pdf viewer c# winform : Add image to pdf in preview control application system azure html winforms console pb4book14-part2272

improve  fuel  efficiency.  Shifts  within  the  energy  sector,  with
rapid growth in wind and solar energy while coal and oil are
declining, also signal a basic shift in values, one that could even-
tually alter every sector of the economy. If so, this combined
with a national leadership that shares  these emerging values,
could lead to social and economic change on a scale and at a
pace we cannot now easily imagine.52
It is quite possible that U.S. oil consumption, for example,
has peaked. The combination of much more demanding auto-
mobile efficiency standards, a dramatic restoration of funding
for public transit, and an encouraging shift not only to more
fuel-efficient gas-electric hybrid cars but to both plug-in hybrids
and electric cars could dramatically reduce gasoline sales. The
U.S. Department of Energy in past years had projected substan-
tial growth in U.S. oil consumption, but it has recently revised
this downward. The question now is not will oil use decline, but
how  fast  will  it  do  so.  Carbon  emissions  may  also  have
peaked.53
Of the three models of social change, relying on the Pearl
Harbor model is by far the riskiest, because by the time a socie-
ty-changing catastrophic event occurs, it may be too late. The
Berlin Wall model works, despite the lack of government sup-
port, but it does take time. Some 40 years elapsed after the com-
munist takeover of the governments of Eastern Europe before
the  spreading  opposition  became  strong  enough to  overcome
repressive regimes and switch to democratically elected govern-
ments.  The  ideal  situation  for  rapid,  historic  progress occurs
when mounting grassroots pressure for change merges with a
national leadership  committed to the same change. This may
help explain why the world has such high hopes for the new U.S.
leadership as it faces the challenges described in earlier chapters.
AWartime Mobilization 
The U.S. entry into World War II offers an inspiring case study
in rapid mobilization. Mobilizing to save civilization both par-
allels and contrasts with this earlier mobilization. For the war,
the United States underwent a massive economic restructuring,
but it was only intended to be temporary. Mobilizing to save civ-
ilization, in contrast, requires an economic restructuring that
will endure.
Can We Mobilize Fast Enough?
259
ects on  this  relationship.  There were  times  in the  1980s  and
1990s when it seemed every few weeks another study was being
released that had analyzed and documented one health effect or
another  associated  with  smoking.  Eventually  smoking  was
linked to more than 15 forms of cancer and to heart disease and
strokes. As public awareness of the damaging effects of smok-
ing on health accumulated, various measures were adopted that
banned smoking on planes and in offices, restaurants, and other
public places. As a result of these collective changes, cigarette
smoking per person peaked around 1970 and began a long-term
decline that continues today.49
One of the defining events in this social shift came when the
tobacco industry agreed to compensate state governments for
past Medicare costs of treating smoking victims. More recently,
in June 2009 Congress passed by an overwhelming margin and
President  Obama  signed  a  bill  that  gave the  Food  and Drug
Administration  the  authority  to  regulate  tobacco  products,
including advertising. It opened a new chapter in the effort to
reduce the health toll from smoking.50
The sandwich model of social change is in many ways the
most  attractive  one,  partly  because  it  brings  a  potential  for
rapid change. As of mid-2009, the strong grassroots interest in
cutting carbon emissions and developing renewable sources of
energy is merging with the interests of President Obama and his
administration.  One  result,  as  noted  earlier,  is  the  de  facto
moratorium on building new coal plants.
There are many signs that the United States may be moving
toward a tipping point on climate, much as it did on civil rights
in the 1960s. Though some of the indicators also reflect the eco-
nomic downturn, it now seems likely that carbon emissions in
the United States peaked in 2007 and have begun what will be a
long-term decline. The burning of coal and oil, the principal
sources of carbon emissions, may both now be declining. And
the  automobile  fleet  may be  shrinking. With  the  cars  to  be
scrapped in 2009 likely to exceed sales,  the U.S. automobile fleet
may have peaked and also begun to decline.51
The shift to more fuel-efficient cars over the last two years,
spurred  in  part  by  higher  gasoline  prices,  was  strongly  rein-
forced by the new automobile fuel efficiency standards and by
rescue  package  pressures  on  the  automobile  companies  to
258
PLAN B 4.0
Add image to pdf in preview - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add image to pdf reader; add multiple jpg to pdf
Add image to pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add jpg signature to pdf; add jpg to pdf preview
visualize it. Equally impressive, by the end of the war more than
5,000  ships  were added to the 1,000 or  so that made  up  the
American Merchant Fleet in 1939.58
In  her  book  No  Ordinary  Time, Doris  Kearns  Goodwin
describes how various firms converted. A sparkplug factory was
among the first to switch to the production of machine guns.
Soon  a  manufacturer  of stoves  was  producing  lifeboats.  A
merry-go-round factory was making gun mounts; a toy compa-
ny was turning out compasses; a corset manufacturer was pro-
ducing grenade  belts;  and  a  pinball  machine  plant  began  to
make armor-piercing shells.59
In retrospect, the speed of this conversion from a peacetime
to  a  wartime  economy  is  stunning.  The  harnessing  of U.S.
industrial power tipped the scales decisively toward the Allied
Forces, reversing the tide of war. Germany and Japan, already
fully extended, could not counter this effort. British Prime Min-
ister Winston Churchill often quoted his foreign secretary, Sir
Edward Grey: “The United States is like a giant boiler. Once the
fire is lighted under it, there is no limit to the power it can gen-
erate.”
60
This mobilization of resources within a matter of months
demonstrates that a country and, indeed, the world can restruc-
ture the economy quickly if convinced of the  need to do so.
Many people—although not yet the majority—are already con-
vinced of the need for a wholesale economic restructuring. The
purpose of this book is to convince more people of this need,
helping to tip the balance toward the forces of change and hope.
Mobilizing to Save Civilization
Mobilizing to save civilization means fundamentally restructur-
ing the global economy in order to stabilize climate, eradicate
poverty, stabilize population, restore the economy’s natural sup-
port systems,  and, above all, restore hope. We have the tech-
nologies, economic instruments, and financial resources to do
this.  The  United  States,  the  wealthiest  society  that  has  ever
existed, has the resources to lead this effort. 
On  the eradication  of poverty,  Jeffrey  Sachs of Columbia
University’s Earth Institute sums it up well: “The tragic irony of
this moment is that the rich countries are so rich and the poor
so poor that a few added tenths of one percent of GNP from the
Can We Mobilize Fast Enough?
261
Initially, the  United  States resisted  involvement in the war
and responded only after it was directly attacked at Pearl Har-
bor on December 7, 1941. But respond it did. After an all-out
commitment, the U.S. engagement helped turn the tide of war,
leading  the  Allied  Forces  to  victory  within  three-and-a-half
years.54
In his State of the Union address on January 6, 1942, one
month after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, President Franklin D.
Roosevelt announced the country’s arms production goals. The
United States, he said, was planning to produce 45,000 tanks,
60,000 planes, 20,000 anti-aircraft guns, and several thousand
ships. He added, “Let no man say it cannot be done.”
55
No one had ever seen such huge arms production numbers.
Public skepticism was widespread. But Roosevelt and his col-
leagues realized that the world’s largest concentration of indus-
trial power at  that time was in the U.S. automobile industry.
Even during the Depression, the United States was producing 3
million or more cars a year. After his State of the Union address,
Roosevelt met with auto industry leaders and told them that the
country would rely heavily on them to reach these arms pro-
duction  goals.  Initially they wanted to continue making  cars
and simply add on the production of armaments. What they did
not  yet  know  was  that  the  sale  of new cars  would  soon  be
banned. From  early February 1942  through the  end  of 1944,
nearly three years, essentially no cars were produced in the Unit-
ed States.56
In addition to a ban on the production and sale of cars for
private use,  residential and highway construction was halted,
and driving for pleasure was banned. Strategic goods—includ-
ing tires, gasoline, fuel oil, and sugar—were rationed beginning
in 1942. Cutting back on private consumption of these goods
freed up material resources that were vital to the war effort.57
The year 1942 witnessed the greatest expansion of industri-
al output in the nation’s history—all for military use. Wartime
aircraft needs were enormous. They included not only fighters,
bombers,  and  reconnaissance  planes,  but  also  the troop  and
cargo transports needed to fight a war on distant fronts. From
the  beginning  of 1942  through  1944,  the  United  States  far
exceeded the initial goal of 60,000 planes, turning out a stag-
gering 229,600 aircraft, a fleet so vast it is hard today to even
260
PLAN B 4.0
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Convert PDF to Tiff image (.tif, .tiff). • Convert PDF to HTML (.htm, .html). PDF Annotation. • Add sticky notes to PDF document in preview.
add image to pdf preview; add jpg to pdf online
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
PDF to Tiff image (.tif, .tiff). • Convert PDF to HTML (.htm, .html). PDF Annotation. • Add sticky notes to PDF document. • Highlight PDF text in preview.
adding a jpg to a pdf; adding an image to a pdf in preview
$187  billion,  roughly  one  third  of the  current  U.S.  military
budget or 13 percent of the global military budget. (See Tables
10–2 and 10–3.) In a sense this is the new defense budget, the
one that addresses the most serious threats to our security.65
Unfortunately, the United States continues to focus on build-
ing an ever-stronger military, largely ignoring the threats posed
by continuing environmental deterioration, poverty, and popu-
lation growth. Its 2008 military expenditures totaled $607 bil-
Can We Mobilize Fast Enough?
263
rich ones ramped up over the coming decades could do what
was  never before  possible in  human history:  ensure  that  the
basic needs of health and education are met for all impoverished
children in this world.”61
We can calculate roughly the costs of the changes needed to
move our twenty-first century civilization off the decline-and-
collapse  path  and  onto  a  path  that  will  sustain  civilization.
What we cannot calculate is the cost of not adopting Plan B.
How do you put a price tag on civilizational collapse and the
massive suffering and death that typically accompanies it? 
As noted in Chapter 7, the additional external funding need-
ed to achieve universal primary education in developing coun-
tries that require help, for instance, is conservatively estimated
at  $10  billion  per  year.  Funding  for  adult  literacy  programs
based largely on volunteers will take an estimated additional $4
billion  annually.  Providing  for  the  most  basic  health  care  in
developing countries is estimated at $33 billion by the World
Health Organization. The additional funding needed to provide
reproductive  health  care  and  family  planning  services  to  all
women in developing countries amounts to $17 billion a year.
62
Closing the condom gap by providing the additional 14.7 bil-
lion condoms needed each year to control the spread of HIV in
the developing world and Eastern Europe requires roughly $3
billion—$440 million for  condoms and $2.2 billion for  AIDS
prevention  education  and  condom  distribution.  The  cost  of
extending school lunch programs to the 44 poorest countries is
$6 billion. An estimated $4 billion per year would cover the cost
of assistance  to  preschool  children  and  pregnant  women  in
these  countries.  Altogether,  the  cost  of reaching  basic  social
goals comes to $77 billion a year.63
As noted in Chapter 8, a poverty eradication effort that is
not accompanied by an earth restoration effort is doomed to
fail. Protecting topsoil, reforesting the earth, restoring oceanic
fisheries,and other needed measures will cost an estimated $110
billion  in  additional  expenditures  per  year.  The  most  costly
activities, protecting biological diversity at $31 billion and con-
serving soil on cropland at $24 billion, account for almost half
of the earth restoration annual outlay.64
Combining social goals and earth restoration  components
into a Plan B budget yields an additional annual expenditure of
262
PLAN B 4.0
Table 10–2. Plan B Budget: Additional Annual Expenditures
Needed to Meet Social Goals and to Restore the Earth
Goal
Funding
(billion dollars)
Basic Social Goals
Universal primary education
10
Eradication of adult illiteracy
4
School lunch programs for 44 poorest countries
6
Assistance to preschool children and
pregnant women in 44 poorest countries
4
Reproductive health and family planning
17
Universal basic health care
33
Closing the condom gap
3
Total
77
Earth Restoration Goals
Planting trees to reduce flooding 
and conserve soil
6
Planting trees to sequester carbon
17
Protecting topsoil on cropland
24
Restoring rangelands
9
Restoring fisheries
13
Protecting biological diversity
31
Stabilizing water tables
10 
Total
110
Grand Total
187
Source: See endnotes 63 and 64.
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
C# DLLs for Word File Preview. Add references: Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Word file in C#.net.
add image to pdf acrobat; adding image to pdf
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
Add necessary XDoc.PowerPoint DLL libraries into your created C# application as You may get document preview image from an existing PowerPoint file in C#.net.
attach image to pdf form; add a picture to a pdf
collapse, or we can consciously move onto a new path, one that
will sustain economic progress. In this situation, the failure to
act is a de facto decision to  stay on the decline-and-collapse
path.
No one can argue today that we do not have the resources to
do the job. We can stabilize world population. We can get rid of
hunger, illiteracy, disease, and poverty, and we can restore the
earth’s  soils,  forests,  and fisheries. Shifting  13 percent  of the
world military budget to the Plan B budget would be more than
adequate  to  move  the  world onto  a  path  that  would  sustain
progress. We can  build a  global  community  where the  basic
needs of all people are satisfied—a world that will allow us to
think of ourselves as civilized.
This economic restructuring depends on tax restructuring,
on getting the  market  to be ecologically honest, as described
earlier. The benchmark of political leadership will be whether
leaders succeed in shifting taxes from work to environmentally
destructive activities. It is tax shifting, not additional appropri-
ations, that is the key to restructuring the energy economy in
order to stabilize climate.
It is easy to spend hundreds of billions in response to terror-
ist threats, but the reality is that the resources needed to disrupt
amodern economy are small, and a U.S. Department of Home-
land Security, however heavily funded, provides only minimal
protection from suicidal terrorists. The challenge is not to pro-
vide a high-tech military response to terrorism but to build a
global  society  that  is  environmentally  sustainable  and  equi-
table—one  that  restores  hope  for  everyone.  Such  an  effort
would do more to combat terrorism than any increase in mili-
tary  expenditures  or  any  new  weapons  systems,  however
advanced.
Just as the forces of decline can reinforce each other, so can
the forces of progress. For example, efficiency gains that lower
oil dependence also reduce carbon emissions and air pollution.
Steps to eradicate poverty help stabilize population. Reforesta-
tion sequesters carbon, increases aquifer recharge, and reduces
soil erosion. Once  we  get  enough trends headed in the  right
direction, they will reinforce each other.
The world needs a major success story in reducing carbon
emissions and dependence on oil in order to bolster hope in the
Can We Mobilize Fast Enough?
265
lion, 41 percent of the global total of $1,464 billion. Other lead-
ing spenders included China ($85 billion), France ($66 billion),
the United Kingdom ($65 billion), and Russia ($59 billion).66
As of mid-2009, direct U.S. appropriations for the Iraq war,
which has lasted longer than World War II, total some $642 bil-
lion. Economists Joseph Stiglitz and Linda Bilmes calculate that
if all the costs are included, such as the lifetime of care required
for returning troops who are brain-injured or psychologically
shattered, the cost of war will in the end approach $3 trillion.
Yet the Iraq war may prove to be one of history’s most costly
mistakes not so much because of fiscal outlay but because it has
diverted  the  world’s  attention  from  climate  change  and  the
other threats to civilization itself.67
It  is  decision  time.  Like  earlier  civilizations  that  got  into
environmental trouble, we can decide to stay with business as
usual and watch our modern economy decline and eventually
264
PLAN B 4.0
Table 10–3. Military Budgets by Country and for the World
in 2008 and Plan B Budget
Country
Budget
(billion dollars)
United States
607
China
85
France
66
United Kingdom
65
Russia
59
Germany
47
Japan
46
Italy
41
Saudi Arabia
38
India
30
All other
380 
World Military Expenditure
1,464
Plan B Budget
187
Source: See endnote 65.
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
enables compressing and decompressing in preview in ASP.NET to reduce or minimize original PDF document size Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or
add image to pdf acrobat reader; add picture to pdf file
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Excel file in C#.net.
how to add a picture to a pdf document; how to add image to pdf in acrobat
want to organize a group of like-minded individuals. You might
begin by talking with others to help select an issue or issues to
work on.
And communicate with your elected representatives on the
city council or the national legislature. Aside from the particu-
lar issue that you choose to work on, there are two overriding
policy challenges: restructuring taxes and reordering fiscal pri-
orities.  Write  or  e-mail  your elected  representative  about  the
need to restructure taxes by reducing income taxes and raising
environmental taxes. Remind him or her that leaving costs off
the books may offer a Ponzi sense of prosperity in the short run
but that it leads to collapse in the long run.
Let your political representatives know that a world spend-
ing more than $1 trillion a year for military purposes is simply
out  of sync  with  reality,  not  responding  to  the most  serious
threats to our future. Ask them if $187 billion a year, the Plan B
budget, is an unreasonable expenditure to save civilization. Ask
them if diverting one eighth of the global military budget to
saving civilization is too costly. Remind them of how the United
States mobilized during World War II.
69
And  above  all,  don’t  underestimate  what  you  can  do.
Anthropologist Margaret Mead once said, “Never doubt that a
small group of concerned citizens can change the world. Indeed,
it is the only thing that ever has.”70
In addition, it doesn’t hurt to underpin your political efforts
with  lifestyle  changes.  But  remember  they  supplement  your
political action; they are not a substitute for it. Urban planner
Richard Register recounts meeting a bicycle activist friend wear-
ing a t-shirt that said “I just lost 3,500 pounds. Ask me how.”
When queried he said he had sold his car. Replacing a 3,500-
pound car with a 22-pound bicycle obviously reduces energy use
dramatically, but  it also reduces  materials use by 99 percent,
indirectly saving still more energy.71
Dietary changes can also make a difference. We learned that
the climate footprint differences between a diet rich in red meat
and a plant-based diet is roughly the same as the climate foot-
print difference between driving a large fuel-guzzling SUV and
ahighly  efficient gas-electric hybrid. Those  of us  with  diets
heavy in fat-rich livestock products can do both ourselves and
civilization a favor by moving down the food chain.72
Can We Mobilize Fast Enough?
267
future. If the United States, for instance, were to launch a crash
program to shift to  plug-in  and all-electric hybrid cars  while
simultaneously investing in thousands of wind farms, Ameri-
cans could do most of their driving with wind energy, dramati-
cally reducing the need for oil.
With many U.S. automobile assembly lines currently idled, it
would be a relatively simple matter to retool some of them to
produce wind turbines, enabling the country to quickly harness
its vast wind energy potential. This would be a rather modest
initiative compared with the restructuring during World War II,
but it would help the world to see that restructuring an econo-
my is achievable and that it can be done quickly, profitably, and
in  a  way  that  enhances  national  security  both  by  reducing
dependence on vulnerable oil supplies and by avoiding disrup-
tive climate change.
What You and I Can Do
One of the questions I hear most frequently is, What can I do?
People often expect me to talk about lifestyle changes, recycling
newspapers, or changing light bulbs.  These are  essential, but
they are  not  nearly  enough.  We  now  need  to  restructure  the
global  economy, and  quickly. It  means  becoming  politically
active, working for the needed changes. Saving civilization is not
aspectator sport.
Inform yourself, read about the issues. If you want to know
what happened to earlier civilizations that found themselves in
environmental trouble, read Collapse by Jared Diamond or A
Short History of Progress by Ronald Wright or The Collapse of
Complex Societies by Joseph Tainter. If you found this book
useful in helping you think about what to do, share it with oth-
ers. It can be downloaded free of charge from the Institute’s
Web site, earthpolicy.org.68
Pick an issue that’s meaningful to you, such as tax restruc-
turing, banning inefficient  light  bulbs, phasing out coal-fired
power plants, or working for streets in your community that are
pedestrian- and bicycle-friendly, or join a group that is working
to stabilize world population. What could be more exciting and
rewarding than getting personally involved in trying to save civ-
ilization? 
You may want to proceed on your own, but you might also
266
PLAN B 4.0
How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word following steps below, you can create an image viewer WinForm Open or create a new WinForms application, add necessary dll
adding an image to a pdf form; add photo to pdf online
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Generally speaking, using well-designed APIs, C# developers can do following things. Remove Image from PDF Page Using C#. Add necessary references:
add jpg to pdf acrobat; adding images to pdf forms
Beyond  these  rather  painless  often  healthily  beneficial
lifestyle  changes,  we  can  also  think  about  sacrifice.  During
World War II the military draft asked millions of young men to
risk the ultimate sacrifice. But we do not need to sacrifice lives
as we battle to save civilization. We are called on only to be
politically active and to make lifestyle changes. During the early
part  of World  War  II  President  Roosevelt  frequently  asked
Americans to adjust their lifestyles. What contributions can we
make today, in time, money, or reduced consumption, to help
save civilization?
The choice is ours—yours and mine. We can stay with busi-
ness as usual and preside over an economy that continues to
destroy its natural support systems until it destroys itself, or we
can adopt Plan B and be the generation that changes direction,
moving the world onto a path of sustained progress. The choice
will be made by our generation, but it will affect life on earth
for all generations to come.
268
PLAN B 4.0
Chapter 1. Selling Our Future
1. Sandra Postel, Pillar of Sand (New York:  W. W. Norton & Company,
1999), pp. 13–21.
2. Guy  Gugliotta,  “The  Maya:  Glory  and  Ruin,”  National  Geographic,
August 2007; Jared Diamond, Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or
Succeed (New York: Penguin Group, 2005); Postel, op. cit. note 1,  pp.
13–21; Joseph Tainter, The Collapse of Complex Societies (Cambridge,
U.K.: CambridgeUniversity Press, 1998).
3. U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization  (FAO),  “Soaring  Food Prices:
Facts, Perspectives, Impacts, and Actions Required,” paper presented at
the High-Level Conference on World  Food Security: the Challenges of
Climate Change and Bioenergy, Rome, 3–5 June 2008; historical wheat,
corn, and soybean prices are Chicago Board of Trade futures data from
TFC Commodity Charts, “Grain & Oilseed Commodities Futures,” at
futures.tradingcharts.com/grains_oilseeds.html, viewed 16 January 2009;
current  wheat,  corn,  and  soybean  prices  are Chicago Board of Trade
futures data from CME Group, “Commodity Products,” various dates, at
www.cmegroup.com; rice prices from Nathan Childs and Katherine Bald-
win, Rice Outlook (Washington,  DC:  U.S. Department of Agriculture
(USDA), Economic Research Service (ERS), 11 June 2009), p. 26.
4. U.N. General Assembly, “United Nations Millennium Declaration,” reso-
lution adopted by the General Assembly, 8 September 2000; FAO, “1.02
Billion People Hungry,” press release (Rome: 19 June 2009). 
5. U.N. Population Division, World Population Prospects: The 2008 Revision
Population Database, at esa.un.org/unpp, updated 11 March 2009.
6. USDA,  Production,  Supply and  Distribution, electronic  database,  at
Notes
Desertification in Northern China,” CAREERI, Chinese Academy of Sci-
ences,  seminar on desertification,  held in Lanzhou, China, May 2002;
“Scientists Meeting in Tunis Called for Priority Activities to Curb Deser-
tification,” UN News Service, 21 June 2006. 
15. Noel Gollehon and William Quinby, “Irrigation in the American West:
Area, Water and Economic Activity,” Water Resources Development, vol.
16, no. 2 (2000), pp. 187–95; Sandra Postel, Last Oasis (New York: W. W.
Norton & Company, 1997), p. 137; R. Srinivasan, “The Politics of Water,”
Info Change Agenda, issue 3 (October 2005); Water Strategist, various
issues, at www.waterstrategist.com; “China Politics: Growing Tensions
Over Scarce Water,” The Economist, 21 June 2004.
16. USDA, op. cit. note 6; pre-1960 data from USDA, in Worldwatch Institute,
Signposts 2001, CD-ROM (Washington, DC: 2001).
17. USDA, op. cit. note 6; pre-1960 data from USDA, op. cit. note 16.
18. USDA,  op.  cit.  note  6;  Kenneth  G.  Cassman  et  al.,  “Meeting  Cereal
Demand  While Protecting Natural  Resources  and  Improving Environ-
mental Quality,” Annual Review of Environment and Resources,Novem-
ber 2003, pp. 322, 350; Thomas R. Sinclair, “Limits to Crop Yield?” in
American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and
Soil Science Society of America, Physiology and Determination of Crop
Yield (Madison, WI: 1994), pp. 509–32.
19. Peter M. Vitousek et al., “Human Appropriation of the Products of Pho-
tosynthesis,” BioScience, vol. 36, no. 6 (June 1986), pp. 368–73.
20. USDA, op. cit. note 6; U.N. Population Division, op. cit. note 5.
21. Financial Times, “In Depth: The Global Food Crisis,” at www.ft.com/
foodprices, updated 6 May 2008; USDA, op. cit. note 6. 
22. Office of the President, Republic of the Philippines, “RP Assured of 1.5
Million  Metric  Tons  of Rice  Supply  from  Vietnam  Annually,”  press
release (Manila: 26 March 2008); “Yemen to Seek Australian Food Coop-
eration,”  WorldGrain.com, 19  May 2008;  “Indonesia  Set  to  Become
Major Rice Exporter Next Year,” WorldGrain.com,1 July 2008; “Bahrain
to Own Rice Farms in Thailand,” TradeArabia,online business newswire,
30 May 2008; Javier Blas, “Nations  Make  Secret  Deals  Over  Grain,”
Financial Times, 10 April 2008; Maria  Kolesnikova and  Alaa Shahine,
“Russia, Egypt Agree on Wheat Deals to Boost Shipments,” Bloomberg,
23 June 2009.
23. GRAIN, Seized! The 2008 Land Grab for Food and  Financial Security
(Barcelona: October 2008); USDA, op. cit. note 6; “Libya Agrees Deal to
Grow Wheat in Ukraine,” Reuters, 27 May 2009. 
24. Joachim von Braun and Ruth Meinzen-Dick, “Land Grabbing” by Foreign
Investorsin Developing Countries, Policy Brief No. 13 (Washington, DC:
International Food Policy Research Institute, April 2009).
25. GRAIN, op. cit. note 23; von Braun and Meinzen-Dick, op. cit. note 24;
“Buying Farmland Abroad: Outsourcing’s Third Wave,” The Economist,
21 May 2009. 
26. GRAIN, op. cit. note 23; “Land Deals in Africa and Asia: Cornering For-
eign Fields,” The Economist, 21 May 2009; Javier Blas, “Saudis Get First
Taste  of Foreign  Harvest,”  Financial  Times, 4 March  2009;  “Saudi’s
Hadco Eyes Sudan, Turkey in Food Security Push,” Reuters, 17 February
2009;  U.N.  World  Food  Programme,  “Countries,”  at  www.wfp.org/
Notes: chapter 1
271
www.fas.usda.gov/psdonline,  updated  12  May  2009;  U.N.  Population
Division, op. cit. note 5. 
7. Ward’s Automotive Group, World Motor Vehicle Data 2008 (Southfield,
MI: 2008), pp. 239–42; USDA, op. cit. note 6; F.O. Licht, “Too Much Too
Soon?  World Ethanol  Production  to  Break  Another  Record  in  2005,”
World Ethanol and  Biofuels  Report, vol. 3, no.  20 (21 June 2005), pp.
429–35; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Information Admin-
istration (EIA), “World Crude Oil Prices,” and “U.S. All Grades All For-
mulations  Retail Gasoline Prices,” at tonto.eia.doe.gov,  viewed 31  July
2007. 
8. Cropland losing topsoil is author’s estimate; USDA, op. cit. note 6; FAO,
The State of Food and Agriculture 1995 (Rome: 1995), p. 175. 
9. Lester R. Brown, Outgrowing the Earth (New York: W. W. Norton &
Company, 2004), pp. 101–02; Peter H. Gleick et al., The World’s Water
2004–2005 (Washington, DC: Island Press, 2004), p. 88; U.N. Population
Division, op. cit. note 5; Andrew England, “Saudis to Phase Out Wheat
Production,” Financial Times, 10 April 2008; John Briscoe, India’s Water
Economy:  Bracing  for  a  Turbulent  Future (New  Delhi:  World  Bank,
2005); World Bank, China: Agenda for Water Sector Strategy for North
China (Washington, DC: April 2001), pp. vii, xi. 
10. Shaobing Peng et al., “Rice Yields Decline with Higher Night Tempera-
ture from Global Warming,” Proceedings of the National Academy of
Sciences, 6 July 2004, pp. 9,971–75; J. Hansen, NASA’s Goddard Institute
for  Space  Studies,  “Global  Temperature  Anomalies  in  0.1  C,”  at
data.giss.nasa.gov/gistemp/tabledata/GLB.Ts.txt,  updated  April  2009;
“Summary for  Policymakers,”  in  Intergovernmental  Panel  on  Climate
Change, Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution
of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovern-
mental Panel on Climate Change (Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge Universi-
ty Press, 2007), p. 13.
11. U.N. Environment Programme, Global Outlook for Ice and Snow (Nairo-
bi:  2007);  Lester  R.  Brown,  “Melting  Mountain  Glaciers  Will  Shrink
Grain Harvests in China and India,” Plan B Update (Washington, DC:
Earth Policy Institute, 20 March 2008); USDA, op. cit. note 6.
12. W. T. Pfeffer,  J. T. Harper, and S. O’Neel,  “Kinematic Constraints on
Glacier Contributions to 21st-Century Sea-Level Rise,” Science, vol. 321
(5 September 2008) pp. 1,340–43; James Hansen, “Scientific Reticence and
Sea Level Rise,” Environmental Research Letters, vol. 2 (24 May 2007);
Environmental Change and Forced Scenarios Project, “Preliminary Finds
from the  EACH-FOR Project  on Environmentally Induced Migration”
(September 2008), p. 16; U.N. Development Programme, Human Devel-
opment Report 2007/2008 (New York: 2007), p. 100;  World Bank, World
Development Report 1999/2000 (New York: Oxford University Press, Sep-
tember 1999); USDA, op. cit. note 6; U.N. Population Division, op. cit.
note 5. 
13. FAO, FISHSTAT Plus, electronic database, at www.fao.org, updated Feb-
ruary 2009. 
14. Wang  Tao,  Cold  and  Arid  Regions  Environmental  and  Engineering
Research Institute (CAREERI), Chinese Academy of Sciences, e-mail to
author, 4 April 2004; Wang Tao, “The Process and Its Control of Sandy
270
Notes: chapter 1
vol. 99, no. 14 (9 July 2002), pp. 9,266–71; Global Footprint Network,
WWF,  and  Zoological Society of London,  Living  Planet Report 2008
(Gland, Switzerland: WWF, October 2008), p. 2. 
39. Author’s estimate based on previously cited figures for China and India,
as well as other countries such as Saudi Arabia and Pakistan where water
tables are falling due to overpumping.
40. FAO, The State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture 2008 (Rome: 2009), p.
7; Ransom A. Myers and Boris Worm, “Rapid Worldwide Depletion of
Predatory  Fish  Communities,”  Nature, vol.  432  (15  May  2003),  pp.
280–83. 
41. Paul Hawken, “Commencement Address to the Class of 2009,” speech at
University of Portland, Portland, OR, 3 May 2009.
42. Eric Pfanner, “Failure Brings Call for Tougher Standards: Accounting for
Enron: Global Ripple Effects,” International Herald Tribune, 17 January
2002.
43. Nicholas Stern, The Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change
(London: HM Treasury, 2006). 
44. DOE,  EIA,  “Weekly  Retail  Gasoline  and  Diesel  Prices,”  at  tonto.eia.
doe.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_gnd_dcus_nus_w.htm, viewed 5 June 2009.
45. International Center for Technology Assessment (ICTA), The Real Cost
of Gasoline: An Analysis of the Hidden External Costs Consumers Pay to
Fuel Their Automobiles (Washington, DC: 1998); ICTA, Gasoline Cost
Externalities Associated with Global Climate Change (Washington, DC:
September 2004); ICTA, Gasoline Cost Externalities: Security and Pro-
tection Services (Washington, DC: January 2005); Terry Tamminen, Lives
Per Gallon: The True Cost of Our Oil Addiction (Washington, DC: Island
Press, 2006),  p. 60, adjusted  to 2007  prices  with Bureau of Economic
Analysis, “Table 3—Price Indices for Gross Domestic Product and Gross
Domestic Purchases,” GDP and Other Major Series, 1929–2007 (Wash-
ington, DC: August 2007); DOE, op. cit. note 44.
46. Munich Re, Topics Annual Review: Natural Catastrophes 2001 (Munich,
Germany: 2002), pp. 16–17; value of China’s wheat and rice harvests from
USDA, op. cit. note 6, updated 12 July 2007, using prices from Interna-
tional Monetary Fund, International Financial Statistics, electronic data-
base, at ifs.apdi.net/imf. 
47. “Forestry Cuts Down on Logging,” China Daily, 26 May 1998; Erik Eck-
holm,  “China  Admits  Ecological Sins  Played  Role  in  Flood Disaster,”
New York Times, 26 August 1998.
48. Fund for Peace and Foreign Policy,“The Failed States Index,” Foreign Pol-
icy, July/August 2005, pp. 56–65.
49. Ibid.
50. Lydia Polgreen, “In Congo, Hunger and Disease Erode Democracy,” New
York Times, 23 June 2006; International Rescue Committee, Mortality in
the Democratic Republic of Congo: An Ongoing Crisis (New York: Jan-
uary 2008), p. ii; Lydia Polgreen, “Hundreds Killed Near Chad’s Border
With Sudan,” New York Times, 14 November 2006; “A Failing State: The
Himalayan Kingdom Is a Gathering Menace,” The Economist, 4 Decem-
ber 2004. 
51. “The Indian Ocean: The Most Dangerous Seas in the World,” The Econ-
omist,17 July 2008; U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime, World Drug Report
Notes: chapter 1
273
countries, viewed 4 June 2009. 
27. “Saudis Invest $1.3 Billion in Indonesian Agriculture,” Reuters, 24 March
2009; von Braun and Meinzen-Dick, op. cit. note 24.
28. Von Braun and Meinzen-Dick, op. cit. note 24; USDA, op. cit. note 6; U.N.
Population Division, op. cit. note 5; “China ‘May Lease Foreign Fields’,”
BBC News, 29 April 2008; Gurbir Singh, “China is Buying Farm Lands
Abroad to Ensure Food Supplies at Home,” Business World (New Delhi),
16 May 2008;  “China Eyes  Russian Farmlands  in  Food Push,” Russia
Today (Moscow), 11 May 2008; GRAIN, op. cit. note 23, p. 3; “Govt to
Lease Land for FDI in Agriculture,” Myanmar Times, 11–17 September
2006; U.N. World Food Programme, op. cit. note 26.
29. USDA, op. cit. note 6; GRAIN, op. cit. note 23, pp. 4, 5; “Buying Farm-
land Abroad,” op. cit. note 25; Javier Blas, “Hyundai Plants Seoul’s Flag
on 50,000ha of Russia,” Financial Times,15 April 2009.
30. Erik Ansink and Arjan Ruijs, “Climate Change and the Stability of Water
Allocation Agreements,” Fondazione Ene Enrico Mattei, Working Paper
No. 16.2007 (February 2007), pp. 21–23.
31. “Memorandum of Understanding on Construction of Agriculture Tech-
nology Transfer Center and Grain Production and Processing Base in the
Philippines,”  available  at  www.newsbreak.com.ph/dmdocuments/
special%20coverages/China%20Agri/Fuhua%20MOU.pdf,  signed  15
January 2007; “China: ‘Going Outward’ for Food Security,” Stratfor, 30
April 2008; Luzi Ann Javier, “China’s Appetite for Filipino Paddies Breeds
Farmer  Opposition,”  Bloomberg, 21  February  2008;  Tom  Burgis  and
Javier Blas, “Madagascar Scraps Daewoo Farm Deal,” Financial Times,
18 March 2009; “Zambia’s Opposition Condemns Reported Chinese Bio-
fuels Project,” Earth Times, 2 April 2009.
32. GRAIN, op. cit. note 23, p. 10; “Buying Farmland Abroad,” op. cit. note
25. 
33. Amena Bakr, “Pakistan Offers Farmland to Foreign Investors,” Reuters,
20 April 2009.
34. Michiyo Nakamoto and Javier Blas, “G8 Move to Halt ‘Farmland Grab-
bing’,” Financial Times,26 May 2009; von Braun and Meinzen-Dick, op.
cit. note 24.
35. USDA, op. cit. note 6; U.N. Population Division, op. cit. note 5. 
36. “Cereal Offenders,” The Economist, 27 May 2008; “Commodities Boom
Recalls 70s Surge; Prices Not There Yet,” Dow Jones Newswires, 27 June
2008; Fred H. Sanderson, “The Great Food Fumble,” Science, vol. 188 (9
May 1975), pp. 503–09; U.S. Department of the Treasury, “Report on For-
eign Holdings of U.S. Securities at End-June 2008,” press release (Wash-
ington, DC: 30 April  2009); U.S. Department  of the Treasury, “Major
Foreign  Holders  of Treasury  Securities,”  current  and  historical  data
tables, at www.treasury.gov/tic, updated 16 January 2009. 
37. James Bandler and Nicholas Varchaver, “How Bernie Did It,” Fortune,
vol. 159, no. 10 (11 May 2009); “The Madoff Affair: Going Down Quiet-
ly,” The Economist,12 May 2009.
38. Angus Maddison, “Statistics on World Population, GDP and Per Capita
GDP,  1–2006  AD,”  at  www.ggdc.net/maddison,  updated  March  2009;
Mathis Wackernagel  et al., “Tracking the Ecological Overshoot of the
Human Economy,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences,
272
Notes: chapter 1
64. U.N. World Food Programme, op. cit. note 26. 
65. Stephanie McCrummen, “In an Eastern Congo Oasis, Blood amid the
Greenery,” Washington Post, 22 July 2007. 
66. U.N. Population Division, op. cit. note 5.
67. Harold G. Vatter, The US Economy in World War II (New York: Colum-
bia  University  Press,  1985),  p.  13;  Alan  L.  Gropman, Mobilizing  U.S.
Industry in World War II (Washington, DC: National Defense University
Press,  August  1996);  Doris  Kearns  Goodwin,  No  Ordinary  Time—
Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II (New
York: Simon & Schuster, 1994), p. 316.
68. U.N. Population Division, World Population Prospects: The 2008 Revi-
sion, Extended Dataset, CD-ROM (New York: 9 April 2009). 
69. CalCars, “All About Plug-In Hybrids,” at www.calcars.org, viewed 9 June
2009;  General Motors, “Imagine: A Daily Commute  Without Using  a
Drop of Gas,” at www.chevrolet.com/electriccar, viewed 8 August 2008.
70. Larry Kinney, Lighting Systems in Southwestern Homes: Problems and
Opportunities,prepared for DOE, Building America Program through the
Midwest  Research  Institute,  National  Renewable  Energy  Laboratory 
Division (Boulder, CO: Southwest Energy Efficiency Project, June 2005),
pp. 4–5; CREE LED Lighting, “Ultra-Efficient  Lighting,” at www.cree
lighting.com/efficiency.htm, viewed 17 April 2009. 
71. Denmark from Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC), “Interactive World
Map,”  at  www.gwec.net/index.php?id=126,  viewed  29  May  2009,  and
from Flemming Hansen, “Denmark to Increase Wind Power to 50% by
2025, Mostly Offshore,” Renewable Energy Access, 5 December 2006;
GWEC, Global Wind 2008 Report (Brussels: 2009), p. 13, with European
per person consumption from European Wind Energy Association, “Wind
Power on Course to Become Major European Energy Source by the End
of the Decade,” press release (Brussels: 22 November 2004); China’s solar
water heaters from Werner Weiss, Irene Bergmann, and Roman Stelzer,
Solar Heat Worldwide: Markets and Contribution to the Energy Supply
2007 (Gleisdorf, Austria: International Energy Agency, Solar Heating &
Cooling Programme, May 2009), p. 20; Iceland National Energy Authori-
ty and Ministries of Industry and Commerce, Geothermal Development
and Research in Iceland (Reykjavik: April 2006), p. 16; share of electrici-
ty calculated by Earth Policy Institute using installed capacity from Rug-
gero Bertani, “World Geothermal Generation in 2007,” GHC Bulletin,
September 2007, p. 9; capacity factor from Ingvar B. Fridleifsson et al.,
“The Possible Role and Contribution of Geothermal Energy to the Miti-
gation of Climate Change,” in O. Hohmeyer and T. Trittin, eds., IPCC
Scoping Meeting on Renewable Energy Sources, Proceedings (Luebeck,
Germany: 20–25 January 2008), p. 5; total electricity generation from
“World  Total  Net  Electricity  Generation,  1980–2005,”  in  DOE,  EIA,
International Energy Annual 2005 (Washington, DC: 13 September 2007). 
72. Se-Kyung  Chong,  “Anmyeon-do  Recreation  Forest:  A  Millennium  of
Management,” in Patrick B. Durst et al., In Search of Excellence: Exem-
plary Forest Management in Asia and the Pacific, Asia-Pacific Forestry
Commission (Bangkok: FAO  Regional Office for Asia  and the Pacific,
2005),  pp.  251–59;  Daniel  Hellerstein,  “USDA  Land  Retirement  Pro-
grams,” in USDA, Agricultural Resources and Environmental Indicators
Notes: chapter 1
275
2009 (Vienna: June 2009), p. 34; Ania Lichtarowica, “Conquering Polio’s
Last Frontier,” BBC News, 2 August 2007.
52. Neil MacFarquhar, “Haiti’s Woes Are Top Test for Aid Effort,” New York
Times, 31 March 2009; U.S. Central Intelligence Agency, The World Fact-
book, at  www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook, updated
26 June 2009; Madeleine K. Albright and Robin Cook, “The World Needs
to Step It Up in Afghanistan,” International Herald Tribune, 5 October
2004;  Desmond  Butler,  “5-Year  Hunt  Fails  to  Net  Qaeda  Suspect  in
Africa,” New York Times, 14 June 2003; Emilio San Pedro, “U.S. Ready to
Aid Mexico Drug Fight,” BBC News, 2 March 2009.
53. Fund for Peace and Foreign Policy,“The Failed States Index,” Foreign Pol-
icy, July/August issues, 2005–09. 
54. Fund for Peace and Foreign Policy,“The Failed States Index,” Foreign Pol-
icy, July/August 2007, pp. 54–63; Table 1–1 from Fund for Peace and For-
eign Policy, “The Failed States Index,” Foreign Policy, July/August 2009,
pp. 80–93. 
55. Fund for Peace and Foreign Policy, op. cit. note 53.
56. U.N. Population Division, op. cit. note 5; Fund for Peace and Foreign Pol-
icy, July/August 2009, op. cit. note 54; Richard Cincotta and Elizabeth
Leahy, “Population Age Structure and Its Relation to Civil Conflict: A
Graphic  Metric,”  Woodrow  Wilson  International  Center  for  Scholars
Environmental Change and Security Program Report, vol. 12 (2006–07),
pp. 55–58. 
57. Fund for Peace and Foreign Policy, July/August 2009, op. cit. note 54.
58. Ibid.; U.N. Population Division op. cit. note 5. 
59. Fund for Peace and Foreign Policy, July/August 2009, op. cit. note 54; U.N.
Population Division, op. cit. note 5.
60. Fund for Peace and Foreign Policy, July/August 2009, op. cit. note 54; U.N.
World Food Programme, op. cit. note 26.
61. Financial Times, op. cit. note 21; Carolyn Said, “Nothing Flat about Tor-
tilla Prices: Some in Mexico Cost 60 Percent More, Leading to a Serious
Struggle for Low-Income People,” San Francisco Chronicle, 13 January
2007;  Adam  Morrow and  Khaled  Moussa  al-Omrani,  “Egypt:  Rising
Food Costs Provoke Fights Over Subsidised Bread,” Inter Press Service, 26
March 2008; Raphael Minder, John Aglionby, and Jung-a Song, “Soaring
Soybean Price Stirs  Anger  Among Poor,” Financial  Times, 18 January
2008; Joseph Delva and Jim Loney, “Haiti’s Government Falls after Food
Riots,” Reuters, 12 April 2008.
62. Keith Bradsher, “High Rice Cost Creating Fears of Asian Unrest,” New
York Times, 29 March 2008; Kamran Haider, “Pakistani Troops Escort
Wheat Trucks to Stop Theft,” Reuters, 13 January 2008; Nadeem Sarwar,
“Pakistan’s  Poor,  Musharraf Reeling  Under  Wheat  Crisis,”  Deutsche
Presse-Agentur, 14 January 2008; Carlotta Gall, “Hunger and Food Prices
Push Afghanistan to Brink,” New York Times, 16 May 2008; U.N. World
Food Programme, “Almost 6 Million Sudanese Await WFP Support in
2009,” at www.wfp.org, 5 March 2009.
63. United Nations, “United Nations Peacekeeping Operations,” background
note, at www.un.org/Depts/dpko/dpko/bnote.htm, viewed 8 June 2009;
North  Atlantic  Treaty  Organization,  “NATO  in  Afghanistan,”  at
www.nato.int/issues/Afghanistan/index.html, updated 27 March 2009.
274
Notes: chapter 1
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested