pdf viewer for asp.net web application : Add image pdf acrobat SDK software project wpf windows asp.net UWP postgresql-9.4-A4201-part2837

Chapter 55. Index Access Method Interface Definition
Access methods that support ordering operators should set
pg_am
.
amcanorderbyop
to true. This
indicates that the index is capable of returning entries inan order satisfying
ORDER BY index_key
operator constant
.Scanmodifiers of that form canbe passed to
amrescan
as described previ-
ously.
The
amgettuple
function has a
direction
argument, which can be either
ForwardScanDirection
(the normal case) or
BackwardScanDirection
. If the first call after
amrescan
specifies
BackwardScanDirection
, then the set of matching index entries is to be
scanned back-to-front rather than in the normal front-to-back direction, so
amgettuple
must return
the last matching tuple in the index, rather than the first one as it normally would. (This will only
occur for access methods that set
amcanorder
to true.) After the first call,
amgettuple
must
be prepared to advance the scan in either direction from the most recently returned entry. (But if
pg_am
.
amcanbackward
is false, all subsequent calls will have the same direction as the first one.)
Access methods that support ordered scans must support “marking” a position in a scan and later
returning to the marked position. The same position might be restored multiple times. However, only
one position need be remembered per scan; a new
ammarkpos
call overrides the previously marked
position. An access method that does not support ordered scans should still provide mark and restore
functions in
pg_am
,but it is sufficient to have them throw errors if called.
Both the scan position and the mark position (if any) must be maintained consistently in the face
of concurrent insertions or deletions in the index. It is OK if a freshly-inserted entry is not returned
by a scan that would have found the entry if it had existed when the scan started, or for the scan to
return such an entryupon rescanning or backing up even though it had not beenreturned the firsttime
through. Similarly, a concurrent delete mightor mightnotbe reflectedin the results of a scan. Whatis
important is thatinsertions or deletions not cause the scan to miss or multiply return entries that were
not themselves being inserted or deleted.
If the index stores the original indexed data values (and not some lossy representation of them), it is
useful to support index-only scans, in which the index returns the actual data not just the TID of the
heap tuple. This will only work if the visibility map shows that the TID is on an all-visible page; else
the heap tuple must be visited anyway to check MVCC visibility. But thatis no concern of the access
method’s.
Insteadof using
amgettuple
,an index scancanbe done with
amgetbitmap
tofetchalltuples inone
call. This can be noticeably more efficient than
amgettuple
because it allows avoiding lock/unlock
cycles within the access method. Inprinciple
amgetbitmap
shouldhave the same effects as repeated
amgettuple
calls, but we impose several restrictions tosimplify matters. First of all,
amgetbitmap
returns all tuples at once and marking or restoring scan positions isn’t supported. Secondly, the tu-
ples are returned in a bitmap which doesn’t have any specific ordering, which is why
amgetbitmap
doesn’t take a
direction
argument. (Ordering operators will never be supplied for such a scan,
either.) Also, there is no provision for index-only scans with
amgetbitmap
,since there is no way
to return the contents of index tuples. Finally,
amgetbitmap
does not guarantee any locking of the
returned tuples, with implications spelled out in Section 55.4.
Note thatit is permitted for anaccess methodtoimplement only
amgetbitmap
andnot
amgettuple
,
or vice versa, if its internal implementation is unsuited to one API or the other.
55.4. Index Locking Considerations
Index access methods must handle concurrent updates of the index by multiple processes. The
core PostgreSQL system obtains
AccessShareLock
on the index during an index scan, and
1938
Add image pdf acrobat - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
adding an image to a pdf form; add an image to a pdf
Add image pdf acrobat - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add image to pdf form; how to add image to pdf in preview
Chapter 55. Index Access Method Interface Definition
RowExclusiveLock
when updating the index (including plain
VACUUM
). Since these lock types do
not conflict, the access method is responsible for handling any fine-grainedlockingit might need. An
exclusive lock on the index as a whole will be taken only during index creation, destruction, or
REINDEX
.
Building anindextype thatsupports concurrent updates usually requires extensive and subtle analysis
of the required behavior. For the b-tree and hash index types, you can read about the design decisions
involved in
src/backend/access/nbtree/README
and
src/backend/access/hash/README
.
Aside from the index’s owninternal consistency requirements, concurrentupdates create issues about
consistency between the parent table (the heap) and the index. Because PostgreSQL separates ac-
cesses and updates of the heap from those of the index, there are windows in which the index might
be inconsistent with the heap. We handle this problem with the following rules:
Anew heap entry is made before making its index entries. (Therefore a concurrent index scan is
likely to fail to see the heap entry. This is okay because the index reader would be uninterested in
an uncommitted row anyway. But see Section 55.5.)
When a heap entry is to be deleted (by
VACUUM
), all its index entries must be removed first.
An index scan must maintain a pin on the index page holding the item last returned by
amgettuple
, and
ambulkdelete
cannot delete entries from pages that are pinned by other
backends. The need for this rule is explained below.
Without the third rule, it is possible for an indexreader tosee anindex entry just before it is removed
by
VACUUM
,and then to arrive at the corresponding heap entry after that was removed by
VACUUM
.
This creates no serious problems if that item number is still unused when the reader reaches it, since
an empty item slot will be ignored by
heap_fetch()
.But what if a third backend has already re-
used the item slotfor something else? When usingan MVCC-compliant snapshot, there is no problem
because the new occupant of the slot is certain to be too newto pass the snapshot test. However, with
anon-MVCC-compliant snapshot (such as
SnapshotAny
), it would be possible to accept and return
arow thatdoes not in fact matchthe scan keys. Wecould defend against this scenario byrequiring the
scan keys to be rechecked against the heap row in all cases, but that is too expensive. Instead, we use
apin on an index page as a proxy to indicate that the reader might still be “in flight” from the index
entry to the matching heap entry. Making
ambulkdelete
block on such a pin ensures that
VACUUM
cannot delete the heap entry before the reader is done with it. This solution costs little in run time,
and adds blocking overhead only in the rare cases where there actuallyis a conflict.
This solution requires that index scans be “synchronous”: we have to fetch each heap tuple imme-
diately after scanning the corresponding index entry. This is expensive for a number of reasons. An
“asynchronous” scan in which we collect many TIDs from the index, and only visit the heap tuples
sometime later, requires much less indexlockingoverhead and canallowa more efficient heap access
pattern. Per the above analysis, we must use the synchronous approach for non-MVCC-compliant
snapshots, but an asynchronous scan is workable for a query using an MVCC snapshot.
In an
amgetbitmap
index scan, the access method does not keep an index pinon any of the returned
tuples. Therefore it is only safe to use such scans with MVCC-compliant snapshots.
When the
ampredlocks
flag is not set, any scan using that indexaccess methodwithin a serializable
transaction willacquire a nonblockingpredicate lock on the fullindex. This will generate a read-write
conflict with the insert of any tuple into that index by a concurrent serializable transaction. If certain
patterns of read-write conflicts are detected among a set of concurrent serializable transactions, one
of those transactions may be canceled to protect data integrity. When the flag is set, it indicates that
the index access method implements finer-grained predicate locking, which will tend to reduce the
frequency of such transaction cancellations.
1939
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Convert image files to PDF. File & Page Process. Annotate & Comment. Add, insert PDF native annotations to PDF file. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF
adding an image to a pdf in acrobat; how to add a jpg to a pdf
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. you can easily perform file conversion from PDF document to image or document
add signature image to pdf; add jpg to pdf acrobat
Chapter 55. Index Access Method Interface Definition
55.5. Index Uniqueness Checks
PostgreSQL enforces SQL uniqueness constraints using unique indexes, which are indexes that
disallow multiple entries with identical keys. An access method that supports this feature sets
pg_am
.
amcanunique
true. (At present, only b-tree supports it.)
Because of MVCC, it is always necessary to allow duplicate entries to exist physically in an index:
the entries might refer tosuccessive versions of asingle logicalrow. The behavior we actuallywant to
enforce is that no MVCC snapshot could include two rows with equal index keys. This breaks down
into the following cases that must be checked when inserting a new row into a unique index:
If a conflicting valid rowhas been deleted by the current transaction, it’s okay. (In particular, since
anUPDATE always deletes the old row version before inserting the newversion, this will allow an
UPDATE on a row without changing the key.)
If a conflicting row has been inserted by an as-yet-uncommitted transaction, the would-be inserter
must wait to see if that transaction commits. If it rolls back then there is no conflict. If it commits
withoutdeletingthe conflicting rowagain, there is a uniqueness violation. (In practice we just wait
for the other transaction to end and then redo the visibility checkin toto.)
Similarly, if a conflicting valid row has been deleted by an as-yet-uncommitted transaction, the
would-be inserter must wait for that transaction to commit or abort, andthen repeat the test.
Furthermore, immediately before reporting a uniqueness violation according to the above rules, the
access method must recheck the liveness of the row being inserted. If it is committed dead then no
violation should be reported. (This case cannot occur during the ordinary scenario of inserting a row
that’s just been created by the current transaction. It can happen during
CREATE UNIQUE INDEX
CONCURRENTLY
,however.)
We require the index access method to apply these tests itself, which means that it must reach into
the heap to check the commit status of any row that is shown to have a duplicate key according to
the index contents. This is without a doubt ugly and non-modular, but it saves redundant work: if we
did a separate probe then the index lookup for a conflicting row would be essentially repeated while
finding the place to insert the new row’s index entry. What’s more, there is no obvious way to avoid
race conditions unless the conflict check is an integral part of insertion of the new index entry.
If the unique constraint is deferrable, there is additional complexity: we need to be able to insert
an index entry for a new row, but defer any uniqueness-violation error until end of statement or
even later. To avoid unnecessary repeat searches of the index, the index access method should do
apreliminary uniqueness check during the initial insertion. If this shows that there is definitely no
conflicting live tuple, we are done. Otherwise, we schedule a recheck to occur when it is time to
enforce the constraint. If, at the time of the recheck, both the inserted tuple and some other tuple with
the same key are live, then the error must be reported. (Note that for this purpose, “live” actually
means “anytuple in the indexentry’s HOT chainis live”.) Toimplementthis, the
aminsert
function
is passed a
checkUnique
parameter having one of the followingvalues:
UNIQUE_CHECK_NO
indicates that no uniqueness checking should be done (this is not a unique
index).
UNIQUE_CHECK_YES
indicates thatthis is a non-deferrable unique index, andthe uniqueness check
must be done immediately, as described above.
UNIQUE_CHECK_PARTIAL
indicates that the unique constraint is deferrable. PostgreSQL will use
this mode to insert eachrow’s index entry. The access method must allow duplicate entries into the
1940
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Image and Document Conversion Supported by Windows Viewer. Convert to PDF.
add an image to a pdf form; acrobat insert image in pdf
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. SDK to convert PowerPoint document to PDF document code for PowerPoint to TIFF image conversion
acrobat insert image into pdf; add an image to a pdf in preview
Chapter 55. Index Access Method Interface Definition
index, and report any potential duplicates by returning FALSE from
aminsert
.For each row for
whichFALSE is returned, a deferred recheck will be scheduled.
The access method must identify any rows which might violate the unique constraint, but it is not
an error for it to report false positives. This allows the check to be done without waiting for other
transactions to finish; conflicts reported here are not treated as errors and will be rechecked later,
by which time they may no longer be conflicts.
UNIQUE_CHECK_EXISTING
indicates that this is a deferred recheck of a row that was reported as
apotential uniqueness violation. Although this is implemented by calling
aminsert
,the access
method must not insert a new index entry in this case. The index entry is already present. Rather,
the access method must check to see if there is another live index entry. If so, and if the target row
is also still live, report error.
It is recommended that in a
UNIQUE_CHECK_EXISTING
call, the access method further verify that
the target row actually does have an existing entry in the index, and report error if not. This is a
good idea because the index tuple values passed to
aminsert
will have been recomputed. If the
index definition involves functions that are not really immutable, we might be checking the wrong
area of the index. Checking that the target row is found in the recheck verifies that we are scanning
for the same tuple values as were used in the original insertion.
55.6. Index Cost Estimation Functions
The
amcostestimate
function is given information describinga possible indexscan, including lists
of WHERE and ORDER BY clauses that have been determined to be usable with the index. It must
return estimates of the cost of accessing the index and the selectivity of the WHERE clauses (that is,
the fraction of parent-table rows that will be retrieved during the indexscan). For simple cases, nearly
alltheworkof the costestimator canbedone bycalling standardroutines inthe optimizer;the pointof
havingan
amcostestimate
function is to allow index access methods toprovideindex-type-specific
knowledge, in case it is possible to improve on the standard estimates.
Each
amcostestimate
function must have the signature:
void
amcostestimate (PlannerInfo
*
root,
IndexPath
*
path,
double loop_count,
Cost
*
indexStartupCost,
Cost
*
indexTotalCost,
Selectivity
*
indexSelectivity,
double
*
indexCorrelation);
The first three parameters are inputs:
root
The planner’s information about the query being processed.
path
The index access path being considered. All fields except cost andselectivity values are valid.
1941
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word SDK to convert Word document to PDF document. demo code for Word to TIFF image conversion
how to add a photo to a pdf document; add jpg to pdf preview
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Using this VB.NET Imaging PDF Watermark Add-on, you can a watermark that consists of text or image (such as And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no
how to add image to pdf document; add an image to a pdf acrobat
Chapter 55. Index Access Method Interface Definition
loop_count
The number of repetitions of the index scan that should be factored into the cost estimates. This
willtypically be greater thanone when consideringa parameterized scanfor use inthe insideof a
nestloop join. Note that the cost estimates should still be for just one scan;a larger
loop_count
means that it may be appropriate to allow for some caching effects across multiple scans.
The last four parameters are pass-by-reference outputs:
*
indexStartupCost
Set to cost of index start-up processing
*
indexTotalCost
Set to total cost of index processing
*
indexSelectivity
Set to index selectivity
*
indexCorrelation
Set to correlation coefficient between index scan order and underlying table’s order
Note that cost estimate functions must be written in C, not in SQL or any available procedural lan-
guage, because they must access internal data structures of the planner/optimizer.
The index
access costs should be computed using
the parameters used
by
src/backend/optimizer/path/costsize.c
: a sequential disk block fetch has cost
seq_page_cost
,a nonsequential fetch has cost
random_page_cost
,and the cost of processing
one index row should usually be taken as
cpu_index_tuple_cost
.In addition, an appropriate
multiple of
cpu_operator_cost
should be charged for any comparison operators invoked during
index processing (especially evaluation of the indexquals themselves).
The access costs should include all disk and CPU costs associated with scanning the index itself, but
not the costs of retrieving or processing the parent-table rows that are identified by the index.
The “start-up cost” is the part of the total scan cost that must be expended before we can begin to
fetch the first row. For most indexes this can be taken as zero, but an index type with a high start-up
cost might want to set it nonzero.
The
indexSelectivity
should be set to the estimated fraction of the parent table rows that will
be retrieved during the index scan. In the case of a lossy query, this will typically be higher than the
fraction of rows that actually pass the given qual conditions.
The
indexCorrelation
shouldbe set to the correlation (ranging between-1.0and 1.0) between the
index order and the table order. This is used to adjust the estimate for the cost of fetching rows from
the parent table.
When
loop_count
is greater than one, the returned numbers should be averages expected for any
one scan of the index.
Cost Estimation
Atypical cost estimator will proceed as follows:
1. Estimate and return the fraction of parent-table rows that will be visited based on the given
qual conditions. Inthe absence of anyindex-type-specific knowledge, use the standard optimizer
function
clauselist_selectivity()
:
1942
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
Also designed to be used add-on for .NET Image SDK, RasterEdge Bitmap to PDF Converter can Powerful image converter for Bitmap and PDF files; No need for
add image to pdf acrobat; how to add photo to pdf in preview
PDF to WORD Converter | Convert PDF to Word, Convert Word to PDF
out transformation between different kinds of image files and Word Converter has accurate output, and PDF to Word need the support of Adobe Acrobat & Microsoft
add picture to pdf in preview; add a jpg to a pdf
Chapter 55. Index Access Method Interface Definition
*
indexSelectivity = clauselist_selectivity(root, path->indexquals,
path->indexinfo->rel->relid,
JOIN_INNER, NULL);
2. Estimate the number of indexrows that willbe visited duringthe scan. For many index types this
is the same as
indexSelectivity
times the number of rows in the index, but it might be more.
(Note that the index’s size in pages and rows is available from the
path->indexinfo
struct.)
3. Estimate the number of index pages that will be retrieved during the scan. This might be just
indexSelectivity
times the index’s size in pages.
4. Compute the index access cost. A generic estimator might do this:
/
*
*
Our generic assumption is that the index pages will be read
*
sequentially, so they cost seq_page_cost each, not random_page_cost.
*
Also, we charge for evaluation of the indexquals at each index row.
*
All the costs are assumed to be paid incrementally during the scan.
*
/
cost_qual_eval(&index_qual_cost, path->indexquals, root);
*
indexStartupCost = index_qual_cost.startup;
*
indexTotalCost = seq_page_cost
*
numIndexPages +
(cpu_index_tuple_cost + index_qual_cost.per_tuple)
*
numIndexTuples;
However, the above does notaccountfor amortization of index reads across repeated index scans.
5. Estimate the index correlation. For a simple ordered index ona single field, this can be retrieved
from pg_statistic. If the correlation is not known, the conservative estimate is zero (no correla-
tion).
Examples of cost estimator functions can be found in
src/backend/utils/adt/selfuncs.c
.
1943
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
as a kind of compensation for limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS VB.NET PPT: VB Code to Add Embedded Image Object to
add image to pdf reader; add png to pdf acrobat
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
add image to pdf file acrobat; adding image to pdf in preview
Chapter 56. GiST Indexes
56.1. Introduction
GiST stands for Generalized Search Tree. It is a balanced, tree-structured access method, that acts as
abase template in which to implement arbitrary indexing schemes. B-trees, R-trees and many other
indexing schemes can be implemented in GiST.
One advantage of GiST is that it allows the development of custom data types with the appropriate
access methods, by an expert in the domainof the data type, rather than a database expert.
Someof the informationhere isderivedfrom the Universityof CaliforniaatBerkeley’s GiST Indexing
Project web site
1
and Marcel Kornacker’s thesis, Access Methods for Next-Generation Database
Systems
2
.The GiST implementation in PostgreSQL is primarily maintained by Teodor Sigaev and
Oleg Bartunov, and there is more information on their web site
3
.
56.2. Built-in Operator Classes
The core PostgreSQL distribution includes the GiST operator classes shown in Table 56-1. (Some of
the optional modules described in Appendix F provide additional GiST operator classes.)
Table 56-1. Built-in GiST Operator Classes
Name
Indexed Data Type
Indexable
Operators
Ordering Operators
box_ops
box
&& &> &< &<| >>
<< <<| <@ @>@ |&>
|>>~ ~=
circle_ops
circle
&& &> &< &<| >>
<< <<| <@ @>@ |&>
|>>~ ~=
inet_ops
inet
,
cidr
&& >> >>= > >= <>
<< <<= < <= =
point_ops
point
>> >^ << <@ <@ <@
<^ ~=
<->
poly_ops
polygon
&& &> &< &<| >>
<< <<| <@ @>@ |&>
|>>~ ~=
range_ops
any range type
&& &> &< >> << <@
-|- = @> @>
tsquery_ops
tsquery
<@ @>
tsvector_ops
tsvector
@@
1. http://gist.cs.berkeley.edu/
2. http://www.sai.msu.su/~megera/postgres/gist/papers/concurrency/access-methods-for-next-generation.pdf.gz
3. http://www.sai.msu.su/~megera/postgres/gist/
1944
Chapter 56. GiST Indexes
For historical reasons, the
inet_ops
operator class is not the default class for types
inet
and
cidr
.
To use it, mention the class name in
CREATE INDEX
,for example
CREATE INDEX ON my_table USING gist (my_inet_column inet_ops);
56.3. Extensibility
Traditionally, implementing a new index access method meant a lot of difficult work. It was neces-
sary to understand the inner workings of the database, such as the lock manager and Write-Ahead
Log. The GiST interface has a high level of abstraction, requiring the access method implementer
only to implement the semantics of the data type being accessed. The GiST layer itself takes care of
concurrency, logging and searching the tree structure.
This extensibility should not be confused with the extensibility of the other standard search trees in
terms of the data they can handle. For example, PostgreSQL supports extensible B-trees and hash
indexes. That means that you can use PostgreSQL to build a B-tree or hash over any data type you
want. But B-trees only support range predicates (
<
,
=
,
>
), and hash indexes only support equality
queries.
So if you index, say, an image collection with a PostgreSQL B-tree, you can only issue queries such
as “is imagex equal to imagey”, “is imagex less than imagey” and “is imagex greater than imagey”.
Depending on how you define “equals”, “less than” and “greater than” in this context, this could
be useful. However, by using a GiST based index, you could create ways to ask domain-specific
questions, perhaps “find all images of horses” or “find all over-exposed images”.
All it takes to get a GiST access method up and running is to implement several user-defined meth-
ods, which define the behavior of keys in the tree. Of course these methods have to be pretty fancy
to support fancy queries, but for all the standard queries (B-trees, R-trees, etc.) they’re relatively
straightforward. In short, GiST combines extensibility along with generality, code reuse, and a clean
interface.
There are seven methods that an index operator class for GiST must provide, and an eighth that is
optional. Correctness of the index is ensured by proper implementation of the
same
,
consistent
and
union
methods, while efficiency (size and speed) of the index will depend on the
penalty
and
picksplit
methods. The remainingtwo basicmethods are
compress
and
decompress
,which
allowan index to have internaltree data of adifferenttype than the dataitindexes. The leaves areto be
of the indexed data type, while the other tree nodes can be of any C struct(but you still have to follow
PostgreSQL data type rules here, see about
varlena
for variable sized data). If the tree’s internal
data type exists at the SQL level, the
STORAGE
option of the
CREATE OPERATOR CLASS
command
can be used. The optional eighth method is
distance
,which is needed if the operator class wishes
to support ordered scans (nearest-neighbor searches).
consistent
Given an index entry
p
and a query value
q
, this function determines whether the index
entry is “consistent” with the query; that is, could the predicate “
indexed_column
indexable_operator q
”be true for any row represented by the index entry? For a leaf index
entry this is equivalent to testing the indexable condition, while for an internal tree node this
determines whether it is necessary to scan the subtree of the index represented by the tree node.
When the result is
true
,a
recheck
flag must also be returned. This indicates whether the
predicate is certainly true or only possibly true. If
recheck
=
false
then the index has tested
the predicate condition exactly, whereas if
recheck
=
true
the row is only a candidate match.
1945
Chapter 56. GiST Indexes
In that case the system will automatically evaluate the
indexable_operator
against the
actual row value to see if it is really a match. This convention allows GiST to support both
lossless and lossy index structures.
The SQL declaration of the function must look like this:
CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION my_consistent(internal, data_type, smallint, oid, internal)
RETURNS bool
AS ’MODULE_PATHNAME’
LANGUAGE C STRICT;
And the matchingcode in the C module could thenfollow this skeleton:
Datum
my_consistent(PG_FUNCTION_ARGS);
PG_FUNCTION_INFO_V1(my_consistent);
Datum
my_consistent(PG_FUNCTION_ARGS)
{
GISTENTRY
*
entry = (GISTENTRY
*
) PG_GETARG_POINTER(0);
data_type
*
query = PG_GETARG_DATA_TYPE_P(1);
StrategyNumber strategy = (StrategyNumber) PG_GETARG_UINT16(2);
/
*
Oid subtype = PG_GETARG_OID(3);
*
/
bool
*
recheck = (bool
*
) PG_GETARG_POINTER(4);
data_type
*
key = DatumGetDataType(entry->key);
bool
retval;
/
*
*
determine return value as a function of strategy, key and query.
*
*
Use GIST_LEAF(entry) to know where you’re called in the index tree,
*
which comes handy when supporting the = operator for example (you could
*
check for non empty union() in non-leaf nodes and equality in leaf
*
nodes).
*
/
*
recheck = true;
/
*
or false if check is exact
*
/
PG_RETURN_BOOL(retval);
}
Here,
key
is an element in the index and
query
the value being looked up in the index. The
StrategyNumber
parameter indicates which operator of your operator class is being applied —
itmatches oneof theoperator numbers in the
CREATE OPERATOR CLASS
command. Depending
on what operators you have included in the class, the data type of
query
could vary with the
operator, but the above skeleton assumes it doesn’t.
union
This method consolidates information in the tree. Given a set of entries, this function generates
anew index entry that represents all the given entries.
The SQL declaration of the function must look like this:
CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION my_union(internal, internal)
RETURNS internal
AS ’MODULE_PATHNAME’
LANGUAGE C STRICT;
And the matchingcode in the C module could thenfollow this skeleton:
Datum
my_union(PG_FUNCTION_ARGS);
PG_FUNCTION_INFO_V1(my_union);
1946
Chapter 56. GiST Indexes
Datum
my_union(PG_FUNCTION_ARGS)
{
GistEntryVector
*
entryvec = (GistEntryVector
*
) PG_GETARG_POINTER(0);
GISTENTRY
*
ent = entryvec->vector;
data_type
*
out,
*
tmp,
*
old;
int
numranges,
i = 0;
numranges = entryvec->n;
tmp = DatumGetDataType(ent[0].key);
out = tmp;
if (numranges == 1)
{
out = data_type_deep_copy(tmp);
PG_RETURN_DATA_TYPE_P(out);
}
for (i = 1; i < numranges; i++)
{
old = out;
tmp = DatumGetDataType(ent[i].key);
out = my_union_implementation(out, tmp);
}
PG_RETURN_DATA_TYPE_P(out);
}
As you can see, in this skeleton we’re dealing with a data type where
union(X, Y, Z) =
union(union(X, Y), Z)
.It’s easyenough to support data types where this is notthe case, by
implementing the proper union algorithm in this GiST support method.
The
union
implementationfunctionshould returna pointer tonewly
palloc()
edmemory. You
can’t just return whatever the input is.
compress
Converts the data item into a format suitable for physical storage in an index page.
The SQL declaration of the function must look like this:
CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION my_compress(internal)
RETURNS internal
AS ’MODULE_PATHNAME’
LANGUAGE C STRICT;
And the matchingcode in the C module could thenfollow this skeleton:
Datum
my_compress(PG_FUNCTION_ARGS);
PG_FUNCTION_INFO_V1(my_compress);
Datum
my_compress(PG_FUNCTION_ARGS)
{
GISTENTRY
*
entry = (GISTENTRY
*
) PG_GETARG_POINTER(0);
GISTENTRY
*
retval;
1947
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested