pdf viewer control in asp net c# : How to add image to pdf in preview application SDK utility azure .net web page visual studio PDF32000_200834-part2352

© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
333
PDF 32000-1:2008
Since we are now dealing with multiple objects at a time, it is useful to have some notation for distinguishing 
among  them.  Accordingly,  the  variables  introduced  earlier  are  altered  to  include  a  second-level  subscript 
denoting an object’s position in the transparency stack. 
stands for the source colour of the ith object in the stack. The subscript 0 represents the initial backdrop; 
subscripts 1 to n denote the bottommost to topmost objects in an n-element stack. In addition, the subscripts b
and r are dropped from the variables C
b
f
β
q
β
, α
β
C
r
f
ρ
q
ρ
, and 
α
ρ
; other variables retain their mnemonic 
subscripts. 
These conventions permit the compositing formulas to be restated as recurrence relations among the elements 
of a stack. For instance, the result of the colour compositing computation for object i is denoted by C
i
(formerly 
C
r
). This computation takes as one of its inputs the immediate backdrop colour, which is the result of the colour 
compositing computation for object i 
1; this is denoted by C
1
(formerly C
b
). 
The revised formulas for a simple n-element stack (not including any groups) shall be, for i 
=
1, … , n: 
where the variables have the meanings shown in Table 140. 
NOTE
Compare these formulas with those shown in 11.3.8, "Summary of Basic Compositing Computations."
Table 140 –  Revised variables for the basic compositing formulas  
Variable
Meaning
Source shape for object i
Object shape for object i
Mask shape for object i
Constant shape for object i
Result shape after compositing object i
C
s
i
f
s
i
f
j
i
f
m
i
f
k
i
×
×
=
q
s
i
q
j
i
q
m
i
q
k
i
×
×
=
α
s
i
f
s
i
q
s
i
×
=
α
i
Union
α
i 1
α
s
i
,
(
)
=
f
i
Union f
i 1
f
s
i
,
(
)
=
q
i
α
i
f
i
= -----
C
i
1
α
s
i
α
i
–-------
C
i 1
×
α
s
i
α
i
-------
1
α
i 1
( –
)
C
s
i
×
α
i 1
B
i
C
i 1
C
s
i
,
(
)
×
+
[
]
×
+
=
f
s
i
f
j
i
f
m
i
f
k
i
f
i
How to add image to pdf in preview - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
how to add picture to pdf; add image to pdf in preview
How to add image to pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
adding an image to a pdf form; add a picture to a pdf document
PDF 32000-1:2008
334
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
11.4.3
Group Structure and Nomenclature
As stated earlier, the elements of a group shall be treated as a separate transparency stack, referred to as the 
group stack. These objects shall be composited against a selected initial  backdrop and the resulting colour, 
shape, and opacity shall then be treated as if they belonged to a single object. The resulting object is in turn 
composited with the group’s backdrop in the usual way. 
NOTE
This computation entails interpreting the stack as a tree. For an n-element group that begins at position i in the 
stack,  it  treats  the  next n  objects  as  an n-element substack,  whose  elements are  given  an  independent 
numbering of 1 to n. These objects are then removed from the object numbering in the parent (containing) 
stack and replaced by the group object, numbered i, followed by the remaining objects to be painted on top of 
the group, renumbered starting at i + 1. This operation applies recursively to any nested subgroups. 
The term element (denoted E
i 
) refers to a member of some group; it can be either an individual object or a 
contained subgroup. 
From the perspective of a particular element in a nested group, there are three different backdrops of interest: 
The group backdrop is the result of compositing all elements up to but not including the first element in the 
group. (This definition is altered if the parent group is a knockout group; see 11.4.6, "Knockout Groups") 
The initial backdrop is a backdrop that is selected for compositing the group’s first element. This is either 
the same as the group backdrop (for a non-isolated group) or a fully transparent backdrop (for an isolated 
group). 
The immediate backdrop is the result of compositing all elements in the group up to but not including the 
current element. 
When all elements in a group have been composited, the result shall be treated as if the group were a single 
object, which shall then be composited with the group backdrop. This operation shall occur whether the initial 
Source opacity for object i
Object opacity for object i
Mask opacity for object i
Constant opacity for object i
Result opacity after compositing object i
Source alpha for object i
Result alpha after compositing object i
Source colour for object i
Result colour after compositing object i
Blend function for object i
Table 140 –  Revised variables for the basic compositing formulas  (continued)
Variable
Meaning
q
s
i
q
j
i
q
m
i
q
k
i
q
i
α
s
i
α
i
C
s
i
C
i
B
i
C
i 1
C
s
i
,
(
)
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Convert PDF to Tiff image (.tif, .tiff). • Convert PDF to HTML (.htm, .html). PDF Annotation. • Add sticky notes to PDF document in preview.
how to add jpg to pdf file; how to add an image to a pdf file
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
PDF to Tiff image (.tif, .tiff). • Convert PDF to HTML (.htm, .html). PDF Annotation. • Add sticky notes to PDF document. • Highlight PDF text in preview.
add a picture to a pdf; add jpg to pdf acrobat
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
335
PDF 32000-1:2008
backdrop chosen for compositing the elements of the group was the group backdrop or a transparent backdrop. 
A conforming reader shall ensure that the backdrop’s contribution to the overall result is applied only once. 
11.4.4
Group Compositing Computations
The colour and opacity of a group shall be defined by the group compositing function
where the variables have the meanings shown in Table 141. 
NOTE 1
The opacity is not given explicitly as an argument or result of this function. Almost all of the computations use 
the product of shape and opacity (alpha) rather than opacity alone; therefore, it is usually convenient to work 
directly with shape and alpha rather than shape and opacity. When needed, the opacity can be computed by 
dividing the alpha by the associated shape. 
The result of applying the group compositing function shall then be treated as if it were a single object, which in 
turn  is composited with  the group’s backdrop according to the formulas  defined  in this sub-clause. In  those 
formulas, the colour, shape, and alpha (C , f, and 
α
) calculated by the group compositing function shall be used, 
respectively, as the source colour C
s
, the object shape f
j
, and the object alpha 
α
The group compositing formulas for a non-isolated, non-knockout group are defined as follows: 
Initialization: 
For each group element E
i
G (i 
=
1, … , n)
Table 141 –  Arguments and results of the group compositing function  
Variable
Meaning
The transparency group: a compound object consisting of all 
elements E
1
, … , E
n
of the group—the n constituent objects’ 
colours, shapes, opacities, and blend modes 
Colour of the group’s backdrop 
Computed colour  of the  group, which shall be used as the 
source colour when the group is treated as an object 
Computed shape of the  group, which  shall be used as the 
object shape when the group is treated as an object 
Alpha of the group’s backdrop 
Computed alpha of the  group, which shall be used  as  the 
object alpha when the group is treated as an object 
C f
α
, ,
Composite C
0
α
0
G
, ,
(
)
=
G
C
0
C
f
α
0
α
f
g
0
α
g
0
0.0
=
=
C
s
i
f
j
i
α
j
i
, ,
Composite C
i 1
α
i 1
E
i
,
,
(
)
intrinsic color, shape, and  shape opacity
×
(
)
of E
i
=
if E
i
is a group
otherwise
f
s
i
f
j
i
f
m
i
f
k
i
×
×
=
α
s
i
α
j
i
f
m
i
q
m
i
×
(
)
f
k
i
q
k
i
( ×
)
×
×
=
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
C# DLLs for Word File Preview. Add references: Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Word file in C#.net.
add signature image to pdf; add image to pdf java
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
Add necessary XDoc.PowerPoint DLL libraries into your created C# application as You may get document preview image from an existing PowerPoint file in C#.net.
how to add a photo to a pdf document; adding images to pdf forms
PDF 32000-1:2008
336
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
Result: 
where the variables have the meanings shown in Table 142 (in addition to those in Table 141). 
For an element 
E
i
that is an elementary object, the colour, shape, and alpha values  ,  , and   are intrinsic 
attributes  of  the  object.  For  an  element  that  is  a  group,  the  group  compositing  function  shall  be  applied 
recursively to  the subgroup and  the  resulting Cf,  and 
α
values  shall be used  for  its  ,  , and 
in  the 
calculations for the parent group. 
Table 142 –  Variables used in the group compositing formulas  
Variable
Meaning
Element i of the group: a compound variable representing the 
element’s colour, shape, opacity, and blend mode 
Source shape for element E
i 
Object shape for element E
i 
Mask shape for element E
i 
Constant shape for element E
i 
Group  shape:  the  accumulated  source  shapes  of  group 
elements E
1
to E
i 
, excluding the initial backdrop 
Mask opacity for element E
i 
Constant opacity for element E
i 
Source alpha for element E
i 
Object alpha for element E
i 
: the product of its object shape 
and object opacity 
f
g
i
Union f
g
i 1
f
s
i
,
(
)
=
α
g
i
Union
α
g
i 1
α
s
i
,
(
)
=
α
i
Union
α
0
α
g
i
( ,
)
=
C
i
1
α
s
i
α
i
–-------
C
i 1
×
α
s
i
α
i
-------
1
α
i 1
( –
)
C
s
i
×
α
i 1
B
i
C
i 1
C
s
i
,
(
)
×
+
(
)
×
+
=
C
C
n
C
n
C
0
(
)
α
0
α
g
n
--------
α
0
×
+
=
f
f
g
n
=
α
α
g
n
=
C
s
i
f
j
i
α
j
i
C
s
i
f
j
i
α
j
i
E
i
f
s
i
f
j
i
f
m
i
f
k
i
f
g
i
q
m
i
q
k
i
α
s
i
α
j
i
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
enables compressing and decompressing in preview in ASP.NET to reduce or minimize original PDF document size Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or
add image to pdf acrobat reader; add photo to pdf file
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Excel file in C#.net.
add jpeg to pdf; how to add an image to a pdf in preview
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
337
PDF 32000-1:2008
NOTE 2
The elements of a group are composited onto a backdrop that includes the group’s initial backdrop. This is 
done to achieve the correct effects of the blend modes, most of which are dependent on both the backdrop and 
source colours being blended. This feature is what distinguishes non-isolated groups from isolated groups, 
discussed in the next sub-clause.
NOTE 3
Special attention should be directed to the formulas at the end that compute the final results C, f, and 
α
, of the 
group compositing function. Essentially, these formulas remove the contribution of the group backdrop from 
the  computed results.  This  ensures  that  when  the  group  is  subsequently  composited  with that  backdrop 
(possibly with additional shape  or opacity inputs or a different blend mode), the backdrop’s contribution is 
included only once. 
For colour, the backdrop removal is accomplished by an explicit calculation, whose effect is essentially the 
reverse of compositing with the Normal blend mode. The formula is a simplification of the following formulas, 
which present this operation more intuitively: 
where   is the backdrop fraction, the relative contribution of the backdrop colour to the overall colour. 
NOTE 4
For  shape  and  alpha,  backdrop removal is accomplished by maintaining  two sets of  variables to hold the 
accumulated values. There is never any need to compute the corresponding complete shape, f
i
, that includes 
the backdrop contribution. 
The group shape and alpha,   and 
, shall accumulate only the shape and alpha of the group elements, 
excluding  the  group  backdrop.  Their  final  values  shall  become  the  group  results  returned  by  the  group 
compositing function. The complete alpha, 
α
i
, includes the backdrop contribution as well; its value is used in 
the colour compositing computations. 
NOTE 5
As a result of these corrections, the effect of compositing objects as a group is the same as that of compositing 
them separately (without grouping) if the following conditions hold: 
The  group  is  non-isolated and  has the same knockout attribute as its parent group  (see 11.4.5, "Isolated 
Groups," and “Knockout Groups”). 
When compositing the group’s results with the group  backdrop, the Normal blend mode is used,  and the 
shape and opacity inputs are always 1.0. 
Group  alpha:  the  accumulated  source  alphas  of  group 
elements E
1
to E
i
, excluding the initial backdrop 
Accumulated alpha after compositing  element E
i
, including 
the initial backdrop 
Source colour for element E
i
Accumulated colour after compositing element E
i
, including 
the initial backdrop 
Blend function for element E
i
Table 142 –  Variables used in the group compositing formulas  (continued)
Variable
Meaning
α
g
i
α
i
C
s
i
C
i
B
i
C
i 1
C
s
i
,
(
)
φ
b
1
α
g
n
( –
)
α
0
×
Union
α
0
α
g
n
( ,
)
--------------------------------------
=
C
C
n
φ
b
C
0
×
1
φ
b
-------------------------------
=
φ
b
f
g
i
α
g
i
How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word following steps below, you can create an image viewer WinForm Open or create a new WinForms application, add necessary dll
add picture to pdf form; attach image to pdf form
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Generally speaking, using well-designed APIs, C# developers can do following things. Remove Image from PDF Page Using C#. Add necessary references:
add jpg to pdf; adding an image to a pdf in preview
PDF 32000-1:2008
338
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
11.4.5
Isolated Groups
An isolated group  is one whose elements shall be composited onto a fully transparent initial backdrop rather 
than onto the group’s backdrop. The resulting source colour, object shape, and object alpha for the group shall 
be therefore independent of the group backdrop. The only interaction with the group backdrop shall occur when 
the group’s computed colour, shape, and alpha are composited with it. 
In particular, the special effects produced by the blend modes of objects within the group take into account only 
the intrinsic colours and opacities of those objects; they shall not be influenced by the group’s backdrop. 
EXAMPLE
Applying the Multiply blend mode to an object in the group produces a darkening effect on other objects 
lower in the group’s stack but not on the group’s backdrop. 
Figure L.17 in Annex L illustrates this effect for a group consisting of four overlapping circles in a light gray 
colour  (C = M = Y = 0.0; K = 0.15).  The  circles  are  painted  within  the  group  with  opacity  1.0  in  the 
Multiply blend mode; the group itself is painted against its backdrop in Normal blend mode. In the top 
row, the group is isolated and thus does not interact with the rainbow backdrop. In the bottom row, the 
group is non-isolated and composites with the backdrop. The figure also illustrates the difference between 
knockout and non-knockout groups (see “Knockout Groups”). 
NOTE 1
Conceptually, the effect of an isolated group could be represented by a simple object that directly specifies a 
colour, shape, and opacity at each point. This flattening  of an isolated group is sometimes useful for importing 
and exporting fully composited artwork in applications. Furthermore, a group that specifies an explicit blending 
colour space shall be an isolated group. 
For  an  isolated  group,  the  group  compositing  formulas  shall  be  altered  by  adding  one  statement  to  the 
initialization: 
That is, the initial backdrop on which the elements of the group are composited shall be transparent rather than 
inherited from the group’s backdrop. 
NOTE 2
This substitution also makes C
0
undefined, but the normal compositing formulas take care of that. Also, the 
result  computation  for C automatically  simplifies  to C = C
,  since there  is no  backdrop  contribution to  be 
factored out. 
11.4.6
Knockout Groups
In a knockout group, each individual element shall be composited with the group’s initial backdrop rather than 
with the stack of preceding elements in the group. When objects have binary shapes (1.0 for inside, 0.0  for 
outside), each object shall overwrite (knocks out) the effects of any earlier elements it overlaps within the same 
group. At any given point, only the topmost object enclosing the point shall contribute to the result colour and 
opacity of the group as a whole. 
EXAMPLE
Figure L.17 in Annex L about 11.4.5, "Isolated Groups," illustrates the difference between knockout and 
non-knockout groups. In the left column, the four overlapping circles are defined as a knockout group and 
therefore do not composite with each other within the group. In the right column, the circles form a non-
knockout group and thus do composite with each other. In each column, the upper and lower figures 
depict an isolated and a non-isolated group, respectively. 
NOTE 1
This model is similar to the opaque imaging model, except that the “topmost object wins” rule applies to both 
the colour and the opacity. Knockout groups are useful in composing a piece of artwork from a collection of 
overlapping objects, where the topmost object in any overlap completely obscures those beneath. At the same 
time, the topmost object interacts with the group’s initial backdrop in the usual way, with its opacity and blend 
mode applied as appropriate. 
The concept of knockout is generalized to accommodate fractional shape values. In that case, the immediate 
backdrop shall be only partially knocked out and shall be replaced by only a fraction of the result of compositing 
the object with the initial backdrop. 
α
0
0.0
=
if the group is isolated
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
339
PDF 32000-1:2008
The restated group compositing formulas deal with knockout groups by introducing a new variable, b, which is 
a subscript that specifies which previous result to use as the backdrop in the compositing computations: 0 in a 
knockout group or i 
1 in  a non-knockout  group.  When b 
=
i 
1, the  formulas simplify  to the ones given in 
11.4.4, "Group Compositing Computations." 
In the general case, the computation shall proceed in two stages: 
a) Composite the source object with the group’s initial backdrop, disregarding the object’s shape and using a 
source shape value of 1.0 everywhere. This produces unnormalized temporary alpha and colour results, 
α
t
and C
t
NOTE 2
For colour, this computation is essentially the same as the unsimplified colour compositing formula given in 
11.3.6, "Interpretation of Alpha," but using a source shape of 1.0. 
b) Compute a weighted average of this result with the object’s immediate backdrop, using the source shape 
as the weighting factor. Then normalize the result colour by the result alpha: 
This averaging computation shall be performed for both colour and alpha. 
NOTE 3
The preceding formulas show this averaging directly. The formulas in 11.4.8, "Summary of Group Compositing 
Computations," are  slightly  altered  to use source  shape  and alpha  rather than  source shape and opacity, 
avoiding the need to compute a source opacity value explicitly. 
NOTE 4
C
t
in Group Compositing Computations is slightly different from the preceding C
t
: it is premultiplied by
.
NOTE 5
The extreme values of the source shape produce the straightforward knockout effect. That is, a shape value of 
1.0 (inside) yields the colour and opacity that result from compositing the object with the initial backdrop. A 
shape value of 0.0 (outside) leaves the previous group results unchanged. 
The existence of the knockout feature is the main reason for maintaining a separate shape value rather than 
only a single  alpha  that combines  shape and opacity. The  separate shape  value shall be computed in any 
group that is subsequently used as an element of a knockout group. 
A knockout group may be isolated or non-isolated; that is, isolated  and knockout are independent attributes. A 
non-isolated knockout group composites its topmost enclosing element with the group’s backdrop. An isolated 
knockout group composites the element with a transparent backdrop. 
NOTE 6
When a non-isolated group is nested within a knockout group, the initial backdrop of the inner group is the 
same as that of the outer group; it is not the immediate backdrop of the inner group. This behaviour, although 
perhaps unexpected, is a consequence of the group compositing formulas when b 
=
0. 
α
t
Union
α
g
b
q
s
i
,
(
)
=
C
t
1 q
s
i
( –
)
α
b
C
b
×
×
q
s
i
1
α
b
( –
)
C
s
i
×
α
b
B
i
C
b
C
s
i
( ,
)
×
+
(
)
×
+
=
α
g
i
1 f
s
i
( –
)
α
g
i 1
×
f
s
i
α
t
×
+
=
α
i
Union
α
0
α
g
i
( ,
)
=
C
i
1 f
s
i
( –
)
α
i 1
C
i 1
×
×
f
s
i
C
t
×
+
α
i
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
=
f
s
i
PDF 32000-1:2008
340
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
11.4.7
Page Group
All of the elements painted directly onto a page—both top-level groups and top-level objects that are not part of 
any group—shall be treated as if they were contained in a transparency group P, which in turn is composited 
with a context-dependent backdrop. This group is called the page group
The page group shall be treated in one of two distinctly different ways: 
Ordinarily, the page shall be imposed directly on an output medium, such as paper or a display screen. The 
page group shall be treated as an isolated group, whose results shall then be composited with a backdrop 
colour  appropriate for the medium.  The backdrop is nominally white, although  varying according to  the 
actual  properties of the medium. However, some conforming readers may choose to provide a different 
backdrop, such as a checker board or grid to aid in visualizing the effects of transparency in the artwork. 
A “page” of a PDF file may be treated as a graphics object to be used as an element of a page of some 
other document. 
EXAMPLE
This case arises,  for  example,  when placing  a  PDF file containing a piece of artwork produced  by a 
drawing program into a page layout produced by a layout program. In this situation, the PDF “page” is not 
composited with the media colour; instead, it is treated as an ordinary transparency group, which can be 
either isolated or non-isolated and is composited with its backdrop in the normal way. 
The remainder of this sub-clause pertains only to  the first use of the page group, where it is to be imposed 
directly on the medium. 
The colour C of the page at a given point shall be defined by a simplification of the general group compositing 
formula: 
where the variables have the meanings shown in Table 143. The first formula computes the colour and alpha 
for the  group given a transparent backdrop—in effect,  treating P  as an isolated group. The  second  formula 
composites the results with the context-dependent backdrop (using the equivalent of the Normal blend mode). 
Table 143 –  Variables used in the page group compositing formulas  
Variable
Meaning
The page group, consisting of all elements E
1
, … , E
n
in the 
page’s top-level stack 
Computed colour of the page group 
Computed shape of the page group 
Computed alpha of the page group 
Computed colour of the page 
Initial  colour  of  the  page  (nominally  white  but  may  vary 
depending on the properties of the medium or the needs of 
the application) 
An  undefined  colour  (which  is  not  used,  since  the 
α
0
argument of Composite is 0) 
C
g
f
g
α
g
, ,
Composite U
·
0 P
, ,
(
)
=
C
1
α
g
( –
)
W
×
α
g
C
g
×
+
=
P
C
g
f
g
α
g
C
W
U
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
341
PDF 32000-1:2008
If not otherwise specified, the page group’s colour space shall be inherited from the native colour space of the 
output device—that is, a device colour space, such as DeviceRGB or DeviceCMYK. An explicit colour space 
should be  specified,  particularly  a  CIE-based space,  to  ensure  more  predictable  results  of the compositing 
computations  within  the  page  group.  In  this  case, all page-level compositing  shall  be  done in  the  specified 
colour space,  and  the  entire result  shall  then  be converted to  the  native colour  space  of the output device 
before being composited with the context-dependent backdrop. 
NOTE
This  case  also  arises  when  the  page  is  not  actually  being  rendered  but  is  converted  to  a  flattened 
representation in an opaque imaging model, such as PostScript. 
11.4.8
Summary of Group Compositing Computations
This  sub-clause  is  a  restatement  of  the  group  compositing  formulas  that  also  takes  isolated  groups  and 
knockout groups into account. See Tables 141 and 142 in 11.4.4, "Group Compositing Computations," for the 
meanings of the variables. 
Initialization: 
For each group element E
i
G (i 
=
1, … , n)
C f
α
, ,
Composite C
0
α
0
G
, ,
(
)
=
f
g
0
α
g
0
0
=
=
α
0
0
if the group is isolated
=
b
0
i 1
=
if the group is knockout
otherwise
C
s
i
f
j
i
α
j
i
, ,
Composite C
b
α
b
E
i
, ,
(
)
intrinsic color, shape, and  shape opacity
×
(
)
of E
i
=
if E
i
is a group
otherwise
f
s
i
f
j
i
f
m
i
f
k
i
×
×
=
α
s
i
α
j
i
f
m
i
q
m
i
×
(
)
f
k
i
q
k
i
( ×
)
×
×
=
f
g
i
Union f
g
i 1
f
s
i
,
(
)
=
α
g
i
1 f
s
i
( –
)
α
g
i 1
×
f
s
i
α
s
i
( –
)
α
g
b
×
α
s
+
+
=
α
i
Union
α
0
α
g
i
( ,
)
=
C
t
f
s
i
α
s
i
( –
)
α
b
C
b
×
×
α
s
i
1
α
b
( –
)
C
s
i
×
α
b
B
i
C
b
C
s
i
( ,
)
×
+
×(
+
=
C
i
1 f
s
i
( –
)
α
i 1
C
i 1
×
×
C
t
+
α
i
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
=
PDF 32000-1:2008
342
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
Result: 
NOTE
Once  again,  keep  in  mind  that  these  formulas  are  in  their most  general  form.  They  can  be  significantly 
simplified when some sources of shape and opacity are not present or when shape and opacity need not be 
maintained separately. Furthermore, in each specific type of group (isolated or not, knockout or not), some 
terms of  these formulas  cancel  or  drop out. An efficient implementation should use  the  simplified  derived 
formulas. 
11.5 Soft Masks
11.5.1
General
As stated  in  earlier  sub-clauses, the shape and opacity  values  used  in  compositing an  object  may  include 
components called the mask shape (f
m
) and mask opacity (q
m
), which may be supplied in a PDF file from a 
source independent of the object. Such an independent source, called a soft mask, defines values that may 
vary across different points on the page. 
NOTE 1
The word soft emphasizes that the mask value at a given point is not limited to just 0.0 or 1.0 but can take on 
intermediate fractional values as well. Such a mask is typically the only means of providing position-dependent 
opacity values, since elementary objects do not have intrinsic opacity of their own. 
NOTE 2
A mask used as a source of shape values is also called a soft clip, by analogy with the “hard” clipping path of 
the opaque imaging model (see Section 8.5.4). The soft clip is a generalization of the hard clip: a hard clip can 
be represented as a soft clip having shape values of 1.0 inside and 0.0 outside the clipping path. Everywhere 
inside  a  hard  clipping  path,  the  source  object’s  colour  replaces  the  backdrop;  everywhere  outside,  the 
backdrop shows through unchanged. With a soft clip, by contrast, a gradual transition can be created between 
an object and its backdrop, as in a vignette. 
A mask may be defined by creating a transparency group and painting objects into it, thereby defining colour, 
shape, and opacity in the usual way. The resulting group may then be used to derive the mask in either of two 
ways, as described in the following sub-clauses. 
11.5.2
Deriving a Soft Mask from Group Alpha
In the first method of defining a soft mask, the colour, shape, and opacity of a transparency group G shall be 
first computed by the usual formula 
where C
0
and 
α
0
represent an arbitrary backdrop whose value does not contribute to the eventual result. The 
Cf, and 
α
results shall be the group’s colour, shape, and alpha, respectively, with the backdrop factored out. 
The mask  value  at each  point shall  then be derived from the alpha of  the  group. The alpha value shall be 
passed through a separately specified transfer function, allowing the masking effect to be customized. 
NOTE
Since the group’s colour is not used in this case, there is no need to compute it.
C
C
n
C
n
C
0
(
)
α
0
α
g
n
--------
α
0
×
+
=
f
f
g
n
=
α
α
g
n
=
C f
α
, ,
Composite C
0
α
0
G
, ,
(
)
=
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested