pdf viewer control in asp net c# : Add an image to a pdf with acrobat control application system azure web page winforms console PDF32000_200836-part2354

© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
353
PDF 32000-1:2008
11.7 Colour Space and Rendering Issues
11.7.1
General
This sub-clause describes the interactions between transparency and other aspects of colour specification and 
rendering in the PDF imaging model. 
11.7.2
Colour Spaces for Transparency Groups
As discussed in 11.6.6, "Transparency Group XObjects," a transparency group shall either have an explicitly 
declared colour space of its own or inherit that of its parent group. In either case, the colours of source objects 
within the group shall be converted to the group’s colour space, if necessary, and all blending and compositing 
computations shall be done in that space (see “Blending Colour Space”). The resulting colours shall then be 
interpreted in that colour space when the group is subsequently composited with its backdrop. 
NOTE 1
Under this arrangement, it is envisioned that all or most of a given piece of artwork will be created in a single 
colour space—most likely, the working colour space of the application generating it. The use of multiple colour 
spaces typically will arise only when assembling independently produced artwork onto a page. After all the 
artwork has been placed on the page, the conversion from the group’s colour space to the page’s device colour 
space will be done as the last step, without any further transparency compositing. The transparent imaging 
model does not require that this convention be followed, however; the reason for adopting it is to avoid the loss 
of colour information and the introduction of errors resulting from unnecessary colour space conversions. 
Only  an  isolated  group may  have  an  explicitly declared  colour  space  of  its  own. Non-isolated  groups  shall 
inherit their colour space from the parent group (subject to special treatment for the page group, as described 
in “Page Group”). 
NOTE 2
This is because the use of an explicit colour space in a non-isolated group would require converting colours 
from the backdrop’s colour space to that of the group in order to perform the compositing computations. Such 
conversion may not be possible (since some colour conversions can be performed only in one direction), and 
even if possible, it would entail an excessive number of colour conversions. 
NOTE 3
The choice of a group colour space has significant effects on the results that are produced: 
As noted in 11.3.4, "Blending Colour Space," the results of compositing in a device colour space is device-
dependent. For the compositing computations to work in a device-independent way, the group’s colour space 
should be CIE-based. 
A consequence of choosing a CIE-based group colour space is that only CIE-based spaces can be used to 
specify the colours of objects within the group. This is because conversion from device to CIE-based colours is 
not possible in general; the defined conversions work only in the opposite direction. See further discussion 
subsequently. 
The  compositing  computations  and  blend  functions  gene
rally  compute  linear  combinations  of  colour 
component values, on the assumption that the component values themselves are linear. For this reason, it is 
usually best to choose a group colour space that has a linear gamma function. If a nonlinear colour space is 
chosen, the results are still well-defined, but the appearance may not match the user’s expectations. 
NOTE 4
The  CIE-based sRGB  colou
 space  (see  “CIE-Based  Colour  Spaces”)  is  nonlinear  and  hence  may  be 
unsuitable for use as a group colour space. 
NOTE 5
Implementations of the transparent imaging model should use as much precision as possible in representing 
colours during compositing computations and in the accumulated group results. To minimize the accumulation 
of roundoff errors and avoid additional errors arising from the use of linear group colour spaces, more precision 
is needed for intermediate results than is typically used to represent either the original source data or the final 
rasterized results. 
If a group’s colour space—whether specified explicitly or inherited from the parent group—is CIE-based, any 
use of device colour spaces for painting objects shall be subject to special treatment. Device colours cannot be 
painted directly into such a group, since there is no generally defined method for converting them to the CIE-
based colour space. This problem arises in the following cases: 
Add an image to a pdf with acrobat - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
adding a jpeg to a pdf; how to add an image to a pdf file in acrobat
Add an image to a pdf with acrobat - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
how to add a jpeg to a pdf; adding images to pdf
PDF 32000-1:2008
354
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
DeviceGray DeviceRGB, and  DeviceCMYK colour spaces, unless remapped to default CIE-based 
colour spaces (see “Default Colour Spaces”) 
Operators (such as rg ) that specify a device colour space implicitly, unless that space is remapped 
Special  colour  spaces whose base  or underlying space is  a  device  colour  space,  unless  that  space  is 
remapped 
The default  colour space remapping mechanism  should always be employed when  defining  a transparency 
group  whose  colour  space  is  CIE-based.  If  a  device  colour  is  specified  and  is  not  remapped,  it  shall  be 
converted to  the  CIE-based  colour  space in an  implementation-dependent fashion, producing unpredictable 
results.
NOTE 6
The foregoing restrictions do not apply if the group’s colour space is implicitly converted to DeviceCMYK, as 
discussed in “Implicit Conversion of CIE-Based Colour Spaces”. 
11.7.3
Spot Colours and Transparency
The  foregoing  discussion  of  colour  spaces  has  been  concerned  with process colours—those  produced  by 
combinations of an output device’s process colorants. Process colours may be specified directly in the device’s 
native colour space (such as DeviceCMYK), or they may be produced by conversion from some other colour 
space, such as a CIE-based (CalRGB or ICCBased ) space. Whatever means is used to specify them, process 
colours shall be subject to conversion to and from the group’s colour space. 
spot colour is an additional colour component, independent of those used to produce process colours. It may 
represent  either  an  additional  separation  to  be  produced  or  an  additional  colorant  to  be  applied  to  the 
composite page (see “Separation Colour Spaces” and “DeviceN Colour Spaces”). The colour component value, 
or tint, for a spot colour specifies the concentration of the corresponding spot colorant. Tints are conventionally 
represented as subtractive, rather than additive, values. 
Spot colours are inherently device-dependent and are not always available. In the opaque imaging model, each 
use of a spot  colour component  in a Separation or DeviceN colour  space is accompanied  by an alternate 
colour space and a tint transformation function for mapping tint values into that space. This enables the colour 
to be approximated with process colorants when the corresponding spot colorant is not available on the device. 
Spot  colours  can  be  accommodated  straightforwardly  in  the  transparent  imaging  model  (except  for  issues 
relating to overprinting, discussed in “Overprinting and Transparency”). When an object is painted transparently 
with a spot colour component that is available in the output device, that colour shall be composited with the 
corresponding spot colour component of the backdrop, independently of the compositing that is performed for 
process colours. A spot colour retains its own identity; it shall not be subject to conversion to or from the colour 
space of the enclosing transparency group or page. If the object is an element of a transparency group, one of 
two things shall happen: 
The group shall maintain a separate colour value for each spot colour component, independently of the 
group’s colour space. In effect, the spot colour passes directly through the group hierarchy to the device, 
with no colour conversions performed. However, it shall still be subject to blending and compositing with 
other objects that use the same spot colour. 
The spot colour shall be converted to its alternate colour space. The resulting colour shall then be subject 
to the usual compositing rules for process colours. In particular, spot colours shall not be available in a 
transparency group XObject that is used to define a soft mask; the alternate colour space shall always be 
substituted in that case. 
Only a single shape value and opacity value shall be maintained at each point in the computed group results; 
they shall apply to both  process and spot colour components. In effect,  every object shall be considered to 
paint every existing colour component, both process and spot. Where no value has been explicitly specified for 
a  given  component  in  a  given  object,  an  additive  value  of  1.0  (or  a  subtractive  tint  value  of  0.0)  shall  be 
assumed. For instance, when painting an object with a colour specified in a DeviceCMYK or ICCBased  colour 
space, the process colour components shall be painted as specified and the spot colour components shall be 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Convert image files to PDF. File & Page Process. Annotate & Comment. Add, insert PDF native annotations to PDF file. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF
pdf insert image; add picture to pdf in preview
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. you can easily perform file conversion from PDF document to image or document
add photo pdf; add photo to pdf reader
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
355
PDF 32000-1:2008
painted with an additive value of 1.0. Likewise, when painting an object with a colour specified in a Separation
colour space,  the  named  spot colour shall  be painted  as specified and  all  other components (both  process 
colours and other spot colours) shall be painted with an additive value of 1.0. The consequences of this are 
discussed in 11.7.4, "Overprinting and Transparency."
Under the opaque imaging model, a Separation  or DeviceN colour space may specify the individual process 
colour components of the output device, as if they were spot colours. However, within a transparency group, 
this  should  be  done only  if the  group  inherits the  native  colour space  of  the  output  device (or  is  implicitly 
converted to DeviceCMYK, as discussed in 8.6.5.7, "Implicit Conversion of CIE-Based Colour Spaces"). If any 
other  colour  space  has  been  specified  for  the  group,  the  Separation  or DeviceN  colour  space  shall  be 
converted to its alternate colour space.
NOTE
In general, within a transparency group containing an explicitly-specified colour space, the group's process 
colour components  are different from the device's process  colour components. Conversion  to the  device's 
process colour components occurs only after all colour compositing computations for the group have been 
completed. Consequently, the device's process colour components are not accessible within the group.
For instance, outside of any transparency group, a device whose native colour space is DeviceCMYK has a 
Cyan component that may be specified in a Separation or DeviceN colour space. On the other hand, within a 
transparency group whose colour space is ICCBased , the group has no Cyan  component available to be 
painted.
11.7.4
Overprinting and Transparency
11.7.4.1 General
In the opaque imaging model, overprinting is controlled by two parameters of the graphics state: the overprint 
parameter and the overprint mode (see “Overprint Control”). Painting an object causes some specific set of 
device colorants to be marked, as determined by the current colour space and current colour in the graphics 
state. The remaining colorants shall be either erased or left unchanged, depending on whether the overprint 
parameter is false   or true . When  the  current colour space is DeviceCMYK,  the  overprint mode parameter 
additionally enables this selective marking of colorants to be applied to individual colour components according 
to whether the component value is zero or nonzero. 
NOTE 1
Because this model of overprinting deals directly with the painting of device colorants, independently of the 
colour  space  in  which  source  colours  have  been  specified,  it  is  highly  device-dependent  and  primarily 
addresses production needs rather than design intent. Overprinting is usually reserved for opaque colorants or 
for very dark colours, such as black. It is also invoked during late-stage production operations such as trapping 
(see “Trapping Support”), when the actual set of device colorants has already been determined. 
NOTE 2
Consequently,  it is  best  to think  of transparency as taking place in  appearance space,  but  overprinting of 
device colorants in device space. This means that colorant overprint decisions should be made at output time, 
based on the actual resultant colorants of any transparency compositing operation. On the other hand, effects 
similar to overprinting can be achieved in a device-independent manner by taking advantage of blend modes, 
as described in the next sub-clause. 
11.7.4.2 Blend Modes and Overprinting
As  stated  in  11.7.3,  "Spot  Colours  and  Transparency,"  each  graphics  object  that  is  painted  shall  affect  all 
existing colour components:  all  process colorants  in  the transparency  group’s  colour  space  as  well as  any 
available spot colorants. For colour components whose value has not been specified, a source colour value of 
1.0 shall be assumed; when objects are fully opaque and the Normal blend mode is used, this shall have the 
effect of  erasing those components.  This treatment is consistent  with  the  behaviour  of the opaque  imaging 
model with the overprint parameter set to false . 
The  transparent  imaging  model  defines some  blend  modes,  such  as Darken, that  can  be used  to  achieve 
effects similar to overprinting. The blend function for Darken is 
B c
b
c
s
( ,
)
min c
b
c
s
( ,
)
=
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Image and Document Conversion Supported by Windows Viewer. Convert to PDF.
how to add a picture to a pdf file; add a jpeg to a pdf
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Using this VB.NET Imaging PDF Watermark Add-on, you can a watermark that consists of text or image (such as And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no
add jpg to pdf form; add image pdf
PDF 32000-1:2008
356
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
In this blend mode, the result of compositing shall always be the same as the backdrop colour when the source 
colour is 1.0, as it is for all unspecified colour components. When the backdrop is fully opaque, this shall leave 
the result colour  unchanged  from  that of  the backdrop. This  is  consistent with the behaviour  of the opaque 
imaging model with the overprint parameter set to true . 
If the object or backdrop is not fully opaque, the actions described previously are altered accordingly. That is, 
the erasing effect shall be reduced, and overprinting an object with a colour value of 1.0 may affect the result 
colour. While these results may or may not be useful, they lie outside the realm of the overprinting and erasing 
behaviour defined in the opaque imaging model. 
When  process  colours  are  overprinted  or  erased  (because  a  spot  colour  is  being  painted),  the  blending 
computations  described  previously  shall  be  done  independently  for  each  component  in  the  group’s  colour 
space. If that space is different from the native colour space of the output device, its components are not the 
device’s actual process colorants; the blending computations shall affect the process colorants only after the 
group’s  results  have  been  converted  to  the  device  colour  space.  Thus  the  effect  is  different  from  that  of 
overprinting  or  erasing  the  device’s  process  colorants  directly.  On  the  other  hand,  this  is  a  fully  general 
operation that works uniformly, regardless of the type of object or of the computations that produced the source 
colour. 
NOTE 1
The discussion so far has focused on those colour components whose values are not specified and that are to 
be either erased or left unchanged. However, the Normal or Darken blend modes used for these purposes 
may not be suitable for use on those components whose colour values are specified. In particular, using the 
Darken blend mode for such components would preclude overprinting a dark colour with a lighter one. 
Moreover, some other blend mode may be specifically desired for those components. 
The PDF graphics state specifies only one current blend mode parameter, which shall always apply to process 
colorants and sometimes to spot colorants as well. Specifically, only separable, white-preserving blend modes 
shall be used for spot colours. If the specified blend mode is not separable and white-preserving, it shall apply 
only to process colour components, and the Normal blend mode shall be substituted for spot colours. 
A blend mode is white-preserving if its blend function B has the property that B (1.0, 1.0) = 1.0. 
NOTE 2
Of the standard separable blend modes listed in Table 136 in 11.3.5, "Blend Mode," all except Difference and 
Exclusion are white-preserving. This ensures that when objects accumulate in an isolated transparency 
group, the accumulated values for unspecified components remain 1.0 as long as only white-preserving blend 
modes are used. The group’s results can then be overprinted using Darken (or other useful modes) while 
avoiding unwanted interactions with components whose values were never specified within the group. 
11.7.4.3 Compatibility with Opaque Overprinting
Because the use of blend modes  to achieve effects similar to  overprinting  does  not  make  direct use of  the 
overprint  control  parameters  in  the  graphics  state,  such  methods  are  usable  only  by  transparency-aware 
applications.  For  compatibility  with  the  methods  of  overprint  control  used  in  the  opaque  imaging  model,  a 
special  blend  mode,  CompatibleOverprint,  is  provided  that  consults  the  overprint-related  graphics  state 
parameters to compute its result. This mode shall apply only when painting elementary graphics objects (fills, 
strokes, text, images, and shadings). It shall not be invoked explicitly and shall not be identified by any PDF 
name  object;  rather,  it shall be  implicitly  invoked  whenever  an  elementary  graphics  object  is painted  while 
overprinting is enabled (that is, when the overprint parameter in the graphics state is true ). 
NOTE 1
Earlier designs  of the transparent imaging  model  included  an additional blend  mode named Compatible, 
which explicitly invoked the CompatibleOverprint blend mode described here. Because CompatibleOverprint is 
now invoked implicitly whenever appropriate, it is never necessary to specify the Compatible blend mode for 
use in compositing. 
The Compatible blend mode shall be treated as equivalent to Normal
The value of  the blend function (
c
b
c
s
) in the CompatibleOverprint mode shall be either 
c
b
or 
c
s
, depending 
on the setting of the overprint mode parameter, the current and group colour spaces, and the source colour 
value 
c
s
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. SDK to convert PowerPoint document to PDF document code for PowerPoint to TIFF image conversion
add an image to a pdf with acrobat; how to add an image to a pdf in reader
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word SDK to convert Word document to PDF document. demo code for Word to TIFF image conversion
how to add image to pdf in acrobat; add photo to pdf in preview
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
357
PDF 32000-1:2008
If the overprint mode is 1 (nonzero overprint mode) and the current colour space and group colour space 
are  both DeviceCMYK,  then  process  colour  components  with  nonzero  values  shall  replace  the 
corresponding  component  values  of  the  backdrop;  components  with  zero  values  leave  the  existing 
backdrop  value  unchanged.  That  is,  the  value  of  the  blend  function B (c
b
c
s
 shall  be  the  source 
component c
s
for  any  process  (DeviceCMYK colour  component  whose  (subtractive)  colour  value  is 
nonzero; otherwise it shall be the backdrop component c
b
. For spot colour components, the value shall 
always be c
b
In all other cases, the value of B (
c
b
c
s
) shall be c
s
for all colour components specified in the current colour 
space, otherwise c
b
EXAMPLE 1
If the current colour space is DeviceCMYK or CalRGB, the value of the blend function is c
s
for process 
colour  components and c
b
for spot components. On the other hand,  if the current  colour  space  is  a 
Separation space representing a spot colour component, the value is c
s
for that spot component and c
b
for all process components and all other spot components. 
NOTE 2
In  the previous descriptions, the term current colour space refers  to the colour space used for  a  painting 
operation. This may be specified by the current colour space parameter in the graphics state (see “Colour 
Values”), implicitly by colour operators such as rg  (“Colour Operators”), or by the ColorSpace entry of an 
image XObject (“Image Dictionaries”). In the case of an Indexed  space, it refers to the base colour space (see 
“Indexed Colour Spaces”); likewise for Separation and DeviceN spaces that revert to their alternate colour 
space, as described under “Separation Colour Spaces” and “DeviceN Colour Spaces”. 
If the current blend mode  when  CompatibleOverprint is invoked is any mode other than Normal, the object 
being painted shall be implicitly treated as if it were defined in a non-isolated, non-knockout transparency group 
and painted using the CompatibleOverprint blend mode. The group’s results shall then be painted using the 
current blend mode in the graphics state. 
NOTE 3
It is not necessary to create such an implicit transparency group if the current blend mode is Normal; simply 
substituting the CompatibleOverprint blend mode while painting the object produces equivalent results. There 
are some additional cases in which the implicit transparency group can be optimized out. 
EXAMPLE 2
Figure L.20 in Annex L shows the effects of all four possible combinations of blending and overprinting, 
using the Screen blend mode in the DeviceCMYK colour space. The label “overprint enabled” means 
that the overprint parameter in the graphics state is true  and the overprint mode is 1. In the upper half of 
the figure, a light green oval is painted opaquely (opacity = 1.0) over a backdrop shading from pure yellow 
to pure magenta. In the lower half, the same object is painted with transparency (opacity = 0.5). 
11.7.4.4 Special Path-Painting Considerations
The  overprinting considerations  discussed  in  11.7.4.3,  "Compatibility with  Opaque Overprinting," also affect 
those path-painting operations that combine filling and stroking a path in a single operation. These include the 
BB*b, and b* operators (see “Path-Painting Operators”) and the painting of glyphs with text rendering mode 
2 or 6 (“Text Rendering Mode”). For transparency compositing purposes, the combined fill and stroke shall be 
treated as a single graphics object,  as if they were enclosed in a  transparency  group. This implicit group is 
established and used as follows: 
If overprinting is enabled (the overprint parameter in the graphics state is true ) and the current stroking 
and nonstroking  alpha  constants are  equal,  a  non-isolated,  non-knockout  transparency  group  shall  be 
established. Within the group, the fill and stroke shall be performed with an alpha value of 1.0 but with the 
CompatibleOverprint blend mode. The group results shall then be composited with the backdrop, using the 
originally specified alpha and blend mode. 
In all other cases, a non-isolated knockout group shall be established. Within the group, the fill and stroke 
shall be performed with their respective prevailing  alpha  constants  and the prevailing blend mode.  The 
group results shall then be composited with the backdrop, using an alpha value of 1.0 and the Normal
blend mode. 
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
Also designed to be used add-on for .NET Image SDK, RasterEdge Bitmap to PDF Converter can Powerful image converter for Bitmap and PDF files; No need for
how to add an image to a pdf; add image to pdf
PDF to WORD Converter | Convert PDF to Word, Convert Word to PDF
out transformation between different kinds of image files and Word Converter has accurate output, and PDF to Word need the support of Adobe Acrobat & Microsoft
adding an image to a pdf file; add multiple jpg to pdf
PDF 32000-1:2008
358
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
NOTE 1
In the case  of showing text with the combined filling  and stroking text  rendering modes, this  behaviour is 
independent of the text knockout parameter in the graphics state (see “Text Knockout”). 
NOTE 2
The purpose of these rules is to avoid having a non-opaque stroke composite with the result of the fill in the 
region of overlap, which would produce a double border effect that is usually undesirable. The special case 
that applies when the overprint parameter is true  is for backward compatibility with the overprinting behavior of 
the opaque imaging model. If a desired effect cannot be achieved with a combined filling and stroking operator 
or text rendering mode, it can be achieved by specifying the fill and stroke with separate path objects and an 
explicit transparency group. 
NOTE 3
Overprinting of the stroke over the fill does not work in the second case described previously (although either 
the fill or the stroke can still overprint the backdrop). Furthermore, if the overprint graphics state parameter is 
true, the results are discontinuous at the transition between equal and unequal values of the stroking and 
nonstroking alpha constants. For this reason, it is best not to use overprinting for combined filling and stroking 
operations if the stroking and nonstroking alpha constants are being varied independently. 
11.7.4.5 Summary of Overprinting Behaviour
Tables 148 and 149 summarize the overprinting and erasing behaviour in the opaque and transparent imaging 
models,  respectively.  Table 148  shows  the  overprinting  rules  used  in  the  opaque  model,  as  described  in 
“Overprint Control”. Table 149 shows the equivalent rules as implemented by the CompatibleOverprint blend 
mode in the transparent model. The names OP and OPM in the tables refer to the overprint and overprint mode 
parameters of the graphics state. 
Table 148 –  Overprinting behavior in the opaque imaging model  
Source colour 
space
Affected colour 
component
Effect on colour component
OP false
OP true,
OPM 0
OP true, 
OPM 1
DeviceCMYK,
specified directly,
not in a sampled 
image
CMY, or K
Paint source
Paint source
Paint source 
if 
0.0
Do not paint if 
=
0.0
Process colorant 
other than CMYK
Paint source
Paint source
Paint source
Spot colorant
Paint 0.0
Do not paint
Do not paint
Any process colour 
space (including 
other cases of 
DeviceCMYK)
Process colorant
Paint source
Paint source
Paint source
Spot colorant
Paint 0.0
Do not paint
Do not paint
Separation or
DeviceN
Process colorant
Paint 0.0
Do not paint
Do not paint
Spot colorant 
na
med in source 
space
Paint source
Paint source
Paint source
Spot colorant not 
named in source 
space
Paint 0.0
Do not paint
Do not paint
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
add jpg to pdf file; add a jpg to a pdf
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
as a kind of compensation for limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS VB.NET PPT: VB Code to Add Embedded Image Object to
add picture to pdf reader; add picture to pdf document
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
359
PDF 32000-1:2008
Colour component values are represented  in these tables  as subtractive  tint values  because overprinting is 
typically applied  to subtractive  colorants such as inks rather than to additive ones  such as phosphors on a 
display screen. The CompatibleOverprint blend mode is therefore described as if it took subtractive arguments 
and  returned  subtractive results.  In  reality,  however,  CompatibleOverprint  (like  all  blend  modes)  shall  treat 
colour  components  as  additive  values;  subtractive  components  shall  be  complemented  before  and  after 
application of the blend function. 
NOTE 1
This  note  describes an important  difference  between  Table 148 and  Table 149.  In Table 148, the  process 
colour components being discussed are the actual device colorants—the colour components of the output 
device’s native colour space (DeviceGray, DeviceRGB, or DeviceCMYK). In Table 149, the process colour 
components are those of the group’s colour space, which is not necessarily the same as that of the output 
device  (and  can  even  be  something  like CalRGB  or ICCBased ).  For  this  reason,  the  process  colour 
components of the  group colour space cannot be treated as if  they were spot colours in a Separation or 
DeviceN colour space (see “Spot Colours and Transparency”). This difference between opaque and 
transparent overprinting and erasing rules arises only within a transparency group (including the page group, if 
its colour space is different from the native colour space of the output device). There is no difference in the 
treatment of spot colour components. 
NOTE 2
Table 149 has one additional row at the bottom. It applies when painting an object that is a transparency group 
rather than an elementary object (fill, stroke, text, image, or shading). As stated in 11.7.3, "Spot Colours and 
Transparency,"  a  group  is  considered  to  paint  all  colour  components,  both  process  and  spot.  Colour 
components that were not explicitly painted by any object in the group have an additive colour value of 1.0 
(subtractive tint 0.0). Since no information is retained about which components were actually painted within the 
group, compatible overprinting is not possible in this case; the CompatibleOverprint blend mode reverts to 
Normal, with no consideration of the overprint and overprint mode parameters. A transparency-aware 
conforming writer can choose a more suitable blend mode, such as Darken, to produce an effect similar to 
overprinting. 
Table 149 –  Overprinting behavior in the transparent imaging model  
Source color space
Affected colour 
component of 
group colour 
space
Value of blend function B (c
b
c
s
) expressed as tint
OP false
OP true, 
OPM 0
OP true, 
OPM 1
DeviceCMYK,
specified directly,
not in a sampled 
image
CMY, or K
c
s
c
s
c
s
if c
s
0.0
c
b
if c
s
=
0.0
Process colour 
component other 
than CMYK
c
s
c
s
c
s
Spot colorant
c
s
(
=
0.0)
c
b
c
b
Any process colour 
space (including 
other cases of 
DeviceCMYK)
Process colour 
component
c
s
c
s
c
s
Spot colorant
c
s
(
=
0.0)
c
b
c
b
Separation or
DeviceN
Process colour 
component
c
s
(
=
0.0)
c
b
c
b
Spot colorant 
named in source 
space
c
s
c
s
c
s
Spot colorant not 
named in source 
space
c
s
(
=
0.0)
c
b
c
b
A group (not an 
elementary object)
All colour 
components
c
s
c
s
c
s
PDF 32000-1:2008
360
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
11.7.5
Rendering Parameters and Transparency
11.7.5.1 General
The opaque  imaging model has  several graphics state parameters dealing with the  rendering of colour:  the 
current  halftone  (see  “Halftone  Dictionaries”),  transfer  functions  (“Transfer  Functions”),  rendering  intent 
(“Rendering Intents”), and black-generation and undercolor-removal functions (“Conversion from DeviceRGB 
to DeviceCMYK”). All of these rendering parameters may be specified on a per-object basis; they control how a 
particular object is rendered. When all objects are opaque, it is easy to define what this means. But when they 
are  transparent,  more  than  one  object  may  contribute  to  the  colour  at  a  given  point;  it  is  unclear  which 
rendering parameters to apply in an area where transparent objects overlap. At the same time, the transparent 
imaging model should be consistent with the opaque model when only opaque objects are painted. 
There are two categories  of rendering parameters  that are treated somewhat  differently  in  the  presence of 
transparency. In the  first category are halftone and transfer functions, which are  applied  only when the final 
colour at a given point on the page is known. In the second category are rendering intent, black generation, and 
undercolor removal, which are applied whenever colours are converted from one colour space to another.
11.7.5.2 Halftone and Transfer Function
When objects are transparent, rendering of an object does not occur when the object is specified but at some 
later time. Hence, the implementation shall keep track of the halftone and transfer function parameters at each 
point on the  page from the time they are specified until the time rendering actually occurs. This means that 
these rendering parameters shall be associated with regions of the page rather than with individual objects.
The halftone and transfer function to be used at any given point on the page shall be those in effect at the time 
of  painting  the last  (topmost)  elementary graphics object  enclosing  that point,  but  only  if  the  object  is fully 
opaque. Only elementary objects shall be relevant; the rendering parameters associated with a group object 
are ignored. The topmost object at any point shall be defined to be the topmost elementary object in the entire 
page  stack that has a nonzero object shape value (f
j
) at that point (that is, for which the point is inside the 
object). An object shall be considered to be fully opaque  if all of the following conditions hold at the time the 
object is painted: 
The  current  alpha  constant  in  the  graphics  state  (stroking  or  nonstroking,  depending  on  the  painting 
operation) is 1.0. 
The current blend mode in the graphics state is Normal (or Compatible, which is treated as equivalent to 
Normal). 
The current soft mask  in the graphics  state  is None. If  the object is an image  XObject, there is  not an 
SMask entry in its image dictionary. 
The  foregoing  three  conditions were  also  true at the  time  the Do  operator  was  invoked  for  the  group 
containing the object, as well as for any direct ancestor groups. 
If the current colour is a tiling pattern, all objects in the definition of its pattern cell also satisfy the foregoing 
conditions. 
Together, these conditions ensure that only the object itself shall contribute to the colour  at the  given  point, 
completely obscuring the backdrop. For portions of the page whose topmost object is not fully opaque or that 
are never painted at all, the default halftone and transfer function for the page shall be used. 
If  a graphics object is  painted  with overprinting  enabled—that is, if  the  applicable  (stroking or  nonstroking) 
overprint parameter in the graphics state is true —the halftone and transfer function to use at a given point shall 
be  determined  independently  for  each  colour  component.  Overprinting  implicitly  invokes  the 
CompatibleOverprint blend mode (see “Compatibility with Opaque Overprinting”). An object shall be considered 
opaque for a given component only if CompatibleOverprint yields the source colour (not the backdrop colour) 
for that component. 
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
361
PDF 32000-1:2008
11.7.5.3 Rendering Intent and Colour Conversions
The rendering intent, black-generation, and undercolor-removal parameters control certain colour conversions. 
In the presence of transparency, they may need to be applied earlier than the actual rendering of colour onto 
the page. 
The rendering intent influences the conversion from a CIE-based colour space to a target colour space, taking 
into account the target space’s colour gamut (the range of colours it can reproduce). Whereas in the opaque 
imaging model the target space shall always be the native colour space of the output device, in the transparent 
model it may instead be the group colour space of a transparency group into which an object is being painted. 
The  rendering  intent  is needed  at  the  moment  such  a conversion  is  performed—that  is,  when  painting  an 
elementary or group object specified in a CIE-based colour space into a parent group having a different colour 
space. 
NOTE 1
This  differs  from  the  current halftone  and  transfer  function,  whose values  are  used  only  when  all  colour 
compositing has been completed and rasterization is being performed. 
In all cases, the rendering intent to use for converting an object’s colour (whether that of an elementary object 
or of a transparency group) shall be determined by the rendering intent parameter associated with the object. In 
particular: 
When painting an elementary object with a CIE-based colour into a transparency group having a different 
colour space, the rendering intent used shall be the current rendering intent in effect in the graphics state 
at the time of the painting operation. 
When  painting  a  transparency  group  whose  colour  space  is  CIE-based  into  a  parent  group  having  a 
different colour space, the rendering intent used shall be the current rendering intent in effect at the time 
the Do operator is applied to the group. 
When the colour space of the page group is CIE-based, the rendering intent used to convert colours to the 
native colour space of the output device shall be the default rendering intent for the page. 
NOTE 2
Since there may be one or more nested transparency groups having different CIE-based colour spaces, the 
colour  of  an  elementary  source  object  may  be  converted  to  the  device  colour  space  in  multiple  stages, 
controlled by the rendering intent in effect at each stage. The proper choice of rendering intent at each stage 
depends  on  the  relative  gamuts  of  the  source  and  target  colour  spaces.  It  is  specified  explicitly  by  the 
document producer, not prescribed by the PDF specification, since no single policy for managing rendering 
intents is appropriate for all situations. 
A similar approach works for the black-generation  and undercolor-removal functions, which shall be applied 
only during conversion from DeviceRGB to DeviceCMYK colour spaces: 
When painting an elementary object with a DeviceRGB colour directly into a transparency group whose 
colour space is DeviceCMYK, the functions used shall be the current black-generation and undercolor-
removal functions in effect in the graphics state at the time of the painting operation. 
When painting a transparency group whose colour space is DeviceRGB into a parent group whose colour 
space is DeviceCMYK, the functions used shall be the ones in effect at the time the Do operator is applied 
to the group. 
When the colour space of the page group is DeviceRGB and the native colour space of the output device 
is DeviceCMYK, the functions used to convert colours to the device’s colour space shall be the default 
functions for the page. 
PDF 32000-1:2008
362
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
12
Interactive Features
12.1
General
For purposes of the trigger events E (enter), X (exit), D (down), and U (up), the term mouse denotes a generic 
pointing device with the following characteristics: 
A selection button that can be pressedheld down, and released . If there is more than one mouse button, 
the selection button is typically the left button. 
A  notion  of location —that  is,  an  indication  of  where  on  the  screen  the  device  is  pointing.  Location  is 
typically denoted by a screen cursor. 
A notion of focus —that is, which element in the document is currently interacting with the with the user. In 
many systems, this element is denoted by a blinking caret, a focus rectangle, or a colour change. 
This clause describes the PDF features that allow a user to interact with a document on the screen, using the 
mouse  and  keyboard  (with  the  exception  of  multimedia  features,  which  are  described  in  13,  “Multimedia 
Features”): 
Preference  settings to control the way the document is presented on the screen (12.2, “Viewer 
Preferences”) 
Navigation facilities for moving through the document in a variety of ways (Sections 12.3, “Document-Level 
Navigation” and 12.4, “Page-Level Navigation”) 
Annotations for adding text notes, sounds, movies, and other ancillary information to the document (12.5, 
“Annotations”) 
Actions that can be triggered by specified events (12.6, “Actions”) 
Interactive forms for gathering information from the user (12.7, “Interactive Forms”) 
Digital signatures that authenticate the identity of a user and the validity of the document’s contents (12.8, 
“Digital Signatures”)
Measurement  properties that enable the display of real-world units corresponding to objects on a page 
(12.9, “Measurement Properties”)
12.2
Viewer Preferences
The ViewerPreferences entry in a document’s catalogue (see 7.7.2, “Document Catalog”) designates a  viewer 
preferences dictionary (PDF 1.2) controlling the way the document shall be presented on the screen or in print. 
If no such dictionary is specified, conforming readers should behave in accordance with their own current user 
preference settings. Table 150 shows the contents of the viewer preferences dictionary. 
Table 150 –  Entries in a viewer preferences dictionary  
Key
Type
Value
HideToolbar
boolean
(Optional) A flag specifying whether to hide the conforming 
reader’s  tool  bars  when  the document  is  active. Default  value: 
false
HideMenubar
boolean
(Optional) A flag specifying whether to hide the conforming 
reader’s menu bar when  the document is active. Default value: 
false
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested