pdf viewer for asp.net web application : Add image to pdf form Library SDK component asp.net .net web page mvc postgresql-9.4-A426-part2901

Chapter 9. Functions and Operators
Conversion Name
a
Source Encoding
Destination Encoding
utf8_to_johab
UTF8
JOHAB
utf8_to_koi8_r
UTF8
KOI8R
utf8_to_koi8_u
UTF8
KOI8U
utf8_to_sjis
UTF8
SJIS
utf8_to_tcvn
UTF8
WIN1258
utf8_to_uhc
UTF8
UHC
utf8_to_windows_1250
UTF8
WIN1250
utf8_to_windows_1251
UTF8
WIN1251
utf8_to_windows_1252
UTF8
WIN1252
utf8_to_windows_1253
UTF8
WIN1253
utf8_to_windows_1254
UTF8
WIN1254
utf8_to_windows_1255
UTF8
WIN1255
utf8_to_windows_1256
UTF8
WIN1256
utf8_to_windows_1257
UTF8
WIN1257
utf8_to_windows_866
UTF8
WIN866
utf8_to_windows_874
UTF8
WIN874
windows_1250_to_iso_8859_2
WIN1250
LATIN2
windows_1250_to_mic
WIN1250
MULE_INTERNAL
windows_1250_to_utf8
WIN1250
UTF8
windows_1251_to_iso_8859_5
WIN1251
ISO_8859_5
windows_1251_to_koi8_r
WIN1251
KOI8R
windows_1251_to_mic
WIN1251
MULE_INTERNAL
windows_1251_to_utf8
WIN1251
UTF8
windows_1251_to_windows_866
WIN1251
WIN866
windows_1252_to_utf8
WIN1252
UTF8
windows_1256_to_utf8
WIN1256
UTF8
windows_866_to_iso_8859_5
WIN866
ISO_8859_5
windows_866_to_koi8_r
WIN866
KOI8R
windows_866_to_mic
WIN866
MULE_INTERNAL
windows_866_to_utf8
WIN866
UTF8
windows_866_to_windows_1251
WIN866
WIN
windows_874_to_utf8
WIN874
UTF8
euc_jis_2004_to_utf8
EUC_JIS_2004
UTF8
utf8_to_euc_jis_2004
UTF8
EUC_JIS_2004
shift_jis_2004_to_utf8
SHIFT_JIS_2004
UTF8
utf8_to_shift_jis_2004
UTF8
SHIFT_JIS_2004
euc_jis_2004_to_shift_jis_2004
EUC_JIS_2004
SHIFT_JIS_2004
188
Add image to pdf form - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add signature image to pdf acrobat; attach image to pdf form
Add image to pdf form - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add image to pdf reader; how to add an image to a pdf
Chapter 9. Functions and Operators
Conversion Name
a
Source Encoding
Destination Encoding
shift_jis_2004_to_euc_jis_2004
SHIFT_JIS_2004
EUC_JIS_2004
Notes:
a. The conversion names follow a standard naming scheme: The official name of the source
encoding with all non-alphanumeric characters replaced by underscores, followed by
_to_
,
followed by the similarly processed destination encoding name. Therefore, the names might
deviate from the customary encoding names.
9.4.1.
format
The function
format
produces outputformatted according to a format string, in a style similar to the
Cfunction
sprintf
.
format
(
formatstr text
[,
formatarg "any"
[, ...] ])
formatstr
is a format string that specifies how the result should be formatted. Text in the format
string is copied directly to the result, except where format specifiers are used. Format specifiers act
as placeholders in the string, defining how subsequent function arguments should be formatted and
inserted into the result. Each
formatarg
argument is converted to text according to the usual output
rules for its data type, and then formatted and inserted into the result string according to the format
specifier(s).
Format specifiers are introduced by a
%
character and have the form
%[
position
][
flags
][
width
]
type
where the component fields are:
position
(optional)
Astring of the form
n
$
where
n
is the index of the argument to print. Index 1 means the first
argument after
formatstr
.If the
position
is omitted, the default is to use the next argument
in sequence.
flags
(optional)
Additional options controlling how the format specifier’s output is formatted. Currently the only
supported flag is a minus sign (
-
)which will cause the format specifier’s output to be left-
justified. This has no effect unless the
width
field is also specified.
width
(optional)
Specifies the minimum number of characters to use to display the format specifier’s output. The
output is padded on the left or right (depending on the
-
flag) with spaces as needed to fill the
width. A too-small width does not cause truncation of the output, but is simply ignored. The
width may be specified using any of the following: a positive integer; an asterisk (
*
)to use the
next function argument as the width; or a stringof the form
*n
$
touse the
n
th functionargument
as the width.
If the width comes from a function argument, that argument is consumed before the argument
that is used for the format specifier’s value. If the width argument is negative, the result is left
aligned (as if the
-
flag had been specified) within a field of length
abs
(
width
).
189
VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
featured PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as well can help you have a quick evaluation of our PDF SDK. Add necessary references
adding an image to a pdf in acrobat; add photo to pdf in preview
C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
featured PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as well can help you have a quick evaluation of our PDF SDK. Add necessary references
add a jpg to a pdf; add image to pdf acrobat
Chapter 9. Functions and Operators
type
(required)
The type of format conversion to use to produce the format specifier’s output. The following
types are supported:
s
formats the argument value as a simple string. A null value is treated as an empty string.
I
treats the argument value as an SQL identifier, double-quoting it if necessary. It is an error
for the value to be null.
L
quotes the argument value as an SQL literal. A null value is displayed as the string
NULL
,
without quotes.
In addition to the format specifiers described above, the special sequence
%%
may be used to output a
literal
%
character.
Here are some examples of the basic format conversions:
SELECT format(’Hello %s’, ’World’);
Result:
Hello World
SELECT format(’Testing %s, %s, %s, %%’, ’one’, ’two’, ’three’);
Result:
Testing one, two, three, %
SELECT format(’INSERT INTO %I VALUES(%L)’, ’Foo bar’, E’O\’Reilly’);
Result:
INSERT INTO "Foo bar" VALUES(’O”Reilly’)
SELECT format(’INSERT INTO %I VALUES(%L)’, ’locations’, E’C:\\Program Files’);
Result:
INSERT INTO locations VALUES(E’C:\\Program Files’)
Here are examples using
width
fields and the
-
flag:
SELECT format(’|%10s|’, ’foo’);
Result:
|
foo|
SELECT format(’|%-10s|’, ’foo’);
Result:
|foo
|
SELECT format(’|%
*
s|’, 10, ’foo’);
Result:
|
foo|
SELECT format(’|%
*
s|’, -10, ’foo’);
Result:
|foo
|
SELECT format(’|%-
*
s|’, 10, ’foo’);
Result:
|foo
|
SELECT format(’|%-
*
s|’, -10, ’foo’);
Result:
|foo
|
These examples show use of
position
fields:
SELECT format(’Testing %3$s, %2$s, %1$s’, ’one’, ’two’, ’three’);
Result:
Testing three, two, one
190
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Scan image to PDF, tiff and various image formats. Get image information, such as its location, zonal information Able to edit, add, delete, move, and output PDF
add photo to pdf file; add photo to pdf form
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
passwordSetting.IsAnnot = True ' Allow to fill form. passwordSetting document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file. PDFDocument
add picture to pdf reader; how to add a jpeg to a pdf file
Chapter 9. Functions and Operators
SELECT format(’|%
*
2$s|’, ’foo’, 10, ’bar’);
Result:
|
bar|
SELECT format(’|%1$
*
2$s|’, ’foo’, 10, ’bar’);
Result:
|
foo|
Unlike the standard C function
sprintf
,PostgreSQL’s
format
function allows format specifiers
with and without
position
fields to be mixed in the same format string. A format specifier without
a
position
field always uses the next argument after the last argument consumed. In addition, the
format
function does not requireall function arguments tobe used intheformat string. For example:
SELECT format(’Testing %3$s, %2$s, %s’, ’one’, ’two’, ’three’);
Result:
Testing three, two, three
The
%I
and
%L
format specifiers are particularly useful for safely constructing dynamic SQL state-
ments. See Example 40-1.
9.5. Binary String Functions and Operators
This section describes functions and operators for examining and manipulatingvalues of type
bytea
.
SQL defines some string functions that use key words, rather than commas, to separate arguments.
Details are in Table 9-9. PostgreSQL also provides versions of these functions that use the regular
function invocation syntax (see Table 9-10).
Note: The sample results shown on this page assume that the server parameter
bytea_output
is set to
escape
(the traditional PostgreSQL format).
Table 9-9. SQL Binary String Functions and Operators
Function
Return Type
Description
Example
Result
string ||
string
bytea
String
concatenation
E’\\\\Post’::bytea
||
E’\\047gres\\000’::bytea
\\Post’gres\000
octet_length(
string
)
int
Number of bytes
in binary string
octet_length(E’jo\\000se’::bytea)
5
overlay(
string
placing
string
from
int
[for
int
])
bytea
Replace substring
overlay(E’Th\\000omas’::bytea
placing
E’\\002\\003’::bytea
from 2 for 3)
T\\002\\003mas
191
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
multiple types of image from PDF file in VB.NET, like XObject Image, XObject Form, Inline Image DLLs for PDF Image Extraction in VB.NET. Add necessary references
acrobat insert image in pdf; add image pdf
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
passwordSetting.IsAnnot = true; // Allow to fill form. passwordSetting document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file. PDFDocument
add photo to pdf; add photo to pdf online
Chapter 9. Functions and Operators
Function
Return Type
Description
Example
Result
position(
substring
in
string
)
int
Location of
specified substring
position(E’\\000om’::bytea
in
E’Th\\000omas’::bytea)
3
substring(
string
[from
int
] [for
int
])
bytea
Extract substring
substring(E’Th\\000omas’::bytea
from 2 for 3)
h\000o
trim([both]
bytes
from
string
)
bytea
Remove the
longest string
containing only
the bytes in
bytes
from the
start and end of
string
trim(E’\\000’::bytea
from
E’\\000Tom\\000’::bytea)
Tom
Additional binary string manipulation functions are available and are listed in Table 9-10. Some of
them are usedinternally to implement the SQL-standard string functions listed in Table 9-9.
Table 9-10. Other Binary String Functions
Function
Return Type
Description
Example
Result
btrim(
string
bytea
,
bytes
bytea
)
bytea
Remove the
longest string
consisting only of
bytes in
bytes
from the start and
end of
string
btrim(E’\\000trim\\000’::bytea,
E’\\000’::bytea)
trim
decode(
string
text
,
format
text
)
bytea
Decode binary
data from textual
representation in
string
.Options
for
format
are
same as in
encode
.
decode(E’123\\000456’,
’escape’)
123\000456
encode(
data
bytea
,
format
text
)
text
Encode binary
data into a textual
representation.
Supported formats
are:
base64
,
hex
,
escape
.
escape
converts zero
bytes and
high-bit-set bytes
to octal sequences
(
\nnn
)and
doubles
backslashes.
encode(E’123\\000456’::bytea,
’escape’)
123\000456
192
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
List<Bitmap> images = new List<Bitmap>(); images.Add(new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.gif")); / Build a PDF document with GIF image.
add photo to pdf for; add image field to pdf form
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Sticky Note to PDF Page in C#.NET. Able to add notes to PDF using C# source code in Visual Studio .NET framework.
how to add an image to a pdf in acrobat; add photo to pdf reader
Chapter 9. Functions and Operators
Function
Return Type
Description
Example
Result
get_bit(
string
,
offset
)
int
Extract bit from
string
get_bit(E’Th\\000omas’::bytea,
45)
1
get_byte(
string
,
offset
)
int
Extract byte from
string
get_byte(E’Th\\000omas’::bytea,
4)
109
length(
string
)
int
Length of binary
string
length(E’jo\\000se’::bytea)
5
md5(
string
)
text
Calculates the
MD5 hash of
string
,returning
the result in
hexadecimal
md5(E’Th\\000omas’::bytea)
8ab2d3c9689aaf18
b4958c334c82d8b1
set_bit(
string
,
offset
,
newvalue
)
bytea
Set bit in string
set_bit(E’Th\\000omas’::bytea,
45, 0)
Th\000omAs
set_byte(
string
,
offset
,
newvalue
)
bytea
Setbyte in string
set_byte(E’Th\\000omas’::bytea,
4, 64)
Th\000o@as
get_byte
and
set_byte
number the first byte of a binary string as byte 0.
get_bit
and
set_bit
number bits from the right within each byte; for example bit 0 is the least significant bit of the first
byte, and bit 15 is the most significant bit of the second byte.
See also the aggregatefunction
string_agg
in Section9.20 and the large object functions inSection
32.4.
9.6. Bit String Functions and Operators
This section describes functions and operators for examining and manipulating bit strings, that is
values of the types
bit
and
bit varying
.Asidefrom the usual comparison operators, the operators
shown inTable 9-11 can be used. Bitstring operands of
&
,
|
,and
#
must be of equal length. When bit
shifting, the original length of the string is preserved, as shown in the examples.
Table 9-11. Bit String Operators
Operator
Description
Example
Result
||
concatenation
B’10001’ ||
B’011’
10001011
&
bitwise AND
B’10001’ &
B’01101’
00001
|
bitwise OR
B’10001’ |
B’01101’
11101
#
bitwise XOR
B’10001’ #
B’01101’
11100
~
bitwise NOT
~ B’10001’
01110
<<
bitwise shift left
B’10001’ << 3
01000
193
Chapter 9. Functions and Operators
Operator
Description
Example
Result
>>
bitwise shift right
B’10001’ >> 2
00100
The following SQL-standard functions work on bit strings as well as character strings:
length
,
bit_length
,
octet_length
,
position
,
substring
,
overlay
.
The following functions workon bit strings as well as binarystrings:
get_bit
,
set_bit
.When work-
ing with a bit string, these functions number the first (leftmost) bit of the string as bit 0.
In addition, it is possible to cast integral values to and from type
bit
.Some examples:
44::bit(10)
0000101100
44::bit(3)
100
cast(-44 as bit(12))
111111010100
’1110’::bit(4)::integer
14
Note that casting to just “bit” means casting to
bit(1)
,and so will deliver only the least significant
bit of the integer.
Note: Casting an integer to
bit(n)
copies the rightmost
n
bits. Casting an integer to a bit string
width wider than the integer itself will sign-extend on the left.
9.7. Pattern Matching
There are three separate approaches to pattern matching provided by PostgreSQL: the traditional
SQL
LIKE
operator, the more recent
SIMILAR TO
operator (added in SQL:1999), and POSIX-style
regular expressions. Aside from the basic “does this string match this pattern?” operators, functions
are available to extract or replace matching substrings and to split a string at matching locations.
Tip: If you have pattern matching needs that go beyond this, consider writing a user-defined
function in Perl or Tcl.
Caution
While most regular-expression searches can be executed very quickly, regular
expressions can be contrivedthat takearbitrary amounts of timeandmemoryto
process. Be wary of accepting regular-expression search patterns from hostile
sources. If youmust do so, it is advisable to impose a statement timeout.
Searches using
SIMILAR TO
patterns have the same security hazards, since
SIMILAR TO
provides many of the same capabilities as POSIX-style regular
expressions.
LIKE
searches, being much simpler thanthe other two options, are safer to use
with possibly-hostile pattern sources.
9.7.1.
LIKE
string
LIKE
pattern
[ESCAPE
escape-character
]
string
NOT LIKE
pattern
[ESCAPE
escape-character
]
194
Chapter 9. Functions and Operators
The
LIKE
expression returns true if the
string
matches the supplied
pattern
.(As expected, the
NOT LIKE
expression returns false if
LIKE
returns true, and vice versa. An equivalent expression is
NOT (
string
LIKE
pattern
)
.)
If
pattern
does not contain percent signs or underscores, then the pattern only represents the string
itself; in that case
LIKE
acts like the equals operator. An underscore (
_
)in
pattern
stands for
(matches) any single character; a percent sign (
%
)matches any sequence of zero or more characters.
Some examples:
’abc’ LIKE ’abc’
true
’abc’ LIKE ’a%’
true
’abc’ LIKE ’_b_’
true
’abc’ LIKE ’c’
false
LIKE
pattern matching always covers the entire string. Therefore, if it’s desired to match a sequence
anywhere within a string, the pattern must start and end with a percent sign.
To match a literal underscore or percent sign without matching other characters, the respective char-
acter in
pattern
must be preceded by the escape character. The default escape character is the back-
slash but a different one can be selected by using the
ESCAPE
clause. To match the escape character
itself, write two escape characters.
Note: If you have standard_conforming_strings turned off, any backslashes you write in literal
string constants will need to be doubled. SeeSection 4.1.2.1 for more information.
It’s also possible to select no escape character by writing
ESCAPE ”
.This effectively disables the
escape mechanism, which makes it impossible to turn off the special meaning of underscore and
percent signs in the pattern.
The key word
ILIKE
can be used instead of
LIKE
to make the match case-insensitive according to
the active locale. This is not in the SQL standard but is a PostgreSQL extension.
The operator
~~
is equivalent to
LIKE
, and
~~
*
corresponds to
ILIKE
. There are also
!~~
and
!~~
*
operators that represent
NOT LIKE
and
NOT ILIKE
,respectively. All of these operators are
PostgreSQL-specific.
9.7.2.
SIMILAR TO
Regular Expressions
string
SIMILAR TO
pattern
[ESCAPE
escape-character
]
string
NOT SIMILAR TO
pattern
[ESCAPE
escape-character
]
The
SIMILAR TO
operator returns true or false depending on whether its pattern matches the given
string. It is similar to
LIKE
,except thatitinterprets thepatternusingtheSQL standard’s definitionof a
regular expression. SQL regular expressions are a curious cross between
LIKE
notation and common
regular expression notation.
Like
LIKE
,the
SIMILAR TO
operator succeeds only if its pattern matches the entire string; this is
unlike common regular expression behavior where the pattern can match any part of the string. Also
like
LIKE
,
SIMILAR TO
uses
_
and
%
as wildcard characters denoting any single character and any
string, respectively (these are comparable to
.
and
.
*
in POSIX regular expressions).
195
Chapter 9. Functions and Operators
In addition to these facilities borrowed from
LIKE
,
SIMILAR TO
supports these pattern-matching
metacharacters borrowed from POSIX regular expressions:
|
denotes alternation (either of two alternatives).
• *
denotes repetition of the previous item zero or more times.
+
denotes repetition of the previous item one or more times.
?
denotes repetition of the previous item zero or one time.
{m}
denotes repetition of the previous item exactly
m
times.
{m,}
denotes repetition of the previous item
m
or more times.
{m,n}
denotes repetition of the previous item at least
m
and not more than
n
times.
Parentheses
()
can be usedto group items into a single logical item.
Abracket expression
[...]
specifies a character class, just as in POSIX regular expressions.
Notice that the period (
.
)is not a metacharacter for
SIMILAR TO
.
As with
LIKE
,a backslash disables the special meaning of any of these metacharacters; or a different
escape character can be specified with
ESCAPE
.
Some examples:
’abc’ SIMILAR TO ’abc’
true
’abc’ SIMILAR TO ’a’
false
’abc’ SIMILAR TO ’%(b|d)%’
true
’abc’ SIMILAR TO ’(b|c)%’
false
The
substring
function with three parameters,
substring(
string
from
pattern
for
escape-character
)
, provides extraction of a substring that matches an SQL regular expression
pattern. As with
SIMILAR TO
, the specified pattern must match the entire data string, or else the
function fails and returns null. To indicate the part of the pattern that should be returned on success,
the pattern must contain two occurrences of the escape character followed by a double quote (
"
). The
text matching the portion of the pattern between these markers is returned.
Some examples, with
#"
delimiting the return string:
substring(’foobar’ from ’%#"o_b#"%’ for ’#’)
oob
substring(’foobar’ from ’#"o_b#"%’ for ’#’)
NULL
9.7.3. POSIX Regular Expressions
Table 9-12 lists the available operators for pattern matching using POSIX regular expressions.
Table 9-12. Regular Expression Match Operators
Operator
Description
Example
~
Matches regular expression,
case sensitive
’thomas’ ~ ’.
*
thomas.
*
196
Chapter 9. Functions and Operators
Operator
Description
Example
~
*
Matches regular expression,
case insensitive
’thomas’ ~
*
’.
*
Thomas.
*
!~
Does not match regular
expression, case sensitive
’thomas’ !~
’.
*
Thomas.
*
!~
*
Does not match regular
expression, case insensitive
’thomas’ !~
*
’.
*
vadim.
*
POSIX regular expressions provide a more powerful means for pattern matching than the
LIKE
and
SIMILAR TO
operators. ManyUnixtools such as
egrep
,
sed
,or
awk
usea patternmatchinglanguage
that is similar to the one described here.
Aregular expression is a character sequence that is an abbreviated definition of a set of strings (a
regular set). Astringis saidtomatch aregular expressionif itis a member of theregular setdescribed
by the regular expression. As with
LIKE
,pattern characters match string characters exactly unless
they are special characters in the regular expressionlanguage — but regular expressions use different
special characters than
LIKE
does. Unlike
LIKE
patterns, a regular expression is allowed to match
anywhere within a string, unless the regular expression is explicitly anchored to the beginning or end
of the string.
Some examples:
’abc’ ~ ’abc’
true
’abc’ ~ ’^a’
true
’abc’ ~ ’(b|d)’
true
’abc’ ~ ’^(b|c)’ false
The POSIX pattern language is described in much greater detail below.
The
substring
function with two parameters,
substring(
string
from
pattern
)
,provides ex-
traction of a substring that matches a POSIX regular expression pattern. It returns null if there is no
match, otherwisetheportion of the textthat matched the pattern. But if the patterncontains anyparen-
theses, the portion of the text that matched the first parenthesized subexpression (the one whose left
parenthesis comes first) is returned. Youcan put parentheses around the whole expressionif youwant
to use parentheses within it without triggering this exception. If you need parentheses in the pattern
before the subexpression you want to extract, see the non-capturing parentheses described below.
Some examples:
substring(’foobar’ from ’o.b’)
oob
substring(’foobar’ from ’o(.)b’)
o
The
regexp_replace
function provides substitution of new text for substrings that match POSIX
regular expression patterns. It has the syntax
regexp_replace
(
source
,
pattern
,
replacement
[,
flags
]). The
source
string is returned unchanged if there is no match to the
pattern
.If there
is a match, the
source
string is returned with the
replacement
string substituted for the matching
substring. The
replacement
string cancontain
\n
,where
n
is 1through 9, to indicate thatthesource
substring matching the
n
’th parenthesized subexpression of the pattern should be inserted, and it can
contain
\&
to indicate that the substring matching the entire pattern should be inserted. Write
\\
if
you need to put a literal backslash in the replacement text. The
flags
parameter is an optional text
string containing zero or more single-letter flags that change the function’s behavior. Flag
i
specifies
197
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested