pdf viewer c# winform : Add a jpg to a pdf Library SDK component .net asp.net wpf mvc pb4book7-part2282

ditional fixed-line grid, providing services to millions of people
who would still be on waiting lists if they had relied on tradi-
tional phone lines. Once the initial installment cost of rooftop
solar water heaters is paid, the hot water is essentially free.54
In Europe,  where energy costs are relatively high, rooftop
solar water heaters are also spreading fast. In Austria, 15 per-
cent of all households now rely on them for hot water. And, as
in  China,  in  some  Austrian  villages  nearly  all  homes  have
rooftop collectors. Germany is also forging ahead. Janet Sawin
of the Worldwatch Institute notes that some 2 million Germans
are now living in homes where water and space are both heated
by rooftop solar systems.
55
Inspired by the rapid adoption of rooftop water and space
heaters in Europe in recent years, the European Solar Thermal
Industry Federation (ESTIF) has established an ambitious goal
of 500 million square meters, or 1 square meter of rooftop col-
lector for every European by 2020—a goal slightly greater than
the 0.93 square meters per person found today in Cyprus, the
world  leader.  Most  installations  are  projected  to  be  Solar-
Combi  systems  that  are engineered  to  heat  both  water  and
space.56
Europe’s solar collectors are concentrated in Germany, Aus-
tria, and Greece, with France and Spain also beginning to mobi-
lize. Spain’s initiative was boosted by a March 2006 mandate
requiring  installation  of collectors  on  all  new  or  renovated
buildings. Portugal  followed  quickly  with  its  own  mandate.
ESTIF  estimates  that  the  European  Union  has  a  long-term
potential of developing 1,200 thermal gigawatts of solar water
and space heating, which means that the sun could meet most
of Europe’s low-temperature heating needs.57
The U.S. rooftop solar water heating industry has historical-
ly concentrated on a niche market—selling and marketing 10
million  square  meters  of solar  water  heaters  for  swimming
pools  between 1995  and  2005.  Given  this  base, however,  the
industry was poised to mass-market residential solar water and
space heating systems when federal tax credits were introduced
in 2006. Led by Hawaii, California, and Florida, U.S. installa-
tion of these systems tripled in 2006 and  has continued at a
rapid pace since then.58
We now have the data to make some global projections. With
Stabilizing Climate: Shifting to Renewable Energy
123
transmission lines to connect with major population centers is
relatively short.
Solar thermal electricity costs are falling fast. Today it costs
roughly  12–18¢  per  kilowatt-hour.  The  U.S.  Department  of
Energy goal is to invest in research that will lower the cost to
5–7¢ per kilowatt-hour by 2020.50
We  know  solar  energy  is  abundant.  The  American  Solar
Energy Society notes there are enough solar thermal resources
in the  U.S. Southwest to satisfy  current U.S.  electricity  needs
nearly four times over. The U.S. Bureau of Land Management,
the agency that manages public lands, has received requests for
the land rights to develop solar thermal power plants or photo-
voltaic complexes with a total of 23,000 megawatts of generat-
ing capacity in Nevada, 40,000 megawatts in Arizona, and over
54,000 megawatts in the desert region of southern California.51
At the global level, Greenpeace, the European Solar Thermal
Electricity Association, and the International Energy Agency’s
SolarPACES program have outlined a plan to develop 1.5 mil-
lion megawatts of solar thermal power plant capacity by 2050.
For Plan B we suggest a more immediate world goal of 200,000
megawatts by 2020, a goal that may well be exceeded as the eco-
nomic potential becomes clearer.52
The pace of solar energy development is accelerating as solar
water  heaters—the  other  use  of solar  collectors—take  off.
China, for example, is now home to 27 million rooftop solar
water heaters. With nearly 4,000 Chinese companies manufac-
turing these devices, this relatively simple low-cost technology
has leapfrogged into villages that do not yet have electricity. For
as little  as  $200, villagers  can  have  a  rooftop solar  collector
installed  and  take  their  first  hot  shower.  This  technology  is
sweeping China like wildfire, already approaching market satu-
ration in some communities. Beijing plans to boost the current
114 million square meters of rooftop solar collectors for heat-
ing water to 300 million by 2020.53
The energy harnessed by these installations in China is equal
to the electricity generated by 49 coal-fired power plants. Other
developing countries such as India and Brazil may also soon see
millions of households turning to this inexpensive water heat-
ing technology. This leapfrogging into rural areas without an
electricity grid is similar to the way cell phones bypassed the tra-
122
PLAN B 4.0
Add a jpg to a pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
how to add image to pdf acrobat; add png to pdf acrobat
Add a jpg to a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
how to add an image to a pdf file in acrobat; add jpg signature to pdf
Energy from the Earth
The  heat  in  the  upper six  miles  of the  earth’s  crust  contains
50,000 times as much energy as found in all the world’s oil and
gas reserves combined—a startling statistic that few people are
aware of. Despite this abundance, only 10,500 megawatts of geo-
thermal generating capacity have been harnessed worldwide.64
Partly because of the dominance of the oil, gas, and coal
industries, which have been providing cheap fuel by omitting the
costs of climate change and air pollution from fuel prices, rela-
tively little has been invested in developing the earth’s geother-
mal heat resources. Over the last decade, geothermal energy has
been growing at scarcely 3 percent a year.
65
Half the world’s existing generating capacity is in the United
States and the Philippines. Mexico, Indonesia, Italy, and Japan
account for most of the remainder. Altogether some 24 coun-
tries now convert geothermal energy into electricity. Iceland, the
Philippines, and El Salvador respectively get 27, 26, and 23 per-
cent of their electricity from geothermal power plants.66
The potential of geothermal energy to provide electricity, to
heat homes, and to supply process  heat  for industry is vast.
Among the countries rich in geothermal energy are those bor-
dering the Pacific in the so-called Ring of Fire, including Chile,
Peru,  Colombia,  Mexico, the  United  States, Canada,  Russia,
China, Japan, the Philippines, Indonesia, and Australia. Other
geothermally rich countries include those along the Great Rift
Valley of Africa, such as Kenya and Ethiopia, and those around
the Eastern Mediterranean.
67
Beyond  geothermal  electrical  generation,  an  estimated
100,000  thermal  megawatts  of geothermal  energy  are  used
directly—without  conversion  into  electricity—to  heat  homes
and greenhouses and as process heat in industry. This includes,
for example, the energy used in hot baths in Japan and to heat
homes in Iceland and greenhouses in Russia.68
An  interdisciplinary team  of 13  scientists  and  engineers
assembled by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
in 2006 assessed U.S. geothermal electrical generating potential.
Drawing on the latest technologies, including those used by oil
and gas companies in drilling and in enhanced oil recovery, the
team  estimated  that  enhanced  geothermal  systems  could  be
used to massively develop geothermal energy. This technology
Stabilizing Climate: Shifting to Renewable Energy
125
China setting a goal of 300 million square meters of solar water
heating  capacity  by  2020,  and  ESTIF’s  goal  of 500  million
square meters for Europe by 2020, a U.S. installation of 300 mil-
lion square meters by 2020 is certainly within reach given the
recently adopted tax incentives. Japan, which now has 7 million
square  meters  of rooftop  solar  collectors  heating  water  but
which imports virtually all its fossil fuels, could easily reach 80
million square meters by 2020.59
If China and the European Union  achieve their goals  and
Japan and the United States reach the projected adoptions, they
will have a combined total of 1,180 million square meters of
water  and  space heating  capacity by  2020. With  appropriate
assumptions  for  developing  countries  other  than  China,  the
global total in 2020 could exceed 1.5 billion square meters. This
would give the world a solar thermal capacity by 2020 of 1,100
thermal  gigawatts,  the  equivalent  of 690  coal-fired  power
plants.60
The huge projected expansion in solar water and space heat-
ing in industrial countries could close some existing coal-fired
power plants and reduce natural gas use, as solar water heaters
replace  electric  and  gas  water  heaters.  In  countries  such  as
China  and  India,  however,  solar  water  heaters  will  simply
reduce the need for new coal-fired power plants.
Solar water and space heaters in Europe and China have a
strong  economic  appeal.  On  average,  in  industrial  countries
these  systems  pay  for  themselves  from  electricity  savings  in
fewer than 10 years. They are also responsive to energy security
and climate change concerns.61
With the cost of rooftop heating systems declining, particu-
larly  in  China,  many  other  countries  will  likely  join  Israel,
Spain, and Portugal in mandating that all new buildings incor-
porate rooftop solar water heaters. No longer a passing  fad,
these rooftop appliances are fast entering the mainstream.62
Thus the harnessing of solar energy is expanding on every
front  as  concerns  about  climate  change  and  energy  security
escalate, as government incentives for harnessing solar energy
expand, and as these costs decline while those of fossil fuels rise.
In 2009, new U.S. generating capacity from solar sources could
exceed that from coal for the first time.63
124
PLAN B 4.0
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
example, this C#.NET PDF to JPEG converter library will name the converted JPEG image file Output.jpg. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references
how to add a jpg to a pdf; adding jpg to pdf
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Add necessary references page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(0) ' Convert the first PDF page to page.ConvertToImage(ImageType.JPEG, Program.RootPath + "\\Output.jpg").
how to add a picture to a pdf file; adding images to a pdf document
baths—is again beginning to build geothermal power plants.74
In Europe, Germany has 4 small geothermal power plants in
operation and some 180 plants in the pipeline. Werner  Buss-
mann,  head  of the  German  Geothermal  Association,  says,
“Geothermal sources could supply Germany’s electricity needs
600 times over.” Monique Barbut, head of the Global Environ-
ment Facility, expects the number of countries tapping geother-
mal  energy  for  electricity  to  rise  from  roughly  20  when  the
century began to close to 50 by 2010.75
Beyond  geothermal  power  plants,  geothermal  (ground
source) heat pumps are now being widely used for both heating
and cooling. These take advantage of the remarkable stability of
the earth’s temperature near the surface and then use that as a
source of heat in the winter when the air temperature is low and
asource of cooling in the summer when the temperature is high.
The great attraction of this technology is that it can provide
both heating and cooling and do so with 25–50 percent less elec-
tricity than would be needed with conventional systems. In Ger-
many,  for  example,  there  are  now  130,000  geothermal  heat
pumps operating in residential or commercial buildings. This
base  is  growing  steadily,  as  at  least  25,000  new  pumps  are
installed each year.76
In the direct use of geothermal heat, Iceland and France are
among the leaders. Iceland’s use of geothermal energy to heat
almost 90 percent of its homes has largely eliminated coal for
this use. Geothermal energy accounts for more than one third of
Iceland’s total energy use. Following the two oil price hikes in
the 1970s, some 70 geothermal heating facilities were construct-
ed in France, providing both heat and hot water for an estimat-
ed 200,000 residences. In the United States, individual homes are
supplied directly with geothermal heat in Reno, Nevada, and in
Klamath  Falls,  Oregon.  Other  countries  that  have  extensive
geothermally  based  district-heating  systems  include  China,
Japan, and Turkey.
77
Geothermal heat is ideal for greenhouses in northern coun-
tries.Russia, Hungary, Iceland, and the United States are among
the many countries that use it to produce fresh vegetables in the
winter. With rising oil prices boosting fresh produce transport
costs, this practice will likely become far more common in the
years ahead.78
Stabilizing Climate: Shifting to Renewable Energy
127
involves drilling down to the hot rock layer, fracturing the rock
and pumping water into the cracked rock, then extracting the
superheated  water  to  drive  a  steam  turbine.  The  MIT  team
notes that with this technology the United States has enough
geothermal energy to meet its energy needs 2,000 times over.
69
Though it is still costly, this technology can be used almost
anywhere to convert geothermal heat into electricity. Australia
is currently the leader in developing pilot plants using this tech-
nology, followed by Germany and France. To fully realize this
potential for the United States, the MIT team estimated that the
government  would  need  to  invest  $1  billion  in  geothermal
research  and  development  in  the  years  immediately  ahead,
roughly the cost of one coal-fired power plant.70
Even before this exciting new technology is widely deployed,
investors are moving ahead with existing technologies. For many
years, U.S. geothermal energy was confined largely to the Gey-
sers  project north of San Francisco, easily the world’s  largest
geothermal generating complex, with 850 megawatts of generat-
ing capacity. Now the United States, which has more than 3,000
megawatts of geothermal generation, is experiencing a geother-
mal renaissance. Some 126 power plants under development in
12 states are expected to nearly triple U.S. geothermal generating
capacity.  With  California,  Nevada,  Oregon,  Idaho,  and  Utah
leading the way, and with many new companies in the field, the
stage is set for massive U.S. geothermal development.71
Indonesia, richly endowed with geothermal energy, stole the
spotlight in 2008  when it announced a plan to  develop  6,900
megawatts of geothermal generating capacity. The Philippines,
currently the world’s number two generator of electricity from
geothermal sources, is planning a number of new projects.72
Among the Great Rift countries in Africa—including Tanza-
nia, Kenya, Uganda, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Djibouti—Kenya is
the early leader. It now has over 100 megawatts of geothermal
generating capacity and is planning 1,200 more megawatts by
2015. This would double its current electrical generating capac-
ity of 1,200 megawatts from all sources.73
Japan, which has 18 geothermal power plants with a total of
535 megawatts of generating capacity, was an early leader in this
field. Now, following nearly two decades of inactivity, this geo-
thermally rich country—long known for its thousands of hot
126
PLAN B 4.0
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
Add necessary references to your C# project: String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
add picture to pdf form; add png to pdf acrobat
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Add necessary references to your C# project: String inputFilePath = @"**jpg"; String outputFilePath = @"**pdf"; // Convert Jpeg to PDF and show
add an image to a pdf form; add a picture to a pdf document
land–scarce world, energy crops cannot compete with solar elec-
tricity, much less with the far more land-efficient wind power.83
In the forest products industry, including both sawmills and
paper mills, waste has long been used to generate electricity. U.S.
companies burn forest wastes both to produce process heat for
their own use and to generate electricity for sale to local utili-
ties. The nearly 11,000 megawatts in U.S. plant-based electrical
generation comes primarily from burning forest waste.84
Wood waste is also widely used in urban areas for combined
heat and power production, with the heat typically used in dis-
trict heating systems. In Sweden, nearly half of all residential
and commercial buildings are served with district heating sys-
tems. As recently as 1980, imported oil supplied over 90 percent
of the heat for these systems, but by 2007 oil had been largely
replaced by wood chips and urban waste.85
In the United States, St. Paul, Minnesota—a city of 275,000
people—began to develop district heating more than 20 years
ago. It built a combined heat and power plant to use tree waste
from the city’s parks, industrial wood waste, and wood from
other sources. The plant, using 250,000 tons or more of waste
wood per year, now supplies district heating to some 80 percent
of the downtown area, or more than 1 square mile of residen-
tial and commercial floor space. This shift to wood waste large-
ly replaced coal, thus simultaneously cutting carbon emissions
by 76,000 tons per year, disposing of waste wood, and providing
asustainable source of heat and electricity.86
Oglethorpe Power, a large group of utilities in the state of
Georgia,  has  announced  plans  to  build  up  to  three  100-
megawatt  biomass-fueled  power  plants.  The  principal  feed-
stocks will be wood chips, sawmill wood waste, forest harvest
residue, and, when available, pecan hulls and peanut shells.
87
The sugar industry recently has begun to burn cane waste to
cogenerate heat and power. This received a big boost in Brazil,
when  companies  with  cane-based  ethanol  distilleries  realized
that burning bagasse, the fibrous material left after the sugar
syrup is extracted, could simultaneously produce heat for their
fermentation process  and generate  electricity  that they  could
sell  to  the local  utility. This  system,  now  well  established,  is
spreading  to  sugar  mills  in  other  countries  that  produce  the
remaining four fifths of the world’s sugar harvest.88
Stabilizing Climate: Shifting to Renewable Energy
129
Among the 16 countries using geothermal energy for aqua-
culture are China, Israel, and the United States. In California,
for example, 15 fish farms annually produce some 10 million
pounds of tilapia, striped bass, and catfish using warm water
from underground.
79
The number of countries turning to geothermal energy for
both electricity and heat is rising fast. So, too, is the range of
uses. Romania, for instance, uses geothermal energy for district
heating, for greenhouses, and to supply hot water for homes
and factories.80
Hot underground water is widely used for both bathing and
swimming. Japan has 2,800 spas, 5,500 public bathhouses, and
15,600 hotels and inns that use geothermal hot water. Iceland
uses  geothermal  energy  to  heat  some  100  public  swimming
pools, most of them year-round open-air pools. Hungary heats
1,200 swimming pools with geothermal energy.
81
If the four most populous countries located on the Pacific
Ring of Fire—the United States, Japan, China, and Indonesia—
were  to  seriously  invest  in  developing  their  geothermal
resources, they could easily make this a leading world energy
source. With a conservatively estimated potential in the United
States and Japan alone of 240,000 megawatts of generation, it
is easy to envisage a world with thousands of geothermal power
plants  generating  some  200,000  megawatts  of electricity,  the
Plan B goal, by 2020.82
Plant-Based Sources of Energy
As oil and natural gas reserves are being depleted, the world’s
attention is also turning to plant-based energy sources. In addi-
tion to the energy crops discussed in Chapter 2, these include
forest industry byproducts, sugar  industry  byproducts,  urban
waste, livestock waste, plantations of fast-growing trees, crop
residues, and urban tree and yard wastes—all of which can be
used  for  electrical  generation,  heating,  or  the  production  of
automotive fuels.
The potential use of plant-based sources of energy is limited
because even corn—the most efficient of the grain crops—can
convert just 0.5 percent of solar energy into a usable form. In con-
trast, solar PV or solar thermal power plants convert roughly 15
percent of sunlight into a usable form, namely electricity. In a
128
PLAN B 4.0
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
1.bmp")); images.Add(new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")); images.Add(new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.png")); / Build a PDF document with
how to add image to pdf reader; add picture to pdf reader
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
1.bmp")) images.Add(New REImage(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")) images.Add(New REImage(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.png")) ' Build a PDF document with
adding an image to a pdf in acrobat; acrobat insert image in pdf
surged ahead of Brazil in ethanol production in 2005, the near
doubling of output during 2007 and 2008 helped to drive world
food prices to all-time highs. In Europe, with its high goals for
biodiesel use and low potential for expanding oilseed produc-
tion, biodiesel refiners are turning to palm oil from Malaysia
and Indonesia, driving the clearing of rainforests for palm plan-
tations.93
In a world that no longer has excess cropland capacity, every
acre planted in corn for ethanol means another acre must be
cleared somewhere for crop production. An early 2008 study led
by Tim Searchinger of Princeton University that was published
in Science used a global agricultural model to show that when
including the land clearing in the tropics, expanding U.S. biofu-
el production increased annual greenhouse gas emissions dra-
matically instead  of reducing  them, as  more  narrowly based
studies claimed.
94
Another study published in Science, this one by a team from
the  University  of Minnesota,  reached  a  similar  conclusion.
Focusing  on  the  carbon  emissions  associated  with  tropical
deforestation,  it  showed  that  converting  rainforests  or  grass-
lands to corn, soybean, or palm oil biofuel production led to a
carbon emissions increase—a “biofuel carbon debt”—that was
at least  37 times  greater  than the  annual  reduction in green-
house gases resulting from the shift from fossil fuels to biofu-
els.95
The case  for  crop-based  biofuels was further undermined
when  a  team  led  by  Paul  Crutzen,  a  Nobel  Prize–winning
chemist at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in Germany,
concluded that emissions of nitrous oxide, a potent greenhouse
gas, from the synthetic nitrogen fertilizer used to grow crops
suchas corn and rapeseed for biofuel production can negate any
net reductions of CO
2
emissions from replacing fossil fuels with
biofuels,  thus  making  biofuels  a  threat  to  climate  stability.
Although the U.S. ethanol industry rejected these findings, the
results were confirmed in a 2009 report from the International
Council for Science, a worldwide federation of scientific associ-
ations.96
The more research is done on liquid biofuels, the less attrac-
tive they become. Fuel ethanol production today relies almost
entirely on sugar and starch feedstocks, but work is now under
Stabilizing Climate: Shifting to Renewable Energy
131
Within cities, garbage is also burned to produce heat  and
power  after,  it  is  hoped,  any  recyclable  materials  have  been
removed. In Europe, waste-to-energy plants supply 20 million
consumers with heat. France, with 128 plants, and Germany,
with 67 plants, are the European leaders. In the United States,
some 89 waste-to-energy plants convert 20 million tons of waste
into  power  for  6  million  consumers.  It  would,  however,  be
preferable to work toward a zero-garbage economy where the
energy invested in the paper, cardboard, plastic, and other com-
bustible materials could largely be recovered by recycling. Burn-
ing garbage is not a smart way to deal with the waste problem.89
Until we get zero waste, however, the methane (natural gas)
produced  in  existing  landfills  as  organic  materials  in  buried
garbage decompose can  also be  tapped to produce industrial
process  heat  or  to  generate electricity  in  combined  heat  and
power  plants.  The  35-megawatt  landfill-gas  power  plant
planned by Puget Sound Energy and slated to  draw methane
from Seattle’s landfill will join more than 100 other such power
plants in operation in the United States.90
Near Atlanta, Interface—the world’s largest manufacturer of
industrial carpet—convinced the city to invest $3 million in cap-
turing methane from the municipal landfill and to build a nine-
mile pipeline  to  an  Interface  factory.  The  natural  gas in this
pipeline, priced 30 percent below the world market price, meets
20 percent of the factory’s needs. The landfill is projected to
supply methane for 40 years, earning the city $35 million on its
original  $3  million investment  while reducing operating costs
for Interface.91
As discussed in Chapter 2, crops are also used to produce
automotive fuels, including both ethanol and biodiesel. In 2009
the world was on track to produce  19 billion  gallons of fuel
ethanol and nearly 4 billion gallons of biodiesel. Half of the
ethanol will come from the United States, a third from Brazil,
and the remainder from a dozen or so other countries, led by
China and Canada. Germany and France are each responsible
for 15 percent of the world’s biodiesel output; the other major
producers are the United States, Brazil, and Italy.92
Once widely heralded as the alternative to oil, crop-based
fuels  have come under closer scrutiny in recent  years, raising
serious doubts about their feasibility. In the United States, which
130
PLAN B 4.0
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. Add Stamp Annotation. image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and
attach image to pdf form; acrobat add image to pdf
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and
how to add an image to a pdf in reader; add picture pdf
the  economics  of generation  increasingly  favor  renewable
sources  over fossil  fuels. And there  is growing interest  in in-
stream turbines that do not need a dam and are less environ-
mentally intrusive.101
Tidal power (actually, lunar power) holds a certain fascina-
tion because of its sheer potential scale. Canada’s Bay of Fundy,
for example, has a potential generating capacity of more than
4,000 megawatts. Other countries are looking at possible proj-
ects in the 7,000- to 15,000-megawatt range.102
The first large tidal generating facility—La Rance barrage,
with a maximum generating capacity of 240 megawatts—was
built 40 years ago in France and is still operating today. Within
the  last  few years  interest  in  tidal power  has  spread  rapidly.
South Korea, for example, is building a 254-megawatt project
on its west coast. Scheduled for completion in 2009, this facility
will provide enough electricity for the half-million people living
in the  nearby  city  of Ansan.  At another  site  30 miles to  the
north,  engineers  are  planning  an  812-megawatt  tidal  facility
near Incheon. In March 2008, Lunar Energy of the United King-
dom reached agreement with Korea Midland Power to develop
aturbine field off the coast of South Korea that would generate
300  megawatts of power.  China  is  planning  a  300-megawatt
tidal facility at the mouth of the Yalu River near North Korea.
Far to the south, New Zealand is planning a 200-megawatt proj-
ect in the Kaipara Harbour on the country’s northwest coast.103
Giant projects are under consideration in several countries,
including India, Russia, and the United Kingdom. India is plan-
ning to build a 39-mile barrage across the Gulf of Khambhat on
the country’s northwest coast with a 7,000-megawatt generating
capacity. In the  United Kingdom,  several political leaders are
pushing for an 8,600-megawatt tidal facility in the Severn Estu-
ary on the country’s southwest coast. This is equal to 11 percent
of U.K. electrical generating capacity. Russian planners are talk-
ing in terms of a 15,000-megawatt tidal barrage in the White Sea
in northwestern Russia, near Finland. Part of this power would
likely be  exported to Europe. A facility under  discussion for
Tugurski Bay on the country’s Far Eastern coast would provide
8,000 megawatts to power local industry.104
In the United States, the focus is on smaller tidal facilities.
Since  2007  the  Federal  Energy  Regulatory  Commission  has
Stabilizing Climate: Shifting to Renewable Energy
133
way to develop efficient technologies to convert cellulosic mate-
rials into ethanol. Several studies indicate that switchgrass and
hybrid poplars could produce relatively high ethanol yields on
marginal lands, but there is no low-cost technology for convert-
ing  cellulose  into  ethanol  available  today  or  in  immediate
prospect.97
Athird report published in  Science indicates that burning
cellulosic crops directly to generate electricity to power electric
cars yields 81 percent more transport miles than converting the
crops into liquid fuel. The question is how much could plant
materials contribute to the world’s energy supply. Based on a
study from the U.S. Departments of Energy and Agriculture, we
estimate that  using forest  and urban  wood waste,  as  well as
some perennial crops such as switchgrass and fast-growing trees
on nonagricultural land, the United States could develop more
than  40  gigawatts  of electrical  generating  capacity  by  2020,
roughly four times the current level. For Plan B, we estimate that
the  worldwide  use  of plant  materials  to  generate  electricity
could contribute 200 gigawatts of capacity by 2020.98
Hydropower: Rivers, Tides, and Waves 
The term hydropower has traditionally referred to  dams that
harnessed the energy in river flows, but today it also includes
harnessing the energy in tides and waves as well as using small-
er “in-stream” turbines to capture the energy in rivers and tides
without building dams.99
Roughly  16  percent  of the  world’s  electricity comes  from
hydropower, most of it from large dams. Some countries such as
Brazil and the Democratic Republic of the Congo get the bulk
of their electricity from river power. Large dam building flour-
ished  during  the  third quarter  of the  last  century,  but  then
slowed as the remaining good sites for dam building dwindled
and as the costs of displacing people, ecological damage, and
land inundation became more visible.100
Small-scale projects, which are not nearly as disruptive, are
still  in  favor.  In  2006,  small  dams  with  a  combined  6,000
megawatts of generating capacity were built in rural areas of
China. For many rural communities these are currently the only
source of electricity. Though China leads in new construction,
many other countries are also building small-scale structures, as
132
PLAN B 4.0
tinues to escalate, the additional capacity from hydro, tidal, and
wave power by 2020 could easily exceed the 400 gigawatts need-
ed to reach the Plan B goal.109
The World Energy Economy of 2020
As this chapter has described, the transition from coal, oil, and
gas to wind, solar, and geothermal energy is well under way. In
the old economy, energy was produced by burning something—
oil, coal, or natural gas—leading to the carbon emissions that
have come to define our economy. The new  energy economy
harnesses the energy in wind, the energy coming from the sun,
and heat from within the earth itself. It will be largely electri-
cally driven. In addition to its use for lighting and for household
appliances, electricity will be widely used in the new economy
both in transport and to heat and cool buildings. Climate-dis-
rupting fossil fuels will fade into the past as countries turn to
clean, climate-stabilizing, nondepletable sources of energy.
Backing away from fossil fuels begins with the electricity sec-
tor, where the development of 5,300 gigawatts of new renewable
generating capacity worldwide by 2020—over half of it from
wind—would be more than enough to replace all the coal and
oil and 70 percent of the natural gas now used to generate elec-
tricity. The addition of close to 1,500 gigawatts of thermal heat-
ing capacity by 2020, roughly two thirds of it from rooftop solar
water and space heaters, will sharply reduce the use of both oil
and gas for heating buildings and water. (See Table 5–1.)110
In looking at the broad shifts from 2008 to the Plan B energy
economy  of 2020, fossil-fuel-generated  electricity drops  by  90
percent  worldwide.  This  is  more  than  offset  by  the  fivefold
growth in renewably generated electricity. In the transportation
sector,energy use from fossil fuels drops by some 70 percent. This
comes first from shifting to all-electric and highly efficient plug-
in hybrids cars that will run almost entirely on electricity, nearly
all of it from renewable sources. And it also comes from shifting
to electric trains, which are much more efficient than diesel-pow-
ered ones. Many buildings will be all-electric—heated, cooled,
and illuminated entirely with carbon-free renewable electricity.
At the country and regional level, each energy profile will be
shaped by the locally unique endowment of renewable sources
of energy. Some countries, such as the United  States, Turkey,
Stabilizing Climate: Shifting to Renewable Energy
135
issued  more  than 30  preliminary permits, including  those  for
projects in Puget Sound, San Francisco Bay, and New York’s East
River. The San Francisco Bay project by Oceana Energy Compa-
ny will have at least 20 megawatts of generating capacity.105
Wave power, though it is a few years behind tidal power, is
now attracting the attention of both engineers and investors. In
the United States, the northern Californian utility PG&E has
filed a plan to develop a 40-megawatt wave farm off the state’s
north coast. GreenWave Energy Solutions has been issued pre-
liminary permits for two projects of up to 100 megawatts each
off California’s coast, one in the north and one in the south.
And  San  Francisco  is  seeking  a  permit  to  develop  a  10–30
megawatt wave power project off its coast.106
The world’s first wave farm, a 2-megawatt facility built by
Pelamis Wave Power of the United Kingdom, is operating off
the coast of Portugal. The project’s second phase would expand
this to 22 megawatts. Scottish firms Aquamarine Power and Air-
tricity are teaming up to  build 1,000 megawatts of wave  and
tidal power off the coast of Ireland and the United Kingdom.
Ireland as a whole has the most ambitious wave power develop-
ment goal, planning 500 megawatts of wave generating capaci-
ty  by 2020,  enough  to  supply  7  percent  of its  electricity.
Worldwide, the harnessing of wave power could generate a stag-
gering 10,000 gigawatts of electricity, more than double current
world  electricity  generation  of 4,000  gigawatts  from  all
sources.107
We project that the  945  gigawatts  (945,000 megawatts) of
hydroelectric power in operation worldwide in 2008 will expand
to 1,350 gigawatts by 2020. According to China’s official pro-
jections, 270 gigawatts will be added there, mostly from large
dams in the country’s southwest. The remaining 135 gigawatts
in  our  projected growth  of hydropower  would  come  from  a
scattering of large dams still being built in countries like Brazil
and  Turkey, a large  number  of small  hydro  facilities,  a fast-
growing number of tidal projects, and numerous smaller wave
power projects.108
Within the United States, where there is little interest in new
dams, there is a resurgence of interest in installing generating
facilities in non-powered dams and in expanding existing hydro
facilities. If the worldwide interest in tidal and wave energy con-
134
PLAN B 4.0
Other countries, including Spain, Algeria, Egypt, India, and
Mexico, will turn primarily to solar thermal power plants and
solar PV arrays to power their economies. For Iceland, Indone-
sia, Japan, and the Philippines, geothermal energy will likely be
their mother lode. Still others will likely rely heavily on hydro,
including Norway, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and
Nepal. Some technologies, such as rooftop solar water heaters,
will be used virtually everywhere.
With the Plan B energy economy of 2020, the United States
will get 44 percent of its electricity from wind farms. Geother-
mal power plants will supply another 11 percent. Photovoltaic
cells, most of them on rooftops, will supply 8 percent of elec-
tricity, with  solar  thermal power  plants  providing  5  percent.
Roughly 7 percent will come from hydropower. The remaining
25 percent comes from nuclear power, biomass, and natural gas,
in that order. (See capacity figures in Table 5–2.)
112
As  the  energy  transition  progresses,  the  system  for trans-
porting energy from source to consumers will change beyond
recognition.  In  the  old  energy economy,  pipelines carried  oil
from fields to consumers or to ports, where it was loaded on
tankers. A huge fleet of tankers moved oil from the Persian Gulf
to markets on every continent.
Texas  offers  a  model  of how  to  build  a  grid  to  harness
renewable energy. After a survey showed that the state had two
strong concentrations of wind energy, one in West Texas and
the other in the Panhandle, the Public Utility Commission coor-
dinated the design of a network of high-voltage transmission
lines to  link these  regions with consumption  centers such as
Dallas/Ft. Worth and San Antonio. With a $5-billion investment
and up to 2,900 miles of transmission lines, the stage has been
set to harness 18,500 megawatts of wind generating  capacity
from these  two regions  alone,  enough  to  supply half of the
state’s 24 million residents.113
Already, major utilities and private investors are proposing
to  build  highly  efficient  high-voltage  direct-current  (HVDC)
lines to link wind-rich regions with consumption centers. For
example, TransCanada is proposing to develop two high-volt-
age lines: the Zephyr Line, which will link wind-rich Wyoming
with the California market, and the Chinook Line, which will
do  the same for  wind-rich  Montana. These  lines  of roughly
Stabilizing Climate: Shifting to Renewable Energy
137
and China, will likely rely on the broad base of renewables—
wind, solar, and geothermal power—for their energy. But wind,
including both onshore and offshore, is likely to emerge as the
leading energy source in each of these countries.
In June 2009, Xiao Ziniu, director of China’s National Cli-
mate Center, said that China had up to 1,200 gigawatts of wind
generating potential. This compares with the country’s current
total electricity generating capacity of 790 gigawatts. Xiao said
the new assessment he was citing “assures us that the country’s
entire electricity demand can be met by wind power alone.” In
addition,  the study identified 250 gigawatts of offshore wind
power  potential.  A  senior  Chinese  official  had  earlier
announced  that  wind  generating  capacity  would  reach  100
megawatts  by  2020,  which  means  it  would  overtake  nuclear
power well before then.
111
136
PLAN B 4.0
Table 5–1. World Renewable Energy Capacity in 2008
and Plan B Goals for 2020
Source
2008
Goal for 2020
Electricity Generating Capacity
(electrical gigawatts)
Wind
121
3,000
Rooftop solar electric systems
13
1,400
Solar electric power plants
2
100
Solar thermal power plants
0
200
Geothermal
10
200
Biomass
52
200
Hydropower
945  
1,350  
Total
1,143
6,450
Thermal Energy Capacity
(thermal gigawatts)
Solar rooftop water and 
120
1,100
space heaters
Geothermal
100
500
Biomass
250 
350 
Total
470  
1,950  
Source: See endnote 110.
sions. Since  no  two wind farms have identical  wind profiles,
each one added to the grid makes wind a more stable source of
electricity. With thousands of wind farms spread from coast to
coast, wind becomes a stable source of energy, part of baseload
power. This, coupled with the capacity to forecast wind speeds
and  solar  intensity throughout  the  country at  least  a  day  in
advance, makes it possible to manage the diversity of renewable
energy resources efficiently.116
For India, a national grid would enable it to harness the vast
solar  resources  of the  Great  Indian  Desert.  Europe,  too,  is
beginning to think seriously of investing in a continental super-
grid. Stretching from Norway to Egypt and from Morocco to
western  Siberia,  it  would  enable  the  region  to  harness  vast
amounts  of wind  energy,  particularly  in  offshore  Western
Europe, and the almost unlimited solar energy in the northern
Sahara and on Europe’s southern coast. Like the proposed U.S.
national  grid,  the  Europe-wide  grid  would  use  high-voltage
direct-current lines that transmit electricity far more efficiently
than existing lines do.117
An Irish firm, Mainstream Renewable Power, is proposing to
use HVDC undersea cables to build the European supergrid off-
shore. The grid would stretch from the Baltic Sea to the North
Sea  then  south  through  the  English  Channel  to  southern
Europe. The company notes that this could avoid the time-con-
suming acquisition of land to  build a continental land-based
system. The Swedish firm ABB Group, which has just complet-
ed a 400-mile HVDC undersea cable linking Norway and the
Netherlands, is partnering with Mainstream Renewable Power
in proposing to build the first stages of the supergrid.118
A long-standing  proposal  by  the  Club  of Rome,  called
DESERTEC, goes further, with plans to connect Europe to the
abundant solar energy of North Africa and the Middle East. In
July 2009, 11 leading European firms—including Munich Re,
Deutsche Bank, ABB, and Siemens—and an Algerian company,
Cevital, announced a plan to create the DESERTEC Industrial
Initiative. This firm’s goal will be to craft a concrete plan and
funding proposal to develop enough solar thermal generating
capacity in North Africa and the Middle East to export elec-
tricity to Europe and to meet the needs of producer countries.
This energy proposal, which could exceed 300,000 megawatts of
Stabilizing Climate: Shifting to Renewable Energy
139
1,000  miles  each  are  both  designed  to  accommodate  3,000
megawatts of wind-generated electricity.114
In the Northern Plains and the Midwest, ITC Holdings Cor-
poration is proposing what  it calls  the Green  Power Express.
This  investment  in  3,000  miles  of high-voltage  transmission
lines  is  intended  to link  12,000  megawatts  of wind  capacity
from North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa, and Minnesota with
the more  densely populated industrial Midwest. These initial
heavy-duty transmission lines can eventually become part of the
national grid that U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu wants to
build.115
A strong,  efficient  national  grid  will  reduce  generating
capacity  needs, lower  consumer  costs,  and  cut  carbon  emis-
138
PLAN B 4.0
Table 5–2. U.S. Electricity Generating Capacity in 2008
and Plan B Goals for 2020
Source
2008
Goal for 2020
(electrical gigawatts)
Fossil Fuels and Nuclear
Coal
337
0
Oil
62
0
Natural Gas
459
140
Nuclear
106  
106  
Total
965
246
Renewables
Wind
25
710
Rooftop solar electric systems
1
190
Solar electric power plants
0
30
Solar thermal power plants
0
120
Geothermal
3
70
Biomass
11
40
Hydropower
78  
100 
Total
119
1,260
Note: Columns may not add to totals due to rounding.
Source: See endnote 112.
The deserts  of the U.S.  Southwest  will  feature  clusters of
solar thermal power plants, with vast arrays of mirrors, cover-
ing  several square miles each. Wind farms and solar thermal
power plants will be among the more visible features of the new
energy economy. The roofs of millions of homes and commer-
cial buildings will sport solar cell arrays as rooftops become a
source of electricity. How much more local can you get? There
will also be millions  of rooftops with solar water and  space
heaters.
Governments  are using  a  variety  of policy  instruments to
help drive this energy restructuring. These include tax restruc-
turing—raising the tax on carbon emissions and lowering the
tax on income—and carbon cap-and-trade systems. The former
approach is more transparent and easily administered and not
so readily manipulated as the latter.120
For  restructuring  the  electricity  sector,  feed-in  tariffs,  in
which utilities are required to pay more for electricity generated
from renewable sources, have been remarkably successful. Ger-
many’s impressive early success with this measure has led to its
adoption by more than 40 other countries, including most of
those in the European Union. In the United States, at least 33
states  have adopted  renewable  portfolio  standards  requiring
utilities to get a certain share of their electricity from renewable
sources. The United States has also used tax credits for wind,
geothermal, solar photovoltaics, solar water and space heating,
and geothermal heat pumps.121
To achieve some goals, governments are simply using man-
dates, such as those requiring rooftop solar water heaters on all
new buildings, higher efficiency standards for cars and appli-
ances, or a ban on the sale of incandescent light bulbs. Each
government has to select the policy instruments that work best
in its particular economic and cultural settings.
In the new energy economy, our cities will be unlike any we
have known during our lifetime. The air will be clean and the
streets will be quiet, with only the scarcely audible hum of elec-
tric motors. Air pollution alerts will be a thing of the past as
coal-fired  power  plants  are  dismantled  and  recycled  and  as
gasoline- and-diesel-burning engines largely disappear.
This transition is now building its own momentum, driven
by an intense excitement from the realization that we are tap-
Stabilizing Climate: Shifting to Renewable Energy
141
solar thermal generating capacity, is huge by any standard. It is
being driven by concerns about disruptive climate change and
by  the  depletion  of oil  and  gas  reserves.  Caio  Koch-Weser,
Deutsche  Bank vice  chairman, said,  “The Initiative  shows in
what dimensions and on what scale we must think if we are to
master the challenges from climate change.”119
The  twentieth  century  witnessed  the  globalization  of the
world energy economy as the entire world came to depend heav-
ily on a handful of countries for oil, many of them in one region
of the world. This century will witness the localization of the
world energy economy as countries begin to tap their indige-
nous resources of renewable energy.
The  localization  of the  energy  economy  will  lead  to  the
localization of the food economy. For example, as the cost of
shipping fresh produce from distant markets rises with the price
of oil, there will be more local farmers’ markets. Diets will be
more locally based and seasonally sensitive than they are today.
The combination of moving down the food chain and reducing
the food miles in our diets will dramatically reduce energy use
in the food economy.
As agriculture localizes, livestock production will likely start
to shift from mega-sized cattle, hog, and poultry feeding opera-
tions. There will be fewer specialized  farms  and more mixed
crop-livestock  operations.  Feeding  operations  will  become
smaller  as  the  pressure  to  recycle nutrients mounts  with  the
depletion of the world’s finite phosphate reserves and as fertil-
izer prices rise. The recent growth in the number of small farms
in the United States will likely continue. As world food insecu-
rity mounts, more and more people will be looking to produce
some  of their  own  food  in  backyards,  in  front  yards,  on
rooftops, in community  gardens,  and elsewhere,  further con-
tributing to the localization of agriculture.
The new energy economy will be highly visible from the air.
Afew years ago on a flight from Helsinki to London I counted
22  wind  farms  when  crossing  Denmark,  long  a  wind power
leader. Is this a glimpse of the future, I wondered? One day U.S.
air  travelers  will  see  thousands  of wind  farms  in  the  Great
Plains, stretching from the Gulf Coast of Texas to the Canadi-
an border, where ranchers and farmers will be double cropping
wind with cattle, corn, and wheat.
140
PLAN B 4.0
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested