pdf viewer for asp.net web application : How to add image to pdf file SDK application service wpf windows winforms dnn postgresql-9.4-A4193-part2827

Chapter 48. System Catalogs
Name
Type
References
Description
histogram_bounds
anyarray
Alist of values that
divide the column’s
values into groups of
approximately equal
population. The values
in
most_common_vals
,
if present, are omitted
from this histogram
calculation. (This
column is null if the
column data type does
not have a
<
operator
or if the
most_common_vals
list accounts for the
entire population.)
correlation
real
Statistical correlation
between physical row
ordering and logical
ordering of the column
values. This ranges
from -1 to+1. When
the value is near -1 or
+1, an index scanon
the column will be
estimated to be cheaper
thanwhen it is near
zero, due to reduction
of random access tothe
disk. (This column is
null if the column data
type does not have a
<
operator.)
most_common_elems
anyarray
Alist of non-null
element values most
often appearing within
values of the column.
(Nullfor scalar types.)
1858
How to add image to pdf file - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
how to add an image to a pdf file; add a picture to a pdf document
How to add image to pdf file - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add png to pdf preview; add png to pdf acrobat
Chapter 48. System Catalogs
Name
Type
References
Description
most_common_elem_freqs
real[]
Alist of the
frequencies of the most
common element
values, i.e., the fraction
of rows containing at
least one instance of
the given value. Two or
three additional values
follow the per-element
frequencies; these are
the minimum and
maximum of the
preceding per-element
frequencies, and
optionallythe
frequency of null
elements. (Null when
most_common_elems
is.)
elem_count_histogram
real[]
Ahistogram of the
counts of distinct
non-null element
values withinthe
values of the column,
followedby the
average number of
distinct non-null
elements. (Null for
scalar types.)
The maximum number of entries in the array fields can be controlled on a column-by-column
basis using the
ALTER TABLE SET STATISTICS
command, or globally by setting the
default_statistics_target run-time parameter.
48.70.
pg_tables
The view
pg_tables
provides access to useful information about each table in the database.
Table 48-71.
pg_tables
Columns
Name
Type
References
Description
schemaname
name
pg_namespace
.nspname
Name of schema
containing table
tablename
name
pg_class
.relname
Name of table
tableowner
name
pg_authid
.rolname
Name of table’s owner
tablespace
name
pg_tablespace
.spcname
Name of tablespace
containing table (null if
default for database)
1859
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
add a picture to a pdf; add photo to pdf
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file.
adding image to pdf; add image to pdf form
Chapter 48. System Catalogs
Name
Type
References
Description
hasindexes
boolean
pg_class
.relhasindex
True if table has (or
recently had) any
indexes
hasrules
boolean
pg_class
.relhasrules
True if table has (or
once had) rules
hastriggers
boolean
pg_class
.relhastriggers
True if table has (or
once had) triggers
48.71.
pg_timezone_abbrevs
The view
pg_timezone_abbrevs
provides a list of time zone abbreviations that are currently
recognized by the datetime input routines. The contents of this view change when the
timezone_abbreviations run-time parameter is modified.
Table 48-72.
pg_timezone_abbrevs
Columns
Name
Type
Description
abbrev
text
Time zone abbreviation
utc_offset
interval
Offset from UTC (positive
means east of Greenwich)
is_dst
boolean
True if this is a daylight-savings
abbreviation
48.72.
pg_timezone_names
The view
pg_timezone_names
provides a list of time zone names that are recognized by
SET
TIMEZONE
,alongwiththeir associatedabbreviations, UTC offsets, anddaylight-savingsstatus. (Tech-
nically, PostgreSQL uses UT1rather thanUTC because leapseconds are not handled.) Unlike the ab-
breviations shown in
pg_timezone_abbrevs
,many of these names imply a set of daylight-savings
transition date rules. Therefore, the associatedinformation changes across local DST boundaries. The
displayed information is computed based on the current value of
CURRENT_TIMESTAMP
.
Table 48-73.
pg_timezone_names
Columns
Name
Type
Description
name
text
Time zone name
abbrev
text
Time zone abbreviation
utc_offset
interval
Offset from UTC (positive
means east of Greenwich)
is_dst
boolean
True if currently observing
daylight savings
1860
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF;
adding an image to a pdf in preview; add jpg to pdf online
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively.
add image to pdf; adding image to pdf form
Chapter 48. System Catalogs
48.73.
pg_user
The view
pg_user
provides access to information about database users. This is simply a publicly
readable view of
pg_shadow
that blanks out the password field.
Table 48-74.
pg_user
Columns
Name
Type
Description
usename
name
User name
usesysid
oid
IDof this user
usecreatedb
bool
User can create databases
usesuper
bool
User is a superuser
usecatupd
bool
User can update system
catalogs. (Even a superuser
cannot do this unless this
column is true.)
userepl
bool
User can initiate streaming
replication and put the system
in and out of backup mode.
passwd
text
Not the password (always reads
as
********
)
valuntil
abstime
Password expiry time (only
used for password
authentication)
useconfig
text[]
Session defaults for run-time
configuration variables
48.74.
pg_user_mappings
The view
pg_user_mappings
provides access to information about user mappings. This is essen-
tially a publicly readable view of
pg_user_mapping
that leaves out the options field if the user has
no rights to use it.
Table 48-75.
pg_user_mappings
Columns
Name
Type
References
Description
umid
oid
pg_user_mapping
.oid
OID of the user
mapping
srvid
oid
pg_foreign_server
.oid
The OID of the foreign
server that contains this
mapping
srvname
name
pg_foreign_server
.srvname
Name of the foreign
server
umuser
oid
pg_authid
.oid
OID of the local role
being mapped, 0 if the
user mapping is public
1861
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
RasterEdge .NET Image SDK has included a variety of image and document Add necessary references In addition, VB.NET users can append a PDF file to the end of a
attach image to pdf form; add image to pdf online
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Convert smooth lines to curves. Detect and merge image fragments. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document. Add necessary references:
how to add jpg to pdf file; how to add a picture to a pdf document
Chapter 48. System Catalogs
Name
Type
References
Description
usename
name
Name of the local user
to be mapped
umoptions
text[]
User mapping specific
options, as
“keyword=value”
strings, if the current
user is the owner of the
foreign server, else null
48.75.
pg_views
The view
pg_views
provides access to useful informationabout each view in the database.
Table 48-76.
pg_views
Columns
Name
Type
References
Description
schemaname
name
pg_namespace
.nspname
Name of schema
containing view
viewname
name
pg_class
.relname
Name of view
viewowner
name
pg_authid
.rolname
Name of view’s owner
definition
text
View definition(a
reconstructed
SELECT
query)
1862
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
PDF document splitting, PDF page reordering and PDF page image and text Add necessary references: In addition, C# users can append a PDF file to the end of a
adding an image to a pdf; adding images to a pdf document
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
1). ' Create output PDF file path list Dim outputFilePaths As New List(Of String) Dim i As Integer For i = 0 To splitIndex.Length outputFilePaths.Add(Program
add image to pdf java; how to add a jpeg to a pdf file
Chapter 49. Frontend/Backend Protocol
PostgreSQL uses a message-based protocol for communication between frontends and backends
(clients and servers). The protocol is supported over TCP/IP and also over Unix-domain sockets.
Port number 5432 has been registered with IANA as the customary TCP port number for servers
supporting this protocol, but in practice any non-privileged port number can be used.
This document describes version 3.0 of the protocol, implemented in PostgreSQL 7.4 and later. For
descriptions of the earlier protocol versions, see previous releases of the PostgreSQL documentation.
Asingle server can support multiple protocol versions. The initial startup-request message tells the
server whichprotocol version the client is attempting to use, and then the server follows that protocol
if it is able.
In order to serve multiple clients efficiently, the server launches a new “backend” process for each
client. In the current implementation, a new child process is created immediately after an incoming
connection is detected. This is transparent to the protocol, however. For purposes of the protocol, the
terms “backend” and “server” are interchangeable; likewise “frontend” and “client” are interchange-
able.
49.1. Overview
The protocol has separate phases for startup and normal operation. In the startup phase, the frontend
opens a connection to the server and authenticates itself to the satisfaction of the server. (This might
involve a single message, or multiple messages depending on the authentication method being used.)
If all goes well, the server then sends status information to the frontend, and finally enters normal
operation. Except for the initial startup-request message, this part of the protocol is driven by the
server.
During normal operation, the frontend sends queries and other commands to the backend, and the
backend sends back query results and other responses. There are a few cases (such as
NOTIFY
)
wherein the backend will send unsolicited messages, but for the most part this portion of a session is
driven by frontend requests.
Terminationof the session is normallyby frontend choice, butcan be forced bythe backend in certain
cases. In any case, when the backend closes the connection, it will roll back any open (incomplete)
transaction before exiting.
Within normaloperation, SQL commands can be executed through either of two sub-protocols. In the
“simple query” protocol, the frontend just sends a textual query string, which is parsed and immedi-
ately executed by the backend. In the “extended query” protocol, processing of queries is separated
into multiple steps: parsing, binding of parameter values, and execution. This offers flexibility and
performance benefits, at the cost of extra complexity.
Normal operation has additional sub-protocols for special operations such as
COPY
.
49.1.1. Messaging Overview
Allcommunication is througha stream of messages. Thefirst byteof a message identifies the message
type, and the next four bytes specify the length of the rest of the message (this length count includes
itself, but not the message-type byte). The remaining contents of the message are determined by the
1863
Chapter 49. Frontend/Backend Protocol
message type. For historical reasons, the very first message sent by the client (the startup message)
has no initial message-type byte.
To avoid losing synchronization with the message stream, both servers and clients typically read an
entire message into a buffer (using the byte count) before attempting to process its contents. This
allows easy recovery if an error is detected while processing the contents. In extreme situations (such
as nothavingenoughmemory to buffer the message), the receiver canuse the byte count to determine
how much input to skip before it resumes reading messages.
Conversely, both servers and clients must take care never to send an incomplete message. This is
commonlydone bymarshalingthe entiremessagein abuffer before beginning tosend it. If a commu-
nications failure occurs partway throughsendingor receivinga message, the onlysensible response is
to abandonthe connection, since there is little hope of recoveringmessage-boundary synchronization.
49.1.2. Extended Query Overview
In the extended-query protocol, execution of SQL commands is divided into multiple steps. The state
retained between steps is represented by two types of objects: prepared statements and portals. A
prepared statement represents the result of parsing and semantic analysis of a textual query string. A
prepared statement is not in itself ready to execute, because it might lack specific values for parame-
ters. Aportal represents a ready-to-execute or already-partially-executedstatement, with any missing
parameter values filled in. (For
SELECT
statements, a portal is equivalent to an open cursor, but we
choose to use a different term since cursors don’t handle non-
SELECT
statements.)
The overallexecutioncycle consists of a parse step, which creates a prepared statement from a textual
query string; a bind step, which creates a portal given a prepared statement and values for anyneeded
parameters; and an execute step that runs a portal’s query. In the case of a query that returns rows
(
SELECT
,
SHOW
,etc), the execute step can be told to fetch only a limited number of rows, so that
multiple execute steps might be needed to complete the operation.
The backendcan keep track of multipleprepared statements andportals (butnote thatthese existonly
within a session, and are never shared across sessions). Existing prepared statements and portals are
referencedby names assigned whenthey were created. In addition, an “unnamed” prepared statement
and portal exist. Although these behave largely the same as named objects, operations on them are
optimized for the case of executing a query only once and then discarding it, whereas operations on
named objects are optimized on the expectation of multiple uses.
49.1.3. Formats and Format Codes
Data of a particular data type might be transmitted in any of several different formats. As of Post-
greSQL 7.4 the only supported formats are “text” and “binary”, but the protocol makes provision for
future extensions. The desired format for any value is specified by a format code. Clients can spec-
ify a format code for each transmitted parameter value and for each column of a query result. Text
has format code zero, binary has format code one, and all other format codes are reserved for future
definition.
The text representation of values is whatever strings are produced and accepted by the input/output
conversion functions for the particular data type. In the transmitted representation, there is no trailing
null character; the frontend must add one to received values if it wants to process them as C strings.
(The text format does not allow embedded nulls, by the way.)
Binary representations for integers use network byte order (most significant byte first). For other data
types consult the documentation or source code to learn about the binary representation. Keep in
1864
Chapter 49. Frontend/Backend Protocol
mind that binary representations for complex data types might change across server versions; the text
format is usually the more portable choice.
49.2. Message Flow
This section describes the message flow and thesemantics of eachmessagetype. (Details of the exact
representation of each message appear in Section 49.5.) There are several different sub-protocols de-
pendingonthestate of the connection: start-up, query, functioncall,
COPY
,and termination. There are
also special provisions for asynchronous operations (including notification responses and command
cancellation), which can occur at any time after the start-up phase.
49.2.1. Start-up
To begin a session, a frontend opens a connection to the server and sends a startup message. This
message includes the names of the user and of the database the user wants to connect to; it also
identifies the particular protocol version to be used. (Optionally, the startup message can include
additional settings for run-time parameters.) The server then uses this information andthe contents of
its configuration files (such as
pg_hba.conf
)to determine whether the connection is provisionally
acceptable, and what additional authentication is required (if any).
The server then sends an appropriate authentication request message, to which the frontend must
replywith anappropriate authenticationresponsemessage (suchas a password). For all authentication
methods except GSSAPI and SSPI, there is at most one request and one response. In some methods,
no response at all is needed from the frontend, and so no authentication request occurs. For GSSAPI
and SSPI, multiple exchanges of packets may be needed to complete the authentication.
The authentication cycleends withthe server either rejectingtheconnectionattempt(ErrorResponse),
or sending AuthenticationOk.
The possible messages from the server in this phase are:
ErrorResponse
The connection attempt has been rejected. The server then immediately closes the connection.
AuthenticationOk
The authentication exchange is successfully completed.
AuthenticationKerberosV5
The frontend mustnow take partin aKerberos V5 authentication dialog(notdescribedhere, part
of the Kerberos specification) with the server. If this is successful, the server responds with an
AuthenticationOk, otherwise it responds with an ErrorResponse. This is no longer supported.
AuthenticationCleartextPassword
The frontend must now send a PasswordMessage containing the password in clear-text form. If
this is the correct password, the server responds withan AuthenticationOk, otherwise it responds
with an ErrorResponse.
AuthenticationMD5Password
The frontend must now send a PasswordMessage containing the password (with username)
encrypted via MD5, then encrypted again using the 4-byte random salt specified in the Au-
thenticationMD5Password message. If this is the correct password, the server responds with
1865
Chapter 49. Frontend/Backend Protocol
an AuthenticationOk, otherwise it responds with an ErrorResponse. The actual PasswordMes-
sage can be computed in SQL as
concat(’md5’, md5(concat(md5(concat(password,
username)), random-salt)))
.(Keep in mind the
md5()
function returns its result as a hex
string.)
AuthenticationSCMCredential
This response is only possible for local Unix-domain connections on platforms that support
SCM credential messages. The frontend must issue an SCM credential message and then send a
single data byte. (The contents of the data byte are uninteresting; it’s only used to ensure that the
server waits long enough to receive the credential message.) If the credential is acceptable, the
server responds with an AuthenticationOk, otherwise it responds with an ErrorResponse. (This
message type is only issued by pre-9.1 servers. It may eventually be removed from the protocol
specification.)
AuthenticationGSS
The frontend must now initiate a GSSAPI negotiation. The frontend will send a PasswordMes-
sage with the first part of the GSSAPI data stream in response to this. If further messages are
needed, the server will respond with AuthenticationGSSContinue.
AuthenticationSSPI
The frontend must now initiate a SSPI negotiation. The frontend will send a PasswordMessage
with the first part of the SSPI data stream in response to this. If further messages are needed, the
server will respond with AuthenticationGSSContinue.
AuthenticationGSSContinue
This message contains the response data from the previous step of GSSAPI or SSPI negotia-
tion (AuthenticationGSS, AuthenticationSSPI or a previous AuthenticationGSSContinue). If the
GSSAPI or SSPI data in this message indicates more data is needed to complete the authenti-
cation, the frontend must send that data as another PasswordMessage. If GSSAPI or SSPI au-
thentication is completed by this message, the server will nextsend AuthenticationOk toindicate
successful authenticationor ErrorResponse to indicate failure.
If the frontend does not support the authentication method requested by the server, then it should
immediately close the connection.
After having received AuthenticationOk, the frontend must wait for further messages from the server.
In this phase a backend process is being started, and the frontend is just an interested bystander. It is
still possible for the startup attempt to fail (ErrorResponse), but in the normal case the backend will
send some ParameterStatus messages, BackendKeyData, and finally ReadyForQuery.
During this phase the backend will attempt to apply any additional run-time parameter settings that
were given in the startupmessage. If successful, these values become sessiondefaults. Anerror causes
ErrorResponse and exit.
The possible messages from the backend in this phase are:
BackendKeyData
This message provides secret-key data that the frontend must save if it wants to be able to is-
sue cancel requests later. The frontend should not respond to this message, but should continue
listening for a ReadyForQuery message.
ParameterStatus
This messageinforms the frontend aboutthecurrent (initial) settingof backendparameters, such
as client_encoding or DateStyle. The frontend can ignore this message, or record the settings
1866
Chapter 49. Frontend/Backend Protocol
for its future use; see Section 49.2.6 for more details. The frontend should not respond to this
message, but should continue listening for a ReadyForQuery message.
ReadyForQuery
Start-up is completed. The frontend can now issue commands.
ErrorResponse
Start-up failed. The connection is closed after sending this message.
NoticeResponse
Awarning message has been issued. The frontend should display the message but continue
listening for ReadyForQuery or ErrorResponse.
The ReadyForQuery message is the same one that the backend will issue after each command cycle.
Dependingonthecodingneeds of the frontend, itis reasonableto consider ReadyForQueryas starting
acommand cycle, or to consider ReadyForQuery as ending the start-up phase and each subsequent
command cycle.
49.2.2. Simple Query
Asimple query cycle is initiated by the frontend sending a Query message to the backend. The mes-
sage includes an SQL command (or commands) expressed as a text string. The backend then sends
one or more response messages depending on the contents of the query command string, and finally
aReadyForQuery response message. ReadyForQuery informs the frontend that it can safely send a
newcommand. (Itis not actually necessaryfor the frontend towait for ReadyForQuery beforeissuing
another command, but the frontend must then take responsibility for figuring out what happens if the
earlier command fails and already-issued later commands succeed.)
The possible response messages from the backend are:
CommandComplete
An SQL command completed normally.
CopyInResponse
The backend is ready to copy data from the frontend to a table; see Section 49.2.5.
CopyOutResponse
The backend is ready to copy data from a table to the frontend; see Section 49.2.5.
RowDescription
Indicates that rows are about to be returned in response to a
SELECT
,
FETCH
,etc query. The
contents of this message describe the column layout of the rows. This will be followed by a
DataRow message for each row being returned to the frontend.
DataRow
One of the set of rows returned by a
SELECT
,
FETCH
,etc query.
EmptyQueryResponse
An empty query string was recognized.
ErrorResponse
An error has occurred.
1867
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested