pdf viewer control in asp net c# : How to add an image to a pdf in preview SDK Library project wpf asp.net html UWP PDF32000_200833-part2351

© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
323
PDF 32000-1:2008
This formula represents a simplified form of the compositing formula in which the shape and opacity values are 
combined and represented as a single alpha value; the more general form is presented later. This function is 
based on the over operation defined in the article “Compositing Digital Images,” by Porter and Duff (see 
the Bibliography), extended to include a blend mode in the region of overlapping coverage. The following sub-
clauses elaborate on the meaning and implications of this formula. 
11.3.4
Blending Colour Space
The  compositing  formula  shown  in  11.3.3,  "Basic  Compositing  Formula,"  represents  a  vector  function:  the 
colours  it  operates  on  are  represented  in  the  form  of n-element  vectors,  where n  denotes  the  number  of 
components required by the colour space in used in the compositing process. The ith component of the result 
colour C
r
shall  be  obtained  by  applying  the  compositing  formula  to  the ith  components  of  the  constituent 
colours C
b
C
s
, and B (C
b
C
s
). The result of the computation thus depends on the colour space in which the 
colours  are represented. For this reason, the  colour space used for  compositing, called the blending colour 
space, is explicitly made part of the transparent imaging model. When necessary, backdrop and source colours 
shall be converted to the blending colour space before the compositing computation. 
Of the PDF colour spaces described in Section 8.6, the following shall be supported as blending colour spaces:
DeviceGray
DeviceRGB
DeviceCMYK
CalGray
CalRGB
ICCBased colour spaces equivalent to the preceding (including calibrated CMYK
The Lab space and ICCBased  spaces that represent lightness and chromaticity separately (such as L*a*b*, 
L*u*v*, and HSV) shall not be used as blending colour spaces because the compositing computations in such 
spaces do not give meaningful results when applied separately to each component. In addition, an ICCBased
space used as a blending colour space shall be bidirectional; that is, the ICC profile shall contain both AToB
and BToA transformations. 
The blending colour space shall be consulted only for process colours. Although blending may also be done on 
individual spot colours specified in a Separation or DeviceN colour space, such colours shall not be converted 
to  a  blending  colour  space  (except  in  the  case  where  they  first  revert  to  their  alternate  colour  space,  as 
described under Section 8.6.6.4 and “DeviceN Colour Spaces”). Instead, the specified colour 
components shall 
be blended individually with the corresponding components of the backdrop. 
The blend functions for the various blend modes are defined such that the range for each colour component 
shall  be  0.0  to  1.0  and  that  the  colour  space  shall  be  additive.  When  performing  blending  operations  in 
Backdrop alpha
Source alpha
Result alpha
Blend function
Table 135 –  Variables used in the basic compositing formula  (continued)
Variable
Meaning
α
b
α
s
α
r
B C
b
C
s
( ,
)
How to add an image to a pdf in preview - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add jpeg to pdf; add image to pdf form
How to add an image to a pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
adding image to pdf file; add an image to a pdf acrobat
PDF 32000-1:2008
324
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
subtractive  colour spaces (DeviceCMYKSeparation, and DeviceN), the colour component values shall be 
complemented (subtracted from 1.0) before the blend function is applied and the results of the function shall 
then be complemented back before being used. 
NOTE
This adjustment makes the effects of the various blend modes numerically consistent across all colour spaces. 
However, the actual visual effect produced by a given blend mode still depends on the colour space. Blending 
in  a device  colour  space produces device-dependent results, whereas in a  CIE-based  space it  produces 
results that are consistent across all devices. See 11.7, "Colour Space and Rendering Issues," for additional 
details concerning colour spaces. 
11.3.5
Blend Mode
In principle, any function of the backdrop and source colours that yields another colour, C
r
, for the result may be 
used as  a  blend  function B (C
b
C
s
),  in  the  compositing formula to  customize the blending  operation.  PDF 
defines a standard set of named blend functions, or blend modes, listed in Tables 136 and 137. Figures L.18
and L.19 in Annex L illustrate the resulting visual effects for RGB and CMYK colours, respectively. 
A blend  mode is termed separable if each  component of  the  result  colour  is  completely  determined by  the 
corresponding components of the constituent backdrop and source colours—that is, if the blend mode function 
B is applied separately to each set of corresponding components: 
where the lowercase variables c
r
c
b
, and 
c
s
denote corresponding components of the colours C
r
C
b
, and C
s
,
expressed in  additive form.  A separable  blend  mode  may  be  used  with  any colour space, since it  applies 
independently  to any number  of components.  Only  separable blend modes  shall  be  used for blending spot 
colours.
NOTE 1
Theoretically, a blend mode could have a different function for each colour component and still be separable; 
however, none of the standard PDF blend modes have this property.
Table 136 lists the standard separable blend modes available in PDF and the algorithms/formulas that shall be 
used in the calculation of blended colours. 
Table 136 –  Standard separable blend modes  
Name
Result
Normal
NOTE
Selects the source colour, ignoring the backdrop.
Compatible
Same as Normal. This mode exists only for compatibility and should not be used.
Multiply
NOTE 1
Multiplies the backdrop and source colour values.
NOTE 2
The  result  colour  is  always  at  least  as  dark  as  either  of  the  two 
constituent colours. Multiplying any colour with black produces black; 
multiplying with white leaves the original colour unchanged. Painting 
successive overlapping objects with a colour other than black or white 
produces progressively darker colours. 
c
r
B c
b
c
s
( ,
)
=
B c
b
c
s
( ,
)
c
s
=
B c
b
c
s
( ,
)
c
b
c
s
×
=
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Convert PDF to Tiff image (.tif, .tiff). • Convert PDF to HTML (.htm, .html). PDF Annotation. • Add sticky notes to PDF document in preview.
add picture to pdf online; add jpg signature to pdf
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
PDF to Tiff image (.tif, .tiff). • Convert PDF to HTML (.htm, .html). PDF Annotation. • Add sticky notes to PDF document. • Highlight PDF text in preview.
add picture to pdf file; how to add a jpeg to a pdf file
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
325
PDF 32000-1:2008
Screen
NOTE 3
Multiplies the complements of the backdrop and source colour values, 
then complements the result.
NOTE 4
The  result  colour  is  always  at  least  as  light  as  either  of  the  two 
constituent colours. Screening any colour with white produces white; 
screening with black leaves the original colour unchanged. The effect 
is  similar  to  projecting  multiple  photographic  slides  simultaneously 
onto a single screen. 
Overlay
NOTE 5
Multiplies or screens the colours, depending on the backdrop colour 
value.  Source  colours  overlay  the  backdrop  while  preserving  its 
highlights and shadows. The backdrop colour is not replaced but is 
mixed with the source colour to reflect the lightness or darkness of the 
backdrop.
Darken
NOTE 6
Selects the darker of the backdrop and source colours.
NOTE 7
The backdrop is replaced with the source where the source is darker; 
otherwise, it is left unchanged. 
Lighten
NOTE 8
Selects the lighter of the backdrop and source colours.
NOTE 9
The backdrop is replaced with the source where the source is lighter; 
otherwise, it is left unchanged. 
ColorDodge
NOTE 10
Brightens the backdrop colour to reflect the source colour. Painting 
with black produces no changes. 
ColorBurn
NOTE 11
Darkens  the  backdrop  colour to  reflect  the  source  colour.  Painting 
with white produces no change.
HardLight
NOTE 12
Multiplies  or  screens the  colours,  depending on  the  source  colour 
value.  The  effect  is  similar  to  shining  a  harsh  spotlight  on  the 
backdrop.
Table 136 –  Standard separable blend modes  (continued)
Name
Result
B c
b
c
s
( ,
)
1
1 c
b
( –
)
1 c
s
( –
)
×
[
]
=
c
b
c
s
c
b
c
s
( ×
)
+
=
Bc
b
c
s
( ,
)
HardLight c
s
c
b
( ,
)
=
B c
b
c
s
( ,
)
min c
b
c
s
( ,
)
=
B c
b
c
s
( ,
)
max c
b
c
s
( ,
)
=
Bc
b
c
s
( ,
)
min 1 c
b
1 c
s
( –
)
( , , ⁄
)
if c
s
1
<
1
if c
s
=
=
B c
b
c
s
( ,
)
1 min 1 1 c
b
( –
)
c
s
( ,
)
if c
s
0
>
0
if c
s
=
=
B c
b
c
s
( ,
)
Multiply c
b
2 c
s
( , , ×
)
if c
s
0.5
Screen c
b
2 c
s
1
( , , ×
)
if c
s
0.5
>
=
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
C# DLLs for Word File Preview. Add references: Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Word file in C#.net.
add image to pdf file; how to add a jpg to a pdf
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
Add necessary XDoc.PowerPoint DLL libraries into your created C# application as You may get document preview image from an existing PowerPoint file in C#.net.
how to add image to pdf in preview; how to add image to pdf file
PDF 32000-1:2008
326
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
Table 137  lists  the standard  nonseparable  blend  modes. Since the  nonseparable  blend  modes  consider  all 
colour  components  in  combination,  their  computation  depends  on  the  blending  colour  space  in  which  the 
components are interpreted. They may be applied to all multiple-component colour spaces that are allowed as 
blending colour spaces (see “Blending Colour Space”). 
NOTE 2
All of these blend modes conceptually entail the following steps:
a) Convert the backdrop and source colours from the blending colour space to an intermediate HSL (hue-
saturation-luminosity) representation. 
b) Create a new colour from some combination of hue, saturation, and luminosity components selected from 
the backdrop and source colours.
c) Convert the result back to the original (blending) colour space.
However,  the  following  formulas given do  not  actually  perform  these conversions. Instead, they start  with 
whichever colour (backdrop or source) is providing the hue for the result; then they adjust this colour to have 
the proper saturation and luminosity.
The nonseparable blend mode formulas make use of several auxiliary functions. These functions operate on 
colours that are assumed to have red, green, and blue components. Blending of CMYK colour spaces requires 
special treatment, as described in this sub-clause. 
These functions shall have the following definitions:
SoftLight
where
NOTE 13
Darkens  or  lightens  the  colours,  depending  on  the  source  colour 
value.  The  effect  is  similar  to  shining  a  diffused  spotlight  on  the 
backdrop.
Difference
NOTE 14
Subtracts the  darker of the two  constituent colours  from the lighter 
colour:
NOTE 15
Painting with white  inverts the backdrop colour;  painting  with black 
produces no change. 
Exclusion
NOTE 16
Produces an effect similar to that of the Difference mode but lower in 
contrast. Painting with white inverts the backdrop colour; painting with 
black produces no change.
Table 136 –  Standard separable blend modes  (continued)
Name
Result
Bc
b
c
s
( ,
)
c
b
1 2 c
s
( – – ×
)
c
b
1 c
b
( –
)
×
×
if c
s
0.5
c
b
2 c
s
1
( ×
)
Dc
b
( )
c
b
(
)
×
+
if c
s
0.5
>
=
Dx
( )
16 x 12
( × × –
)
x 4
× +
(
)
x
×
if x 0.25
x
if x 0.25
>
=
B c
b
c
s
( ,
)
c
b
c
s
=
Bc
b
c
s
( ,
)
c
b
c
s
2 c
b
c
×
×
s
+
=
Lum C
( )
0.3 C
red
×
0.59 C
green
×
0.11 C
blue
×
+
+
=
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
enables compressing and decompressing in preview in ASP.NET to reduce or minimize original PDF document size Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or
add photo to pdf; add signature image to pdf acrobat
How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word following steps below, you can create an image viewer WinForm Open or create a new WinForms application, add necessary dll
adding a png to a pdf; adding an image to a pdf
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
327
PDF 32000-1:2008
The subscripts minmid, and max (in the next function) refer to the colour components having the minimum, 
middle, and maximum values upon entry to the function.
Table 137 –  Standard nonseparable blend modes  
Name
Result
Hue
NOTE 1
Creates a colour with the hue of the source colour and the saturation 
and luminosity of the backdrop colour. 
Saturation
NOTE 2
Creates a colour with the saturation of the source colour and the hue 
and luminosity of the backdrop colour. Painting with this mode in an 
area of the backdrop that is a pure gray (no saturation) produces no 
change. 
SetLum C l
( ,
)
let d
l Lum C
( )
C
red
C
red
d
C
green
+
C
green
d
C
blue
+
C
blue
d
returnClipColor C
( )
+
=
=
=
=
ClipColor C
( )
let l
Lum C
( )
let n
min C
red
C
green
C
blue
,
,
(
)
let x
max C
red
C
green
C
blue
,
,
(
)
if n 0.0
C
red
<
l
C
red
l
(
)
l
×
(
)
l n
( –
)
(
)
C
green
+
l
C
green
l
(
)
l
×
(
)
l n
( –
)
(
)
C
blue
+
l
C
blue
l
(
)
l
×
(
)
l n
( –
)
(
)
if x 1.0
C
red
>
+
l
C
red
l
(
)
1 l
( –
)
×
(
)
x l
( –
)
(
)
C
green
+
l
C
green
l
(
)
1 l
( –
)
×
(
)
x l
( –
)
(
)
C
blue
+
l
C
blue
l
(
)
1 l
( –
)
×
(
)
x l
( –
)
(
)
return C
+
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
Sat C
( )
max C
red
C
green
C
blue
,
,
(
)
min C
red
C
green
C
blue
,
,
(
)
=
SetSat C s
( ,
)
if C
max
C
min
C
mid
>
C
mid
C
min
(
)
s
×
(
)
C
max
C
min
(
)
(
)
C
max
s
else
C
mid
C
max
0.0
C
min
0.0
return C
=
=
=
=
=
B C
b
C
s
( ,
)
SetLum SetSat C
s
Sat C
b
( )
( ,
)
Lum C
b
( )
,
(
)
=
B C
b
C
s
( ,
)
SetLum SetSat C
b
Sat C
s
( )
( ,
)
Lum C
b
( )
,
(
)
=
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Excel file in C#.net.
adding an image to a pdf in acrobat; acrobat insert image in pdf
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Generally speaking, using well-designed APIs, C# developers can do following things. Remove Image from PDF Page Using C#. Add necessary references:
add jpg to pdf online; add photo to pdf for
PDF 32000-1:2008
328
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
The formulas in this sub-clause apply to RGB spaces. Blending in CMYK spaces (including both DeviceCMYK
and ICCBased  calibrated CMYK spaces) shall be handled in the following way:
The C, M, and Y components shall be converted to their complementary RG, and B components in the 
usual  way.  The  preceding  formulas  shall  be  applied  to  the RGB  colour  values.  The  results  shall  be 
converted back to CM, and Y.
For the K component, the result shall be the K component of C
b
for the HueSaturation, and Color blend 
modes; it shall be the K component of C
s
for the Luminosity blend mode.
11.3.6
Interpretation of Alpha
The colour compositing formula 
produces a result colour that is a weighted average of the backdrop colour, the source colour, and the blended 
B (C
b
C
s
) term, with the weighting determined by the backdrop and source alphas 
α
β
and 
α
s
. For the simplest 
blend mode, Normal, defined by 
the compositing formula collapses to a simple weighted average of the backdrop and source colours, controlled 
by  the  backdrop  and  source  alpha  values.  For  more  interesting  blend  functions,  the backdrop  and  source 
alphas control whether the effect of the blend mode is fully realized or is toned down by mixing the result with 
the backdrop and source colours. 
The  result  alpha, 
α
ρ
 actually  represents  a  computed  result,  described  in  11.3.7,  "Shape  and  Opacity 
Computations." The result colour shall be normalized by the result alpha, ensuring that when this colour and 
alpha are subsequently used together in another compositing operation, the colour’s contribution is correctly 
represented. 
NOTE 1
If 
α
ρ
is zero, the result colour is undefined. 
NOTE 2
The  preceding  formula  represents  a  simplification  of  the  following  formula,  which  presents  the  relative 
contributions of backdrop, source, and blended colours in a more straightforward way: 
Color
NOTE 3
Creates a colour with the hue and saturation of the source colour and 
the luminosity of the backdrop colour. This preserves the gray levels 
of the backdrop and is useful for colouring monochrome images or 
tinting colour images. 
Luminosity
NOTE 4
Creates a colour with the luminosity of the source colour and the hue 
and saturation of the backdrop colour. This produces an inverse effect 
to that of the Color mode. 
Table 137 –  Standard nonseparable blend modes  (continued)
Name
Result
B C
b
C
s
( ,
)
SetLum C
s
Lum C
b
( )
( ,
)
=
B C
b
C
s
( ,
)
SetLum C
b
Lum C
s
( )
( ,
)
=
C
r
1
α
s
α
r
–------
C
b
×
α
s
α
r
------
1
α
b
( –
)
C
s
×
α
b
B C
b
C
s
( ,
)
×
+
[
]
×
+
=
B c
b
·
c
s
( ,
)
c
s
=
α
r
C
r
×
1
α
s
( –
) α
b
C
b
×
×
[
]
1
α
b
( –
) α
s
C
s
×
×
[
]
α
b
α
s
B C
b
C
s
( ,
)
×
×
[
+
+
=
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
329
PDF 32000-1:2008
(The simplification requires a substitution based on the alpha compositing formula, which is presented in the 
next sub-clause.) Thus, mathematically, the backdrop and source alphas control the influence of the backdrop 
and  source colours, respectively, while their product controls the influence of the blend function.  An alpha 
value of 
α
s
=
0.0 or 
α
β 
=
0.0 results in no blend mode effect; setting 
α
s
=
1.0 and 
α
β
=
1.0 results in maximum 
blend mode effect. 
11.3.7
Shape and Opacity Computations
11.3.7.1 General
As  stated earlier,  the alpha values  that  control the compositing  process shall  be  defined as  the product of 
shape and opacity: 
This sub-clause examines the various shape and opacity values individually.  Once  again, keep in mind that 
conceptually these values are computed for every point on the page. 
11.3.7.2 Source Shape and Opacity
Shape  and  opacity  values  may  come  from  several  sources.  The  transparency  model  provides  for  three 
independent sources for each. However, the PDF representation  imposes some limitations  on  the  ability to 
specify all of these sources independently (see “Specifying Shape and Opacity”). 
Object shape. Elementary objects such as strokes, fills, and text have an intrinsic shape, whose value shall 
be 1.0 for points inside the object and 0.0 outside. Similarly, an image with an explicit mask (see “Explicit 
Masking”) has a shape that shall be 1.0 in the unmasked portions and 0.0 in the masked portions. The 
shape of a group object shall be the union of the shapes of the objects it contains. 
NOTE 1
Mathematically, elementary objects have “hard” edges, with a shape value of either 0.0 or 1.0 at every point. 
However, when such objects are rasterized to device pixels, the shape values along the boundaries may be 
anti-aliased,  taking  on  fractional  values  representing  fractional coverage  of those pixels.  When such anti-
aliasing is performed, it is important to treat the fractional coverage as shape rather than opacity. 
Mask  shape. Shape values for compositing an object may be taken from an additional source, or soft 
mask, independent of the object itself, as described in 11.5, "Soft Masks."
NOTE 2
The use of a soft mask to modify the shape of an object or group, called soft clipping, can produce effects such 
as a gradual transition between an object and its backdrop, as in a vignette. 
Constant shape. The source shape may be modified at every point by a scalar shape constant
NOTE 3
This is merely a convenience, since the same effect could be achieved with a shape mask whose value is the 
same everywhere. 
Object opacity. Elementary objects have an opacity of 1.0 everywhere. The opacity of a group object shall 
be the result of the opacity computations for all of the objects it contains. 
Mask opacity. Opacity values, like shape values, may be provided by a soft mask independent of the object 
being composited. 
Constant opacity. The source opacity may be modified at every point by a scalar opacity constant
NOTE 4
It is useful to think of this value as the “current opacity,” analogous to the current colour used when painting 
elementary objects. 
α
b
f
b
q
b
×
=
α
r
f
r
q
r
×
=
α
s
f
s
q
s
×
=
PDF 32000-1:2008
330
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
All of the shape and opacity inputs shall have values in the range 0.0 to 1.0 (inclusive), with a default value of 
1.0. 
The three shape inputs shall be multiplied together, producing an intermediate value called the source shape.
The three opacity inputs shall be multiplied together, producing an intermediate value called the source opacity.
Where the variables have the meanings shown in Table 138. 
NOTE 5
The effect of each of these inputs is that the painting operation becomes more transparent as the input values 
decreases.
When an object is painted with a tiling pattern, the object shape and object opacity for points in the object’s 
interior are determined by those of corresponding points in the pattern, rather than being 1.0 everywhere (see 
“Patterns and Transparency”). 
11.3.7.3 Result Shape and Opacity
In addition to a result colour, the painting operation also shall compute an associated result shape  and result 
opacity. These computations shall be based on the union function 
where b and s shall be the backdrop and source values to be composited. 
NOTE 1
This is a generalization of the conventional concept of union for opaque shapes, and it can be thought of as an 
“inverted multiplication”—a multiplication with the inputs and outputs complemented. The result tends toward 
1.0: if either input is 1.0, the result is 1.0. 
The result shape and opacity shall be given by 
Table 138 –  Variables used in the source shape and opacity formulas  
Variable
Meaning
Source shape
Object shape
Mask shape
Constant shape
Source opacity
Object opacity
Mask opacity
Constant opacity
f
s
f
j
f
m
f
k
×
×
=
q
s
q
j
q
m
q
k
×
×
=
f
s
f
j
f
m
f
k
q
s
q
j
q
m
q
k
Union b s
( ,
)
1
1 b
( –
)
1 s
( –
)
×
[
]
=
b
s
b s
( ×
)
+ –
=
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
331
PDF 32000-1:2008
where the variables have the meanings shown in Table 139. 
These formulas shall be interpreted as follows: 
The result shape shall be the union of the backdrop and source shapes. 
The result opacity shall be the union of the backdrop and source opacities, weighted by their respective 
shapes. The result shall then be divided by (normalized by) the result shape. 
NOTE 2
Since alpha is just the product of shape and opacity, it can easily be shown that 
This formula can be used whenever the independent shape and opacity are not needed. 
11.3.8
Summary of Basic Compositing Computations
This sub-clause is a summary of all the computations presented in this sub-clause. They are given in an order 
such  that  no  variable  is  used  before  it  is computed;  also,  some  of  the  formulas  have  been  rearranged  to 
simplify them. See Tables 135, 138, and 139 for the meanings of the variables used in these formulas. 
Table 139 –  Variables used in the result shape and opacity formulas  
Variable
Meaning
Result shape
Backdrop shape
Source shape
Result opacity
Backdrop opacity
Source opacity
f
r
Union f
b
f
s
( ,
)
=
q
r
Union f
b
q
b
×
f
s
q
s
, ×
(
)
f
r
----------------------------------------------------------
=
f
r
f
b
f
s
q
r
q
b
q
s
α
r
Union
α
b
α
s
( ,
)
=
Union b s
( ,
)
1
1 b
( –
)
1 s
( –
)
×
[
]
=
b
s
b s
( ×
)
+ –
=
f
s
f
j
f
m
f
k
×
×
=
q
s
q
j
q
m
q
k
×
×
=
f
r
Union f
b
·
f
s
( ,
)
=
PDF 32000-1:2008
332
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
11.4 Transparency Groups
11.4.1
General
transparency group   is  a  sequence of  consecutive  objects in a transparency  stack that shall be  collected 
together and composited to produce a single colour, shape, and opacity at each point. The result shall then be 
treated as if it were a single object for subsequent compositing operations. Groups may be nested within other 
groups to form a tree-structured group hierarchy. 
NOTE
This facilitates creating independent pieces of artwork, each composed of multiple objects, and then combining 
them, possibly with additional transparency effects applied during the combination.
The objects contained within a group shall be treated as a separate transparency stack called the group stack
The  objects  in  the  stack  shall  be  composited  against  an  initial  backdrop  (discussed  later),  producing  a 
composite colour, shape,  and opacity for the group as a whole. The result is an object  whose shape is  the 
union of the shapes of its constituent objects and whose colour and opacity are the result of the compositing 
operations. This object shall then be composited with the group’s backdrop in the usual way. 
In addition to its computed colour, shape, and opacity, the group as a whole may have several further attributes: 
All of the input variables that affect the compositing computation for individual objects may also be applied 
when compositing the group with its backdrop. These variables include mask and constant shape, mask 
and constant opacity, and blend mode. 
The group may be isolated  or non-isolated,  which shall  determine the initial backdrop against  which its 
stack is composited. 
The group may be knockout or non-knockout, which shall determine whether the objects within its stack 
are composited with one another or only with the group’s backdrop. 
An isolated group may specify its own blending colour space, independent of that of the group’s backdrop. 
Instead of being composited onto the current page, a group’s results may be used as a source of shape or 
opacity values for creating a soft mask (see “Soft Masks”). 
11.4.2
Notation for Group Compositing Computations
This  sub-clause  introduces  some  notation  for  dealing  with  group  compositing.  Subsequent  sub-clauses 
describe the group compositing formulas for a non-isolated, non-knockout group and the special properties of 
isolated and knockout groups. 
α
b
f
b
q
b
×
=
α
s
f
s
q
s
×
=
α
r
Union
α
b
α
s
( ,
)
=
q
r
α
r
f
r
------
=
C
r
1
α
s
α
r
–------
C
b
×
α
s
α
r
------
1
α
b
( –
)
C
s
×
α
b
B C
b
C
s
( ,
)
×
+
[
]
×
+
=
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested