pdf viewer dll for c# : Add a jpeg to a pdf application software utility azure winforms html visual studio postgresql-9.4-A415-part2779

Chapter 5. Data Definition
5.9.6. Caveats
The following caveats apply topartitioned tables:
There is no automatic way to verify that all of the
CHECK
constraints are mutually exclusive. It is
safer to create code that generates partitions and creates and/or modifies associated objects than to
write each by hand.
The schemes shown here assume that the partition key column(s) of a row never change, or at
least do not change enough to require it to move to another partition. An
UPDATE
that attempts
to do that will fail because of the
CHECK
constraints. If you need to handle such cases, you can
put suitable update triggers on the partition tables, but it makes management of the structure much
more complicated.
If you are using manual
VACUUM
or
ANALYZE
commands, don’tforget that you need torun them on
each partition individually. A command like:
ANALYZE measurement;
will only process the master table.
The following caveats apply toconstraint exclusion:
Constraint exclusion only works when the query’s
WHERE
clause contains constants (or exter-
nally supplied parameters). For example, a comparison against a non-immutable function such
as
CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
cannot be optimized, since the planner cannot know which partition the
function value might fall into at run time.
Keep the partitioning constraints simple, else the planner may not be able to prove that partitions
don’tneedto be visited. Usesimpleequalityconditions for list partitioning, or simplerangetests for
range partitioning, asillustratedinthe preceding examples. Agoodruleof thumbis thatpartitioning
constraints should contain only comparisons of the partitioning column(s) to constants using B-
tree-indexable operators.
All constraints on all partitions of the master table are examined during constraint exclusion, so
large numbers of partitions are likely to increase query planning time considerably. Partitioning
using these techniques will work well with up to perhaps a hundred partitions; don’t try to use
many thousands of partitions.
5.10. Foreign Data
PostgreSQL implements portions of the SQL/MED specification, allowing you to access data that
resides outside PostgreSQL using regular SQL queries. Such data is referred to as foreign data. (Note
that this usage is not to be confused with foreign keys, which are a type of constraint within the
database.)
Foreign data is accessed with help from a foreign data wrapper. A foreign data wrapper is a library
thatcan communicate withan external data source, hiding the details of connectingto the data source
and obtaining data from it. There are some foreign data wrappers available as
contrib
modules; see
Appendix F. Other kinds of foreign data wrappers might be found as third party products. If none of
the existing foreign data wrappers suit your needs, you can write your own; see Chapter 53.
78
Add a jpeg to a pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
adding an image to a pdf; add image pdf
Add a jpeg to a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
adding an image to a pdf file; add image in pdf using java
Chapter 5. Data Definition
To access foreign data, you need to create a foreign server object, which defines how to connect to
aparticular external data source according to the set of options used by its supporting foreign data
wrapper. Then you needto create one or more foreigntables, which define the structure of the remote
data. A foreign table can be used in queries just like a normal table, buta foreign table has no storage
in the PostgreSQL server. Whenever it is used, PostgreSQL asks the foreign data wrapper to fetch
data from the external source, or transmit data to the external source in the case of update commands.
Accessing remote data may require authenticating to the external data source. This information can
be providedby a user mapping, which can provide additional data such as user names and passwords
based on the current PostgreSQL role.
For additional information, see CREATE FOREIGN DATA WRAPPER, CREATE SERVER, CRE-
ATE USER MAPPING, and CREATE FOREIGN TABLE.
5.11. Other Database Objects
Tables are the central objects in a relational database structure, because they hold your data. But they
arenotthe onlyobjects thatexistina database. Manyother kinds of objects canbecreatedtomake the
use and management of the data more efficient or convenient. They are not discussed in this chapter,
but we give you a list here so that you are aware of what is possible:
Views
Functions and operators
Data types and domains
Triggers and rewrite rules
Detailed information on these topics appears in Part V.
5.12. Dependency Tracking
When you create complex database structures involving many tables with foreign key constraints,
views, triggers, functions, etc. you implicitly create a net of dependencies between the objects. For
instance, a table with a foreign key constraint depends on the table it references.
To ensure the integrity of the entire database structure, PostgreSQL makes sure that you cannot drop
objects that other objects still depend on. For example, attempting to drop the products table we had
considered in Section 5.3.5, with the orders table depending on it, would result in an error message
such as this:
DROP TABLE products;
NOTICE:
constraint orders_product_no_fkey on table orders depends on table products
ERROR:
cannot drop table products because other objects depend on it
HINT:
Use DROP ... CASCADE to drop the dependent objects too.
The error message contains a useful hint: if you do not want to bother deleting all the dependent
objects individually, you can run:
DROP TABLE products CASCADE;
79
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Convert PDF to JPEG Using VB.NET. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic. dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Drawing.dll.
add photo to pdf form; add photo to pdf in preview
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic. dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Drawing.dll.
add signature image to pdf; how to add an image to a pdf in acrobat
Chapter 5. Data Definition
and all the dependent objects will be removed. In this case, it doesn’t remove the orders table, it only
removes the foreign key constraint. (If you want to check what
DROP ... CASCADE
will do, run
DROP
without
CASCADE
and read the
NOTICE
messages.)
Alldrop commands inPostgreSQL support specifying
CASCADE
.Of course, thenatureof the possible
dependencies varies with the type of the object. You can also write
RESTRICT
instead of
CASCADE
to
get the default behavior, which is to prevent the dropping of objects that other objects depend on.
Note: According to the SQL standard, specifying either
RESTRICT
or
CASCADE
is required. No
database system actually enforces that rule, but whether the default behavior is
RESTRICT
or
CASCADE
varies across systems.
Note: Foreign key constraint dependencies and serial column dependencies from PostgreSQL
versions prior to 7.3 are not maintained or created during the upgrade process. All other depen-
dency types will be properly created during an upgrade from a pre-7.3 database.
80
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
add jpg to pdf document; add a jpg to a pdf
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
how to add image to pdf in preview; add signature image to pdf acrobat
Chapter 6. Data Manipulation
The previous chapter discussed how to create tables and other structures to hold your data. Now it is
time to fill the tables with data. This chapter covers how to insert, update, and delete table data. The
chapter after this will finally explainhow to extract your long-lost data from the database.
6.1. Inserting Data
When a table is created, it contains no data. The first thing to do before a database can be of muchuse
is to insert data. Data is conceptually inserted one row at a time. Of course you can also insert more
than one row, but there is no way to insert less than one row. Even if you know only some column
values, a complete row must be created.
To create a new row, use the INSERT command. The command requires the table name and column
values. For example, consider the products table from Chapter 5:
CREATE TABLE products (
product_no integer,
name text,
price numeric
);
An example command to insert a row would be:
INSERT INTO products VALUES (1, ’Cheese’, 9.99);
The data values are listed in the order inwhich the columns appear in the table, separatedby commas.
Usually, the data values will be literals (constants), but scalar expressions are also allowed.
The above syntax has the drawback that you need to know the order of the columns in the table. To
avoidthis youcan also listthecolumns explicitly. For example, both of the following commands have
the same effect as the one above:
INSERT INTO products (product_no, name, price) VALUES (1, ’Cheese’, 9.99);
INSERT INTO products (name, price, product_no) VALUES (’Cheese’, 9.99, 1);
Many users consider it good practice to always list the column names.
If you don’t have values for all the columns, you can omit some of them. In that case, the columns
will be filled with their default values. For example:
INSERT INTO products (product_no, name) VALUES (1, ’Cheese’);
INSERT INTO products VALUES (1, ’Cheese’);
The second form is a PostgreSQL extension. It fills the columns from the left with as many values as
are given, and the rest will be defaulted.
For clarity, you can also request defaultvalues explicitly, for individual columns or for the entire row:
INSERT INTO products (product_no, name, price) VALUES (1, ’Cheese’, DEFAULT);
INSERT INTO products DEFAULT VALUES;
You can insert multiple rows in a single command:
INSERT INTO products (product_no, name, price) VALUES
81
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Sticky Note to PDF Page in C#.NET. Able to add notes to PDF using C# source code in Visual Studio .NET framework.
add picture pdf; pdf insert image
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Load 3 image files (BMP, JPEG and PNG Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")); images.Add(new Bitmap RootPath + "\\" 1.png")); / Build a PDF document with
add image to pdf file; add photo to pdf for
Chapter 6. Data Manipulation
(1, ’Cheese’, 9.99),
(2, ’Bread’, 1.99),
(3, ’Milk’, 2.99);
Tip: When inserting a lot of data at the same time, considering using the COPY command. It
is not as flexible as the INSERT command, but is more efficient. Refer to Section 14.4 for more
information on improving bulk loading performance.
6.2. Updating Data
The modification of data that is already in the database is referred to as updating. You can update
individual rows, alltherows in atable, or a subset of all rows. Each columncanbe updated separately;
the other columns are not affected.
To update existing rows, use the UPDATE command. This requires three pieces of information:
1. The name of the table and column to update
2. The new value of the column
3. Which row(s) to update
Recallfrom Chapter 5 that SQL does not, in general, provide a unique identifier for rows. Therefore it
is not always possible to directly specify which row to update. Instead, you specify which conditions
arow must meet in order to be updated. Only if you have a primary key in the table (independent of
whether you declared it or not) can you reliably address individual rows by choosing a condition that
matches the primarykey. Graphical database access tools rely onthis factto allow you toupdate rows
individually.
For example, this command updates all products that have a price of 5 to have a price of 10:
UPDATE products SET price = 10 WHERE price = 5;
This might cause zero, one, or many rows to be updated. It is not an error to attempt an update that
does not match any rows.
Let’s look at that command in detail. First is the key word
UPDATE
followed by the table name. As
usual, the table name can be schema-qualified, otherwise it is looked up in the path. Next is the key
word
SET
followed by the column name, an equal sign, and the new column value. The new column
value can be any scalar expression, not just a constant. For example, if you want to raise the price of
all products by 10% you could use:
UPDATE products SET price = price
*
1.10;
As you see, the expression for the new value can refer to the existing value(s) in the row. We also
left out the
WHERE
clause. If it is omitted, it means that all rows in the table are updated. If it is
present, only those rows that match the
WHERE
condition are updated. Note that the equals sign in
the
SET
clause is an assignment while the one in the
WHERE
clause is a comparison, but this does not
create any ambiguity. Of course, the
WHERE
conditiondoes not have to be an equalitytest. Many other
operators are available (see Chapter 9). But the expression needs to evaluate to a Boolean result.
82
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C#: Convert PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# File: Compress PDF; C# C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to
add jpg to pdf file; add picture to pdf reader
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
C#: Convert PDF to HTML; C#: Convert PDF to Jpeg; C# File: Compress PDF; C# C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to
add a picture to a pdf; add png to pdf preview
Chapter 6. Data Manipulation
You can update more than one column in an
UPDATE
command by listing more than one assignment
in the
SET
clause. For example:
UPDATE mytable SET a = 5, b = 3, c = 1 WHERE a > 0;
6.3. Deleting Data
So far we have explained how to add data to tables and how to change data. What remains is to
discuss how to remove data that is no longer needed. Just as adding data is only possible in whole
rows, you can only remove entire rows from a table. In the previous section we explained that SQL
does not provide a way to directly address individual rows. Therefore, removing rows can only be
done by specifying conditions that the rows to be removed have to match. If you have a primary key
in the table then you can specify the exact row. But you can also remove groups of rows matching a
condition, or you can remove all rows in the table at once.
You use the DELETE command to remove rows; the syntax is very similar to the
UPDATE
command.
For instance, to remove all rows from the products table that have a price of 10, use:
DELETE FROM products WHERE price = 10;
If you simply write:
DELETE FROM products;
then all rows in the table will be deleted! Caveat programmer.
83
Chapter 7. Queries
The previous chapters explained how to create tables, how to fill them with data, andhow to manipu-
late that data. Now we finally discuss how to retrieve the data from the database.
7.1. Overview
The process of retrieving or the command to retrieve data from a database is called a query. In SQL
the SELECT command is used to specify queries. The general syntax of the
SELECT
command is
[WITH
with_queries
] SELECT
select_list
FROM
table_expression
[
sort_specification
]
The following sections describe the details of the select list, the table expression, and the sort specifi-
cation.
WITH
queries are treated last since they are an advanced feature.
Asimple kind of query has the form:
SELECT
*
FROM table1;
Assuming that there is a table called
table1
,this command would retrieve all rows and all user-
defined columns from
table1
.(The methodof retrieval depends onthe client application. For exam-
ple, the psql program will display an ASCII-art table on the screen, while client libraries will offer
functions to extract individual values from the query result.) The select list specification
*
means all
columns thatthe table expression happens toprovide. Aselectlist can alsoselecta subsetof theavail-
able columns or makecalculations using the columns. For example, if
table1
has columns named
a
,
b
,and
c
(and perhaps others) you can make the following query:
SELECT a, b + c FROM table1;
(assuming that
b
and
c
are of a numerical data type). See Section 7.3 for more details.
FROM table1
isa simple kindof tableexpression:itreads just onetable. Ingeneral, tableexpressions
can be complex constructs of base tables, joins, and subqueries. But you can also omit the table
expression entirely and use the
SELECT
command as a calculator:
SELECT 3
*
4;
This is more useful if the expressions in the select list return varying results. For example, you could
call a function this way:
SELECT random();
7.2. Table Expressions
Atable expression computes a table. The table expression contains a
FROM
clause that is optionally
followed by
WHERE
,
GROUP BY
,and
HAVING
clauses. Trivial table expressions simply refer to a table
on disk, a so-called base table, but more complex expressions can be used to modify or combine base
tables in various ways.
The optional
WHERE
,
GROUP BY
,and
HAVING
clauses in the table expression specify a pipeline of
successive transformations performed on the table derived in the
FROM
clause. All these transforma-
84
Chapter 7. Queries
tions produce a virtual table that provides the rows that are passed to the select list to compute the
output rows of the query.
7.2.1. The
FROM
Clause
The FROM Clause derives a table from one or more other tables given in a comma-separated table
reference list.
FROM
table_reference
[,
table_reference
[, ...]]
Atable reference can be a table name (possibly schema-qualified), or a derived table such as a sub-
query, a
JOIN
construct, or complex combinations of these. If more than one table reference is listed
in the
FROM
clause, the tables are cross-joined (that is, the Cartesian product of their rows is formed;
see below). The result of the
FROM
list is an intermediate virtual table that can then be subject to
transformations by the
WHERE
,
GROUP BY
,and
HAVING
clauses and is finally the result of the overall
table expression.
When a table reference names a table that is the parent of a table inheritance hierarchy, the table
reference produces rows of not only that table but all of its descendant tables, unless the key word
ONLY
precedes the table name. However, the reference produces only the columns that appear in the
named table — any columns added in subtables are ignored.
Instead of writing
ONLY
before the table name, you can write
*
after the table name to explicitly
specify that descendant tables are included. Writing
*
is not necessary since that behavior is the
default (unless you have changed the setting of the sql_inheritance configuration option). However
writing
*
might be useful to emphasize that additional tables will be searched.
7.2.1.1. Joined Tables
Ajoined table is a table derived from two other (real or derived) tables according to the rules of the
particular join type. Inner, outer, and cross-joins are available. The general syntax of a joined table is
T1 join_type T2
[
join_condition
]
Joins of all types can be chained together, or nested: either or both
T1
and
T2
can be joined tables.
Parentheses can be used around
JOIN
clauses to control the join order. In the absence of parentheses,
JOIN
clauses nest left-to-right.
Join Types
Cross join
T1
CROSS JOIN
T2
For every possible combination of rows from
T1
and
T2
(i.e., a Cartesian product), the joined
table will contain a row consisting of all columns in
T1
followed by all columns in
T2
.If the
tables have N and M rows respectively, the joined table will have N * M rows.
FROM
T1
CROSS JOIN
T2
is equivalent to
FROM
T1
INNER JOIN
T2
ON TRUE
(see below).
It is also equivalent to
FROM
T1
,
T2
.
Note: This latter equivalence does not hold exactly when more than two tables appear, be-
cause
JOIN
binds more tightly than comma. For example
FROM
T1
CROSS JOIN
T2
INNER
JOIN
T3
ON
condition
is not the same as
FROM
T1
,
T2
INNER JOIN
T3
ON
condition
be-
cause the
condition
can reference
T1
in the first case but not the second.
85
Chapter 7. Queries
Qualified joins
T1
{ [INNER] | { LEFT | RIGHT | FULL } [OUTER] } JOIN
T2
ON
boolean_expression
T1
{ [INNER] | { LEFT | RIGHT | FULL } [OUTER] } JOIN
T2
USING (
join column list
)
T1
NATURAL { [INNER] | { LEFT | RIGHT | FULL } [OUTER] } JOIN
T2
The words
INNER
and
OUTER
are optional in all forms.
INNER
is the default;
LEFT
,
RIGHT
,and
FULL
imply an outer join.
The join condition is specified in the
ON
or
USING
clause, or implicitly by the word
NATURAL
.
The joincondition determines whichrows from the two source tables are consideredto “match”,
as explained in detail below.
The possible types of qualified join are:
INNER JOIN
For each row R1 of T1, the joined table has a row for each row in T2 that satisfies the join
condition with R1.
LEFT OUTER JOIN
First, an inner join is performed. Then, for each row in T1 that does not satisfy the join
condition with any row in T2, a joined row is added with null values in columns of T2.
Thus, the joined table always has at least one row for each row in T1.
RIGHT OUTER JOIN
First, an inner join is performed. Then, for each row in T2 that does not satisfy the join
condition withanyrow inT1, a joined row is added withnull values in columns of T1. This
is the converse of a left join: the result table will always have a row for each row in T2.
FULL OUTER JOIN
First, an inner join is performed. Then, for each row in T1 that does not satisfy the join
condition with any row in T2, a joined row is added with null values in columns of T2.
Also, for each row of T2 that does not satisfy the join condition with any row in T1, a
joined row with null values in the columns of T1 is added.
The
ON
clause is the most general kind of join condition: it takes a Boolean value expression
of the same kind as is used in a
WHERE
clause. A pair of rows from
T1
and
T2
match if the
ON
expression evaluates to true.
The
USING
clauseis a shorthandthat allows you totake advantageof the specific situation where
both sides of the join use the same name for the joining column(s). It takes a comma-separated
listof the shared column names and forms a join condition that includes an equality comparison
for each one. For example, joining
T1
and
T2
with
USING (a, b)
produces the join condition
ON
T1
.a =
T2
.a AND
T1
.b =
T2
.b
.
Furthermore, the output of
JOIN USING
suppresses redundantcolumns: there is no need to print
both of the matched columns, since they must have equal values. While
JOIN ON
produces all
columns from
T1
followed by all columns from
T2
,
JOIN USING
produces one output column
for each of the listed column pairs (inthe listedorder), followed byanyremainingcolumns from
T1
,followed by any remaining columns from
T2
.
86
Chapter 7. Queries
Finally,
NATURAL
is a shorthand form of
USING
:it forms a
USING
list consisting of all column
names that appear in both input tables. As with
USING
,these columns appear only once in the
output table. If there are no common column names,
NATURAL
behaves like
CROSS JOIN
.
Note:
USING
is reasonably safe from column changes in the joined relations since only the
listedcolumnsarecombined.
NATURAL
is considerablymoreriskysinceanyschemachanges
to either relation that cause a new matching column name to be present will cause the join
to combine that new column as well.
To put this together, assume we have tables
t1
:
num | name
-----+------
1 | a
2 | b
3 | c
and
t2
:
num | value
-----+-------
1 | xxx
3 | yyy
5 | zzz
then we get the following results for the various joins:
=> SELECT
*
FROM t1 CROSS JOIN t2;
num | name | num | value
-----+------+-----+-------
1 | a
|
1 | xxx
1 | a
|
3 | yyy
1 | a
|
5 | zzz
2 | b
|
1 | xxx
2 | b
|
3 | yyy
2 | b
|
5 | zzz
3 | c
|
1 | xxx
3 | c
|
3 | yyy
3 | c
|
5 | zzz
(9 rows)
=> SELECT
*
FROM t1 INNER JOIN t2 ON t1.num = t2.num;
num | name | num | value
-----+------+-----+-------
1 | a
|
1 | xxx
3 | c
|
3 | yyy
(2 rows)
=> SELECT
*
FROM t1 INNER JOIN t2 USING (num);
num | name | value
-----+------+-------
1 | a
| xxx
3 | c
| yyy
(2 rows)
87
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested