pdf viewer c# winform : Adding image to pdf software Library cloud windows asp.net winforms class PDF32000_200816-part2332

© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
153
PDF 32000-1:2008
dictionary.  Regardless  of  how  the  colour  space  is  specified,  it  shall  be  subject  to  remapping  as  described 
below. 
When a device colour space is selected, the ColorSpace subdictionary of the current resource dictionary (see 
7.8.3, "Resource Dictionaries") is checked for the presence of an entry designating a corresponding  default 
colour space  (DefaultGray, DefaultRGB, or DefaultCMYK,  corresponding  to DeviceGrayDeviceRGB,  or 
DeviceCMYK, respectively). If such an entry is present, its value shall be used as the colour space for the 
operation currently being performed. 
Colour values in the original device colour space shall be passed unchanged to the default colour space, which 
shall have the same number of components as the original space. The default colour space should be chosen 
to be compatible with the original, taking into account the components’ ranges and whether the components 
are  additive  or  subtractive.  If  a  colour  value  lies  outside  the  range  of  the  default  colour  space,  it  shall  be 
adjusted to the nearest valid value. 
Any colour space other than a Lab, Indexed , or Pattern colour space may be used as a default colour space 
and it should be compatible with the original device colour space as described above. 
If the selected space is a special colour space based on an underlying device colour space, the default colour 
space shall be used in place of the underlying space. This shall apply to the following colour spaces:
The underlying colour space of a Pattern colour space 
The base colour space of an Indexed  colour space 
The alternate colour space of a Separation or DeviceN colour space (but only if the alternate colour space 
is actually selected) 
See 8.6.6, "Special Colour Spaces", for details on these colour spaces. 
There is no conversion of colour values, such as a tint transformation, when using the default colour space. 
Colour values that are within the range of the device colour space might not be within the range of the default 
colour space (particularly if the default is an ICCBased  colour space). In this case, the nearest values within 
the  range  of  the  default  space  are  used.  For  this  reason,  a Lab  colour  space  shall  not  be  used  as  the 
DefaultRGB colour space. 
8.6.5.7 Implicit Conversion of CIE-Based Colour Spaces
In  cases  where  a  source  colour  space  accurately  represents  the  particular  output  device  being  used,  a 
conforming reader should avoid converting the component colour values but use the source values directly as 
output values. This avoids any unwanted computational error and in the case of 4 component colour spaces 
avoids the conversion from 4 components to 3 and back to 4, a process that loses critical colour information.
NOTE 1
In workflows in which PDF documents are intended for rendering on a specific target output device (such as a 
printing press with particular inks and media), it is often useful to specify the source colours for some or all of a 
document’s objects in a CIE-based colour space that matches  the calibration of  the  intended device. The 
resulting  document,  although  tailored  to  the  specific characteristics  of  the  target  device, remains  device-
independent  and  will  produce  reasonable  results  if  retargeted  to  a  different  output  device.  However,  the 
expectation is that if the document is printed on the intended target device, source colours that have been 
specified  in  a  colour  space  matching  the  calibration  of  the  device  will  pass  through  unchanged,  without 
conversion to and from the intermediate CIE 1931 XYZ space as depicted in Figure 22. 
NOTE 2
In particular, when colours intended for a CMYK output device are specified in an ICCBased  colour space 
using a matching CMYK printing profile, converting such colours from four components to three and back is 
unnecessary and results in a loss of fidelity in the black component. In such cases, a conforming reader may 
provide the ability for the user to specify a particular calibration to use for printing, proofing, or previewing. This 
calibration is then considered to be that of the native colour space of the intended output device (typically 
DeviceCMYK), and colours expressed in a CIE-based source colour space matching it can be treated as if 
they were specified directly in the device’s native colour space. 
Adding image to pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add jpg to pdf document; add jpg to pdf form
Adding image to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add jpeg to pdf; how to add a picture to a pdf document
PDF 32000-1:2008
154
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
NOTE 3
The conditions under which such implicit conversion is done cannot be specified in PDF, since nothing in PDF 
describes the calibration of the output device (although an output intent dictionary, if present, may suggest 
such  a  calibration; see 14.11.5, "Output  Intents"). The conversion is completely  hidden by the  conforming 
reader and plays no part in the interpretation of PDF colour spaces. 
When this type of implicit conversion is done, all of the semantics of the device colour space shall also apply, 
even though they do not apply to CIE-based spaces in general. In particular: 
The nonzero overprint mode (see 8.6.7, "Overprint Control") shall determine the interpretation of colour 
component values in the space. 
If  the  space  is  used as  the  blending  colour space for a transparency  group in the transparent  imaging 
model  (see  11.3.4,  "Blending  Colour  Space";  11.4,  "Transparency  Groups";  and  11.6.6,  "Transparency 
Group XObjects"), components of the space, such as Cyan, may be selected in a Separation or DeviceN
colour space used within the group (see 8.6.6.4, "Separation Colour Spaces" and 8.6.6.5, "DeviceN Colour 
Spaces"). 
Likewise, any uses of device colour spaces for objects within such a transparency group have well-defined 
conversions to the group colour space. 
NOTE 4
A source colour space can be specified directly (for example, with an ICCBased  colour space) or indirectly 
using the default colour space mechanism (for example, DefaultCMYK; see 8.6.5.6, "Default Colour Spaces"). 
The implicit conversion of a CIE-based colour space to a device space should not depend on whether the CIE-
based space is specified directly or indirectly. 
8.6.5.8
Rendering Intents
Although CIE-based  colour specifications  are  theoretically device-independent,  they are subject to  practical 
limitations in the colour reproduction capabilities of the output device. Such limitations may sometimes require 
compromises to be made among various properties of a colour specification when rendering colours for a given 
device. Specifying a rendering intent (PDF 1.1) allows a conforming writer to set priorities regarding which of 
these properties to preserve and which to sacrifice. 
EXAMPLE
The conforming writer might request that colours falling within the output device’s gamut (the range of 
colours it can reproduce) be rendered exactly while sacrificing the accuracy of out-of-gamut colours, or 
that a scanned image such as a photograph be rendered in a perceptually pleasing manner at the cost of 
strict colourimetric accuracy.
Rendering intents shall be specified with the ri operator (see 8.4.4, "Graphics State Operators"), the RI entry in 
a graphics state parameter dictionary (see 8.4.5, "Graphics State Parameter Dictionaries"), or with the Intent
entry  in  image  dictionaries  (see  8.9.5,  "Image  Dictionaries").  The  value  shall  be  a  name  identifying  the 
rendering intent. Table 70 lists the standard rendering intents that shall be recognized. Figure L.5 in Annex L
illustrates their effects. These intents have been chosen to correspond to those defined by the International 
Color Consortium (ICC), an industry organization that has developed standards for device-independent colour. 
If a conforming reader does not recognize the specified name, it shall use the RelativeColorimetric intent by 
default. 
NOTE
Note, however, that the exact set of rendering intents supported may vary from one output device to another; a 
particular device may not support all possible intents or may support additional ones beyond those listed in the 
table.
See  11.7.5,  "Rendering  Parameters  and  Transparency",  and  in  particular  11.7.5.3,  "Rendering  Intent  and 
Colour Conversions", for further discussion of the role of rendering intents in the transparent imaging model. 
C# Word - Insert Image to Word Page in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET PowerPoint, VB.NET Tiff, VB.NET Imaging, VB It's a demo code for adding image to word page using C#.
add photo pdf; how to add image to pdf document
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
add jpg to pdf online; adding images to pdf
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
155
PDF 32000-1:2008
8.6.6
Special Colour Spaces
8.6.6.1 General
Special colour spaces add features or properties to an underlying colour space. There are four special colour 
space families: Pattern, Indexed , Separation, and DeviceN
Table 70 –  Rendering Intents  
Name
Description
AbsoluteColorimetric
Colours  shall  be  represented  solely  with  respect  to the 
light source; no  correction  shall  be  made for  the  output 
medium’s  white  point  (such  as  the  colour  of  unprinted 
paper). Thus, for example, a monitor’s white point, which 
is bluish compared to that of a printer’s paper, would be 
reproduced  with  a  blue  cast.  In-gamut  colours  shall  be
reproduced exactly; out-of-gamut colours shall be mapped 
to the nearest value within the reproducible gamut. 
NOTE 1
This style of reproduction has the advantage 
of providing exact colour matches from one 
output  medium  to  another.  It  has  the 
disadvantage  of  causing  colours  with Y
values between the medium’s white point and 
1.0 to be out of gamut. A typical use might be 
for logos and solid colours that require exact 
reproduction across different media. 
RelativeColorimetric
Colours  shall  be  represented  with  respect  to  the 
combination of the light source and the output medium’s 
white point (such as the colour of unprinted paper). Thus, 
a monitor’s white point can be reproduced on a printer by 
simply  leaving  the  paper  unmarked,  ignoring  colour 
differences between the two media. In-gamut colours shall 
be  reproduced  exactly;  out-of-gamut  colours  shall  be
mapped  to  the  nearest  value  within  the  reproducible 
gamut. 
NOTE 2
This style of reproduction has the advantage 
of  adapting  for  the  varying  white  points  of 
different  output  media.  It  has  the 
disadvantage  of  not  providing  exact  colour 
matches  from  one  medium  to  another.  A 
typical use might be for vector graphics. 
Saturation
Colours shall be represented in a manner that preserves 
or  emphasizes  saturation.  Reproduction  of  in-gamut 
colours may or may not be colourimetrically accurate. 
NOTE 3
A typical use might be for business graphics, 
where  saturation  is  the  most  important 
attribute of the colour. 
Perceptual
Colours shall be represented in a manner that provides a 
pleasing  perceptual  appearance.  To  preserve  colour 
relationships,  both  in-gamut  and  out-of-gamut  colours 
shall be generally modified from their precise colourimetric 
values. 
NOTE 4
A typical use might be for scanned images. 
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
PDF document to/from supported document and image forms. to define text or images on PDF document and Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB
add image to pdf in preview; add picture to pdf reader
C# PowerPoint - Insert Image to PowerPoint File Page in C#.NET
C#.NET PDF Reading, C#.NET Annotate PDF in WPF, C#.NET PDF Create, C#.NET PDF Document Viewer, C#.NET PDF Windows Viewer, C#.NET convert image to PDF, C#.NET
adding image to pdf; add picture to pdf
PDF 32000-1:2008
156
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
8.6.6.2
Pattern Colour Spaces
Pattern colour space (PDF 1.2) specifies that an area is to be painted with a pattern rather than a single 
colour.  The  pattern  shall  be  either  a tiling pattern   (type  1)  or  a shading pattern  (type  2).  8.7,  "Patterns", 
discusses patterns in detail. 
8.6.6.3
Indexed Colour Spaces
An Indexed  colour space specifies that an area is to be painted using a colour map or colour table of arbitrary 
colours in some other space. A conforming reader shall treat each sample value as an index into the colour 
table and shall use the colour value it finds there. This technique can considerably reduce the amount of data 
required to represent a sampled image. 
An Indexed  colour space shall be defined by a four-element array: 
[ /Indexed base hival lookup  ]
The first element shall be the colour space family name Indexed . The remaining elements shall be parameters 
that  an Indexed  colour space requires;  their meanings are discussed below. Setting  the  current stroking or 
nonstroking colour space to an Indexed  colour space shall initialize the corresponding current colour to 0. 
The base parameter shall be an array or name that identifies the base colour space in which the values in the 
colour table are to be interpreted. It shall be any device or CIE-based colour space or (PDF 1.3) a Separation
or DeviceN space, but shall not be a Pattern space or another Indexed  space. If the base colour space is 
DeviceRGB, the values in the colour table shall be interpreted as red, green, and blue components; if the base 
colour space is a CIE-based ABC space such as a CalRGB or Lab space, the values shall be interpreted as A
B, and C components. 
The hival parameter shall be an integer that specifies the maximum valid index value. The colour table shall be 
indexed by integers in the range 0 to hival. hival shall be no greater than 255, which is the integer required to 
index a table with 8-bit index values. 
The colour table shall be defined by the lookup  parameter, which may be either a stream or (PDF 1.2) a byte 
string. It shall  provide  the mapping between index values and the corresponding colours  in the base colour 
space. 
The colour table data shall be m ¥ (hival + 1) bytes long, where m is the number of colour components in the 
base colour space. Each byte shall be an unsigned integer in the range 0 to 255 that shall be scaled to the 
range of the corresponding colour component in the base colour space; that is, 0 corresponds to the minimum 
value in the range for that component, and 255 corresponds to the maximum. 
The colour components for each entry in the table shall appear consecutively in the string or stream. 
EXAMPLE 1
If the base colour space is DeviceRGB and the indexed colour space contains two colours, the order of 
bytes in the string or stream is R
0
G
0
B
0
R
1
G
1
B
1
, where letters denote the colour component and 
numeric subscripts denote the table entry. 
EXAMPLE 1
The following illustrates the specification of  an Indexed colour space that maps 8-bit index values to 
three-component colour values in the DeviceRGB colour space. 
 /Indexed
/DeviceRGB
255
< 000000  FF0000  00FF00  0000FF  B57342  … >
]
The example shows only the first five colour values in the lookup  string; in all, there should be 256 colour 
values and the string should be 768 bytes long. Having established this colour space, the program can 
now specify colours as single-component values in the range 0 to 255. For example, a colour value of 4 
selects  an RGB colour  whose  components  are  coded as  the  hexadecimal  integers B5,  73,  and 42. 
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
add image pdf acrobat; adding an image to a pdf in preview
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Supports adding text to PDF in preview without adobe reader installed in ASP.NET. Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text.
add an image to a pdf in preview; adding an image to a pdf form
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
157
PDF 32000-1:2008
Dividing these by 255 and scaling the results to the range 0.0 to 1.0 yields a colour with red, green, and 
blue components of 0.710, 0.451, and 0.259, respectively. 
Although an Indexed  colour space is useful mainly for images, index values can also be used with the colour 
selection operators SCSCNsc, and scn. 
EXAMPLE 2
The following selects the same colour as does an image sample value of 123.
123  sc
The index value should be an integer in the range 0 to hival. If the value is a real number, it shall be rounded to 
the nearest integer; if it is outside the range 0 to hival, it shall be adjusted to the nearest value within that range. 
8.6.6.4 Separation Colour Spaces
Separation colour space (PDF 1.2) provides a means for specifying the use of additional colorants or for 
isolating the control of individual colour components of a device colour space for a subtractive device. When 
such a space is the current colour space, the current colour shall be a single-component value, called a tint, 
that controls the application of the given colorant or colour components only. 
NOTE 1
Colour output devices produce full colour by combining primary or process colorants in varying amounts. On 
an additive colour device such as a display, the primary colorants consist of red, green, and blue phosphors; 
on a subtractive device such as a printer, they typically consist of cyan, magenta, yellow, and sometimes black 
inks. In addition, some devices can apply special colorants, often called spot colorants, to produce effects that 
cannot  be achieved with the  standard process  colorants alone. Examples include metallic  and fluorescent 
colours and special textures. 
NOTE 2
When printing a page, most devices produce a single composite page on which all process colorants (and spot 
colorants,  if  any)  are  combined.  However,  some  devices,  such  as  imagesetters,  produce  a  separate, 
monochromatic rendition of the page, called a separation, for each colorant. When the separations are later 
combined—on a printing press, for example—and the proper inks or other colorants are applied to them, the 
result is a full-colour page. 
NOTE 3
The term separation is often misused as a synonym for an individual device colorant. In the context of this 
discussion,  a  printing system  that  produces  separations  generates  a  separate  piece  of  physical  medium 
(generally  film)  for  each  colorant. It  is these  pieces  of  physical  medium that  are  correctly referred  to  as 
separations. A particular colorant properly constitutes a separation only if the device is generating physical 
separations, one of which corresponds to the given colorant. The Separation colour space is so named for 
historical  reasons,  but  it  has  evolved  to  the  broader  purpose  of  controlling  the  application  of  individual 
colorants in general, regardless of whether they are actually realized as physical separations. 
NOTE 4
The operation of a Separation colour space itself is independent of the characteristics of any particular output 
device. Depending on the device, the space may or may not correspond to a true, physical separation or to an 
actual colorant. For example, a Separation colour space could be used to control the application of a single 
process colorant (such as cyan) on a composite device that does not produce physical separations, or could 
represent a colour (such as orange) for which no specific colorant exists on the device. A Separation colour 
space provides consistent, predictable behaviour, even on devices that cannot directly generate the requested 
colour. 
Separation colour space is defined as follows: 
[ /Separation name alternateSpace tintTransform  ]
It shall be a four-element array whose first element shall be the colour space family name Separation. The 
remaining elements are  parameters that a Separation colour space requires; their meanings are discussed 
below. 
A colour value in a Separation colour space shall consist of a single tint component in the range 0.0 to 1.0. The 
value  0.0  shall  represent  the  minimum  amount  of  colorant  that  can  be  applied;  1.0  shall  represent  the 
maximum.  Tints  shall  always  be  treated  as subtractive  colours,  even if  the  device  produces  output  for  the 
designated component by an additive method. Thus, a tint value of 0.0 denotes the lightest colour that can be 
VB.NET Image: How to Draw Annotation on Doc Images with Image SDK
multi-page TIFF, Microsoft Office Word and PDF file programmer, you might need some other image annotating tutorials besides adding annotation using VB
how to add an image to a pdf file; add picture to pdf preview
VB.NET TIFF: Add New Image to TIFF File in Visual Basic .NET
NET TIFF image processing SDK and its TIFF image adding function at this section, the following parts will describe the sample method for adding image to TIFF
how to add an image to a pdf file in acrobat; add image pdf document
PDF 32000-1:2008
158
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
achieved with the given colorant, and 1.0 is the darkest. The initial value for both the stroking and nonstroking 
colour in the graphics state shall be 1.0. The SCN and scn operators respectively shall set the current stroking 
and nonstroking colour to a tint value. A sampled image with single-component samples may also be used as a 
source of tint values. 
NOTE 5
This convention is the same as for DeviceCMYK colour components but opposite to the one for DeviceGray
and DeviceRGB.
The name parameter is a name object that shall specify the name of the colorant that this Separation colour 
space is intended to represent (or one of the special names All or None; see below). Such colorant names are 
arbitrary, and there may be any number of them, subject to implementation limits. 
The special colorant name All shall refer collectively to all colorants available on an output device, including 
those for the standard process colorants. When a Separation space  with  this colorant name  is  the  current 
colour space, painting operators shall apply tint values to all available colorants at once. 
NOTE 6
This is useful for purposes such as painting registration targets in the same place on every separation. Such 
marks are typically painted as the last step in composing a page to ensure that they are not overwritten by 
subsequent painting operations. 
The special colorant name None  shall  not  produce any visible  output.  Painting operations in  a Separation
space with this colorant name shall have no effect on the current page. 
A conforming  reader  shall  support Separation  colour spaces  with the colorant names All and None  on  all 
devices, even if the devices are not capable of supporting any others. When processing Separation spaces 
with  either  of  these  colorant  names  conforming  readers  shall  ignore  the alternateSpace  and tintTransform
parameters (discussed below), although valid values shall still be provided. 
At the moment the colour space is set to a Separation space, the conforming reader shall determine whether 
the device has an available colorant corresponding to the name of the requested space. If so, the conforming 
reader  shall ignore the alternateSpace and tintTransform  parameters; subsequent painting  operations within 
the space shall apply the designated colorant directly, according to the tint values supplied. 
The preceding paragraph applies only to subtractive output devices such as printers and imagesetters. For an 
additive  device  such  as  a  computer  display,  a Separation  colour  space  never  applies  a  process  colorant 
directly;  it  always  reverts  to  the  alternate  colour  space  as  described  below.  This  is  because  the  model  of 
applying process colorants independently does not work as intended on an additive device. 
EXAMPLE 1
Painting tints of the Red component on a white background produces a result that varies from white to 
cyan. 
This exception applies only to colorants for additive devices, not to the specific names RedGreen, and Blue
In contrast, a printer might have a (subtractive) ink named Red, which should work as a Separation colour 
space just the same as any other supported colorant. 
If the colorant name associated with a Separation colour space does not correspond to a colorant available on 
the device,  the  conforming  reader  shall arrange  for  subsequent  painting  operations  to  be  performed  in an 
alternate colour space. The intended colours may be approximated by colours in a device or CIE-based colour 
space, which shall then be rendered with the usual primary or process colorants:
The alternateSpace parameter shall be an array or name object that identifies the alternate colour space, 
which  may  be  any  device  or  CIE-based  colour  space  but  may  not  be  another  special  colour  space 
(PatternIndexed , Separation, or DeviceN). 
The tintTransform   parameter  shall  be  a  function  (see  7.10,  "Functions").  During  subsequent  painting 
operations, a conforming reader calls this function to transform a tint value into colour component values in 
the  alternate  colour  space.  The  function  shall  be  called  with  the  tint  value  and  shall  return  the 
corresponding colour component values. That is, the number of components and the interpretation of their 
values shall depend on the alternate colour space. 
VB.NET TIFF: Read, Edit & Process TIFF with VB.NET Image Document
TIFF document at the page level, like TIFF page adding & deleting to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and
adding an image to a pdf form; how to add a jpg to a pdf
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
159
PDF 32000-1:2008
NOTE 7
Painting in the alternate colour space may produce a good approximation of the intended colour when only 
opaque objects are painted. However, it does not correctly represent the interactions between an object and its 
backdrop when the object is painted with transparency or when overprinting (see 8.6.7, "Overprint Control") is 
enabled. 
EXAMPLE 2
The following illustrates the specification of  a Separation colour  space (object  5)  that is intended to 
produce a colour named LogoGreen. If the output device has no colorant corresponding to this colour, 
DeviceCMYK is used as the alternate colour space, and the tint transformation function (object 12) maps 
tint values linearly into shades of a CMYK colour value approximating the LogoGreen colour. 
5  0  obj
% Colour space
  /Separation
/LogoGreen
/DeviceCMYK
12 0 R
endobj
12  0  obj
% Tint transformation function
<<   /FunctionType  4
/Domain  [ 0.0  1.0 ]
/Range  [ 0.0  1.0   0.0  1.0   0.0  1.0   0.0  1.0 ]
/Length  62
>>
stream
{   dup  0.84  mul
 exch  0.00  exch  dup  0.44  mul
 exch  0.21  mul
}
endstream
endobj
See 11.7.3, "Spot Colours and Transparency", for further discussion of the role of Separation colour spaces in 
the transparent imaging model. 
8.6.6.5 DeviceN Colour Spaces
DeviceN colour spaces (PDF 1.3) may contain an arbitrary number of colour components. 
NOTE 1
They provide greater flexibility than is possible with standard device colour spaces such as DeviceCMYK or 
with individual Separation colour spaces. 
EXAMPLE 1
It is possible to create a DeviceN colour space consisting of only the cyan, magenta, and yellow colour 
components, with the black component excluded. 
NOTE 2
DeviceN colour spaces are used in applications such as these: 
High-fidelity colour is the use of more than the standard CMYK process colorants to produce an extended 
gamut,  or  range  of  colours.  A  popular  example  is  the  PANTONE  Hexachrome  system,  which  uses  six 
colorants: the usual cyan, magenta, yellow, and black, plus orange and green. 
Multitone colour systems use a single-component image to specify multiple colour components. In a duotone, 
for example, a single-component image can be used to specify both the black component and a spot colour 
component. The tone reproduction is generally different for the different components. For example, the black 
component might be painted with the exact sample data from the single-component image; the spot colour 
component might be generated as a nonlinear function of the image data in a manner that emphasizes the 
shadows. Figure L.6 in Annex L shows an example that uses black and magenta colour components. In Figure 
L.7 in Annex L, a single-component grayscale image is used to generate a quadtone result that uses four 
colorants: black and three PANTONE spot colours. See EXAMPLE 5 in this sub-clause for the code used to 
generate this image. 
PDF 32000-1:2008
160
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
DeviceN shall be used to represent colour spaces containing multiple components that correspond to colorants 
of some target device. As with Separation colour spaces, conforming readers shall be able to approximate the 
colorants if they are not available on the current output device, such as a display. To accomplish this, the colour 
space definition provides a tint transformation function that shall be used to convert all the components to an 
alternate colour space. 
PDF 1.6 extended the meaning of DeviceN to include colour spaces that are referred to as NChannel colour 
spaces. Such colour spaces may contain an arbitrary number of spot and process components, which may or 
may not correspond to specific device colorants (the process components shall be from a single process colour 
space).  They  provide  information  about  each  component  that  allows  conforming  readers  more  flexibility  in 
converting colours. These colour spaces shall be identified by a value of NChannel for the Subtype entry of 
the attributes dictionary (see Table 71). A value of DeviceN for the Subtype entry, or no value, shall mean that 
only the previous features shall be supported. Conforming readers that do not support PDF 1.6 shall treat these 
colour spaces as normal DeviceN colour spaces and shall use the tint transformation function as appropriate. 
Conforming  writers using  the NChannel  features should follow  certain guidelines,  as noted throughout this 
sub-clause, to achieve good backward compatibility.
EXAMPLE 2
They may use their own blending algorithms for on-screen viewing and composite printing, rather than 
being required to use a specified tint transformation function.
DeviceN colour spaces shall be defined in a similar way to Separation colour spaces—in fact, a Separation
colour space can be defined as a DeviceN colour space with only one component. 
DeviceN colour space shall be specified as follows: 
[ /DeviceN names alternateSpace tintTransform  ]
or 
[ /DeviceN names alternateSpace tintTransform  attributes ]
It  is  a four- or five-element array whose  first  element  shall be  the colour space  family name DeviceN. The 
remaining elements shall be parameters that a DeviceN colour space requires. 
The names parameter shall be  an  array  of  name  objects specifying the individual  colour components. The 
length of the array shall determine the number of components in the DeviceN colour space, which is subject to 
an implementation limit; see Annex C.The component names shall all be different from one another, except for 
the name None, which may be repeated as described later in this sub-clause. The special name All, used by 
Separation colour spaces, shall not be used.
Colour values shall be tint components in the range 0.0 to 1.0:
For DeviceN colour spaces  that do not have a subtype of NChannel, 0.0  shall represent  the minimum 
amount of colorant; 1.0 shall represent the maximum. Tints shall always be treated as subtractive colours, 
even if the device produces output for the designated component by an additive method. Thus, a tint value 
of 0.0 shall denote the lightest colour that can be achieved with the given colorant, and 1.0 the darkest. 
NOTE 3
This  convention  is  the  same  one  as  for DeviceCMYK  colour  components  but  opposite  to  the  one  for 
DeviceGray and DeviceRGB.
For NChannel colour spaces, values for additive process colours (such as RGB) shall be specified in their 
natural form, where 1.0 shall represent maximum intensity of colour.
When this space is set to the current colour space (using the CS or cs operators), each component shall be 
given  an  initial  value  of  1.0.  The SCN  and scn  operators  respectively  shall  set  the  current  stroking  and 
nonstroking colour. Operand values supplied to SCN or scn shall be interpreted as colour component values in 
the order in which the colours are given in the names array, as are the values in a sampled image that uses a 
DeviceN colour space.
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
161
PDF 32000-1:2008
The alternateSpace parameter shall be an array or name object that can be any device or CIE-based colour 
space but shall not be another special colour space (PatternIndexed , Separation, or DeviceN). When the 
colour space is set to a DeviceN space, if any of the component names in the colour space do not correspond 
to a colorant available on the device, the conforming reader shall perform subsequent painting operations in 
the alternate colour space specified by this parameter.
For NChannel colour spaces, the components shall be evaluated individually; that is, only the ones not present 
on the output device shall use the alternate colour space. 
The tintTransform  parameter shall specify a function (see 7.10, "Functions") that is used to transform the tint 
values into the alternate colour space. It  shall be called  with n tint  values and returns m colour  component 
values, where n is the number of components needed to specify a colour in the DeviceN colour space and m is 
the number required by the alternate colour space.
NOTE 4
Painting in the alternate colour space may produce a good approximation of the intended colour when only 
opaque objects are painted. However, it does not correctly represent the interactions between an object and its 
backdrop when the object is painted with transparency or when overprinting (see 8.6.7, "Overprint Control") is 
enabled. 
The colour component name None, which may be present only for DeviceN colour spaces that do not have the 
NChannel subtype, indicates that the corresponding colour component shall never be painted on the page, as 
in a Separation colour  space for the None colorant.  When  a DeviceN  colour space is painting the named 
device colorants directly, colour components corresponding to None colorants shall be discarded. However, 
when the DeviceN colour space reverts to its alternate colour space, those components shall be passed to the 
tint transformation function, which may use them as desired. 
DeviceN colour space whose component colorant names are all None shall always discard its output, just 
the same as a Separation colour space for None; it shall never revert to the alternate colour space. Reversion 
shall occur only if at  least one colour  component (other than None) is  specified and is  not available on the 
device. 
The optional attributes parameter shall be a dictionary (see Table 71) containing additional information about 
the  components  of  colour  space  that  conforming  readers  may  use.  Conforming  readers  need  not  use  the 
alternateSpace and  tintTransform parameters, and may instead use custom blending algorithms, along with 
other  information  provided  in  the  attributes  dictionary  if  present.  (If  the  value  of  the Subtype  entry  in  the 
attributes  dictionary  is NChannel,  such  information  shall  be  present.)  However, alternateSpace  and 
tintTransform shall always be provided for conforming readers that want to use them or do not support PDF 1.6. 
Table 71 –  Entries in a DeviceN Colour Space Attributes Dictionary  
Key
Type
Value
Subtype
name
(Optional;  PDF  1.6) A name specifying the preferred treatment for the 
colour  space.  Values  shall  be DeviceN  or NChannel.  Default  value: 
DeviceN.
PDF 32000-1:2008
162
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
A  value of NChannel for  the Subtype  entry  indicates  that  some  of  the  other  entries  in  this  dictionary  are 
required rather than optional. The Colorants entry specifies a colorants dictionary that contains entries for all 
the spot colorants in the colour space; they shall be defined using individual Separation colour spaces. The 
Process entry specifies a process dictionary (see Table 72) that identifies the process colour space that is 
used by this colour space and the names of its components. It shall be present if Subtype is NChannel and the 
colour space has process colour components. An NChannel colour space shall contain components from at 
most one process colour space.
For  colour  spaces  that  have  a  value  of NChannel  for  the Subtype  entry  in  the  attributes  dictionary  (see 
Table 71), the following restrictions apply to process colours: 
There may be colour components from at most one process colour space, which may be any device or 
CIE-based colour space.
For a non-CMYK  colour space,  the  names of  the  process  components shall appear  sequentially  in  the 
names array, in the normal colour space order (for example, RedGreen, and Blue). However, the names 
in the names array need not match the actual colour space names (for example, a Red component need 
not  be  named Red).The  mapping  of  names  is  specified  in  the  process  dictionary  (see  Table 72  and 
discussion below), which shall be present. 
Definitions for process colorants should not appear in the colorants dictionary. Any such definition shall be 
ignored if the colorant is also present in the process dictionary. Any component not specified in the process 
dictionary shall be considered to be a spot colorant.
For a CMYK colour space, a subset of the components may be present, and they may appear in any order 
in the names array. The reserved names CyanMagentaYellow, and Black shall always be considered 
to be process colours, which do not necessarily correspond to the colorants of a specific device; they need 
not have entries in the process dictionary. 
The  values  associated  with  the  process  components  shall  be  stored  in  their  natural  form  (that  is, 
subtractive colour values for CMYK and additive colour values for RGB), since they shall be interpreted 
Colorants
dictionary
(Required  if Subtype  is NChannel and  the  colour  space includes spot 
colorants;  otherwise  optional) A dictionary describing the individual 
colorants that shall be used in the DeviceN colour space. For each entry in 
this dictionary, the key shall be a colorant name and the value shall be an 
array defining a Separation colour space for that colorant (see 8.6.6.4, 
"Separation  Colour  Spaces").  The  key  shall  match  the  colorant  name 
given in that colour space. 
This  dictionary  provides  information  about  the  individual  colorants  that 
may  be  useful  to some conforming  readers.  In particular,  the alternate 
colour space and tint transformation function of a Separation colour space 
describe  the  appearance  of  that  colorant  alone,  whereas  those  of  a 
DeviceN colour space describe only the appearance of its colorants in 
combination. 
If Subtype  is NChannel,  this  dictionary  shall  have  entries  for  all spot 
colorants in this colour space. This dictionary may also include additional 
colorants not used by this colour space. 
Process
dictionary
(Required  if Subtype  is NChannel  and  the  colour  space  includes 
components of a process colour space, otherwise  optional; PDF 1.6) A 
dictionary (see Table 72) that describes the process colour space whose 
components are included in this colour space.
MixingHints
dictionary
(Optional;  PDF  1.6) A dictionary (see Table 73) that specifies optional 
attributes of the inks that shall be used in blending calculations when used 
as an alternative to the tint transformation function.
Table 71 –  Entries in a DeviceN Colour Space Attributes Dictionary (continued)
Key
Type
Value
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested