pdf viewer control in asp net c# : How to add a photo to a pdf document control SDK platform web page wpf windows web browser PDF32000_200868-part2389

© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
673
PDF 32000-1:2008
Annex  E
(normative)
PDF Name Registry
E.1 General
This annex discusses a registry for developers, controlled by ISO and currently provided by Adobe on behalf of 
ISO.  The registry  contains  private  names  and formats  that  may be  used  by conforming  writers.  Developer 
prefixes  shall  be  used  to  identify  extensions  to PDF  that  use  First  Class  names  (see  below)  and  that  are 
intended  for  public  use.  (See  7.12.2,  “Developer  Extensions  Dictionary.)  “Developers”  means  any  entity 
including individuals, companies, non-profits, standards bodies, open source groups, etc., who are developing 
standards or software to use and extend ISO 32000-1.
Private data may be added to PDF documents that enable conforming reader’s to change behavior based on 
this data. At the same time, users have certain expectations when opening a PDF document, no matter which 
conforming  reader is  being used.  PDF  enforces  certain  restrictions  on  private  data  in  order  to  meet  these 
expectations. 
A conforming writer or conforming reader may define new types of actions, destinations, annotations, security, 
and file system handlers. If a user opens a PDF document using a conforming reader for which the new type of 
object is not supported, the conforming reader shall behave as described in Annex I.
A conforming writer may also add keys to any PDF object that is implemented as a dictionary, except the file 
trailer dictionary (see 7.5.5, "File Trailer"). In addition, a conforming writer may create tags that indicate the role 
of marked-content operators (PDF 1.2), as described in 14.6, "Marked Content". 
E.2 Name Registry
To avoid conflicts with third-party names and with future versions of PDF, ISO maintains a registry for certain 
private  names and  formats. Developers shall only add  private  data that  conforms  to the registry  rules.  The 
registry includes three classes: 
First class. Names and data formats that are of value to a wide range of developers. All names defined in 
this ISO 32000 specification are first-class names. Conforming readers that are publicly available shall use 
first-class names for their private data. First-class names and data formats shall be registered with ISO and 
shall be made available for all developers to use. To submit a private name and format for consideration as 
first-class, see the link on registering a private PDF extension, at the following Web page: 
< http://adobe.com/go/ISO32000Registry> 
Data  format  descriptions shall follow the style of  ISO 32000-1 and  give  a complete  specification  of the 
intended function of the extended information.
Second class. Names that are applicable to a specific developer. ISO does not register second-class data 
formats.)  ISO  distributes  second-class  names  by  registering  developer-specific  4-byte  prefixes.  Those 
bytes followed by a LOW LINE (5Fh) shall be used as the first characters in the names of all private data 
added  by  the  developer.  ISO  shall  not  register  the  same  prefix  to  two  different  developers,  thereby 
ensuring  that  different  developers’  second-class  names  shall  not  conflict.  It  is  the  responsibility  of  the 
developer not to use the same name in conflicting ways. To register a developer-specific prefix, use the 
following Web page:
< http://adobe.com/go/ISO32000Registry>
How to add a photo to a pdf document - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
attach image to pdf form; how to add image to pdf
How to add a photo to a pdf document - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
adding an image to a pdf in acrobat; add image to pdf form
PDF 32000-1:2008
674
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
Third class. Names that may be used only in PDF files that other third parties will never see because they 
can  conflict with  third-class  names  defined  by others.  Third-class  names shall all begin with  a  specific 
prefix reserved for private extensions. This prefix, which is XX, shall be used as the first characters in the 
names of all private data added by the developer. It is not necessary to contact ISO to register third-class 
names. 
New keys for the document information dictionary (see 14.3.3, "Document Information Dictionary") or a thread 
information  dictionary  (in  the I  entry  of  a  thread  dictionary;  see  Section  12.4.3,  “Articles”)  shall  not  be 
registered. 
More information about developer prefixes, handlers and extensions to ISO 32000-1 can be obtained at http://
www.aiim.org/ISO32000Registry.
VB.NET Image: Mark Photo, Image & Document with Polygon Annotation
What's more, if coupled with .NET PDF document imaging add-on, the VB.NET annotator SDK can easily generate polygon annotation on PDF file without using
add photo to pdf online; add signature image to pdf
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
SDK; VB.NET image cropping method to crop picture / photo; VB.NET image cropping control add-on needs a PC com is professional provider of document, content and
add an image to a pdf with acrobat; add image to pdf acrobat reader
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
675
PDF 32000-1:2008
Annex  F
(normative)
Linearized PDF
F.1 General
Linearization of PDF is an optional feature available beginning in PDF 1.2 that enables efficient incremental 
access of the file in a network environment. A conforming reader that does not support this optional feature can 
still  successfully  process  linearized  files  although  not  as  efficiently.  Enhanced  conforming  readers  can 
recognize that a PDF file has been linearized and may take advantage of that organization (as well as added 
hint information) to enhance viewing performance. 
The primary goal for a linearized PDF file is to achieve the following behaviour for documents of arbitrary size 
and so that the total number of pages in the document should have little or no effect on the user-perceived 
performance of viewing any particular page:
When a document is opened, display the first page as quickly as possible. The first page to be viewed may 
be an arbitrary page of the document, not necessarily page 0 (though opening at page 0 is most common). 
When the user requests another page of an open document (for example, by going to the next page or by 
following a link to an arbitrary page), display that page as quickly as possible. 
When data for a page is delivered over a slow channel, display the page incrementally as it arrives. To the 
extent possible, display the most useful data first. 
Permit user interaction, such as following a link, to be performed even before the entire page has been 
received and displayed. 
NOTE
A linearized PDF is optimized for viewing of read-only PDF documents. A linearized PDF should be generated 
once and read many times. 
Incremental update shall still be permitted, but the resulting PDF is no longer linearized and subsequently shall 
be treated as ordinary PDF. Linearizing it again may require reprocessing the entire file; see G.7, "Accessing an 
Updated File" for details. 
Linearized PDF requires two additions to the PDF specification: 
Rules for the ordering of objects in the PDF file 
Additional optional data structures, called hint tables, that enable efficient navigation within the document 
Both of  these additions are  relatively  simple to  describe; however,  using  them  effectively requires a deeper 
understanding of their purpose. Consequently, this annex goes considerably beyond a simple specification of 
these PDF extensions to include background, motivation, and strategies. 
F.2, "Background and Assumptions," provides background information about the properties of the Web that 
are relevant to the design of Linearized PDF. 
F.3, "Linearized PDF Document Structure," specifies the file format and object-ordering requirements  of 
Linearized PDF. 
F.4, "Hint Tables," specifies the detailed representation of the hint tables. 
VB.NET Image: Image Scaling SDK to Scale Picture / Photo
this VB.NET image scaling control add-on, we can only scale one image / picture / photo at a RasterEdge.com is professional provider of document, content and
how to add a picture to a pdf document; add image to pdf file
C# Image: How to Add Antique & Vintage Effect to Image, Photo
C#.NET antique effect creating control add-on is widely used in modern photo editors, which powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff files
acrobat insert image in pdf; add a picture to a pdf
PDF 32000-1:2008
676
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
Annex G, outlines strategies for accessing Linearized  PDF over a network,  which in turn determine the 
optimal way to organize the PDF file. 
The reader is assumed to  be  familiar  with  the basic  architecture of the  Web,  including  terms such  as URL, 
HTTP, and MIME. 
F.2 Background and Assumptions
NOTE 1
The principal problem addressed by the Linearized PDF design is the access of PDF documents through the 
Web. This environment has the following important properties: 
The  access protocol (HTTP) is a  transaction consisting of a  request  and a response. The conforming 
reader presents a request in the form of a URL, and the server sends a response consisting of one or 
more MIME-tagged data blocks. 
After a transaction has completed, obtaining more data requires a new request-response transaction. The 
connection  between  conforming  reader  and  server  does  not  ordinarily  persist  beyond  the  end  of  a 
transaction,  although  some  implementations  may  attempt  to  cache  the  open  connection  to  expedite 
subsequent transactions with the same server. 
Round-trip delay  can  be  significant.  A  request-response  transaction  can  take  up  to  several  seconds, 
independent of the amount of data requested. 
The data rate may be limited. A typical bottleneck is a slow link between the conforming reader and the 
Internet service provider. 
These properties are generally shared by other wide-area network architectures besides the Web. 
Also, CD-ROMs share some of these properties, since they have relatively slow seek times and lim-
ited data rates compared to magnetic media. The remainder of this annex focuses on the Web. 
Some additional properties of the HTTP protocol are relevant to the problem of accessing PDF files 
efficiently. These properties may not all be shared by other protocols or network environments. 
When a PDF file is initially accessed (such as by following a URL hyperlink from some other document), 
the file type is not known to the conforming reader. Therefore, the conforming reader initiates a transaction 
to retrieve the entire document and then inspects the MIME tag of the response as it arrives. Only at that 
point is the document known to be PDF. Additionally, with a properly configured server environment, the 
length of the document becomes known at that time. 
The conforming reader may abort a response while the transaction is still in progress if it decides that the 
remainder of the data is not of immediate interest. In HTTP, aborting the transaction requires closing the 
connection, which interferes with the strategy of caching the open connection between transactions. 
The conforming reader may request retrieval of portions of a document by specifying one or more byte 
ranges  (by offset  and count) in the HTTP request headers.  Each range  can be relative to  either  the 
beginning or the end of the file. The conforming reader may specify as many ranges as it wants in the 
request, and the response consists of multiple blocks, each properly tagged. 
The  conforming  reader  may  initiate  multiple  concurrent  transactions  in  an  attempt  to  obtain  multiple 
responses in parallel. This is commonly done, for instance, to retrieve inline images referenced from an 
HTML document. This strategy is not always reliable and may backfire if the transactions interfere with 
each other by competing for scarce resources in the server or the communication channel. 
NOTE 2
Extensive experimentation has determined that having multiple concurrent transactions does not work very 
well  for  PDF  in  some  important  environments.  Therefore,  Linearized  PDF  is  designed  to  enable  good 
performance to be achieved using only one transaction at a time. In particular, this means that the conforming 
reader needs to have sufficient information to determine the byte ranges for all the objects required to display 
a given page of the PDF file so that it can specify all those byte ranges in a single request. 
NOTE 3
The following additional assumptions are made about the conforming reader and its local environment: 
The conforming reader has plenty of local temporary storage available. It should rarely need to retrieve a 
given portion of a PDF document more than once from the server. 
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
VB.NET Image & Photo Resizing Overview. The practical VB.NET image resizer control add-on, can I powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
add jpg to pdf document; add a jpg to a pdf
VB.NET Image: How to Save Image & Print Image Using VB.NET
NET programmers save & print image / photo / picture from NET method and demo code to add image printing printing multi-page document files, like PDF and Word
how to add an image to a pdf; adding jpg to pdf
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
677
PDF 32000-1:2008
The conforming reader is able to display PDF data quickly once it has been received. The performance 
bottleneck is assumed to be in the transport system (throughput or round-trip delay), not in the processing 
of data after it arrives. 
The consequence of these assumptions is that it may be advantageous for the conforming reader to 
do considerable extra work to minimize delays due to communications. 
Such  work  includes  maintaining  local  caches  and  reordering  actions  according  to  when  the  needed  data 
becomes available. 
F.3 Linearized PDF Document Structure
F.3.1
General
Except as noted below, all elements of a Linearized PDF file shall be as specified in 7.5, "File Structure", and all 
indirect objects in the file shall be shall be divided into two groups. 
The  first  group  shall  consist  of  the  document  catalogue,  other  document-level  objects,  and  all  objects 
belonging to the first page of the document. These objects shall be numbered sequentially, starting at the 
first object number after the last number of the second group. (The stream containing the hint tables, called 
hint stream , may be numbered out of sequence; see F.3.6, "Hint Streams (Parts 5 and 10)". 
The second group shall consist of all remaining objects in the document, including all pages after the first, 
all shared objects (objects referenced from more than one page, not counting objects referenced from the 
first page), and so forth. These objects shall be numbered sequentially starting at 1. 
These  groups  of  objects  shall  be  indexed  by  exactly  two  cross-reference  table  sections.  For  pedagogical 
reasons the linearized PDF is considered to be composed from 11 parts, in order, and the composition of these 
groups is discussed in more detail in the sections that follow. All objects shall have a generation number of 0. 
Beginning with PDF 1.5, PDF files may contain object streams (see 7.5.7, "Object Streams"). In linearized files 
containing object streams, the following conditions shall apply:
These  additional  objects  may  not  be  contained  in  an  object  stream:  the  linearization  dictionary,  the 
document catalogue, and page objects.
Objects stored within object streams shall be given the highest range of object numbers within the main 
and first-page cross-reference sections.
For files containing object streams, hint data may specify the location and size of the object streams only 
(or  uncompressed  objects),  not  the  individual  compressed  objects.  Similarly,  shared  object  references 
shall be made to the object stream containing a compressed object, not to the compressed object itself.
Cross-reference streams (7.5.8, "Cross-Reference  Streams") may  be  used in  place of traditional cross-
reference tables. The  logic  described  in  this  sub-clause  shall  still  apply,  with  the  appropriate  syntactic 
changes.
EXAMPLE 1
Part 1: Header
% PDF-1 . 1 
% … Binary characters …
EXAMPLE 2
Part 2: Linearization parameter dictionary
43  0  obj
<<  /Linearized  1.0
% Version
/L  54567
% File length
/H  [ 475  598 ]
% Primary hint stream offset and length (part 5)
/O  45
% Object number of first page’s page object (part 6)
/E  5437
% Offset of end of first page
/N  11
% Number of pages in document
VB.NET Image: Tutorial for Flipping Image Using Our .NET Image SDK
version of .NET imaging SDK and add the following dlls a mirror reflection of the photo on the powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff files
how to add an image to a pdf in reader; add jpg to pdf
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned signature Add necessary references code extract all images and delete them all from PDF document.
how to add photo to pdf in preview; add image to pdf
PDF 32000-1:2008
678
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
/T  52786
% Offset of first entry in main cross-reference table (part 11)
>>
endobj
EXAMPLE 3
Part 3: First-page cross-reference table and trailer
xref
43  14
0000000052  00000  n
0000000392  00000  n
0000001073  00000  n
… Cross-reference entries for remaining objects in the first page …
0000000475  00000  n
trailer
<<  /Size  57
% Total number of cross-reference table entries in document
/Prev  52776
% Offset of main cross-reference table (part 11)
/Root  44 0 R
% Indirect reference to catalogue (part 4)
… Any other entries, such as Info and Encrypt …
% (part 9)
>>
% Dummy cross-reference table offset
startxref
0
% % EOF
EXAMPLE 4
Part 4: Document catalogue and other required document-level objects
44  0  obj
<<  /Type  /Catalog
/Pages  42 0 R
>>
endobj
… Other objects …
EXAMPLE 5
Part 5: Primary hint stream (may precede or follow part 6)
56  0  obj
<<  /Length  457
… Possibly other stream attributes, such as Filter …
/S  221
% Position of shared object hint table
… Possibly entries for other hint tables …
>>
stream
… Page offset hint table …
… Shared object hint table …
… Possibly other hint tables …
endstream
endobj
EXAMPLE 6
Part 6: First-page section (may precede or follow part 5)
45  0  obj
<<  /Type  /Page
>>
endobj
… Outline hierarchy (if the PageMode value in the document catalog is UseOutlines) …
… Objects for first page, including both shared and nonshared objects …
EXAMPLE 7
Part 7: Remaining pages
 0  obj
<<  /Type  /Page
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
679
PDF 32000-1:2008
… Other page attributes, such as MediaBox, Parent, and Contents …
>>
endobj
… Nonshared objects for this page …
… Each successive page followed by its nonshared objects …
… Last page followed by its nonshared objects …
EXAMPLE 8
Part 8: Shared objects for all pages except the first
… Shared objects …
EXAMPLE 9
Part 9: Objects not associated with pages, if any
… Other objects …
EXAMPLE 10
Part 10: Overflow hint stream (optional)
… Overflow hint stream …
EXAMPLE 11
Part 11: Main cross-reference table and trailer
xref
0  43
0000000000  65535  f
… Cross-reference entries for all except first page’s objects …
trailer
<<  /Size  43 >>
% Trailer need not contain other entries; in particular,
% it should not have a Prev entry
% Offset of first-page cross-reference table (part 3)
startxref
257
% % EOF
F.3.2
Header (Part 1)
The Linearized PDF file shall begin with the standard header line (see 7.5.2, "File Header"). Linearization is 
independent of PDF version number and may be applied to any PDF file of version 1.1 or greater. 
The binary characters following the PERCENT SIGN (25h) on the second line are characters with codes 128 or 
greater, as recommended in 7.5.2, "File Header". 
F.3.3
Linearization Parameter Dictionary (Part 2)
Following the header, the first object in the body of the file (part 2) shall be an indirect dictionary object, the 
linearization  parameter  dictionary, which shall contain the parameters listed in Table F.1. All values in this 
dictionary shall be direct objects. There shall be no references to this dictionary anywhere in the document; 
however, the first-page cross-reference table (part 3) shall contain a normal entry for it. 
The linearization parameter dictionary shall be entirely contained within the first 1024 bytes of the PDF file. This 
limits the amount of data a conforming reader must read before deciding whether the file is linearized. 
PDF 32000-1:2008
680
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
F.3.4
First-Page Cross-Reference Table and Trailer (Part 3)
Part 3 shall contain the cross-reference table for objects belonging to the first page (discussed in F.3.4, "First-
Page Cross-Reference Table and Trailer (Part 3)") as well as for the document catalogue and document-level 
objects appearing before the first page (discussed in F.3.5, "Document Catalogue and Document-Level Objects 
(Part 4)"). Additionally, this cross-reference table shall contain entries for the linearization parameter dictionary 
(at the beginning) and the primary hint stream (at the end). This table shall be a valid cross-reference table as 
defined in 7.5.4, "Cross-Reference Table", although its position in the file shall not be at the end of the file. It 
shall consist of a single cross-reference subsection that has no free entries. 
In  PDF  1.5  and  later,  cross-reference  streams  (see  7.5.8,  "Cross-Reference  Streams")  may  be  used  in 
linearized files in place of traditional cross-reference tables. The logic described in this section, along with the 
appropriate syntactic changes for cross-reference streams shall still apply. 
Table F.1 –  Entries in the linearization parameter dictionary  
Parameter
Type
Value
Linearized
number
(Required) A version identification for the linearized format. 
L
integer
(Required) The length of the entire file in bytes. It shall be exactly 
equal to the actual length of the PDF file. A mismatch indicates that 
the file is not linearized and shall be treated as ordinary PDF, ignoring 
linearization information. (If the mismatch resulted from appending an 
update, the linearization information may still be correct but requires 
validation; see G.7, "Accessing an Updated File" for details.) 
H
array
(Required) An array of two or four integers, [ offset
1
length
1
 or 
offset
1
length
1
offset
2
length
2
]. offset
1
shall  be  the  offset  of  the 
primary  hint  stream  from  the  beginning  of  the  file.  (This  is  the 
beginning of the stream object, not the beginning of the stream data.) 
length
1
shall  be  the  length  of  this  stream,  including  stream  object 
overhead. 
If the value of the primary hint stream dictionary’s Length entry is an 
indirect reference, the object it refers to shall immediately follow the 
stream object, and length
1
also shall include the length of the indirect 
length object, including object overhead. 
If there is an overflow hint stream, offset
2
and length
2
shall specify its 
offset and length. 
O
integer
(Required) The object number of the first page’s page object. 
E
integer
(Required) The offset of the end of the first page (the end of EXAMPLE 
6 in F.3.1, "General"), relative to the beginning of the file. 
N
integer
(Required) The number of pages in the document. 
T
integer
(Required) In documents that use standard main cross-reference 
tables (including hybrid-reference files; see 7.5.8.4, "Compatibility with 
Applications That Do Not Support Compressed Reference Streams"), 
this  entry  shall  represent  the  offset  of  the  white-space  character 
preceding the first entry of the main cross-reference table (the entry for 
object number 0), relative to the beginning of the file. Note that this 
differs  from  the Prev  entry in the  first-page  trailer, which  gives the 
location of the xref line that precedes the table. 
(PDF  1.5) Documents that use cross-reference streams exclusively 
(see 7.5.8, "Cross-Reference Streams"), this entry shall represent the 
offset of the main cross-reference stream object. 
P
integer
(Optional) The page number of the first page; see F.3.4, "First-Page 
Cross-Reference Table and Trailer (Part 3)". Default value: 0. 
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
681
PDF 32000-1:2008
Below the table shall be the first-page trailer. The trailer’s Prev entry shall give the offset of the main cross-
reference table near the end of the file. A conforming reader that does not support the linearized feature shall 
process this correctly even though the trailers are linked in an unusual order. It interprets the first-page cross-
reference table as an update to an original document that is indexed by the main cross-reference table. 
The first-page trailer shall contain valid Size and Root entries, as well as any other entries needed to display 
the document. The Size value shall be the combined number of entries in both the first-page cross-reference 
table and the main cross-reference table. 
The first-page trailer may optionally end with startxref, an integer, and %%EOF, just as in an ordinary trailer. 
This information shall be ignored. 
F.3.5
Document Catalogue and Document-Level Objects (Part 4)
Following the first-page cross-reference table and trailer are the catalogue dictionary and other objects that are 
required present when the document is opened. These additional objects (constituting part 4) shall include the 
values of the following entries if they are present and are indirect objects: 
The conforming reader Preferences entry in the catalogue. 
The PageMode  entry  in the catalogue. Note  that if the value of PageMode  is  UseOutlines, the outline 
hierarchy shall be located in part 6; otherwise, the outline hierarchy, if any, shall be located in part 9. See 
F.3.10, "Other Objects (Part 9)" for details. 
The Threads entry in the catalogue, along with all thread dictionaries it refers to. This does not include the 
threads’ information dictionaries or the individual bead dictionaries belonging to the threads. 
The OpenAction entry in the catalogue. 
The AcroForm  entry in the catalogue. Only the top-level interactive form dictionary shall be present, not 
the objects that it refers to. 
The Encrypt entry in the first-page trailer dictionary. All values in the encryption dictionary shall also be 
located here. 
All other objects shall not be located here but instead shall be at the end of the file; see F.3.10, "Other Objects 
(Part  9)".  This  includes  objects  such  as  page  tree  nodes,  the  document  information  dictionary,  and  the 
definitions for named destinations. 
NOTE
The objects located here are indexed by the first-page cross-reference table, even though they are not logically 
part of the first page. 
F.3.6
Hint Streams (Parts 5 and 10)
The core of the linearization information shall be stored in data structures known as hint tables, whose format is 
described in F.4, "Hint Tables." They shall provide indexing information that enables the conforming reader to 
construct a single request for all the objects that are needed to display any page of the document or to retrieve 
other  information  efficiently.  The  hint  tables  may  contain  additional  information  to  optimize  access  by 
conforming writer extensions to application-specific data. 
The hint tables shall not be logically part of the information content of the document; they shall be derived from 
the  document.  Any  action  that  changes  the  document—for  instance,  appending  an  incremental 
update—invalidates the hint tables. The document remains a valid PDF file but is no longer linearized; see G.7, 
"Accessing an Updated File" for details. 
The hint tables are binary data structures that shall be enclosed in a stream object. Syntactically, this stream 
shall be a PDF indirect object. However, there shall be no references to the stream anywhere in the document. 
PDF 32000-1:2008
682
© 
Adobe Systems Incorporated 2008 – All rights reserved
Therefore, it is not logically part of the document, and an operation that regenerates the document may remove 
the stream. 
Usually, all the hint tables shall be contained in a single stream, known as the primary hint stream . Optionally, 
there may be an additional stream containing more hints, known as the overflow hint stream . The contents of 
the two hint streams shall be concatenated and treated as if they were a single unbroken stream. 
The primary hint stream, which shall be required, is shown as part 5 in Example 5. The order of this part and 
the first-page section, shown as  part  6, may be reversed; see Annex G  for considerations  on  the choice of 
placement. The overflow hint stream, part 10, is optional. 
The location and length of the primary hint stream, and of the overflow hint stream if present, shall be given in 
the linearization parameter dictionary at the beginning of the file. 
The hint streams shall be assigned the last object numbers in the file—that is, after the object number for the 
last object  in  the  first page.  Their cross-reference  table  entries  shall  be  at the  end  of the  first-page  cross-
reference  table.  This  object  number  assignment  shall  be  independent  of  the  physical  locations  of  the  hint 
streams in the file. 
NOTE
This convention keeps their object numbers from conflicting with the numbering of the linearized objects. 
With one exception, the values of all entries in the hint streams’ dictionaries shall be direct objects and may 
contain no indirect object references. The exception is the stream dictionary’s Length entry (see the discussion 
of the H entry in Table F.1).
In  addition  to  the  standard stream  attributes,  the  dictionary of the primary hint stream  shall  contain  entries 
giving the position of the beginning of each hint table in the stream. These positions shall be counted in bytes 
relative to the beginning of the stream data (after decoding filters, if any, are applied) and with the overflow hint 
stream concatenated if present. The dictionary of the overflow hint stream shall not contain these entries. The 
keys designating the standard hint tables in the primary hint stream’s dictionary are listed in Table F.2; F.4, "Hint 
Tables," documents the format of these hint tables. Additionally, there is a required page offset hint table, which 
shall be the first table in the stream and shall start at offset 0. 
Table F.2 –  Standard hint tables  
Key
Hint table
S
(Required) Shared object hint table (see F.4.2, “Shared Object Hint 
Table”)
T
(Present only if thumbnail images exist) Thumbnail hint table (see F.4.3, 
"Thumbnail Hint Table")
O
(Present only if a document outline exists) Outline hint table (see F.4.4, 
“Generic Hint Tables”)
A
(Present only if article threads exist) Thread information hint table (see 
F.4.4, “Generic Hint Tables”)
E
(Present only if named destinations exist) Named destination hint table 
(see F.4.4, “Generic Hint Tables”)
V
(Present only if an interactive form dictionary exists) Interactive form hint 
table (see F.4.5, “Extended Generic Hint Tables”)
I
(Present  only if a document information  dictionary exists) Information 
dictionary hint table (see F.4.4, “Generic Hint Tables”)
C
(Present  only  if a logical  structure hierarchy exists;  PDF 1.3) Logical 
structure hint table (see F.4.5, “Extended Generic Hint Tables”)
L
(PDF 1.3) Page label hint table (see F.4.4, “Generic Hint Tables”)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested