pdf viewer dll for c# : Adding jpg to pdf SDK software service wpf winforms web page dnn postgresql-9.4-A4110-part2736

Chapter 39. Procedural Languages
The special return type of
language_handler
tells the database system that this function does
not return one of the defined SQL data types and is not directly usable in SQL statements.
3. Optionally, the language handler can provide an “inline” handler function that executes anony-
mous code blocks (DO commands) written in this language. If an inline handler function is pro-
vided by the language, declare it with a command like
CREATE FUNCTION
inline_function_name
(internal)
RETURNS void
AS ’
path-to-shared-object
LANGUAGE C;
4. Optionally, the language handler can provide a “validator” function that checks a function def-
inition for correctness without actually executing it. The validator function is called by
CREATE
FUNCTION
if it exists. If a validator function is provided by the language, declare it with a com-
mand like
CREATE FUNCTION
validator_function_name
(oid)
RETURNS void
AS ’
path-to-shared-object
LANGUAGE C STRICT;
5. Finally, the PL must be declared with the command
CREATE [TRUSTED] [PROCEDURAL] LANGUAGE
language-name
HANDLER
handler_function_name
[INLINE
inline_function_name
]
[VALIDATOR
validator_function_name
] ;
The optional key word
TRUSTED
specifies that the language does not grant access to data that
the user would not otherwise have. Trusted languages are designed for ordinary database users
(those without superuser privilege) and allows them to safely create functions and trigger proce-
dures. Since PL functions are executed inside the database server, the
TRUSTED
flag should only
be given for languages that do not allow access to database server internals or the file system.
The languages PL/pgSQL, PL/Tcl, and PL/Perl are considered trusted; the languages PL/TclU,
PL/PerlU, and PL/PythonU are designed to provide unlimited functionality and should not be
marked trusted.
Example 39-1 shows how the manual installation procedure would work with the language PL/Perl.
Example 39-1. Manual Installation of PL/Perl
The following command tells the database server where to find the shared object for the PL/Perl
language’s call handler function:
CREATE FUNCTION plperl_call_handler() RETURNS language_handler AS
’$libdir/plperl’ LANGUAGE C;
PL/Perl has an inline handler function and a validator function, so we declare those too:
CREATE FUNCTION plperl_inline_handler(internal) RETURNS void AS
’$libdir/plperl’ LANGUAGE C;
CREATE FUNCTION plperl_validator(oid) RETURNS void AS
’$libdir/plperl’ LANGUAGE C STRICT;
The command:
CREATE TRUSTED PROCEDURAL LANGUAGE plperl
HANDLER plperl_call_handler
INLINE plperl_inline_handler
VALIDATOR plperl_validator;
1028
Adding jpg to pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add multiple jpg to pdf; add picture to pdf in preview
Adding jpg to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add photo pdf; add jpeg to pdf
Chapter 39. Procedural Languages
then defines that the previously declared functions should be invoked for functions and trigger proce-
dures where the language attribute is
plperl
.
Ina default PostgreSQL installation, the handler for thePL/pgSQL language is builtand installedinto
the “library” directory; furthermore, the PL/pgSQL language itself is installed in all databases. If Tcl
support is configured in, the handlers for PL/Tcl and PL/TclU are built and installed in the library
directory, but the language itself is notinstalled in any database by default. Likewise, the PL/Perl and
PL/PerlU handlers are builtand installed if Perl support is configured, andthe PL/PythonUhandler is
installed if Python support is configured, but these languages are not installed by default.
1029
JPG to Word Converter | Convert JPEG to Word, Convert Word to JPG
What's more, using filters, adding morphing effects, watermarks, and do some color Open JPEG to Word Converter first; Load JPG images from local folders in
add picture to pdf form; how to add a jpeg to a pdf
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Gratis control for creating PDF from multiple image formats such as tiff, jpg, png, gif Besides, using this PDF document metadata adding control, you
adding a jpg to a pdf; add image in pdf using java
Chapter 40. PL/pgSQL - SQL Procedural
Language
40.1. Overview
PL/pgSQL is a loadable procedural language for the PostgreSQL database system. The design goals
of PL/pgSQL were tocreate a loadable procedural language that
can be used to create functions and trigger procedures,
adds control structures to the SQL language,
can perform complex computations,
inherits all user-defined types, functions, and operators,
can be defined to be trusted by the server,
is easy to use.
Functions created with PL/pgSQL can be used anywhere that built-in functions could be used. For
example, it is possible to create complex conditional computation functions and later use them to
define operators or use them in index expressions.
In PostgreSQL 9.0 and later, PL/pgSQL is installed by default. However it is still a loadable module,
so especially security-conscious administrators could choose to remove it.
40.1.1. Advantages of Using PL/pgSQL
SQL is the language PostgreSQL and most other relational databases use as query language. It’s
portable and easy to learn. But every SQL statement must be executed individually by the database
server.
That means that your client application must send each query to the database server, wait for it to
be processed, receive and process the results, do some computation, then send further queries to the
server. Allthis incurs interprocess communication andwill also incur network overhead if your client
is on a different machine than the database server.
With PL/pgSQL you can group a block of computation and a series of queries inside the database
server, thus having the power of a procedural language and the ease of use of SQL, but with consid-
erable savings of client/server communication overhead.
Extra round trips between client and server are eliminated
Intermediate results that theclient does notneeddonothavetobe marshaled or transferred between
server and client
Multiple rounds of query parsing can be avoided
This can result in a considerable performance increase as compared to an application that does not
use stored functions.
Also, with PL/pgSQL you can use all the data types, operators and functions of SQL.
1030
VB.NET Imaging - Generate Barcode Image in VB.NET
as common image files such as png and jpg. quality PLANET postal barcode images in PDF, Word and VB.NET barcode generator component for adding POSTNET barcode
add a picture to a pdf file; add photo to pdf preview
C# Word - Insert Image to Word Page in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB It's a demo code for adding image to word page using C# 0); REImage image = new REImage(@"C:\logo2.jpg"); page.AddImage
add multiple jpg to pdf; how to add image to pdf reader
Chapter 40. PL/pgSQL - SQL Procedural Language
40.1.2. Supported Argument and Result Data Types
Functions writteninPL/pgSQL can acceptas arguments any scalar or arraydata type supported by the
server, and theycan returna result of any of these types. Theycan also accept or return anycomposite
type (row type) specified by name. It is also possible to declare a PL/pgSQL function as returning
record
,which means that the result is a row type whose columns are determined by specification in
the calling query, as discussed in Section 7.2.1.4.
PL/pgSQL functions can be declared to accept a variable number of arguments by using the
VARIADIC
marker. This works exactly the same way as for SQL functions, as discussed in Section
35.4.5.
PL/pgSQL functions can also be declared to accept and return the polymorphic types
anyelement
,
anyarray
,
anynonarray
,
anyenum
,and
anyrange
.The actual data types handled by a polymor-
phic function can vary from call to call, as discussed in Section 35.2.5. An example is shown in
Section 40.3.1.
PL/pgSQL functions can also be declared to return a “set” (or table) of any data type that can be
returned as a single instance. Such a function generates its output by executing
RETURN NEXT
for
each desired element of the result set, or by using
RETURN QUERY
to output the result of evaluating a
query.
Finally, a PL/pgSQL function can be declared to return
void
if it has no useful return value.
PL/pgSQL functions can also be declared with output parameters in place of an explicit specification
of the return type. This does not add any fundamental capability to the language, but it is often con-
venient, especially for returning multiple values. The
RETURNS TABLE
notation can also be used in
place of
RETURNS SETOF
.
Specific examples appear in Section 40.3.1 and Section 40.6.1.
40.2. Structure of PL/pgSQL
PL/pgSQL is a block-structuredlanguage. The complete textof a function definition must be a block.
Ablock is defined as:
[ <<
label
>> ]
[ DECLARE
declarations
]
BEGIN
statements
END [
label
];
Each declarationandeachstatementwithin ablock is terminatedbya semicolon. A block that appears
within another block must have a semicolon after
END
,as shown above; however the final
END
that
concludes a function body does not require a semicolon.
Tip: A common mistakeis towrite a semicolon immediately after
BEGIN
.This is incorrect and will
result in a syntax error.
1031
C# Image: How to Draw Text on Images within Rasteredge .NET Image
to make this image text adding application work LoadImage = new Bitmap("C:\\1.jpg"); Graphic Text powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to add image to pdf form; add image field to pdf form
VB.NET Image: Visual Basic .NET Guide to Draw Text on Image in .
is the Visual Basic .NET method for adding text on Dim LoadImage As New Bitmap("C:\1.jpg") Dim Text powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document,
add an image to a pdf acrobat; add a picture to a pdf document
Chapter 40. PL/pgSQL - SQL Procedural Language
A
label
is only needed if you want to identify the block for use in an
EXIT
statement, or to qualify
the names of the variables declared in the block. If a label is given after
END
,it must match the label
at the block’s beginning.
All key words are case-insensitive. Identifiers are implicitly converted to lower case unless double-
quoted, just as they are in ordinary SQL commands.
Comments work the same way in PL/pgSQL code as in ordinary SQL. A double dash (
--
)starts a
comment that extends tothe end of the line. A
/
*
starts a blockcomment that extends tothe matching
occurrence of
*
/
.Block comments nest.
Any statement in the statement sectionof a blockcanbe asubblock. Subblocks canbeused for logical
groupingor tolocalize variables to asmall group of statements. Variables declared in asubblockmask
anysimilarly-named variables of outer blocks for the duration of the subblock; butyoucan access the
outer variables anyway if you qualify their names with their block’s label. For example:
CREATE FUNCTION somefunc() RETURNS integer AS $$
<< outerblock >>
DECLARE
quantity integer := 30;
BEGIN
RAISE NOTICE ’Quantity here is %’, quantity;
-- Prints 30
quantity := 50;
--
-- Create a subblock
--
DECLARE
quantity integer := 80;
BEGIN
RAISE NOTICE ’Quantity here is %’, quantity;
-- Prints 80
RAISE NOTICE ’Outer quantity here is %’, outerblock.quantity;
-- Prints 50
END;
RAISE NOTICE ’Quantity here is %’, quantity;
-- Prints 50
RETURN quantity;
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;
Note: There is actually a hidden “outer block” surrounding the body of any PL/pgSQL function.
This block provides thedeclarations of the function’s parameters (if any), as well as some special
variables such as
FOUND
(see Section 40.5.5). The outer block is labeledwith thefunction’s name,
meaning that parameters and special variables can be qualified with the function’s name.
It is important not to confuse the use of
BEGIN
/
END
for grouping statements in PL/pgSQL with the
similarly-namedSQL commands for transaction control. PL/pgSQL’s
BEGIN
/
END
are onlyfor group-
ing; theydonot startor end atransaction. Functions andtrigger procedures arealways executedwithin
atransaction established by anouter query — they cannotstart or commit that transaction, since there
would be nocontextfor them to execute in. However, a block containing an
EXCEPTION
clauseeffec-
tively forms a subtransactionthatcan be rolled back without affecting the outer transaction. For more
about that see Section 40.6.6.
1032
C# PowerPoint - Insert Image to PowerPoint File Page in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET pptx"); BasePage page = doc.GetPage(0); REImage image = new REImage(@"C:\logo2.jpg"); page.AddImage
add a jpeg to a pdf; add photo to pdf file
VB.NET Image: Create Image from Stream; Stream to Image Converter
image sharpening and old photo effect adding, resize source TIF encoder, GIF encoder and JPG encoder powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
adding image to pdf in preview; how to add image to pdf document
Chapter 40. PL/pgSQL - SQL Procedural Language
40.3. Declarations
All variables used in a block must be declared in the declarations section of the block. (The only
exceptions are that the loop variable of a
FOR
loop iterating over a range of integer values is auto-
matically declared as an integer variable, andlikewise the loop variable of a
FOR
loop iterating over a
cursor’s result is automatically declared as a record variable.)
PL/pgSQL variables can have any SQL data type, such as
integer
,
varchar
,and
char
.
Here are some examples of variable declarations:
user_id integer;
quantity numeric(5);
url varchar;
myrow tablename%ROWTYPE;
myfield tablename.columnname%TYPE;
arow RECORD;
The general syntax of a variable declaration is:
name
[ CONSTANT ]
type
[ COLLATE
collation_name
] [ NOT NULL ] [ { DEFAULT | := | = }
expression
The
DEFAULT
clause, if given, specifies the initial value assigned to the variable when the block is
entered. If the
DEFAULT
clause is not given then the variable is initialized to the SQL null value. The
CONSTANT
option prevents the variable from being assigned to after initialization, so that its value
will remain constant for the duration of the block. The
COLLATE
option specifies a collation to use
for the variable (see Section 40.3.6). If
NOT NULL
is specified, an assignment of a null value results
in a run-time error. All variables declared as
NOT NULL
must have a nonnull default value specified.
Equal (
=
)can be used instead of PL/SQL-compliant
:=
.
Avariable’s default value is evaluated and assigned to the variable each time the block is entered
(not just once per function call). So, for example, assigning
now()
to a variable of type
timestamp
causes the variable to have the time of the current function call, not the time when the function was
precompiled.
Examples:
quantity integer DEFAULT 32;
url varchar := ’http://mysite.com’;
user_id CONSTANT integer := 10;
40.3.1. Declaring Function Parameters
Parameters passed to functions are named with the identifiers
$1
,
$2
,etc. Optionally, aliases can be
declared for
$
n
parameter names for increased readability. Either the alias or the numeric identifier
can then be used to refer to the parameter value.
There are two ways to create an alias. The preferred way is to give a name to the parameter in the
CREATE FUNCTION
command, for example:
CREATE FUNCTION sales_tax(subtotal real) RETURNS real AS $$
BEGIN
RETURN subtotal
*
0.06;
END;
1033
Chapter 40. PL/pgSQL - SQL Procedural Language
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;
The other way is to explicitly declare an alias, using the declaration syntax
name
ALIAS FOR $
n
;
The same example in this style looks like:
CREATE FUNCTION sales_tax(real) RETURNS real AS $$
DECLARE
subtotal ALIAS FOR $1;
BEGIN
RETURN subtotal
*
0.06;
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;
Note: These two examples are not perfectly equivalent. In the first case,
subtotal
could be
referenced as
sales_tax.subtotal
,but in the second case it could not. (Had we attached a
label to the inner block,
subtotal
could be qualified with that label, instead.)
Some more examples:
CREATE FUNCTION instr(varchar, integer) RETURNS integer AS $$
DECLARE
v_string ALIAS FOR $1;
index ALIAS FOR $2;
BEGIN
-- some computations using v_string and index here
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;
CREATE FUNCTION concat_selected_fields(in_t sometablename) RETURNS text AS $$
BEGIN
RETURN in_t.f1 || in_t.f3 || in_t.f5 || in_t.f7;
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;
When a PL/pgSQL function is declared with output parameters, the output parameters are given
$
n
names and optional aliases in just the same wayas the normal input parameters. An output parameter
is effectively a variable that starts out NULL; it should be assigned to during the execution of the
function. The final value of the parameter is what is returned. For instance, the sales-tax example
could also be done this way:
CREATE FUNCTION sales_tax(subtotal real, OUT tax real) AS $$
BEGIN
tax := subtotal
*
0.06;
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;
Notice that we omitted
RETURNS real
—we could have included it, but it would be redundant.
Output parameters are most useful when returning multiple values. A trivial example is:
1034
Chapter 40. PL/pgSQL - SQL Procedural Language
CREATE FUNCTION sum_n_product(x int, y int, OUT sum int, OUT prod int) AS $$
BEGIN
sum := x + y;
prod := x
*
y;
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;
As discussed in Section 35.4.4, this effectively creates an anonymous record type for the function’s
results. If a
RETURNS
clause is given, it must say
RETURNS record
.
Another way to declare a PL/pgSQL function is with
RETURNS TABLE
,for example:
CREATE FUNCTION extended_sales(p_itemno int)
RETURNS TABLE(quantity int, total numeric) AS $$
BEGIN
RETURN QUERY SELECT s.quantity, s.quantity
*
s.price FROM sales AS s
WHERE s.itemno = p_itemno;
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;
This is exactly equivalent to declaring one or more
OUT
parameters and specifying
RETURNS SETOF
sometype
.
When the return type of a PL/pgSQL function is declared as a polymorphic type (
anyelement
,
anyarray
,
anynonarray
,
anyenum
,or
anyrange
), a special parameter
$0
is created. Its data type
is the actual return type of the function, as deduced from the actual input types (see Section 35.2.5).
This allows the function to access its actual return type as shownin Section 40.3.3.
$0
is initialized to
null and can be modified by the function, so it can be used to hold the return value if desired, though
that is not required.
$0
can also be given an alias. For example, this function works on any data type
that has a
+
operator:
CREATE FUNCTION add_three_values(v1 anyelement, v2 anyelement, v3 anyelement)
RETURNS anyelement AS $$
DECLARE
result ALIAS FOR $0;
BEGIN
result := v1 + v2 + v3;
RETURN result;
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;
The same effect can be had by declaring one or more output parameters as polymorphic types. In this
case the special
$0
parameter is not used; the output parameters themselves serve the same purpose.
For example:
CREATE FUNCTION add_three_values(v1 anyelement, v2 anyelement, v3 anyelement,
OUT sum anyelement)
AS $$
BEGIN
sum := v1 + v2 + v3;
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;
1035
Chapter 40. PL/pgSQL - SQL Procedural Language
40.3.2.
ALIAS
newname
ALIAS FOR
oldname
;
The
ALIAS
syntax is more general than is suggested in the previous section: you can declare an alias
for any variable, not just function parameters. The main practical use for this is to assign a different
name for variables with predetermined names, suchas
NEW
or
OLD
within a trigger procedure.
Examples:
DECLARE
prior ALIAS FOR old;
updated ALIAS FOR new;
Since
ALIAS
creates two different ways to name the same object, unrestricted use can be confusing.
It’s best to use it only for the purpose of overriding predetermined names.
40.3.3. Copying Types
variable
%TYPE
%TYPE
provides the data type of a variable or table column. You can use this to declare variables that
will hold database values. For example, let’s say you have a column named
user_id
in your
users
table. To declare a variable withthe same data type as
users.user_id
you write:
user_id users.user_id%TYPE;
By using
%TYPE
you don’t need to know the data type of the structure you are referencing, and most
importantly, if the data type of the referenceditem changes in the future (for instance: you change the
type of
user_id
from
integer
to
real
), you might not need to change your function definition.
%TYPE
is particularly valuable in polymorphic functions, since the data types needed for internal
variables can change from one call to the next. Appropriate variables can be created by applying
%TYPE
to the function’s arguments or result placeholders.
40.3.4. Row Types
name table_name%ROWTYPE
;
name composite_type_name
;
Avariable of a composite type is called a row variable (or row-type variable). Such a variable can
hold a whole row of a
SELECT
or
FOR
query result, so long as that query’s column set matches the
declared type of the variable. The individual fields of the row value are accessed using the usual dot
notation, for example
rowvar.field
.
Arow variable can be declared to have the same type as the rows of an existing table or view, by
using the
table_name%ROWTYPE
notation; or it can be declared by giving a composite type’s name.
(Since every table has an associated composite type of the same name, it actually does not matter in
PostgreSQL whether you write
%ROWTYPE
or not. But the form with
%ROWTYPE
is more portable.)
Parameters toa function can becomposite types (completetable rows). In thatcase, the corresponding
identifier
$
n
will be a row variable, and fields can be selected from it, for example
$1.user_id
.
1036
Chapter 40. PL/pgSQL - SQL Procedural Language
Only the user-defined columns of a table row are accessible in a row-type variable, not the OID or
other system columns (because the row could be from a view). The fields of the row type inherit the
table’s field size or precision for data types such as
char(
n
)
.
Here is an example of using composite types.
table1
and
table2
are existing tables having at least
the mentioned fields:
CREATE FUNCTION merge_fields(t_row table1) RETURNS text AS $$
DECLARE
t2_row table2%ROWTYPE;
BEGIN
SELECT
*
INTO t2_row FROM table2 WHERE ... ;
RETURN t_row.f1 || t2_row.f3 || t_row.f5 || t2_row.f7;
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;
SELECT merge_fields(t.
*
) FROM table1 t WHERE ... ;
40.3.5. Record Types
name
RECORD;
Record variables are similar to row-type variables, but they have no predefined structure. They take
on the actual row structure of the row they are assigned during a
SELECT
or
FOR
command. The
substructure of a record variable can change each time it is assigned to. A consequence of this is that
until a record variable is first assigned to, it has no substructure, andany attempt to access a field in it
will draw a run-time error.
Note that
RECORD
is not a true data type, only a placeholder. One should also realize that when a
PL/pgSQL function is declared to return type
record
,this is not quite the same concept as a record
variable, even though such a function might use a record variable to hold its result. In both cases the
actual row structure is unknownwhenthe function is written, but for a function returning
record
the
actual structure is determined when the calling query is parsed, whereas a record variable canchange
its row structure on-the-fly.
40.3.6. Collation of PL/pgSQL Variables
When a PL/pgSQL function has one or more parameters of collatable data types, a collationis identi-
fied for each function call depending on the collations assigned to the actual arguments, as described
in Section22.2. If a collationis successfullyidentified(i.e., there are no conflicts of implicitcollations
among the arguments) then all the collatable parameters are treated as having that collation implic-
itly. This will affect the behavior of collation-sensitive operations within the function. For example,
consider
CREATE FUNCTION less_than(a text, b text) RETURNS boolean AS $$
BEGIN
RETURN a < b;
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;
SELECT less_than(text_field_1, text_field_2) FROM table1;
1037
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested