pdf viewer for asp.net web application : Add jpeg signature to pdf Library software component .net windows html mvc postgresql-9.4-A4281-part2925

Appendix E. Release Notes
New utilities:
*
ipcclean added to the distribution
ipcclean usually does not need to be run, but if your backend crashes
and leaves shared memory segments hanging around, ipcclean will
clean them up for you.
New documentation:
*
the user manual has been revised and libpq documentation added.
E.297. Postgres95 Release 0.02
ReleaseDate: 1995-05-25
E.297.1. Changes
Incompatible changes:
*
The SQL statement for creating a database is ’CREATE DATABASE’ instead
of ’CREATEDB’. Similarly, dropping a database is ’DROP DATABASE’ instead
of ’DESTROYDB’. However, the names of the executables ’createdb’ and
’destroydb’ remain the same.
New tools:
*
pgperl - a Perl (4.036) interface to Postgres95
*
pg_dump - a utility for dumping out a postgres database into a
script file containing query commands. The script files are in an ASCII
format and can be used to reconstruct the database, even on other
machines and other architectures. (Also good for converting
a Postgres 4.2 database to Postgres95 database.)
The following ports have been incorporated into postgres95-beta-0.02:
*
the NetBSD port by Alistair Crooks
*
the AIX port by Mike Tung
*
the Windows NT port by Jon Forrest (more stuff but not done yet)
*
the Linux ELF port by Brian Gallew
The following bugs have been fixed in postgres95-beta-0.02:
*
new lines not escaped in COPY OUT and problem with COPY OUT when first
attribute is a ’.’
*
cannot type return to use the default user id in createuser
*
SELECT DISTINCT on big tables crashes
*
Linux installation problems
*
monitor doesn’t allow use of ’localhost’ as PGHOST
*
psql core dumps when doing \c or \l
*
the "pgtclsh" target missing from src/bin/pgtclsh/Makefile
*
libpgtcl has a hard-wired default port number
*
SELECT DISTINCT INTO TABLE hangs
*
CREATE TYPE doesn’t accept ’variable’ as the internallength
2738
Add jpeg signature to pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add jpg signature to pdf; add photo to pdf in preview
Add jpeg signature to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
adding image to pdf form; add jpg to pdf
Appendix E. Release Notes
*
wrong result using more than 1 aggregate in a SELECT
E.298. Postgres95 Release 0.01
ReleaseDate: 1995-05-01
Initial release.
2739
C# PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF digital
text from PDF, VB.NET convert PDF to Jpeg, VB.NET Add a signature or an empty signature field in any PDF file Search unsigned signature field in PDF document.
add a jpg to a pdf; how to add image to pdf
VB.NET PDF Digital Signature Library: add, remove, update PDF
C# Online Dicom Viewer, C# Online Jpeg images Viewer VB.NET PDF - Add Digital Signatures to PDF in VB allows PDF such security setting via digital signature.
add image to pdf file; add an image to a pdf with acrobat
Appendix F. Additional Supplied Modules
This appendix and the next one contain information regarding the modules that can be found in the
contrib
directory of the PostgreSQL distribution. These include porting tools, analysis utilities,
and plug-in features that are not part of the core PostgreSQL system, mainly because they address a
limited audience or are too experimental to be part of the main source tree. This does not preclude
their usefulness.
This appendix covers extensions and other server plug-in modules found in
contrib
.Appendix G
covers utility programs.
When building from the source distribution, these components are not built automatically, unless you
build the "world" target (see step 2). You can build and install all of them by running:
make
make install
in the
contrib
directory of a configured source tree; or to build andinstall just one selected module,
do the same in that module’s subdirectory. Many of the modules have regression tests, which can be
executed by running:
make check
before installation or
make installcheck
once you have a PostgreSQL server running.
If you are using a pre-packaged version of PostgreSQL, these modules are typically made available
as a separate subpackage, such as
postgresql-contrib
.
Many modules supply new user-defined functions, operators, or types. To make use of one of these
modules, after you have installed the code you need to register the new SQL objects in the database
system. In PostgreSQL 9.1 and later, this is done by executing a CREATE EXTENSION command.
In a fresh database, you can simply do
CREATE EXTENSION
module_name
;
This command mustbe run by a database superuser. This registers the new SQL objects inthecurrent
database only, so you need torun this command in eachdatabase that you want the module’s facilities
to be available in. Alternatively, run it in database
template1
so that the extension will be copied
into subsequently-created databases by default.
Many modules allow you to install their objects in a schema of your choice. To do that, add
SCHEMA
schema_name
to the
CREATE EXTENSION
command. By default, the objects will be placed in your
current creation target schema, typically
public
.
If your database was brought forward by dump and reload from a pre-9.1versionof PostgreSQL, and
you had been using the pre-9.1 version of the module in it, you should insteaddo
CREATE EXTENSION
module_name
FROM unpackaged;
2740
C# HTML5 Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit Raster
Signature feature for protecting images. supports various images formats, including JPEG, GIF, BMP Supported annotation features includes add text comments to
add jpg to pdf online; add signature image to pdf acrobat
C#: XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET Online Help Manual
Office 2003 and 2007, PDF, DICOM, Gif, Png, Jpeg, Bmp. 6. Click to save created signature with customized name. Click to add a rectangle redaction on the file.
adding image to pdf in preview; add photo to pdf form
Appendix F. Additional Supplied Modules
This willupdate the pre-9.1 objects of the module intoa proper extensionobject. Futureupdates to the
module will be managed by ALTER EXTENSION. For more information about extension updates,
see Section 35.15.
Note, however, that some of these modules are not “extensions” in this sense, but are loaded into the
server in some other way, for instance by way of shared_preload_libraries. See the documentation of
each module for details.
F.1. adminpack
adminpack
provides a number of support functions which pgAdmin and other administration and
management tools can use to provide additional functionality, such as remote management of server
log files.
F.1.1. Functions Implemented
The functions implemented by
adminpack
can only be run by a superuser. Here’s a list of these
functions:
int8 pg_catalog.pg_file_write(fname text, data text, append bool)
bool pg_catalog.pg_file_rename(oldname text, newname text, archivename text)
bool pg_catalog.pg_file_rename(oldname text, newname text)
bool pg_catalog.pg_file_unlink(fname text)
setof record pg_catalog.pg_logdir_ls()
/
*
Renaming of existing backend functions for pgAdmin compatibility
*
/
int8 pg_catalog.pg_file_read(fname text, data text, append bool)
bigint pg_catalog.pg_file_length(text)
int4 pg_catalog.pg_logfile_rotate()
F.2. auth_delay
auth_delay
causes the server to pause briefly before reportingauthentication failure, to make brute-
force attacks on database passwords more difficult. Note that it does nothing to prevent denial-of-
service attacks, and may even exacerbate them, since processes that are waiting before reporting
authentication failure will still consume connection slots.
In order to function, this module must be loaded via shared_preload_libraries in
postgresql.conf
.
F.2.1. Configuration Parameters
auth_delay.milliseconds
(
int
)
The number of milliseconds to wait before reporting an authentication failure. The default is 0.
These parameters must be set in
postgresql.conf
.Typical usage might be:
# postgresql.conf
shared_preload_libraries = ’auth_delay’
2741
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
NET program. Password, digital signature and PDF text, image and page redaction will be used and customized. PDF Annotation Edit.
add picture to pdf in preview; how to add an image to a pdf in acrobat
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
can convert Word, Excel, PowerPoint Tiff, Jpeg, Bmp, Png You may add PDF document protection functionality into your C# APIs for handling digital signature in a
how to add a jpeg to a pdf; adding images to a pdf document
Appendix F. Additional Supplied Modules
auth_delay.milliseconds = ’500’
F.2.2. Author
KaiGai Kohei <
kaigai@ak.jp.nec.com
>
F.3. auto_explain
The
auto_explain
module provides a means for logging execution plans of slow statements au-
tomatically, without having to run EXPLAIN by hand. This is especially helpful for tracking down
un-optimized queries in large applications.
The module provides no SQL-accessible functions. To use it, simply load it into the server. You can
load it into an individual session:
LOAD ’auto_explain’;
(You must be superuser to do that.) More typical usage is to preload it into some or all sessions
by including
auto_explain
in session_preload_libraries or shared_preload_libraries in
postgresql.conf
.Then you can track unexpectedly slow queries no matter when they happen. Of
course there is a price in overhead for that.
F.3.1. Configuration Parameters
There are several configuration parameters that control the behavior of
auto_explain
.Note that the
default behavior is to do nothing, so you must set at least
auto_explain.log_min_duration
if
you want any results.
auto_explain.log_min_duration
(
integer
)
auto_explain.log_min_duration
is the minimum statement execution time, in millisec-
onds, that will cause the statement’s plan to be logged. Settingthis to zerologs all plans. Minus-
one (thedefault) disables loggingof plans. For example, if you setit to
250ms
thenallstatements
that run 250ms or longer will be logged. Only superusers can change this setting.
auto_explain.log_analyze
(
boolean
)
auto_explain.log_analyze
causes
EXPLAIN ANALYZE
output, rather than just
EXPLAIN
output, to be printed when an execution plan is logged. This parameter is off by default. Only
superusers can change this setting.
Note: When this parameter is on, per-plan-node timing occurs for all statements executed,
whether or not they run long enough to actually get logged. This can have an extremely
negative impact on performance. Turning off
auto_explain.log_timing
ameliorates the
performance cost, at the price of obtaining less information.
2742
VB.NET PDF: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF
can convert Word, Excel, PowerPoint Tiff, Jpeg, Bmp, Png You may add PDF document protection functionality into your VB APIs for handling digital signature in a
how to add image to pdf reader; how to add an image to a pdf file in acrobat
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
PDF to text; Convert PDF to Jpeg images; More protected PDF; Allow users to add password to Create signatures in existing PDF signature fields; Create signatures
add image to pdf acrobat reader; add jpg to pdf preview
Appendix F. Additional Supplied Modules
auto_explain.log_buffers
(
boolean
)
auto_explain.log_buffers
controls whether buffer usage statistics are printed when anex-
ecution plan is logged; it’s equivalentto the
BUFFERS
option of
EXPLAIN
.This parameter has no
effect unless
auto_explain.log_analyze
is enabled. This parameter is off by default. Only
superusers can change this setting.
auto_explain.log_timing
(
boolean
)
auto_explain.log_timing
controls whether per-node timing informationis printed when an
execution plan is logged; it’s equivalent to the
TIMING
option of
EXPLAIN
.The overhead of
repeatedly reading the system clock can slow down queries significantly on some systems, so
it may be useful to set this parameter to off when only actual row counts, and not exact times,
are needed. This parameter has noeffect unless
auto_explain.log_analyze
is enabled. This
parameter is on by default. Only superusers can change this setting.
auto_explain.log_triggers
(
boolean
)
auto_explain.log_triggers
causes trigger execution statistics to be included when an ex-
ecution plan is logged. This parameter has no effect unless
auto_explain.log_analyze
is
enabled. This parameter is off by default. Only superusers can change this setting.
auto_explain.log_verbose
(
boolean
)
auto_explain.log_verbose
controls whether verbose details are printed when an execution
plan is logged; it’s equivalent to the
VERBOSE
option of
EXPLAIN
.This parameter is off by
default. Only superusers can change this setting.
auto_explain.log_format
(
enum
)
auto_explain.log_format
selects the
EXPLAIN
output format to be used. The allowed val-
ues are
text
,
xml
,
json
,and
yaml
.The default is text. Only superusers canchange this setting.
auto_explain.log_nested_statements
(
boolean
)
auto_explain.log_nested_statements
causes nested statements (statements executedin-
side a function) to be considered for logging. When it is off, only top-level query plans are
logged. This parameter is off by default. Only superusers can change this setting.
Inordinaryusage, these parameters are set in
postgresql.conf
,although superusers canalter them
on-the-fly within their own sessions. Typical usage might be:
# postgresql.conf
session_preload_libraries = ’auto_explain’
auto_explain.log_min_duration = ’3s’
F.3.2. Example
postgres=# LOAD ’auto_explain’;
postgres=# SET auto_explain.log_min_duration = 0;
postgres=# SET auto_explain.log_analyze = true;
postgres=# SELECT count(
*
)
FROM pg_class, pg_index
WHERE oid = indrelid AND indisunique;
This might produce log output such as:
LOG:
duration: 3.651 ms
plan:
2743
Appendix F. Additional Supplied Modules
Query Text: SELECT count(
*
)
FROM pg_class, pg_index
WHERE oid = indrelid AND indisunique;
Aggregate
(cost=16.79..16.80 rows=1 width=0) (actual time=3.626..3.627 rows=1 loops=1)
->
Hash Join
(cost=4.17..16.55 rows=92 width=0) (actual time=3.349..3.594 rows=92 loops=1)
Hash Cond: (pg_class.oid = pg_index.indrelid)
->
Seq Scan on pg_class
(cost=0.00..9.55 rows=255 width=4) (actual time=0.016..0.140 rows=255 loops=1)
->
Hash
(cost=3.02..3.02 rows=92 width=4) (actual time=3.238..3.238 rows=92 loops=1)
Buckets: 1024
Batches: 1
Memory Usage: 4kB
->
Seq Scan on pg_index
(cost=0.00..3.02 rows=92 width=4) (actual time=0.008..3.187 rows=92 loops=1)
Filter: indisunique
F.3.3. Author
Takahiro Itagaki <
itagaki.takahiro@oss.ntt.co.jp
>
F.4. btree_gin
btree_gin
provides sample GIN operator classes that implement B-tree equivalent behavior for
the data types
int2
,
int4
,
int8
,
float4
,
float8
,
timestamp with time zone
,
timestamp
without time zone
,
time with time zone
,
time without time zone
,
date
,
interval
,
oid
,
money
,
"char"
,
varchar
,
text
,
bytea
,
bit
,
varbit
,
macaddr
,
inet
,and
cidr
.
In general, these operator classes will not outperform the equivalent standard B-tree index methods,
and they lack one major feature of the standard B-tree code: the ability to enforce uniqueness. How-
ever, they are useful for GIN testing and as a base for developing other GIN operator classes. Also,
for queries that test both a GIN-indexable column and a B-tree-indexable column, it might be more
efficient to create a multicolumn GIN index that uses one of these operator classes than to create two
separate indexes that would have to be combined via bitmap ANDing.
F.4.1. Example Usage
CREATE TABLE test (a int4);
-- create index
CREATE INDEX testidx ON test USING gin (a);
-- query
SELECT
*
FROM test WHERE a < 10;
F.4.2. Authors
Teodor Sigaev (<
teodor@stack.net
>) and Oleg Bartunov (<
oleg@sai.msu.su
>). See
http://www.sai.msu.su/~megera/oddmuse/index.cgi/Gin for additional information.
2744
Appendix F. Additional Supplied Modules
F.5. btree_gist
btree_gist
provides GiST index operator classes that implement B-tree equivalent behavior for
the data types
int2
,
int4
,
int8
,
float4
,
float8
,
numeric
,
timestamp with time zone
,
timestamp without time zone
,
time with time zone
,
time without time zone
,
date
,
interval
,
oid
,
money
,
char
,
varchar
,
text
,
bytea
,
bit
,
varbit
,
macaddr
,
inet
,and
cidr
.
In general, these operator classes will not outperform the equivalent standard B-tree index methods,
and they lack one major feature of the standard B-tree code: the ability to enforce uniqueness. How-
ever, they provide some other features that are not available with a B-tree index, as described below.
Also, these operator classes are useful when a multicolumn GiST index is needed, wherein some of
the columns are of data types that are only indexable with GiST but other columns are just simple
data types. Lastly, these operator classes are useful for GiST testing and as a base for developing
other GiST operator classes.
In addition to the typical B-tree search operators,
btree_gist
also provides index support for
<>
(“not equals”). This may be useful in combination with an exclusion constraint, as described below.
Also, for data types for which there is a natural distance metric,
btree_gist
defines a distance
operator
<->
, and provides GiST index support for nearest-neighbor searches using this opera-
tor. Distance operators are provided for
int2
,
int4
,
int8
,
float4
,
float8
,
timestamp with
time zone
,
timestamp without time zone
,
time without time zone
,
date
,
interval
,
oid
,and
money
.
F.5.1. Example Usage
Simple example using
btree_gist
instead of
btree
:
CREATE TABLE test (a int4);
-- create index
CREATE INDEX testidx ON test USING gist (a);
-- query
SELECT
*
FROM test WHERE a < 10;
-- nearest-neighbor search: find the ten entries closest to "42"
SELECT
*
, a <-> 42 AS dist FROM test ORDER BY a <-> 42 LIMIT 10;
Use an exclusion constraint to enforce the rule that a cage at a zoo can contain only one kind of
animal:
=> CREATE TABLE zoo (
cage
INTEGER,
animal TEXT,
EXCLUDE USING gist (cage WITH =, animal WITH <>)
);
=> INSERT INTO zoo VALUES(123, ’zebra’);
INSERT 0 1
=> INSERT INTO zoo VALUES(123, ’zebra’);
INSERT 0 1
=> INSERT INTO zoo VALUES(123, ’lion’);
ERROR:
conflicting key value violates exclusion constraint "zoo_cage_animal_excl"
DETAIL:
Key (cage, animal)=(123, lion) conflicts with existing key (cage, animal)=(123, zebra).
=> INSERT INTO zoo VALUES(124, ’lion’);
INSERT 0 1
2745
Appendix F. Additional Supplied Modules
F.5.2. Authors
Teodor Sigaev (<
teodor@stack.net
>) , Oleg Bartunov (<
oleg@sai.msu.su
>), and Janko
Richter (<
jankorichter@yahoo.de
>). See http://www.sai.msu.su/~megera/postgres/gist/ for
additional information.
F.6. chkpass
This module implements a data type
chkpass
that is designed for storingencrypted passwords. Each
password is automatically converted to encrypted form upon entry, and is always stored encrypted.
To compare, simply compare against a clear text password and the comparison function will encrypt
it before comparing.
There are provisions inthecode toreport anerror if the passwordis determined to be easily crackable.
However, this is currently just a stub that does nothing.
If you precede an input string with a colon, it is assumed tobe an already-encrypted password, and is
stored without further encryption. This allows entry of previously-encrypted passwords.
On output, a colon is prepended. This makes it possible to dump and reload passwords without re-
encryptingthem. If you want the encrypted passwordwithout the colon then use the
raw()
function.
This allows you to use the type with things like Apache’s
Auth_PostgreSQL
module.
The encryption uses the standard Unix function
crypt()
,and so it suffers from all the usual limita-
tions of that function; notably that only the first eight characters of a password are considered.
Note that the
chkpass
data type is not indexable.
Sample usage:
test=# create table test (p chkpass);
CREATE TABLE
test=# insert into test values (’hello’);
INSERT 0 1
test=# select
*
from test;
p
----------------
:dVGkpXdOrE3ko
(1 row)
test=# select raw(p) from test;
raw
---------------
dVGkpXdOrE3ko
(1 row)
test=# select p = ’hello’ from test;
?column?
----------
t
(1 row)
test=# select p = ’goodbye’ from test;
?column?
----------
f
2746
Appendix F. Additional Supplied Modules
(1 row)
F.6.1. Author
D’Arcy J.M. Cain (<
darcy@druid.net
>)
F.7. citext
The
citext
module provides a case-insensitive character string type,
citext
.Essentially, it inter-
nally calls
lower
when comparing values. Otherwise, it behaves almost exactly like
text
.
F.7.1. Rationale
The standard approach to doing case-insensitive matches in PostgreSQL has been to use the
lower
function when comparing values, for example
SELECT
*
FROM tab WHERE lower(col) = LOWER(?);
This works reasonably well, but has a number of drawbacks:
It makes your SQL statements verbose, and you always have to remember to use
lower
on both
the column and the query value.
It won’t use an index, unless you create a functional index using
lower
.
If you declare a column as
UNIQUE
or
PRIMARY KEY
, the implicitly generated index is
case-sensitive. So it’s useless for case-insensitive searches, and it won’t enforce uniqueness
case-insensitively.
The
citext
data type allows you to eliminate calls to
lower
in SQL queries, and allows a primary
key to be case-insensitive.
citext
is locale-aware, just like
text
,which means that the matching of
upper case and lower case characters is dependent on the rules of the database’s
LC_CTYPE
setting.
Again, this behavior is identical to the use of
lower
in queries. But because it’s done transparently
by the data type, you don’t have toremember to do anything special in your queries.
F.7.2. How to Use It
Here’s a simple example of usage:
CREATE TABLE users (
nick CITEXT PRIMARY KEY,
pass TEXT
NOT NULL
);
INSERT INTO users VALUES ( ’larry’,
md5(random()::text) );
INSERT INTO users VALUES ( ’Tom’,
md5(random()::text) );
INSERT INTO users VALUES ( ’Damian’, md5(random()::text) );
INSERT INTO users VALUES ( ’NEAL’,
md5(random()::text) );
INSERT INTO users VALUES ( ’Bjørn’,
md5(random()::text) );
2747
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested