pdf viewer c# winform : Add picture to pdf reader software control dll windows web page winforms web forms PDF32000_200814-part2330

© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
133
PDF 32000-1:2008
8.5.2.2 Cubic Bézier Curves
Curved path segments shall be specified as cubic Bézier curves. Such curves shall be defined by four points: 
the two endpoints (the  current point P
0
and  the final point P
3
) and two control points P
1
and P
2
. Given the 
coordinates of the four points, the curve shall be generated by varying the parameter t from 0.0 to 1.0 in the 
following equation: 
When t = 0.0, the value of the function R (t) coincides with the current point P
0
; when t = 1.0, R (t) coincides with 
the final point P
3
. Intermediate values of t generate intermediate points along the curve. The curve does not, in 
general, pass through the two control points P
1
and P
2
NOTE 1
Cubic Bézier curves have two useful properties: 
The curve can be very quickly split into smaller pieces for rapid rendering. 
The curve is contained within the convex hull of the four points defining the curve, most easily visualized as the 
polygon obtained by stretching a rubber band around the outside of the four points. This property allows rapid 
testing  of  whether  the  curve  lies  completely  outside  the  visible  region,  and  hence  does  not  have  to  be 
rendered. 
NOTE 2
The Bibliography lists several books that describe cubic Bézier curves in more depth. 
x
2
y
2
x
3
y
3
v
Append a cubic Bézier curve to the current path. The curve 
shall extend from the current point to the point (x
3
y
3
), using 
the current point and (x
2
y
2
) as the Bézier control points (see 
8.5.2.2, "Cubic Bézier Curves"). The new current point shall 
be (x
3
y
3
). 
x
1
y
1
x
3
y
3
y
Append a cubic Bézier curve to the current path. The curve 
shall extend from the current point to the point (x
3
y
3
), using 
(x
1
y
1
) and (x
3
y
3
) as the Bézier control points (see 8.5.2.2, 
"Cubic  Bézier  Curves").  The  new  current  point  shall  be 
(x
3
y
3
). 
h
Close  the  current  subpath  by  appending  a  straight  line 
segment from the current point  to the starting point  of the 
subpath. If the current subpath is already closed, h shall do
nothing. 
This  operator  terminates  the  current  subpath.  Appending 
another  segment  to  the  current  path  shall  begin  a  new 
subpath,  even  if  the  new  segment  begins  at  the  endpoint 
reached by the h operation. 
x  y  width  height
re
Append  a  rectangle  to  the  current  path  as  a  complete 
subpath, with lower-left corner  (x, y) and  dimensions width
and height in user space. The operation 
 y  width  height re
is equivalent to 
 y m
x + width ) y  l
x + width )  ( y + height )  l
x ( y + height ) l
h
Table 59 –  Path Construction Operators (continued)
Operands
Operator
Description
R()t
t
( –
)
3
P
0
3t 1 t
( –
)
2
P
1
3t
2
t
( –
)
P
2
t
3
P
3
+
+
+
=
Add picture to pdf reader - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add picture pdf; how to add picture to pdf
Add picture to pdf reader - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add photo to pdf reader; adding images to pdf files
PDF 32000-1:2008
134
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
The most general PDF operator for constructing curved path segments is the c operator, which specifies the 
coordinates of points P
1
P
2
, and P
3
explicitly, as shown in Figure 16 in Annex L. (The starting point, P
0
, is 
defined implicitly by the current point.)
Figure 16 –  Cubic Bézier Curve Generated by the c Operator
Two more operators, v and y, each specify one of the two control points implicitly (see Figure 17 in Annex L). In 
both of these cases, one control point and the final point of the curve shall be supplied as operands; the other 
control point shall be implied: 
For the v operator, the first control point shall coincide with initial point of the curve. 
For the y operator, the second control point shall coincide with final point of the curve. 
Figure 17 –  Cubic Bézier Curves Generated by the v and y Operators
8.5.3
Path-Painting Operators
8.5.3.1
General
The path-painting operators end a path object, causing it to be painted on the current page in the manner that 
the operator specifies. The principal path-painting operators shall be S (for stroking) and f (for filling ). Variants 
x
1
y
1
x
2
y
2
x
3
y
3
c
P
(current point)
P
(x
2
, y
2
)
P
(x
3
, y
3
)
P
(x
1
, y
1
)
x
2
y
2
x
3
y
3
v
Current point
(x
2
, 
y
2
)
(x
3
, 
y
3
)
x
1
y
1
x
3
y
3
y
Current point
(x
1
, 
y
1
)
(x
3
, 
y
3
)
C# TIFF: How to Insert & Burn Picture/Image into TIFF Document
Support adding image or picture to an existing or new new REImage(@"c:\ logo.png"); // add the image powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
add png to pdf preview; add picture to pdf file
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
VB.NET image cropper control SDK; VB.NET image cropping method to crop picture / photo; you can adjust the size of created cropped image file, add antique effect
attach image to pdf form; add image to pdf reader
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
135
PDF 32000-1:2008
of these operators combine stroking and filling in a single operation or apply different rules for determining the 
area to be filled. Table 60 lists all the path-painting operators. 
8.5.3.2 Stroking
The S operator shall paint a line along the current path. The stroked line shall follow each straight or curved 
segment  in  the path, centred on the segment  with  sides parallel to  it. Each of  the path’s subpaths shall  be 
treated separately. 
The results of the S operator shall depend on the current settings of various parameters in the graphics state 
(see 8.4, "Graphics State", for further information on these parameters): 
The  width  of  the  stroked  line  shall  be  determined  by  the  current  line  width  parameter  (8.4.3.2,  "Line 
Width"). 
The colour or pattern of the line shall be determined by the current colour and colour space for stroking 
operations. 
Table 60 –  Path-Painting Operators  
Operands
Operator
Description
S
Stroke the path. 
s
Close and stroke the path. This operator shall have the same effect as the 
sequence h S. 
f
Fill the path, using the nonzero winding number rule to determine the region 
to fill (see 8.5.3.3.2, "Nonzero Winding Number Rule"). Any subpaths that 
are open shall be implicitly closed before being filled.
F
Equivalent  to f;  included  only  for  compatibility.  Although  PDF  reader
applications shall be  able to  accept this operator,  PDF  writer applications 
should use f instead. 
f*
Fill the  path,  using  the  even-odd rule  to  determine the  region  to  fill  (see 
8.5.3.3.3, "Even-Odd Rule"). 
B
Fill  and then  stroke  the path,  using  the  nonzero  winding  number  rule to 
determine the region to fill. This operator shall produce the same result as 
constructing  two  identical  path  objects,  painting  the  first  with f  and  the 
second with S
NOTE
The  filling  and  stroking  portions  of  the  operation  consult 
different values of several graphics state parameters, such as 
the  current  colour.  See  also  11.7.4.4,  "Special  Path-Painting 
Considerations". 
B*
Fill and then stroke the path, using the even-odd rule to determine the region 
to fill. This operator shall produce the same result as B, except that the path 
is filled as if with f* instead of f. See also 11.7.4.4, "Special Path-Painting 
Considerations". 
b
Close, fill, and then stroke the path, using the nonzero winding number rule 
to determine the region to fill. This operator shall have the same effect as the 
sequence h B. See also 11.7.4.4, "Special Path-Painting Considerations". 
b*
Close, fill, and then stroke the path, using the even-odd rule to determine the 
region to fill. This operator shall have the same effect as the sequence h B*. 
See also 11.7.4.4, "Special Path-Painting Considerations". 
n
End the path object without filling or stroking it. This operator shall be a path-
painting  no-op,  used primarily  for  the side  effect  of changing  the  current 
clipping path (see 8.5.4, "Clipping Path Operators"). 
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Codes to Add Antique Effect to Image with .
mature technology to replace a picture's original colors add the glow and noise, and add a little powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to add an image to a pdf in acrobat; add image to pdf acrobat reader
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
drawing As RaterEdgeDrawing = New RaterEdgeDrawing() drawing.Picture = "RasterEdge" drawing provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
add signature image to pdf acrobat; add multiple jpg to pdf
PDF 32000-1:2008
136
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
The line may be painted either solid or with a dash pattern, as specified by the current line dash pattern 
(see 8.4.3.6, "Line Dash Pattern"). 
If a subpath is open, the unconnected ends shall be treated according to the current line cap style, which 
may be butt, rounded, or square (see 8.4.3.3, "Line Cap Style"). 
Wherever two consecutive segments are connected, the joint between them shall be treated according to 
the current line join  style, which  may  be  mitered,  rounded,  or beveled  (see 8.4.3.4,  "Line  Join Style"). 
Mitered joins shall be subject to the current miter limit (see 8.4.3.5, "Miter Limit"). 
Points at which unconnected segments happen to meet or intersect receive no special treatment. In particular, 
using an explicit l operator to give the appearance of closing a subpath, rather than using h, may result in a 
messy corner, because line caps are applied instead of a line join. 
The stroke adjustment  parameter (PDF 1.2)  specifies  that  coordinates  and  line  widths  be  adjusted 
automatically to produce strokes of uniform thickness despite rasterization effects (see 10.6.5, "Automatic 
Stroke Adjustment"). 
If  a  subpath  is  degenerate  (consists  of  a  single-point  closed  path  or  of  two  or  more  points  at  the  same 
coordinates), the S operator shall paint it only if round line caps have been specified, producing a filled circle 
centered at  the  single point. If butt  or projecting square  line  caps have  been  specified, S  shall  produce no 
output, because the orientation of the caps would be indeterminate. This rule shall apply only to zero-length 
subpaths of the path being stroked, and not to zero-length dashes in a dash pattern. In the latter case, the line 
caps shall always be painted, since their orientation is determined by the direction of the underlying path. A 
single-point open subpath (specified by a trailing m operator) shall produce no output. 
8.5.3.3
Filling
8.5.3.3.1 General
The f operator shall use the current nonstroking colour to paint the entire region enclosed by the current path. If 
the  path  consists  of  several  disconnected  subpaths, f  shall  paint  the  insides  of  all  subpaths,  considered 
together. Any subpaths that are open shall be implicitly closed before being filled. 
If  a  subpath  is  degenerate  (consists  of  a  single-point  closed  path  or  of  two  or  more  points  at  the  same 
coordinates), f shall paint the single device pixel lying under that point; the result is device-dependent and not 
generally useful. A single-point open subpath (specified by a trailing m operator) shall produce no output. 
For a simple path, it is intuitively clear  what region  lies inside. However, for a  more  complex  path,  it  is  not 
always obvious which points lie inside the path. For more detailed information, see 10.6.4, “Scan Conversion 
Rules“.
EXAMPLE
A path that intersects itself or has one subpath that encloses another.
The  path  machinery  shall use one of  two  rules  for  determining which  points  lie  inside  a  path:  the  nonzero 
winding number rule and the even-odd rule, both discussed in detail below. The nonzero winding number rule is 
more  versatile  than  the even-odd  rule and shall  be  the  standard  rule the f  operator  uses.  Similarly, the W
operator  shall  use  this  rule  to  determine  the  inside  of  the  current  clipping  path.  The  even-odd  rule  is 
occasionally useful for special effects or for compatibility with other graphics systems; the f* and W* operators 
invoke this rule. 
8.5.3.3.2 Nonzero Winding Number Rule
The nonzero winding number rule determines whether a given point is inside a path by conceptually drawing a 
ray from that point  to  infinity in any direction  and  then examining  the  places  where  a  segment  of the path 
crosses the ray. Starting with a count of 0, the rule adds 1 each time a path segment crosses the ray from left to 
right and subtracts 1 each time a segment crosses from right to left. After counting all the crossings, if the result 
is 0, the point is outside the path; otherwise, it is inside. 
VB.NET Image: Image Scaling SDK to Scale Picture / Photo
Framework application; VB.NET sample code for how to scale image / picture; Frequently asked questions about RasterEdge VB.NET image scaling control SDK add-on.
add a jpeg to a pdf; adding an image to a pdf file
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we this VB.NET image resizer control add-on, can provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to add a photo to a pdf document; adding a jpg to a pdf
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
137
PDF 32000-1:2008
The method just described does not specify what to do if a path segment coincides with or is tangent to the 
chosen ray. Since the direction of the ray is arbitrary, the rule simply chooses a ray that does not encounter 
such problem intersections. 
For  simple  convex  paths,  the  nonzero  winding  number  rule  defines  the  inside  and  outside  as  one  would 
intuitively expect. The more interesting cases are  those  involving  complex or  self-intersecting paths like the 
ones shown in Figure 18 in Annex L. For a path consisting of a five-pointed star, drawn with five connected 
straight line segments intersecting each other, the rule considers the inside to be the entire area enclosed by 
the  star,  including  the  pentagon  in  the  centre.  For  a  path  composed  of  two  concentric  circles,  the  areas 
enclosed by both circles are considered to be inside, provided that both are drawn in the same direction. If the 
circles are drawn in opposite directions, only the doughnut shape between them is inside, according to the rule; 
the doughnut hole is outside. 
Figure 18 –  Nonzero Winding Number Rule
8.5.3.3.3 Even-Odd Rule
An alternative to the nonzero winding number rule is the even-odd rule. This rule determines whether a point is 
inside a path by drawing a ray from that point in any direction and simply counting the number of path segments 
that cross the ray, regardless of direction. If this number is odd, the point is inside; if even, the point is outside. 
This yields the same results as the nonzero winding number rule for paths with simple shapes, but produces 
different results for more complex shapes. 
Figure 19 shows the effects of applying the even-odd rule to complex paths. For the five-pointed star, the rule 
considers the triangular points to be inside the path, but not the pentagon in the centre. For the two concentric 
circles, only the doughnut shape between the two circles is considered inside, regardless of the directions in 
which the circles are drawn. 
Figure 19 –  Even-Odd Rule
8.5.4
Clipping Path Operators
The graphics state shall contain a cu
rrent clipping path that limits the regions of the page affected by painting 
operators. The closed subpaths of this path shall define the area that can be painted. Marks falling inside this 
area shall be applied to the page; those falling outside it shall not be. Sub-clause 8.5.3.3, "Filling" discusses 
precisely what shall be considered to be inside a path.
VB.NET Image: Create Code 11 Barcode on Picture & Document Using
file, apart from above mentioned .NET core imaging SDK and .NET barcode creator add-on, you also need to buy .NET PDF document editor add-on, namely, RasterEdge
add image field to pdf form; add photo to pdf online
C# Word - Paragraph Processing in C#.NET
Add references: C# users can set paragraph properties and create content such as run, footnote, endnote and picture in a paragraph.
adding images to pdf forms; add image to pdf java
PDF 32000-1:2008
138
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
In  the  context of  the transparent  imaging  model (PDF 1.4),  the  current  clipping path  constrains  an object’s 
shape (see 11.2, "Overview of Transparency"). The effective shape is the intersection of the object’s intrinsic 
shape with the clipping path; the source shape value shall be 0.0 outside this intersection. Similarly, the shape 
of a transparency group (defined as the union of the shapes of its constituent objects) shall be influenced both 
by the clipping path in effect when each of the objects is painted and by the one in effect at the time the group’s 
results are painted onto its backdrop. 
The initial clipping path shall include the entire page. A clipping path operator (W or W*, shown in Table 61) 
may appear after the last path construction operator and before the path-painting operator that terminates a 
path  object.  Although  the  clipping  path  operator appears  before  the  painting operator,  it shall  not  alter  the 
clipping path at the point where it appears. Rather, it shall modify the effect of the succeeding painting operator. 
After the path has been painted, the clipping path in the graphics state shall be set to the intersection of the 
current clipping path and the newly constructed path. 
NOTE 1
In addition to path objects, text objects may also be used for clipping; see 9.3.6, "Text Rendering Mode". 
The n operator (see Table 60) is a no-op path-painting operator; it shall cause no marks to be placed on the 
page, but can be used with a clipping path operator to establish a new clipping path. That is, after a path has 
been constructed, the sequence W n shall intersect that path with the current clipping path and shall establish a 
new clipping path. 
NOTE 2
There is no way to enlarge the current clipping path or to set a new clipping path without reference to the 
current one. However, since the clipping path is part of the graphics state, its effect can be localized to specific 
graphics objects by enclosing the modification of the clipping path and the painting of those objects between a 
pair of q and Q operators (see 8.4.2, "Graphics State Stack"). Execution of the Q operator causes the clipping 
path to revert to the value that was saved by the q operator before the clipping path was modified. 
8.6
Colour Spaces
8.6.1
General
PDF includes facilities for specifying the colours of graphics objects to be painted on the current page. The 
colour facilities are divided into two parts: 
Colour  specification. A conforming writer may specify abstract colours in a device-independent way. 
Colours may be described in any of a variety of colour systems, or colour spaces. Some colour spaces are 
related to device colour representation (grayscale, RGBCMYK), others to human visual perception (CIE-
based).  Certain  special  features  are  also  modelled  as  colour  spaces:  patterns,  colour  mapping, 
separations, and high-fidelity and multitone colour. 
Colour rendering. A conforming reader shall reproduce colours on the raster output device by a multiple-
step  process  that  includes  some  combination  of  colour  conversion,  gamma  correction,  halftoning,  and 
scan conversion. Some aspects of this process use information that is specified in PDF. However, unlike 
the facilities for colour specification, the colour-rendering facilities are device-dependent and should not be 
included in a page description. 
Figure 20 and Figure 21 illustrate the  division between  PDF’s (device-independent) colour specification and 
(device-dependent)  colour-rendering  facilities.  This  sub-clause  describes  the  colour  specification  features, 
covering everything that PDF documents need to specify colours. The facilities for controlling colour rendering 
Table 61 –  Clipping Path Operators  
Operands
Operator
Description
W
Modify the current clipping path by intersecting it with the current path, using 
the nonzero winding number rule to determine which regions lie inside the 
clipping path. 
W*
Modify the current clipping path by intersecting it with the current path, using 
the even-odd rule to determine which regions lie inside the clipping path. 
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
139
PDF 32000-1:2008
are described in clause 10, "Rendering"; a conforming writer should use these facilities only  to configure or 
calibrate an output device or to achieve special device-dependent effects. 
8.6.2
Colour Values
As described in 8.5.3, "Path-Painting Operators", marks placed on the page by operators such as f and S shall 
have a colour that is determined by the current colour parameter of the graphics state. A colour value consists 
of one  or more colour components, which  are usually numbers.  A  gray level shall  be specified by  a  single 
number ranging from 0.0 (black) to 1.0 (white). Full colour values may be specified in any of several ways; a 
common method uses three numeric values to specify red, green, and blue components. 
Colour values shall be interpreted according to the current colour space, another parameter of the graphics 
state. A PDF content stream first selects a colour space by invoking the CS operator (for the stroking colour) or 
the cs operator (for the nonstroking colour). It then selects colour values within that colour space with the SC
operator (stroking) or the sc operator (nonstroking). There are also convenience operators—G, g, RGrg , K, 
and k—that select both a colour space and a colour value within it in a single step. Table 74 lists all the colour-
setting operators. 
Sampled images (see 8.9, "Images") specify the colour values of individual samples with respect to a colour 
space designated by the image object itself. While these values are independent of the current colour space 
and colour parameters in the graphics state, all later stages of colour processing shall treat them in exactly the 
same way as colour values specified with the SC or sc operator. 
8.6.3
Colour Space Families
Colour  spaces  are  classified  into colour space families.  Spaces  within  a  family  share  the  same  general 
characteristics; they shall be distinguished by parameter values supplied at the time the space is specified. The 
families fall into three broad categories: 
Device colour spaces directly specify colours or shades of gray that the output device shall produce. They 
provide a variety of colour specification methods, including grayscale, RGB (red-green-blue), and CMYK
(cyan-magenta-yellow-black), corresponding to the colour space families DeviceGrayDeviceRGB, and 
DeviceCMYK. Since each of these families consists of just a single colour space with no parameters, they 
may be referred to as the DeviceGrayDeviceRGB, and DeviceCMYK colour spaces. 
CIE-based colour spaces shall be based on an international standard for colour specification created by 
the Commission Internationale de  l’Éclairage  (International  Commission  on  Illumination).  These spaces 
specify colours in a way that is independent of the characteristics of any particular output device. Colour 
space families in this category include CalGray, CalRGB, Lab, and ICCBased . Individual colour spaces 
within these families shall be specified by means of dictionaries containing the parameter values needed to 
define the space. 
Special colour spaces add features or properties to an underlying colour space. They include facilities for 
patterns, colour mapping,  separations, and high-fidelity and  multitone colour.  The corresponding colour 
space families  are PatternIndexed , Separation, and DeviceN. Individual colour spaces  within  these 
families shall be specified by means of additional parameters. 
Table 62 summarizes the colour space families in PDF.
Table 62 –  Colour Space Families  
Device
CIE-based
Special
DeviceGray (PDF 1.1)
CalGray (PDF 1.1)
Indexed (PDF 1.1)
DeviceRGB (PDF 1.1)
CalRGB (PDF 1.1)
Pattern (PDF 1.2)
DeviceCMYK (PDF 1.1)
Lab (PDF 1.1)
Separation (PDF 1.2)
ICCBased (PDF 1.3)
DeviceN (PDF 1.3)
PDF 32000-1:2008
140
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
Figure 20 –  Colour Specification
Color spaces
Color values
Sources of 
color values
CalRGB
Conversion
to internal
X, Y, Z
values
A, B, C
X, Y, Z
sc, SC, sh,
BI, Do (image XObject)
Alternative
color
transform
tint
Another
color space
scn, SCN, sh,
BI, Do (image XObject)
Indexed
Table
lookup
Another
color space
CIE-
based
color
spaces
Device
color
spaces
Special
color
spaces
Pattern
sc, SC, sh,
BI, Do (image XObject)
scn, SCN
Another
color space
Pattern
dictionary
CalGray
A
sc, SC, sh,
BI, Do (image XObject)
index
pattern
Separation
Lab
A, B, C
sc, SC, sh,
BI, Do (image XObject)
ICCBased   
scn, SCN, sh,
BI, Do (image XObject)
DeviceCMYK
C, M, Y, K
k, K, sc, SC, sh,
BI, Do (image XObject)
Another
(4-component)
color space
DeviceGray
gray
g, G, sc, SC, sh,
BI, Do (image XObject)
Another
(1-component)
color space
Alternative
color
transform
n
components
Another
color space
scn, SCN, sh,
BI, Do (image XObject)
DeviceN
DeviceRGB
rg, RG, sc, SC, sh,
BI, Do (image XObject)
R, G, B
DefaultCMYK
DefaultGray
DefaultRGB
Another
(3-component)
color space
n
components
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
141
PDF 32000-1:2008
Figure 21 –  Colour Rendering
A colour space shall be defined by an array object whose first element is a name object identifying the colour 
space family. The remaining array elements, if any, are parameters that further characterize the colour space; 
their number and types vary according to the particular family. For families that do not require parameters, the 
colour space may be specified simply by the family name itself instead of an array. 
A colour space shall be specified in one of two ways: 
Within  a  content  stream,  the CS  or cs  operator establishes the  current  colour  space  parameter  in  the 
graphics state. The operand shall always be name object, which either identifies one of the colour spaces 
that need no additional parameters (DeviceGrayDeviceRGBDeviceCMYK, or some cases of Pattern
or shall be used as a key in the ColorSpace subdictionary of the current resource dictionary (see 7.8.3, 
Conversion 
from CIE-based
to device
color space
R, G, B
C, M, Y, K
gray
Device color values
(depending on
results of
conversion)
R, G, B
C, M, Y, K
Conversion
from input
device color
space to
device’s
process color
model
Transfer
functions
(per
component)
Halftones
(per
component)
Any single
device
colorant
Device’s
process
colorant(s)
UCR, BG
TR, HT
HT
X, Y, Z
gray
tint
(not specified by PDF)
n
components
Any n device
colorants
Component(s)
of device’s
process
color model
PDF 32000-1:2008
142
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
"Resource Dictionaries"). In the latter case, the value of the dictionary entry in turn shall be a colour space 
array or name. A colour space array shall never be inline within a content stream. 
Outside a  content  stream, certain objects, such as image  XObjects,  shall specify a colour space as an 
explicit parameter, often associated with the key ColorSpace. In this case, the colour space array or name 
shall  always  be  defined  directly  as  a  PDF  object,  not  by  an  entry  in  the ColorSpace  resource 
subdictionary.  This  convention  also  applies  when  colour  spaces  are  defined  in  terms  of  other  colour 
spaces. 
The following operators shall set the current colour space and current colour parameters in the graphics state: 
CS shall set the stroking colour space; cs shall set the nonstroking colour space. 
SC and SCN shall set the stroking colour; sc and scn shall set the nonstroking colour. Depending on the 
colour space, these operators shall have one or more operands, each specifying one component of the 
colour value. 
GRG, and  K shall set the stroking colour space implicitly and the stroking colour as specified by the 
operands; grg , and k do the same for the nonstroking colour space and colour. 
8.6.4
Device Colour Spaces
8.6.4.1
General
The device colour spaces enable a page description to specify colour values that are directly related to their 
representation on an output device. Colour values in these spaces map directly (or by simple conversions) to 
the application of device colorants, such as quantities of ink or intensities of display phosphors. This enables a 
conforming writer to control colours  precisely for a  particular device, but  the results might  not be consistent 
from one device to another. 
Output devices form colours either by adding light sources together or by subtracting light from an illuminating 
source. Computer displays and film recorders typically add colours; printing inks typically subtract them. These 
two ways of forming colours give rise to two complementary methods of colour specification, called additive and 
subtractive colour (see Figure L.1 in Annex L). The most widely used forms of these two types of colour 
specification are known as RGB and CMYK, respectively, for the names of the primary colours on which they 
are based. They correspond to the following device colour spaces: 
DeviceGray controls the intensity of achromatic light, on a scale from black to white. 
DeviceRGB controls the intensities of red, green, and blue light, the three additive primary colours used in 
displays. 
DeviceCMYK controls the concentrations of cyan, magenta, yellow, and black inks, the four subtractive 
process colours used in printing. 
NOTE
Although the notion of explicit colour spaces is a PDF 1.1 feature, the operators for specifying colours in the 
device colour spaces—G, g, RGrg , K, and k—are available in all versions of PDF. Beginning with PDF 1.2, 
colours specified in device colour spaces can optionally be remapped systematically into other colour spaces; 
see 8.6.5.6, "Default Colour Spaces". 
In the transparent imaging model (PDF 1.4), the use of device colour spaces is subject to special treatment 
within a transparency  group whose group colour space is CIE-based (see 11.4, "Transparency Groups" and 
11.6.6, "Transparency Group XObjects"). In particular, the device colour space operators should be used only if 
device  colour  spaces  have  been  remapped  to  CIE-based  spaces  by  means  of  the  default  colour  space 
mechanism. Otherwise, the results are implementation-dependent and unpredictable. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested