pdf viewer dll for c# : How to add an image to a pdf in acrobat software control project winforms azure html UWP postgresql-9.4-A410-part2724

Chapter 4. SQL Syntax
The character with the code zero cannot be in a stringconstant.
4.1.2.3. String Constants with Unicode Escapes
PostgreSQL also supports another type of escape syntax for strings that allows specifying arbitrary
Unicode characters by code point. A Unicode escape string constant starts with
U&
(upper or lower
case letter U followed by ampersand) immediately before the opening quote, without any spaces in
between, for example
U&’foo’
.(Note that this creates an ambiguity with the operator
&
.Use spaces
around the operator to avoid this problem.) Inside the quotes, Unicode characters can be specified
in escaped form by writing a backslash followed by the four-digit hexadecimal code point number
or alternatively a backslash followed by a plus sign followed by a six-digit hexadecimal code point
number. For example, the string
’data’
could be written as
U&’d\0061t\+000061’
The following less trivial example writes the Russian word “slon” (elephant) in Cyrillic letters:
U&’\0441\043B\043E\043D’
If a different escape character than backslash is desired, it can be specified using the
UESCAPE
clause
after the string, for example:
U&’d!0061t!+000061’ UESCAPE ’!’
The escape character can beanysingle character other thana hexadecimal digit, theplus sign, asingle
quote, a double quote, or a whitespace character.
The Unicode escape syntax works only when the server encoding is
UTF8
.When other server encod-
ings are used, only code points in the ASCII range (up to
\007F
)can be specified. Both the 4-digit
and the 6-digit form can be used to specify UTF-16 surrogate pairs to compose characters with code
points larger than U+FFFF, although theavailability of the 6-digit form technically makes this unnec-
essary. (Whensurrogate pairs are usedwhen the server encodingis
UTF8
,they are first combinedinto
asingle code point that is then encoded in UTF-8.)
Also, the Unicode escape syntax for string constants only works when the configuration parameter
standard_conforming_strings is turned on. This is becauseotherwise this syntax couldconfuseclients
that parse the SQL statements to the point that it could lead to SQL injections and similar security
issues. If the parameter is set to off, this syntax will be rejected with an error message.
To include the escape character in the string literally, write it twice.
4.1.2.4. Dollar-quoted String Constants
While the standard syntax for specifying string constants is usually convenient, it can be difficult to
understand when the desired string contains many single quotes or backslashes, since each of those
must be doubled. To allow more readable queries in such situations, PostgreSQL provides another
way, called “dollar quoting”, to write string constants. A dollar-quoted string constant consists of a
dollar sign(
$
), an optional“tag”of zeroor more characters, another dollar sign, an arbitrarysequence
of characters that makes up the string content, a dollar sign, the same tag that began this dollar quote,
and a dollar sign. For example, here are two different ways to specify the string “Dianne’s horse”
using dollar quoting:
$$Dianne’s horse$$
28
How to add an image to a pdf in acrobat - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add image to pdf preview; add jpeg to pdf
How to add an image to a pdf in acrobat - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
how to add an image to a pdf in preview; add jpg to pdf file
Chapter 4. SQL Syntax
$SomeTag$Dianne’s horse$SomeTag$
Notice that inside the dollar-quoted string, single quotes can be used without needing to be escaped.
Indeed, no characters inside a dollar-quotedstring are ever escaped: the string content is always writ-
tenliterally. Backslashes arenot special, andneither are dollar signs, unless theyare partof asequence
matching the opening tag.
It is possible to nest dollar-quoted string constants by choosing different tags at each nesting level.
This is most commonly usedin writing function definitions. For example:
$function$
BEGIN
RETURN ($1 ~ $q$[\t\r\n\v\\]$q$);
END;
$function$
Here, the sequence
$q$[\t\r\n\v\\]$q$
represents a dollar-quoted literal string
[\t\r\n\v\\]
,
which will be recognized when the function bodyis executedby PostgreSQL. But since the sequence
does not matchtheouter dollar quotingdelimiter
$function$
,it is just some more characters within
the constant so far as the outer string is concerned.
The tag, if any, of a dollar-quoted string follows the same rules as an unquoted identifier, except that
it cannot contain a dollar sign. Tags are case sensitive, so
$tag$String content$tag$
is correct,
but
$TAG$String content$tag$
is not.
Adollar-quoted string that follows a keyword or identifier must be separated from it by whitespace;
otherwise the dollar quoting delimiter would be taken as part of the preceding identifier.
Dollar quoting is not part of the SQL standard, but it is often a more convenient way to write com-
plicated string literals than the standard-compliant single quote syntax. It is particularly useful when
representing string constants inside other constants, as is often needed in procedural function defini-
tions. Withsingle-quote syntax, eachbackslash in the aboveexample wouldhave to bewritten as four
backslashes, which would be reduced to two backslashes in parsing the original string constant, and
then to one when the inner string constant is re-parsed during function execution.
4.1.2.5. Bit-string Constants
Bit-string constants look like regular string constants with a
B
(upper or lower case) immediately
before the opening quote (no intervening whitespace), e.g.,
B’1001’
.The only characters allowed
within bit-string constants are
0
and
1
.
Alternatively, bit-string constants can be specified in hexadecimal notation, using a leading
X
(upper
or lower case), e.g.,
X’1FF’
.This notationis equivalentto abit-stringconstantwith four binary digits
for each hexadecimal digit.
Both forms of bit-string constant can be continued across lines in the same way as regular string
constants. Dollar quoting cannot be used in a bit-string constant.
4.1.2.6. Numeric Constants
Numeric constants are accepted in these general forms:
digits
digits
.[
digits
][e[+-]
digits
]
[
digits
].
digits
[e[+-]
digits
]
digits
e[+-]
digits
29
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Convert image files to PDF. File & Page Process. Annotate & Comment. Add, insert PDF native annotations to PDF file. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF
add picture to pdf document; add image to pdf java
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. you can easily perform file conversion from PDF document to image or document
adding an image to a pdf in preview; adding a jpg to a pdf
Chapter 4. SQL Syntax
where
digits
is one or more decimal digits (0 through 9). At least one digit must be before or
after the decimal point, if one is used. At least one digit must follow the exponent marker (
e
), if one
is present. There cannot be any spaces or other characters embedded in the constant. Note that any
leading plus or minus sign is not actually considered part of the constant; it is an operator applied to
the constant.
These are some examples of valid numeric constants:
42
3.5
4.
.001
5e2
1.925e-3
Anumeric constant that contains neither a decimal point nor an exponent is initially presumed to be
type
integer
if its value fits in type
integer
(32 bits); otherwise it is presumed to be type
bigint
if its value fits in type
bigint
(64 bits); otherwise it is taken to be type
numeric
.Constants that
contain decimal points and/or exponents are always initially presumed to be type
numeric
.
The initially assigned data type of a numeric constant is just a starting point for the type resolution
algorithms. In most cases the constant will be automatically coerced to the most appropriate type de-
pendingoncontext. When necessary, youcan force anumeric value tobe interpreted as a specific data
type by casting it. For example, you can force a numeric value to be treated as type
real
(
float4
)
by writing:
REAL ’1.23’
-- string style
1.23::REAL
-- PostgreSQL (historical) style
These are actually just special cases of the general casting notations discussed next.
4.1.2.7. Constants of Other Types
Aconstant of an arbitrary type can be entered using any one of the following notations:
type
string
string
’::
type
CAST ( ’
string
’ AS
type
)
The stringconstant’s text is passedtothe input conversionroutine for the typecalled
type
.The result
is a constant of the indicated type. The explicit type cast can be omitted if there is no ambiguity as to
the type the constant must be (for example, when it is assigned directly to a table column), in which
case it is automatically coerced.
The string constant can be written using either regular SQL notation or dollar-quoting.
It is also possible to specify a type coercion using a function-like syntax:
typename
( ’
string
’ )
but not all type names can be used in this way; see Section 4.2.9 for details.
The
::
,
CAST()
,and function-call syntaxes can also be used to specify run-time type conversions of
arbitrary expressions, as discussedin Section4.2.9. Toavoidsyntacticambiguity, the
type
string
syntax canonly be usedtospecifythetype of a simple literal constant. Another restrictiononthe
type
30
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Image and Document Conversion Supported by Windows Viewer. Convert to PDF.
add picture pdf; how to add photo to pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Using this VB.NET Imaging PDF Watermark Add-on, you can a watermark that consists of text or image (such as And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no
how to add a photo to a pdf document; adding an image to a pdf
Chapter 4. SQL Syntax
string
syntax is that it does not work for array types; use
::
or
CAST()
to specify the type of an
array constant.
The
CAST()
syntaxconforms to SQL. The
type
string
syntax is a generalizationof thestandard:
SQL specifies this syntax only for a few data types, but PostgreSQL allows it for alltypes. Thesyntax
with
::
is historical PostgreSQL usage, as is the function-call syntax.
4.1.3. Operators
An operator name is a sequence of up to
NAMEDATALEN
-1 (63 bydefault) characters from the follow-
ing list:
+- * / < > = ~ ! @ # % ^ & | ‘ ?
There are a few restrictions on operator names, however:
--
and
/
*
cannot appear anywhere in an operator name, since they will be taken as the start of a
comment.
Amultiple-character operator name cannotend in
+
or
-
,unless the name also contains at least one
of these characters:
~! @ # % ^ & | ‘ ?
For example,
@-
is an allowed operator name, but
*
-
is not. This restriction allows PostgreSQL to
parse SQL-compliant queries without requiring spaces between tokens.
When working with non-SQL-standard operator names, you will usually need to separate adjacent
operators with spaces to avoid ambiguity. For example, if you have defined a left unary operator
named
@
,you cannot write
X
*
@Y
;you must write
X
*
@Y
to ensure that PostgreSQL reads it as two
operator names not one.
4.1.4. Special Characters
Some characters that are not alphanumeric have a special meaning that is different from being an
operator. Details on the usage can be found at the location where the respective syntax element is
described. This section only exists to advise the existence and summarize the purposes of these char-
acters.
Adollar sign (
$
)followed by digits is used to represent a positional parameter in the body of
afunction definition or a prepared statement. In other contexts the dollar sign can be part of an
identifier or a dollar-quoted string constant.
Parentheses (
()
)have their usual meaning to group expressions and enforce precedence. In some
cases parentheses are required as part of the fixed syntax of a particular SQL command.
Brackets (
[]
)are usedto selectthe elements of an array. See Section8.15 for more information on
arrays.
Commas (
,
)are used in some syntactical constructs to separate the elements of a list.
31
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. SDK to convert PowerPoint document to PDF document code for PowerPoint to TIFF image conversion
add an image to a pdf acrobat; add signature image to pdf
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word SDK to convert Word document to PDF document. demo code for Word to TIFF image conversion
how to add image to pdf document; add photo to pdf reader
Chapter 4. SQL Syntax
The semicolon (
;
)terminates an SQL command. It cannot appear anywhere within a command,
except within a string constant or quoted identifier.
The colon (
:
)is used to select “slices” from arrays. (See Section 8.15.) In certain SQL dialects
(such as Embedded SQL), the colon is used to prefix variable names.
The asterisk (
*
)is used in some contexts to denote all the fields of a table row or composite value.
It also has a special meaning when used as the argument of an aggregate function, namely that the
aggregate does not require any explicit parameter.
The period (
.
)is used in numeric constants, and to separate schema, table, and column names.
4.1.5. Comments
Acomment is a sequence of characters beginning with double dashes andextending to the end of the
line, e.g.:
-- This is a standard SQL comment
Alternatively, C-style block comments can be used:
/
*
multiline comment
*
with nesting: /
*
nested block comment
*
/
*
/
where the comment begins with
/
*
and extends to the matching occurrence of
*
/
.These block com-
ments nest, as specified in the SQL standard but unlike C, so that one can comment out larger blocks
of code that might contain existing block comments.
Acomment isremovedfrom the input stream beforefurther syntax analysis andiseffectivelyreplaced
by whitespace.
4.1.6. Operator Precedence
Table4-2 shows theprecedence and associativityof theoperators inPostgreSQL. Mostoperatorshave
the same precedence and are left-associative. The precedence and associativity of the operators is
hard-wired intothe parser. This can lead to non-intuitive behavior; for example the Boolean operators
<
and
>
havea differentprecedence thantheBooleanoperators
<=
and
>=
.Also, you willsometimes
need to add parentheses when using combinations of binary and unary operators. For instance:
SELECT 5 ! - 6;
will be parsed as:
SELECT 5 ! (- 6);
because the parser has no idea — until it is too late — that
!
is defined as a postfix operator, not an
infix one. To get the desired behavior in this case, you must write:
SELECT (5 !) - 6;
This is the price one pays for extensibility.
32
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
Also designed to be used add-on for .NET Image SDK, RasterEdge Bitmap to PDF Converter can Powerful image converter for Bitmap and PDF files; No need for
add picture to pdf reader; acrobat add image to pdf
PDF to WORD Converter | Convert PDF to Word, Convert Word to PDF
out transformation between different kinds of image files and Word Converter has accurate output, and PDF to Word need the support of Adobe Acrobat & Microsoft
how to add an image to a pdf; add image to pdf reader
Chapter 4. SQL Syntax
Table 4-2. Operator Precedence (decreasing)
Operator/Element
Associativity
Description
.
left
table/column name separator
::
left
PostgreSQL-style typecast
[]
left
array element selection
+-
right
unary plus, unary minus
^
left
exponentiation
*
/%
left
multiplication, division,
modulo
+-
left
addition, subtraction
IS
IS TRUE
,
IS FALSE
,
IS
NULL
,etc
ISNULL
test for null
NOTNULL
test for not null
(any other)
left
all other native and user-defined
operators
IN
set membership
BETWEEN
range containment
OVERLAPS
time interval overlap
LIKE ILIKE SIMILAR
string pattern matching
<>
less than, greater than
=
right
equality, assignment
NOT
right
logical negation
AND
left
logical conjunction
OR
left
logical disjunction
Note thatthe operator precedence rules also apply to user-definedoperators that have the same names
as the built-in operators mentioned above. For example, if you define a “+” operator for some custom
data type it will have the same precedence as the built-in “+” operator, no matter what yours does.
When a schema-qualified operator name is used in the
OPERATOR
syntax, as for example in:
SELECT 3 OPERATOR(pg_catalog.+) 4;
the
OPERATOR
construct is taken to have the default precedence shown in Table 4-2 for “any other”
operator. This is true no matter which specific operator appears inside
OPERATOR()
.
4.2. Value Expressions
Value expressions are used in a variety of contexts, such as inthe target listof the
SELECT
command,
as new column values in
INSERT
or
UPDATE
,or in search conditions in a number of commands. The
result of a value expression is sometimes called a scalar, to distinguish it from the result of a table
expression (which is a table). Value expressions are therefore also called scalar expressions (or even
simplyexpressions). The expressionsyntax allows the calculation of values from primitive parts using
arithmetic, logical, set, and other operations.
33
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
add photo to pdf; how to add a jpeg to a pdf
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
as a kind of compensation for limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS VB.NET PPT: VB Code to Add Embedded Image Object to
adding image to pdf; add jpg to pdf document
Chapter 4. SQL Syntax
Avalue expression is one of the following:
Aconstant or literal value
Acolumn reference
Apositional parameter reference, in the body of a function definition or prepared statement
Asubscripted expression
Afield selection expression
An operator invocation
Afunction call
An aggregate expression
Awindow function call
Atype cast
Acollation expression
Ascalar subquery
An array constructor
Arow constructor
Another value expression in parentheses (used to group subexpressions and override precedence)
In addition to this list, there are a number of constructs that can be classified as an expression but do
not follow any general syntax rules. These generally have the semantics of a function or operator and
are explained in the appropriate location in Chapter 9. An example is the
IS NULL
clause.
We have already discussed constants in Section 4.1.2. The following sections discuss the remaining
options.
4.2.1. Column References
Acolumncan be referencedin the form:
correlation
.
columnname
correlation
is the name of a table (possibly qualified with a schema name), or an alias for a table
defined by means of a
FROM
clause. The correlation name and separating dot can be omitted if the
column name is unique across all the tables being used inthe current query. (See also Chapter 7.)
4.2.2. Positional Parameters
Apositional parameter reference is used to indicate a value that is supplied externally to an SQL
statement. Parameters are used in SQL function definitions and in prepared queries. Some client
libraries also support specifying data values separately from the SQL command string, in which case
parameters are used to refer to the out-of-line data values. The form of a parameter reference is:
$
number
34
Chapter 4. SQL Syntax
For example, consider the definition of a function,
dept
,as:
CREATE FUNCTION dept(text) RETURNS dept
AS $$ SELECT
*
FROM dept WHERE name = $1 $$
LANGUAGE SQL;
Here the
$1
references the value of the first functionargument whenever the function is invoked.
4.2.3. Subscripts
If an expression yields a value of an array type, then a specific element of the array value can be
extracted by writing
expression
[
subscript
]
or multiple adjacent elements (an “array slice”) can be extracted by writing
expression
[
lower_subscript
:
upper_subscript
]
(Here, the brackets
[ ]
are meant toappear literally.) Each
subscript
is itself an expression, which
must yield an integer value.
In general the array
expression
must be parenthesized, but the parentheses can be omitted when
the expression to be subscripted is just a column reference or positional parameter. Also, multiple
subscripts can be concatenated when the original array is multidimensional. For example:
mytable.arraycolumn[4]
mytable.two_d_column[17][34]
$1[10:42]
(arrayfunction(a,b))[42]
The parentheses in the last example are required. See Section 8.15 for more about arrays.
4.2.4. Field Selection
If an expression yields a value of a composite type (row type), then a specific field of the row can be
extracted by writing
expression
.
fieldname
In general the row
expression
must be parenthesized, but the parentheses can be omitted when the
expression to be selected from is just a table reference or positional parameter. For example:
mytable.mycolumn
$1.somecolumn
(rowfunction(a,b)).col3
(Thus, a qualified column reference is actually just a special case of the field selection syntax.) An
important special case is extracting a field from a table column that is of a composite type:
(compositecol).somefield
(mytable.compositecol).somefield
35
Chapter 4. SQL Syntax
The parentheses are required here to show that
compositecol
is a column name not a table name,
or that
mytable
is a table name not a schema name in the second case.
In a select list (see Section 7.3), you can ask for all fields of a composite value by writing
.
*
:
(compositecol).
*
4.2.5. Operator Invocations
There are three possible syntaxes for an operator invocation:
expression operator expression
(binary infix operator)
operator expression
(unary prefix operator)
expression operator
(unary postfix operator)
where the
operator
token follows the syntax rules of Section 4.1.3, or is one of the key words
AND
,
OR
,and
NOT
,or is a qualified operator name in the form:
OPERATOR(schema.operatorname)
Which particular operators existandwhether theyareunary or binarydependson whatoperatorshave
been defined by the system or the user. Chapter 9 describes the built-in operators.
4.2.6. Function Calls
The syntax for a function call is the name of a function (possibly qualified with a schema name),
followed by its argument list enclosed in parentheses:
function_name
([
expression
[,
expression
... ]] )
For example, the following computes the square root of 2:
sqrt(2)
The list of built-in functions is in Chapter 9. Other functions can be added by the user.
The arguments can optionally have names attached. See Section 4.3 for details.
Note: A function that takes a single argument of composite type can optionally be called using
field-selection syntax, andconversely field selectioncan bewritten infunctional style. That is, the
notations
col(table)
and
table.col
are interchangeable. This behavior is not SQL-standard
but is provided in PostgreSQL because it allows use of functions to emulate “computed fields”.
For more information see Section 35.4.3.
36
Chapter 4. SQL Syntax
4.2.7. Aggregate Expressions
An aggregate expression represents the application of an aggregate function across the rows selected
by a query. An aggregate function reduces multiple inputs to a single output value, such as the sum or
average of the inputs. The syntax of an aggregate expressionis one of the following:
aggregate_name
(
expression
[ , ... ] [
order_by_clause
] ) [ FILTER ( WHERE
filter_clause
) ]
aggregate_name
(ALL
expression
[ , ... ] [
order_by_clause
] ) [ FILTER ( WHERE
filter_clause
aggregate_name
(DISTINCT
expression
[ , ... ] [
order_by_clause
] ) [ FILTER ( WHERE
filter_clause
aggregate_name
(
*
) [ FILTER ( WHERE
filter_clause
) ]
aggregate_name
( [
expression
[ , ... ] ] ) WITHIN GROUP (
order_by_clause
) [ FILTER ( WHERE
where
aggregate_name
is a previously defined aggregate (possibly qualified with a schema name)
and
expression
is any value expression that does not itself contain an aggregate expression or a
window function call. The optional
order_by_clause
and
filter_clause
are described below.
The first form of aggregate expression invokes the aggregate once for each input row. The second
form is the same as the first, since
ALL
is the default. The third form invokes the aggregate once for
each distinct value of the expression (or distinct set of values, for multiple expressions) found in the
input rows. The fourth form invokes the aggregate once for each input row; since no particular input
value is specified, it is generally only useful for the
count(
*
)
aggregate function. The last form is
used with ordered-set aggregate functions, which are described below.
Most aggregate functions ignore null inputs, so that rows in which one or more of the expression(s)
yield null are discarded. This can be assumed to be true, unless otherwise specified, for all built-in
aggregates.
For example,
count(
*
)
yields the total number of input rows;
count(f1)
yields the number of
input rows in which
f1
is non-null, since
count
ignores nulls; and
count(distinct f1)
yields
the number of distinct non-null values of
f1
.
Ordinarily, the input rows are fed to the aggregate function in an unspecified order. In many cases
this does not matter; for example,
min
produces the same result no matter what order it receives
the inputs in. However, some aggregate functions (such as
array_agg
and
string_agg
)produce
results that depend on the ordering of the input rows. When using such an aggregate, the optional
order_by_clause
can be used to specify the desired ordering. The
order_by_clause
has the
same syntax as for a query-level
ORDER BY
clause, as described in Section 7.5, except that its expres-
sions are always just expressions and cannot be output-column names or numbers. For example:
SELECT array_agg(a ORDER BY b DESC) FROM table;
When dealing with multiple-argument aggregate functions, note that the
ORDER BY
clause goes after
all the aggregate arguments. For example, write this:
SELECT string_agg(a, ’,’ ORDER BY a) FROM table;
not this:
SELECT string_agg(a ORDER BY a, ’,’) FROM table;
-- incorrect
The latter is syntactically valid, but it represents a call of a single-argument aggregate function with
two
ORDER BY
keys (the second one being rather useless since it’s a constant).
If
DISTINCT
is specified in addition to an
order_by_clause
,then all the
ORDER BY
expressions
must match regular arguments of the aggregate; that is, you cannot sort on an expression that is not
includedin the
DISTINCT
list.
37
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested