pdf viewer for asp.net web application : Add picture to pdf form control application platform web page html asp.net web browser postgresql-9.4-A427-part2912

Chapter 9. Functions and Operators
case-insensitive matching, while flag
g
specifies replacement of each matching substring rather than
only the first one. Supported flags (though not
g
)are described in Table 9-20.
Some examples:
regexp_replace(’foobarbaz’, ’b..’, ’X’)
fooXbaz
regexp_replace(’foobarbaz’, ’b..’, ’X’, ’g’)
fooXX
regexp_replace(’foobarbaz’, ’b(..)’, E’X\\1Y’, ’g’)
fooXarYXazY
The
regexp_matches
function returns a text array of all of the captured substrings resulting from
matchinga POSIXregular expressionpattern. Ithas thesyntax
regexp_matches
(
string
,
pattern
[,
flags
]). The function can return no rows, one row, or multiple rows (see the
g
flag below). If the
pattern
doesnotmatch, the function returns norows. If thepatterncontains noparenthesized subex-
pressions, theneach rowreturned is a single-element text array containing the substring matching the
whole pattern. If the pattern contains parenthesized subexpressions, the function returns a text array
whose
n
’th elementis the substringmatching the
n
’th parenthesized subexpressionof the pattern (not
counting “non-capturing” parentheses;see below for details). The
flags
parameter is anoptionaltext
string containing zero or more single-letter flags that change the function’s behavior. Flag
g
causes
the function to find each match in the string, not only the first one, and return a row for each such
match. Supported flags (thoughnot
g
)are describedin Table 9-20.
Some examples:
SELECT regexp_matches(’foobarbequebaz’, ’(bar)(beque)’);
regexp_matches
----------------
{bar,beque}
(1 row)
SELECT regexp_matches(’foobarbequebazilbarfbonk’, ’(b[^b]+)(b[^b]+)’, ’g’);
regexp_matches
----------------
{bar,beque}
{bazil,barf}
(2 rows)
SELECT regexp_matches(’foobarbequebaz’, ’barbeque’);
regexp_matches
----------------
{barbeque}
(1 row)
It is possible to force
regexp_matches()
to always return one row by using a sub-select; this is
particularly useful in a
SELECT
target list when you want all rows returned, even non-matching ones:
SELECT col1, (SELECT regexp_matches(col2, ’(bar)(beque)’)) FROM tab;
The
regexp_split_to_table
function splits a string using a POSIX regular expression pattern as
adelimiter. It has the syntax
regexp_split_to_table
(
string
,
pattern
[,
flags
]). If there is
no match to the
pattern
,the function returns the
string
.If there is at least one match, for each
198
Add picture to pdf form - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
adding an image to a pdf in acrobat; add signature image to pdf
Add picture to pdf form - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
how to add an image to a pdf; adding an image to a pdf in preview
Chapter 9. Functions and Operators
match it returns the textfrom the endof thelast match (or thebeginningof thestring) tothe beginning
of the match. Whenthere are no more matches, itreturns the text from the end of the last matchto the
end of the string. The
flags
parameter is an optionaltextstring containing zero or more single-letter
flags that change the function’s behavior.
regexp_split_to_table
supports the flags described in
Table 9-20.
The
regexp_split_to_array
function behaves the same as
regexp_split_to_table
,
except that
regexp_split_to_array
returns its result as an array of
text
. It has the syntax
regexp_split_to_array
(
string
,
pattern
[,
flags
]). The parameters are the same as for
regexp_split_to_table
.
Some examples:
SELECT foo FROM regexp_split_to_table(’the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog’, E’\\s+’) AS foo;
foo
-------
the
quick
brown
fox
jumps
over
the
lazy
dog
(9 rows)
SELECT regexp_split_to_array(’the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog’, E’\\s+’);
regexp_split_to_array
-----------------------------------------------
{the,quick,brown,fox,jumps,over,the,lazy,dog}
(1 row)
SELECT foo FROM regexp_split_to_table(’the quick brown fox’, E’\\s
*
’) AS foo;
foo
-----
t
h
e
q
u
i
c
k
b
r
o
w
n
f
o
x
(16 rows)
As the last example demonstrates, the regexp split functions ignore zero-length matches that occur
at the start or end of the string or immediately after a previous match. This is contrary to the strict
199
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
VB.NET image cropping method to crop picture / photo; size of created cropped image file, add antique effect Public Partial Class Form1 Inherits Form Public Sub
adding a png to a pdf; add photo to pdf file
VB.NET Image: Image Scaling SDK to Scale Picture / Photo
VB.NET DLLs to Scale Image / Picture. There are two this VB.NET image scaling control add-on, we RE__Test Public Partial Class Form1 Inherits Form Public Sub New
add jpg to pdf document; add jpg to pdf online
Chapter 9. Functions and Operators
definition of regexp matching that is implemented by
regexp_matches
,but is usually the most
convenient behavior inpractice. Other software systems such as Perl use similar definitions.
9.7.3.1. Regular Expression Details
PostgreSQL’s regular expressions are implemented using a software package written by Henry
Spencer. Much of the description of regular expressions below is copied verbatim from his manual.
Regular expressions (REs), as defined in POSIX 1003.2, come in two forms: extended REs or EREs
(roughly those of
egrep
), and basic REs or BREs (roughly those of
ed
). PostgreSQL supports both
forms, and also implements some extensions that are not in the POSIX standard, but have become
widely used due to their availability in programming languages such as Perl and Tcl. REs using these
non-POSIXextensions are called advanced REs or AREs in this documentation. AREs are almost an
exact superset of EREs, but BREs have several notational incompatibilities (as well as being much
more limited). We first describe the ARE and ERE forms, noting features that apply only to AREs,
and then describe how BREs differ.
Note:PostgreSQLalways initiallypresumes that aregularexpressionfollows theARE rules. How-
ever, themorelimited ERE or BRE rules can be chosenbyprepending anembeddedoption tothe
RE pattern, as described in Section 9.7.3.4. This can be useful for compatibility with applications
that expect exactly the POSIX 1003.2 rules.
Aregular expression is defined as one or more branches, separated by
|
.It matches anything that
matches one of the branches.
Abranch is zero or more quantified atoms or constraints, concatenated. It matches a match for the
first, followed by a match for the second, etc; an empty branch matches the empty string.
Aquantified atom is an atompossibly followed by a singlequantifier. Without a quantifier, it matches
amatch for the atom. With a quantifier, it can match some number of matches of the atom. An atom
can be any of the possibilities shown in Table 9-13. The possible quantifiers and their meanings are
shown in Table 9-14.
Aconstraintmatchesanemptystring,butmatches onlywhen specific conditions are met.A constraint
can be used where an atom could be used, except it cannot be followed by a quantifier. The simple
constraints are shownin Table 9-15; some more constraints are described later.
Table 9-13. Regular Expression Atoms
Atom
Description
(re)
(where
re
is any regular expression) matches a
match for
re
,with the match noted for possible
reporting
(?:re)
as above, but the match is not noted for
reporting (a “non-capturing” set of parentheses)
(AREs only)
.
matches any single character
[chars]
abracket expression, matching any one of the
chars
(see Section 9.7.3.2 for more detail)
200
C# TIFF: How to Insert & Burn Picture/Image into TIFF Document
Support adding image or picture to an existing or new new REImage(@"c:\ logo.png"); // add the image powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
adding jpg to pdf; add photo to pdf form
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we this VB.NET image resizer control add-on, can provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add a jpeg to a pdf; adding an image to a pdf
Chapter 9. Functions and Operators
Atom
Description
\k
(where
k
is a non-alphanumeric character)
matches that character taken as an ordinary
character, e.g.,
\\
matches a backslash character
\c
where
c
is alphanumeric (possibly followed by
other characters) is an escape, see Section
9.7.3.3 (AREs only; in EREs and BREs, this
matches
c
)
{
when followed by a character other than a digit,
matches the left-brace character
{
;when
followed by a digit, it is the beginning of a
bound
(see below)
x
where
x
is a single character with no other
significance, matches that character
An RE cannot endwith a backslash (
\
).
Note: If you have standard_conforming_strings turned off, any backslashes you write in literal
string constants will need to be doubled. SeeSection 4.1.2.1 for more information.
Table 9-14. Regular Expression Quantifiers
Quantifier
Matches
*
asequence of 0 or more matches of the atom
+
asequence of 1 or more matches of the atom
?
asequence of 0 or 1 matches of the atom
{m}
asequence of exactly
m
matches of the atom
{m,}
asequence of
m
or more matches of the atom
{m,n}
asequence of
m
through
n
(inclusive) matches
of the atom;
m
cannot exceed
n
*
?
non-greedy version of
*
+?
non-greedy version of
+
??
non-greedy version of
?
{m}?
non-greedy version of
{m}
{m,}?
non-greedy version of
{m,}
{m,n}?
non-greedy version of
{m,n}
The forms using
{...}
are known as bounds. The numbers
m
and
n
within a bound are unsigned
decimal integers with permissible values from 0 to 255 inclusive.
Non-greedy quantifiers (available in AREs only) match the same possibilities as their correspond-
ing normal (greedy) counterparts, but prefer the smallest number rather than the largest number of
matches. See Section 9.7.3.5 for more detail.
Note: A quantifier cannot immediately follow another quantifier, e.g.,
**
is invalid. A quantifier
cannot begin an expression or subexpression or follow
^
or
|
.
201
VB.NET Image: How to Save Image & Print Image Using VB.NET
of saving and printing multi-page document files, like PDF and Word, in assembly with VB.NET web image viewer add-on, you VB.NET Method to Save Image / Picture.
how to add a picture to a pdf document; how to add photo to pdf in preview
VB.NET PowerPoint: Add Image to PowerPoint Document Slide/Page
image, clip art or screenshot, the picture will be AddPage", "InsertPage" and "DeletePage" to add, insert or & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
add photo to pdf in preview; adding an image to a pdf file
Chapter 9. Functions and Operators
Table 9-15. Regular Expression Constraints
Constraint
Description
^
matches at the beginning of the string
$
matches at the end of the string
(?=re)
positive lookahead matches at any point where
asubstring matching
re
begins (AREs only)
(?!re)
negative lookahead matches at anypoint where
no substring matching
re
begins (AREs only)
Lookaheadconstraints cannotcontainbackreferences(seeSection9.7.3.3), and all parentheses within
them are considered non-capturing.
9.7.3.2. Bracket Expressions
Abracket expression is a list of characters enclosed in
[]
.It normally matches any single character
from the list (but see below). If the list begins with
^
,it matches any single character not from the
rest of the list. If two characters in the list are separated by
-
,this is shorthand for the full range
of characters between those two (inclusive) in the collating sequence, e.g.,
[0-9]
in ASCII matches
any decimal digit. It is illegal for two ranges to share an endpoint, e.g.,
a-c-e
.Ranges are very
collating-sequence-dependent, so portable programs should avoid relying on them.
To include a literal
]
in the list, make it the first character (after
^
, if that is used). To include a
literal
-
,make it the first or last character, or the second endpoint of a range. To use a literal
-
as
the first endpoint of a range, enclose it in
[.
and
.]
to make it a collating element (see below).
Withthe exception of these characters, some combinations using
[
(see nextparagraphs), and escapes
(AREs only), all other special characters lose their special significance within a bracket expression.
In particular,
\
is not special when following ERE or BRE rules, though it is special (as introducing
an escape) in AREs.
Within a bracket expression, a collating element (a character, a multiple-character sequence that col-
lates as if it were a single character, or a collating-sequence name for either) enclosed in
[.
and
.]
stands for the sequence of characters of that collating element. The sequence is treatedas asingle ele-
ment of the bracketexpression’s list. This allows a bracket expression containing a multiple-character
collating element to match more than one character, e.g., if the collating sequence includes a
ch
collating element, then the RE
[[.ch.]]
*
c
matches the first five characters of
chchcc
.
Note:PostgreSQL currently doesnot support multi-character collating elements. This information
describes possible future behavior.
Within a bracket expression, a collating element enclosed in
[=
and
=]
is anequivalence class, stand-
ingfor the sequences of characters of all collatingelements equivalent to that one, including itself. (If
there are noother equivalent collatingelements, the treatment is as if theenclosingdelimiters were
[.
and
.]
.) For example, if
o
and
^
are the members of an equivalence class, then
[[=o=]]
,
[[=^=]]
,
and
[o^]
are all synonymous. An equivalence class cannot be an endpoint of a range.
Within a bracket expression, the name of a character class enclosed in
[:
and
:]
stands for the list
of all characters belonging to that class. Standard character class names are:
alnum
,
alpha
,
blank
,
cntrl
,
digit
,
graph
,
lower
,
print
,
punct
,
space
,
upper
,
xdigit
.Thesestandfor thecharacter
202
C# Image: How to Add Antique & Vintage Effect to Image, Photo
function to add antique charm to picture & photo C#.NET antique effect creating control add-on is powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
adding a jpeg to a pdf; add image to pdf
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Codes to Add Antique Effect to Image with .
mature technology to replace a picture's original colors add the glow and noise, and add a little powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add image pdf document; add image field to pdf form
Chapter 9. Functions and Operators
classes defined inctype. A locale can provide others. A character class cannot be used as an endpoint
of a range.
There are two special cases of bracket expressions: the bracket expressions
[[:<:]]
and
[[:>:]]
are constraints, matching empty strings at the beginning and end of a word respectively. A word is
defined as a sequence of word characters that is neither preceded nor followed by word characters.
Aword character is an
alnum
character (as defined by ctype) or an underscore. This is an extension,
compatible with but not specified by POSIX 1003.2, and should be used with caution in software in-
tended tobe portable to other systems. The constraintescapes described below are usually preferable;
they are no more standard, but are easier to type.
9.7.3.3. Regular Expression Escapes
Escapes are special sequences beginning with
\
followed by an alphanumeric character. Escapes
come in several varieties: character entry, class shorthands, constraint escapes, and back references.
A
\
followed by an alphanumeric character but not constituting a valid escape is illegal in AREs. In
EREs, there are no escapes: outside a bracket expression, a
\
followed by an alphanumeric character
merely stands for that character as an ordinary character, and inside a bracket expression,
\
is an
ordinary character. (The latter is the one actual incompatibility between EREs and AREs.)
Character-entry escapes exist to make it easier to specify non-printing and other inconvenient char-
acters in REs. They are shown in Table 9-16.
Class-shorthand escapes provide shorthands for certain commonly-used character classes. They are
shown in Table 9-17.
Aconstraint escape is a constraint, matching the empty string if specific conditions are met, written
as an escape. They are shown in Table 9-18.
Aback reference (
\n
)matches the same string matched by the previous parenthesized subexpression
specified by the number
n
(see Table 9-19). For example,
([bc])\1
matches
bb
or
cc
but not
bc
or
cb
.The subexpression must entirely precede the back reference in the RE. Subexpressions are
numbered in the order of their leading parentheses. Non-capturing parentheses do not define subex-
pressions.
Note: Keep in mind that an escape’s leading
\
will need to bedoubled when entering the pattern
as an SQL string constant. For example:
’123’ ~ E’^\\d{3}’ true
Table 9-16. Regular Expression Character-entry Escapes
Escape
Description
\a
alert (bell) character, as in C
\b
backspace, as in C
\B
synonym for backslash (
\
)to help reduce the
need for backslashdoubling
\cX
(where
X
is any character) the character whose
low-order 5 bits are the same as those of
X
,and
whose other bits are all zero
203
Chapter 9. Functions and Operators
Escape
Description
\e
the character whose collating-sequence name is
ESC
,or failing that, the character with octal
value
033
\f
form feed, as in C
\n
newline, as in C
\r
carriage return, as in C
\t
horizontal tab, as in C
\uwxyz
(where
wxyz
is exactlyfour hexadecimal digits)
the character whose hexadecimal value is
0xwxyz
\Ustuvwxyz
(where
stuvwxyz
is exactly eight hexadecimal
digits) the character whose hexadecimal value is
0xstuvwxyz
\v
vertical tab, as inC
\xhhh
(where
hhh
is any sequence of hexadecimal
digits) the character whose hexadecimal value is
0xhhh
(a single character no matter how many
hexadecimal digits are used)
\0
the character whose value is
0
(the null byte)
\xy
(where
xy
is exactly two octal digits, and is not
aback reference) the character whose octal value
is
0xy
\xyz
(where
xyz
is exactly three octal digits, and is
not a back reference) the character whose octal
value is
0xyz
Hexadecimal digits are
0
-
9
,
a
-
f
,and
A
-
F
.Octal digits are
0
-
7
.
Numeric character-entry escapes specifying values outside the ASCII range (0-127) have meanings
dependent on the database encoding. When the encoding is UTF-8, escape values are equivalent to
Unicode code points, for example
\u1234
means the character
U+1234
.For other multibyte encod-
ings,character-entryescapesusuallyjustspecifytheconcatenation of thebyte values for the character.
If the escape value does not correspond to any legal character in the database encoding, no error will
be raised, but it will never match any data.
The character-entry escapes are always takenas ordinary characters. For example,
\135
is
]
inASCII,
but
\135
does not terminate a bracket expression.
Table 9-17. Regular Expression Class-shorthand Escapes
Escape
Description
\d
[[:digit:]]
\s
[[:space:]]
\w
[[:alnum:]_]
(note underscore is included)
\D
[^[:digit:]]
\S
[^[:space:]]
\W
[^[:alnum:]_]
(note underscore is included)
204
Chapter 9. Functions and Operators
Within bracket expressions,
\d
,
\s
,and
\w
lose their outer brackets, and
\D
,
\S
,and
\W
are illegal.
(So, for example,
[a-c\d]
is equivalent to
[a-c[:digit:]]
.Also,
[a-c\D]
,which is equivalent
to
[a-c^[:digit:]]
,is illegal.)
Table 9-18. Regular Expression Constraint Escapes
Escape
Description
\A
matches only at the beginning of the string (see
Section9.7.3.5 for how this differs from
^
)
\m
matches only at the beginning of a word
\M
matches only at the end of a word
\y
matches only at the beginning or end of a word
\Y
matches only at a point that is not the beginning
or end of a word
\Z
matches only at the end of the string (see
Section9.7.3.5 for how this differs from
$
)
Aword is defined as in the specification of
[[:<:]]
and
[[:>:]]
above. Constraint escapes are
illegal within bracket expressions.
Table 9-19. Regular Expression Back References
Escape
Description
\m
(where
m
is a nonzero digit) a back reference to
the
m
’th subexpression
\mnn
(where
m
is a nonzero digit, and
nn
is some
more digits, and the decimal value
mnn
is not
greater than the number of closing capturing
parentheses seen so far) a back reference to the
mnn
’th subexpression
Note:Thereisaninherent ambiguity betweenoctalcharacter-entry escapes andback references,
which is resolved by the following heuristics, as hinted at above. A leading zero always indicates
an octal escape. A single non-zero digit, not followed by another digit, is always taken as a back
reference. A multi-digit sequence not starting with a zero is taken as a back reference if it comes
after a suitable subexpression (i.e., the number is in the legal range for a back reference), and
otherwise is taken as octal.
9.7.3.4. Regular Expression Metasyntax
In addition to the main syntax described above, there are some special forms and miscellaneous syn-
tactic facilities available.
An RE can begin with one of two special director prefixes. If an RE begins with
***
:
,the rest of
the RE is taken as an ARE. (This normally has no effectin PostgreSQL, since REs are assumed to be
AREs; but it does have an effect if ERE or BRE mode had been specified by the
flags
parameter to
aregex function.) If an RE begins with
***
=
,the rest of the RE is taken to be a literal string, with all
characters considered ordinary characters.
205
Chapter 9. Functions and Operators
An ARE can begin with embeddedoptions: a sequence
(?xyz)
(where
xyz
is one or morealphabetic
characters) specifies options affecting the rest of the RE. These options override any previously de-
termined options — in particular, they can override the case-sensitivity behavior implied by a regex
operator, or the
flags
parameter to a regex function. The available option letters are shown in Table
9-20. Note that these same option letters are used in the
flags
parameters of regex functions.
Table 9-20. ARE Embedded-option Letters
Option
Description
b
rest of RE is a BRE
c
case-sensitive matching (overrides operator
type)
e
rest of RE is an ERE
i
case-insensitive matching (see Section 9.7.3.5)
(overrides operator type)
m
historical synonym for
n
n
newline-sensitive matching (see Section 9.7.3.5)
p
partial newline-sensitive matching (see Section
9.7.3.5)
q
rest of RE is a literal (“quoted”) string, all
ordinary characters
s
non-newline-sensitive matching (default)
t
tight syntax (default; see below)
w
inverse partial newline-sensitive (“weird”)
matching (see Section 9.7.3.5)
x
expanded syntax (see below)
Embedded options take effect at the
)
terminating the sequence. They can appear only at the start of
an ARE (after the
***
:
director if any).
In additionto the usual (tight) RE syntax, in which allcharacters are significant, there is anexpanded
syntax, available byspecifying theembedded
x
option. In theexpandedsyntax, white-spacecharacters
in the RE are ignored, as are all characters between a
#
and the following newline (or the end of the
RE). This permits paragraphing and commenting a complex RE. There are three exceptions to that
basic rule:
awhite-space character or
#
preceded by
\
is retained
white space or
#
withina bracket expression is retained
white space and comments cannot appear within multi-character symbols, such as
(?:
For this purpose, white-space characters are blank, tab, newline, and any character that belongs to the
space
character class.
Finally, in an ARE, outside bracket expressions, the sequence
(?#ttt)
(where
ttt
is any text not
containinga
)
)is acomment, completely ignored. Again, this is notallowedbetweenthecharacters of
multi-character symbols, like
(?:
.Such comments are more a historical artifact than a useful facility,
and their use is deprecated; use the expanded syntax instead.
Noneof these metasyntaxextensions is availableif aninitial
***
=
director has specified thattheuser’s
input be treated as a literal string rather than as an RE.
206
Chapter 9. Functions and Operators
9.7.3.5. Regular Expression Matching Rules
In the event that an RE could match more than one substring of a given string, the RE matches the
one starting earliest in the string. If the RE could match more than one substring starting atthatpoint,
either the longest possible match or the shortest possible match will be taken, depending on whether
the RE is greedy or non-greedy.
Whether an RE is greedy or not is determined by the following rules:
Most atoms, and all constraints, have no greediness attribute (because they cannot match variable
amounts of text anyway).
Adding parentheses around an RE does not change its greediness.
Aquantified atom with a fixed-repetition quantifier (
{m}
or
{m}?
)has the same greediness (possi-
bly none) as the atom itself.
Aquantified atom with other normal quantifiers (including
{m,n}
with
m
equal to
n
)is greedy
(prefers longest match).
Aquantifiedatom witha non-greedyquantifier (including
{m,n}?
with
m
equalto
n
)is non-greedy
(prefers shortest match).
Abranch — that is, an RE that has no top-level
|
operator — has the same greediness as the first
quantified atom in it that has a greediness attribute.
An RE consisting of two or more branches connected by the
|
operator is always greedy.
The above rules associate greediness attributes not only with individual quantified atoms, but with
branches and entire REs that contain quantified atoms. What that means is that the matching is done
in such a way that the branch, or whole RE, matches the longest or shortest possible substring as
awhole. Once the length of the entire match is determined, the part of it that matches any particu-
lar subexpression is determined on the basis of the greediness attribute of that subexpression, with
subexpressions starting earlier in the RE taking priority over ones starting later.
An example of what this means:
SELECT SUBSTRING(’XY1234Z’, ’Y
*
([0-9]{1,3})’);
Result:
123
SELECT SUBSTRING(’XY1234Z’, ’Y
*
?([0-9]{1,3})’);
Result:
1
In the first case, the RE as a whole is greedy because
Y
*
is greedy. It can match beginning at the
Y
,
and it matches the longest possible string starting there, i.e.,
Y123
.The output is the parenthesized
part of that, or
123
.In the second case, the RE as a whole is non-greedy because
Y
*
?
is non-greedy.
It canmatch beginning at the
Y
,and it matches the shortest possible string starting there, i.e.,
Y1
.The
subexpression
[0-9]{1,3}
is greedy butitcannot change the decisionas tothe overall matchlength;
so it is forced to match just
1
.
In short, when an RE contains both greedy and non-greedy subexpressions, the total match length is
either as long as possible or as short as possible, according to the attribute assigned to the whole RE.
The attributes assigned to the subexpressions only affect how much of that match they are allowed to
“eat” relative to each other.
The quantifiers
{1,1}
and
{1,1}?
can be used to force greediness or non-greediness, respectively,
on a subexpression or a whole RE. This is useful when you need the whole RE to have a greediness
attribute different from what’s deduced from its elements. As an example, suppose that we are trying
207
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested