pdf viewer dll for c# : Add picture to pdf in preview Library control class asp.net web page html ajax pm_web0-part2706

Enabling poor rural people to overcome poverty
Good practices 
in participatory 
mapping
A review prepared for the 
International Fund for 
Agricultural Development (IFAD)
Add picture to pdf in preview - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add photo to pdf file; acrobat insert image into pdf
Add picture to pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
how to add image to pdf acrobat; how to add a photo to a pdf document
The opinions expressed in this publication are those of the authors and do not
necessarily represent those of the International Fund for Agricultural Development
(IFAD). The designations employed and the presentation of material in this
publication do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of
IFAD concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its
authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. The
designations ‘developed’ and ‘developing’ countries are intended for statistical
convenience and do not necessarily express a judgement about the stage reached
by a particular country or area in the development process.
Cover: 
Participatory evaluation of community empowerment project 
for access to land, Uttar Pradesh, India.
© B. Codispoti/ILC
© 2009 by the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD)
C# Word - Paragraph Processing in C#.NET
Add references: C# users can set paragraph properties and create content such as run, footnote, endnote and picture in a paragraph.
add image pdf acrobat; add photo to pdf for
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned signature, logo, etc. Remove Image from PDF Page Using C#. Add necessary references:
add photo pdf; add a jpeg to a pdf
Foreword
2
Introduction
4
1. What is participatory mapping?
6
2. Participatory mapping applications
8
3. Participatory mapping tools
13
Hands-on mapping
13
Participatory mapping using scale maps and images
14
Participatory 3-D models (P3DM)
15
Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
17
Multimedia and Internet-based mapping
17
4. Participatory mapping best practices and processes
20
Presence of enabling or disabling environments
20
Roles of development intermediaries
25
Awareness of mapping impacts
28
The importance of process
30
5. Conclusions
39
Annex A. Matrix of participatory mapping tools
40
Annex B. IFAD related projects and documents consulted 
in the writing of this review
51
Bibliography
53
Boxes
Box 1
Cultural mapping in Peru
8
Box 2
Participatory land-use planning (PLUP) in Thailand
9
Box 3
Mapping ancestral domains in Northern Mindanao (a PAFID-IFAD project)
10
Box 4
Talking maps in Peru
11
Box 5
GIS and conflict resolution in Ghana
12
Box 6
Conflicting mapping legislation in the Philippines
21
Box 7
Steps for community land delimitation in Mozambique
22
Box 8
Action Against Hunger (AAH) mapping in Nicaragua
25
Box 9
Ingredients for sound relationships
26
Box 10 Free, prior and informed consent
28
Box 11 Reaching consensus on boundaries in Albania
29
Box 12 Six stage mapping process
30
Box 13 Questions to determine the purpose for creating a map
33
Box 14 Gender and decision-making
34
Box 15 Participatory mapping for planning: IFAD’s process in Tunisia
35
Box 16 Gradations of participation
36
Box 17 Questions to ask when evaluating participatory maps
37
Table of contents
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned signature, logo, etc. VB.NET: Remove Image from PDF Page. Add necessary references:
add image to pdf acrobat reader; add image to pdf java
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
Help to copy, paste and cut vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned VB.NET DLLs: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in PDF Page. Add necessary references:
add picture to pdf form; add image to pdf reader
The International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) is an international financial institution and
a specialized United Nations agency dedicated to eradicating rural poverty in developing
countries. Working with poor rural people, governments, donors, non-governmental organizations
(NGOs) and many other partners, IFAD focuses on country-specific solutions 
to empower poor rural women and men to achieve higher incomes and improved food security.
One of the challenges IFAD continues to face in agricultural and rural development work is
identifying effective ways to involve poor communities, particularly the poorest and most
vulnerable, in planning, managing and making decisions about their natural resources.
This is especially important in dealing with pastoralists, indigenous peoples and forest dwellers
that find themselves and their livelihoods disproportionately threatened by climate change,
environmental degradation and conflict related to access to land and natural resources. The
ongoing uncertainties brought about by climate change and climate variability (such as the timing
and intensity of weather patterns) increase their vulnerability and intensify pressure on their
resource base and conflicts among resource users. Because a key asset for pastoralists,
indigenous peoples and forest dwellers is their knowledge of the local environment, an approach
is needed to ensure that this collective wisdom will influence their capacity for planning and
managing natural resources.
To address these concerns, IFAD, in collaboration with the International Land Coalition (ILC),
has implemented since October 2006 the project ‘Development of Decision Tools for Participatory
Mapping in Specific Livelihoods Systems (Pastoralists, Indigenous Peoples, Forest Dwellers)’.
Participatory mapping is not new to IFAD; it has been undertaken to varying degrees in a large
number of projects. However, within the institution there remains limited knowledge about how a
systematic approach could contribute to addressing conflict-related issues and improving
community ownership in sustainable environmental and natural resource management. This
project aims to i) create a better understanding of the potential for participatory mapping to
empower vulnerable groups to sustainably manage their resources; and ii) develop an IFAD-wide
approach to participatory mapping to enable a more systemic implementation of these activities
within IFAD-supported programmes. 
Foreword
C# Word - Document Processing in C#.NET
GetDocument(); //Document clone IDocument doc0 = doc.Clone(); //Get all picture in document List<Bitmap> bitmaps = doc0.GetAllPicture(); Create, Add, Delete or
add photo to pdf reader; how to add image to pdf
3
This review was prepared by Jon Corbett, University of British Columbia Okanagan, in
collaboration with the Consultative Group
1
of the project. The review is intended to strengthen
IFAD’s knowledge about participatory mapping tools and provide the basis for developing IFAD’s
step-by-step methodology. The review has been compiled from an extensive desk review,
knowledge gained from the International Workshop on P-Mapping and Forestry organized by the
ILC and the National Association of Communal Forest and Pasture (NACFP),2 and field visits to
Kenya, Mali and Sudan.
Our role as responsible development partners is to support local communities to solve their
challenges in managing their natural resources in a sustainable manner. If such support is not
provided, achieving the MDGs – particularly MDG 1 (eradicate extreme poverty and hunger) and 
7 (ensure environmental sustainability) – is at risk. IFAD is committed to joining efforts with our
development partners to ensure that affected communities are empowered to engage in the
decision-making processes regarding the natural resources upon which their survival depends.
Sheila Mwanundu
Senior Technical Adviser Environment 
and Natural Resource Management
Technical Advisory Division
On behalf of 
The Consultative Group of the project 
‘Development of Decision Tools 
for Participatory Mapping
in Specific Livelihoods’
1
The Consultative Group includes S. Devos, S. Di Gessa, K. Fara, I. Firmian, H. Liversage, M. Mangiafico, A. Mauro, 
S. Mwanundu, R. Mutandi, R. Omar, G. Rambaldi, R. Samii, L. Sarr.
2
The ‘Sharing Knowledge on Participatory Mapping for Forest and Pasture Areas’ Workshop was held in Tirana from 
27 to 31 May 2007.
“Maps are more than pieces of paper.
They are stories, conversations, lives and
songs lived out in a place and are
inseparable from the political and cultural
contexts in which they are used.” 
Warren, 2004
The past 20 years have witnessed an
explosion of participatory mapping initiatives
throughout the world, in both developing
and developed countries. Participatory
mapping is, in its broadest sense, the creation
of maps by local communities – often with
the involvement of supporting organizations
including governments (at various levels),
non-governmental organizations (NGOs),
universities and other actors engaged in
development and land-related planning. The
International Fund for Agricultural
Development (IFAD) supports many projects
that use participatory mapping processes and
tools to assist in resource decision-making, a
number of which were used in this review. 
Participatory maps provide a valuable
visual representation of what a community
perceives as its place and the significant
features within it. These include depictions of
natural physical features and resources and
socio-cultural features known by the
community. Participatory mapping is
multidisciplinary. What makes it significantly
different from traditional cartography and
map-making is the process by which the
maps are created and the uses to which they
are subsequently put. Participatory mapping
focuses on providing the skills and expertise
for community members to create the maps
themselves, to represent the spatial
knowledge of community members and to
ensure that community members determine
the ownership of the maps and how and to
whom to communicate the information that
the maps provide. The participatory mapping
process can influence the internal dynamics
of a community. This process can contribute
to building community cohesion, help
stimulate community members to engage in
land-related decision-making, raise awareness
about pressing land-related issues and
ultimately contribute to empowering local
communities and their members.
The general aims and specific objectives of
participatory mapping initiatives vary
significantly. This variation is directly related
to the end-use to which these maps will be
put, which in turn is influenced by the
audience that will view and make decisions
about the content of these maps. Maps may
be made exclusively for internal community
consumption or (more commonly) they may
be used to communicate local land-related
knowledge to outsiders. Many examples of
IFAD projects referenced in this document
focus on using maps as a mechanism to
facilitate the communication of community
spatial information to project management
and local government to better target
development interventions.
Participatory mapping projects can also
take on an advocacy role and actively seek
recognition for community spaces through
identifying traditional lands and resources,
demarcating ancestral domain and, in some
Introduction
5
cases, being used as a mechanism to secure
tenure. Participatory maps play an important
role in helping marginalized groups
(including indigenous, pastoralist and forest
dwellers) work towards legal recognition of
customary land rights. NGOs, from small
local ones to large international ones, often
play a crucial role as interlocutors, trainers,
advocates and facilitators in community-
mapping initiatives. A number of projects
supported by the International Land Coalition
(ILC) focus on the role of maps for advocacy.
Often participatory mapping initiatives are
initiated by outsider groups and the maps
produced will contribute to an outsider’s
agenda. In IFAD’s case, that might include
using the maps to assist in collaborative spatial
planning exercises, land-related research and
analysis, amelioration of land and resource
conflicts, or assessing local development
potential. The levels of community
involvement and control over the mapping
process vary considerably among projects. It
should be noted that maps are increasingly
being created by marginalized communities on
their own initiative and without the impetus
from outsiders. This is especially the case with
indigenous First Nations communities in
Western Canada who see the potential for
participatory maps to document their
historical and cultural association with the
land in order to influence land claims and
stimulate interest of local spatial knowledge
among their communities’ youth.
Participatory mapping uses a range of tools
including data collection tools that are
commonly associated with Participatory
Learning and Action (PLA) initiatives. These
tools include mental mapping, ground
mapping, participatory sketch mapping,
transect mapping and participatory 
3-dimensional modelling. Recently
participatory mapping initiatives have begun
to use more technically advanced geographic
information technologies including Global
Positioning Systems (GPS), aerial photos 
and remote-sensed images (from satellites),
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and
other digital computer-based technologies. 
The breadth of tools available makes
participatory mapping highly flexible and
valuable in development initiatives. Yet these
mapping initiatives can be ineffective and
generate confusion and conflict if
implemented without a working knowledge
of cartography, participatory development
processes and community facilitation and
organization skills. 
This report will review existing knowledge
related to participatory mapping and recent
developments. Specifically
•  Section 1 will define the main features
of participatory mapping;
•  Section 2 will discuss key applications of
participatory mapping;
•  Section 3 will present specific tools used
in participatory mapping, including
their strengths and weaknesses;
•  Section 4 will identify good practices
and explore the significance of process
in participatory mapping initiatives.
“Maps are not neutral instruments but have
both cadastral and political contexts.”
Cooke, 2003 (p. 266). 
Since the 1970s, development efforts have
sought to support and promote community
engagement in decision-making through the
creation and use of diverse participatory
methodologies that gather, analyse and
communicate community information. These
methods are incorporated into broader
development models which have matured
from the extractive Rapid Rural Appraisal
(RRA) through Participatory Rural Appraisal
(PRA), culminating in Participatory Learning
and Action (PLA). These are commonly
understood as a “growing family of
approaches, methods, attitudes and beliefs
that enable people to express and analyse the
realities of their lives and conditions, to plan
themselves what action to take and to
monitor and evaluate the results” (Chambers,
1997, p. 102). Many IFAD projects with a
land-use management and community
engagement component use these tools to
inform the project delivery process.
Of all the participatory development
methods that have been adopted, adapted
and applied in a development context, it is
“participatory mapping that has been the
most widespread” (Chambers, 2006, p.1).
There are a rapidly growing number of
participatory mapping initiatives throughout
the world. These initiatives are often referred
to using different terms including
participatory mapping, indigenous mapping,
counter mapping and community mapping.
Though there are differences among
initiatives in their methods, applications and
users, the common theme linking them is
that the process of map-making is undertaken
by a group of non-experts who are associated
with one another based on a shared interest.
For the sake of simplicity, this report will refer
to these different mapping types generically
as participatory mapping. 
Participatory mapping is a map-making
process that attempts to make visible the
association between land and local
communities by using the commonly
understood and recognized language 
of cartography. 
As with any type of map, participatory
maps present spatial information at various
scales. They can depict detailed information
of village layout and infrastructure (e.g.
rivers, roads, transport or the location of
individual houses). They can also be used to
depict a large area (e.g. the full extent of a
community’s traditional use areas, including
information related to natural resource
distribution and territorial boundaries).
Indigenous peoples, forest dwellers and
pastoralists often inhabit large areas that
until recently have been considered marginal;
however, these areas are increasingly being
valued for the resources that they contain.
Participatory maps are not confined to simply
presenting geographic feature information;
they can also illustrate important social,
cultural and historical knowledge including,
for example, information related to land-use
occupancy and mythology, demography,
1. What is 
participatory 
mapping?
7
ethno-linguistic groups, health patterns and
wealth distributions. 
Participatory mapping projects have
proliferated throughout the world over the
past 20 years, from Southeast Asia (i.e.
Indonesia and the Philippines) through
Central Asia, Africa, Europe, North, South
and Central America to Australasia. Many
different types of communities have
undertaken mapping projects, ranging from
relatively prosperous urban groups in
northern Europe and America to forest-
dwelling indigenous groups in the tropics. 
Participatory maps often represent a
socially or culturally distinct understanding
of landscape and include information that is
excluded from mainstream maps, which
usually represent the views of the dominant
sectors of society. This type of map can pose
alternatives to the languages and images of
the existing power structures and become a
medium of empowerment by allowing local
communities to represent themselves
spatially. Participatory maps often differ
considerably from mainstream maps in
content, appearance and methodology.
Criteria used to recognize and denote
community maps include the following:
•  Participatory mapping is defined by the
process of production. Participatory maps
are planned around a common goal and
strategy for use and are often made with
input from an entire community in an
open and inclusive process. The higher
the level of participation by all members
of the community, the more beneficial
the outcome because the final map will
reflect the collective experience of the
group producing the map. 
•  Participatory mapping is defined by a product
that represents the agenda of the community.
It is map production undertaken by
communities to show information that
is relevant and important to their needs
and is for their use. 
•  Participatory mapping is defined by the
content of the maps which depicts local
knowledge and information. The maps
contain a community’s place names,
symbols, scales and priority features and
represent local knowledge systems.
•  Participatory mapping is not defined by the
level of compliance with formal cartographic
conventions. Participatory maps are not
confined by formal media; a community
map may be a drawing in the sand or
may be incorporated into a sophisticated
computer-based GIS. Whereas regular
maps seek conformity, community maps
embrace diversity in presentation and
content. That said, to be useful for
outside groups, such as state authorities,
the closer the maps follow recognized
cartographic conventions, the greater the
likelihood that they will be seen as
effective communication tools.
Participatory mapping by 
Bakgalagadi pastoralists and San
hunter-gatherers in Botswana
© M.Taylor
Box 1
Cultural mapping in Peru
The Southern Highlands Development Project is an IFAD operation in Peru that started in April
2005. It uses community mapping techniques to plan the support the project will provide
communities for increasing the value of their natural and physical assets. The project uses cultural
maps that are designs or models prepared by the communities to indicate their perceptions of the
past, present and future of the local environment and surrounding areas. In their cultural map of the
future, they express what they would like their community to become and in a public presentation
they express what kind of support they need from the project to achieve that. Cultural maps are
elaborated by the communities with the support of a facilitator who is someone from the same
community who has been trained by the project. This planning instrument is being used for
•  improving the management of natural resources;
•  documenting tangible and intangible resources, such as cultural features or traditions of the
communities;
•  identifying economic initiatives based on the resources.
One rural municipality has used cultural maps for planning its Annual Plan of Operations.
“More indigenous territory has been
claimed by maps than by guns. This
assertion has its corollary: more
indigenous territory can be defended and
reclaimed by maps than by guns.” 
Nietschmann, 1995 (p. 37).
Although there are many reasons why a
community might engage in a participatory
mapping process, this report identifies six
broad purposes for initiating a participatory
mapping project. These six purposes directly
support IFAD’s vision of livelihood security
and poverty reduction laid out in its
Strategic Framework 2007-10. Specifically,
IFAD seeks to
•  work with national partners to design
and implement innovative programmes
and projects that fit within national
policies and systems. These initiatives
respond to the needs, priorities,
opportunities and constraints identified
by poor rural people.
•  enable poor rural people to access the
assets, services and opportunities they
need to overcome poverty. Furthermore,
IFAD helps them build their knowledge,
skills and organizations so they can lead
their own development and influence
2. Participatory 
mapping 
applications
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested