing
the number ofproposed plants from 11 to 3, thus preserving the
value ofthe company, did the firms proceed with purchasing the
utility. It was a major win for the environmental community,
which mustered the public support necessary to stop 8 plants
outright and impose stricter regulations on the remaining 3.
Meanwhile, the energy focus in Texas has shifted to developing
its vast resources ofwind energy, pushing it ahead ofCalifornia
in wind-generated electricity.28
In May 2007, Florida’s Public Service Commission refused to
license a huge $5.7 billion, 1,960-megawatt coal plant because
the utility could not prove that building the plant would be
cheaper than investing in conservation, efficiency, and renew-
able energysources.This point, made by Earthjustice, a non-
profit  environmental legal  group, combined with widely
250
PLANB4.0
thermal power plants, solar cell rooftop arrays, and geothermal
power and heat.38
The handwriting is on the wall. In 2008, only five small coal-
fired power plants that were in the planning stage for years were
completed, adding 1,400 megawatts of generating capacity to
the grid. Meanwhile, nearly 100 new wind farms came online,
adding 8,400 megawatts ofgenerating capacity to the grid.39
With the likelihood that few, if any, new coal-fired power
plants will be approved in the United States, this de facto mora-
torium will send a message to the world. Denmark and New
Zealand have already banned new coal-fired power plants.
Other countries are likely to join this effort to cut carbon emis-
sions. Even China, which was building one new coal plant a
week, is surging ahead with harnessing renewable energy devel-
opment and will soon overtake the United States in wind elec-
tric generation. These and other developments suggest that the
goal of cutting carbon emissions 80 percent by 2020 may be
much more attainable than many would have thought.40
Stabilizing Climate
Earlier we outlined the need to cut net carbon dioxide emissions
80 percent by2020 to minimize the futurerise in temperature.
Here we summarize the Plan B measures for doing so, including
both reducing fossil fuel use and increasing biological seques-
tration. 
After energydemand is stabilized by dramatically improving
efficiency, replacing fossil fuels with renewable sources ofener-
gy for generating electricity and heat will reduce carbon emis-
sions in 2020 by more than 3.2 billion tons. (See Table 10–1.)
The biggest single cut in carbon emissions comes from phasing
out the use ofcoal to generate electricity. Other cuts come from
eliminating all the oil and 70 percent ofthe natural gas used to
generate electricity.41
In the transportsector,the greatly reduced use of oil will
eliminate 1.4 billion tons ofcarbon emissions. This reduction
relies heavily on the shift to plug-in hybrid and all-electric cars
that will run on carbon-free sources ofelectricity such as wind.
The remainder comes largely from shifting long-haul freight
from trucks to trains,electrifying freight and passenger trains,
and using green electricity to power them.42
Can We Mobilize Fast Enough?
253
disposing of the 130 million tons of ash produced each year,
enough to fill 1 million railroad cars. The dangers are such that
the Department ofHomeland Security tried to put 44 ofthe most
vulnerable storage facilities on a classified list lest they fall into
the hands ofterrorists. The spill oftoxic coal ash in Tennessee
drove another nail into the lid ofthe coal industry coffin.34
In April 2009, the chairman of the powerful U.S. Federal
Energy Regulatory Commission, Jon Wellinghoff, observed that
the United States may no longer need any additional coal or
nuclear power plants. Regulators, investment banks, and politi-
cal leaders are now beginning to see what has been obvious for
some time to climate scientists such as NASA’s James Hansen,
who says that it makes no sense to build coal-fired power plants
when we will have to bulldoze them in a few years.35
In April 2007, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency (EPA) is both authorized and
obligated to regulate CO
2
emissions under the Clean Air Act.
This watershed decision prompted the Environmental Appeals
Board ofthe EPA in November 2008 to conclude that a region-
al EPAoffice must address CO
2
emissions beforeissuing air pol-
lution permits for a new coal-fired power plant. This not only
put the brakes on the plant in question but also set a precedent,
stalling permits for all other proposed coal plants across the
United States. Acting on the same Supreme Court decision, in
March 2009 the EPA submitted an endangerment finding to the
White House Office ofManagement and Budget. It confirmed
that CO
2
emissions threaten human health and welfare and
must be regulated, jeopardizing new coal plants everywhere.36
The bottom line is that the United States now has, in effect,
ade facto moratorium on the building ofnew coal-fired power
plants.This has led the Sierra Club, the national leader on this
issue, to expand its campaign to reduce carbon emissions to
include the closing ofexisting plants.37
Given the hugepotential for reducing electricity use in the
United States, as noted in Chapter 4, this may be much easier
than it appears. Ifthe efficiency level ofthe other 49 states were
raised to that ofNew York, the most energy-efficient state, the
energy saved would be sufficient to close 80 percent ofthe coun-
try’scoal-fired power plants. The few remaining plants could be
shut down by turning to renewable energy—wind farms, solar
252
PLANB4.0
for example, using less corn and more switchgrass to produce
fuel ethanol. These practices can sequester an estimated 600
million tons ofcarbon per year.44
Together, replacing fossil fuels in electricity generation with
renewable sources of energy, switching to plug-in hybrid and
all-electric cars, shifting to all-electric railways, banning defor-
estation, and sequestering carbon by planting trees and improv-
ing soil management will drop net carbon dioxide emissions in
2020 more than 80 percent below today’s levels. This reduction
gives us the best chance of keeping atmospheric CO
2
concen-
trations from topping 400 parts per million, limiting the future
rise in temperature.
45
The most efficient means ofrestructuring the energy econo-
my to stabilize atmospheric CO
2
levels is a carbon tax. As noted
inChapter 4, we propose a worldwide carbon tax of$200 per
ton to be phased in at the rate of$20 per year between 2010 and
2020.
Paid by the primary producers—the oil and coal compa-
nies—this tax would permeate the entire fossil fuel energy econ-
omy.The tax on coal would be almost double that on natural
gas simply because coal has a much higher carbon content.
Once a schedule for phasing in the carbon tax and reducing the
tax on income is in place, the new prices can be used by all eco-
nomic decisionmakers to make more intelligent decisions. In
contrast to a cap-and-trade approach, in which the price ofcar-
bon fluctuates,the price ofcarbon with tax restructuring is pre-
dictable. For investors, this reduction in risk is invaluable. 
For countries everywhere, particularly developing ones, the
economic good news is that the Plan B energy economy is much
more labor-intensive than the fossil-fuel-based economy it is
replacing. In Germany, for example, which is a leader in the
energytransition, renewable energy industries already employ
more workers than the long-standing fossil fuel and nuclear
industries do.In a world where expanding employment is a uni-
versal goal, this is welcome news indeed.
46
The restructuring ofthe energy economy outlined here will
not only dramatically drop CO
2
emissions, helping to stabilize
climate, it will also eliminate much ofthe air pollution that we
knowtoday.The idea ofapollution-free environment is difficult
for us even to imagine, simply because none of us has ever
Can We Mobilize Fast Enough?
255
At present, net deforestation ofthe earth is responsible for
an estimated 1.5 billion tons ofcarbon emissions per year. The
Plan B goal is to bring deforestation to a halt by 2020, thus
totally eliminating this source ofcarbon emissions. But we are
not content with just halting deforestation. Wewant to increase
the number oftrees in order to sequester carbon. Planting trees
on deforested areas and marginal lands will sequester more than
860 million tons ofcarbon each year. The similarly ambitious
planting of trees to control flooding, reduce rainfall runoffto
recharge aquifers, and protect soils from erosion will take addi-
tional carbon out ofthe atmosphere.43
The other initiative  to sequester carbon  biologically  is
achieved through land use management. This includes expand-
ing the area of minimum- or no-till cropland, planting more
cover crops during the off-season, and using more perennials
instead ofannuals in cropping patterns. The latter would mean,
254
PLANB4.0
Table 10–1. Plan B Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductions and
Sequestration in 2020
Action
Amount
(million tons carbon)
Energy Restructuring
Replacing fossil fuels with renewables
for electricity and heat
3,210
Restructuring the transport system
1,400
Reducing coal and oil use in industry
100
Biological Carbon Sequestration
Ending net deforestation
1,500
Planting trees to sequester carbon
860
Managing soils to sequester carbon
600 
Total Carbon Dioxide Reductions in 2020
7,670
Carbon Dioxide Emissions in 2006
9,350
Percent Reduction from 2006 Baseline
82.0
Source:See endnote 41.
than a decade now, but huge parts ofthe sheet could break off,
sliding into the ocean. 
It is conceivable that this breakup could raise sea level a
frightening two or three feet within a matter ofyears. Unfortu-
nately, ifwe reach this point it may be too late to cut carbon
emissions fast enough to save the remainder ofthe West Antarc-
tic ice sheet or the Greenland ice sheet, whose melting is also
accelerating. This is not the model we want to follow for social
change on climate.
The Berlin Wall model is of interest because the wall’s dis-
mantling in November 1989 was a visual manifestation of a
much more fundamental social change. At some point, the peo-
ple living in Eastern Europe, buoyed by changes in Moscow, had
rejected the great “socialist experiment” with its one-party
political system and centrally planned economy. Although it
was not anticipated, Eastern Europe experienced a political rev-
olution, an essentially bloodless revolution, that changed the
form of government in every country in the region. It had
reached a tipping point, but it was not expected. You can search
the political science journals ofthe 1980s in vain for an article
warning that Eastern Europe was on the verge ofa political rev-
olution. In Washington the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)
“had no idea in January 1989 that a tidal wave ofhistory was
about to break upon us,” reflected Robert Gates, formerly with
the CIA and now U.S. Secretary of Defense, in a 1996 inter-
view.47
Many social changes occur when societies reach tipping
points or cross key thresholds. Once that happens, change
comes rapidly and often unpredictably. One ofthe best known
U.S. tipping points is the growing opposition to smoking that
took place during the last half of the twentieth century. This
anti-smoking movement was fueled by a steady flow ofinfor-
mation on the health-damaging effects of smoking, a process
that began with the Surgeon General’s first report in 1964 on
smoking and health. The tipping point came when this infor-
mation flow finally overcame the heavily funded disinformation
campaign funded by the tobacco industry.48
Published almost every year, the Surgeon General’s report
both drewattention to what was being learned about the effect
ofsmoking on health and spawned countless new research proj-
Can We Mobilize Fast Enough?
257
known an energy economy that was not highly polluting. Work-
ing in coal mines will be history. Black lung disease will eventu-
ally disappear. So too will “code red” alerts warning us to avoid
strenuous exercise because ofdangerous levels ofair pollution.
And, finally, in contrast to investments in oil fields and coal
mines, where depletion and abandonment are inevitable, the
new energy sources are inexhaustible. While wind turbines,
solar cells, and solar thermal systems will all need repair and
occasional replacement, to invest in these new energy sources is
to invest in energy systems that can last forever. This well will
notgo dry.
Three Models ofSocial Change
Can we change fast enough? When thinking about the enor-
mous need for social change as we attempt to move the world
economy onto a sustainable path, I find it useful to look at var-
ious models ofchange. Three stand out. One is the catastroph-
ic event model, which I call the Pearl Harbor model, where a
dramatic event fundamentally changes  how  we  think and
behave.The second model is one whereasociety reaches a tip-
ping point on a particular issue often after an extended period
of gradual change in thinking and attitudes. This I call the
Berlin Wall model. The third is the sandwich model of social
change, where there is a strong grassroots movement pushing
for change on a particular issue that is fully supported by strong
political leadership at the top.
The surprise Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December
7, 1941, was a dramatic wakeup call. It totally changed how
Americans thought about the war. Ifthe American people had
been asked on December 6th whether the country should enter
World War II, probably 95 percent would have said no. By Mon-
day morning, December 8th, perhaps 95 percent would have
said yes. 
The weakness ofthe Pearl Harbor model is that ifwe have
to wait for a catastrophic event to change our behavior, it might
be too late. It could lead to stresses that would themselves lead
to social collapse. When scientists are asked to identify a possi-
ble “Pearl Harbor” scenario on the climate front, they frequent-
ly point to the possible breakup ofthe West Antarctic ice sheet.
Relatively small blocks of it have been breaking off for more
256
PLANB4.0
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested