pdf viewer for asp.net web application : Add image pdf acrobat application SDK tool html .net winforms online postgresql-9.4-A4282-part2926

Appendix F. Additional Supplied Modules
SELECT
*
FROM users WHERE nick = ’Larry’;
The
SELECT
statement will return one tuple, even though the
nick
column was set to
larry
and the
query was for
Larry
.
F.7.3. String Comparison Behavior
citext
performs comparisons byconvertingeach string to lower case(as though
lower
were called)
andthen comparingtheresults normally. Thus, for example, two strings are consideredequalif
lower
would produce identical results for them.
In order to emulate a case-insensitive collation as closely as possible, there are
citext
-specific ver-
sions of a number of string-processing operators and functions. So, for example, the regular expres-
sion operators
~
and
~
*
exhibit the same behavior when applied to
citext
:they both match case-
insensitively. The same is true for
!~
and
!~
*
,as well as for the
LIKE
operators
~~
and
~~
*
,and
!~~
and
!~~
*
.If you’d like to match case-sensitively, you can cast the operator’s arguments to
text
.
Similarly, all of the following functions perform matching case-insensitively if their arguments are
citext
:
regexp_matches()
regexp_replace()
regexp_split_to_array()
regexp_split_to_table()
replace()
split_part()
strpos()
translate()
For the regexp functions, if you want to match case-sensitively, you can specify the “c” flag to force
acase-sensitive match. Otherwise, you must cast to
text
before using one of these functions if you
want case-sensitive behavior.
F.7.4. Limitations
citext
’s case-folding behavior depends on the
LC_CTYPE
setting of your database. How it com-
pares values is therefore determined when the database is created. It is not truly case-insensitive in
the terms defined by the Unicode standard. Effectively, what this means is that, as long as you’re
happy with your collation, you should be happy with
citext
’s comparisons. But if you have data
in different languages stored in your database, users of one language may find their query results
are not as expected if the collation is for another language.
As of PostgreSQL 9.1, you can attach a
COLLATE
specification to
citext
columns or data val-
ues. Currently,
citext
operators willhonor a non-default
COLLATE
specification while comparing
case-folded strings, but the initial folding to lower case is always done according to the database’s
LC_CTYPE
setting (that is, as though
COLLATE "default"
were given). This may be changed in
afuture release so that both steps follow the input
COLLATE
specification.
2748
Add image pdf acrobat - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
how to add a photo to a pdf document; how to add image to pdf in acrobat
Add image pdf acrobat - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
adding images to pdf files; adding images to pdf
Appendix F. Additional Supplied Modules
citext
is not as efficient as
text
because the operator functions and the B-tree comparison func-
tions must make copies of the data and convert it to lower case for comparisons. It is, however,
slightly more efficient than using
lower
to get case-insensitive matching.
citext
doesn’t help much if you need data to compare case-sensitively in some contexts and
case-insensitively in other contexts. The standard answer is to use the
text
type and manually
use the
lower
function when you need to compare case-insensitively; this works all right if case-
insensitive comparison is needed only infrequently. If you need case-insensitive behavior most of
the time and case-sensitive infrequently, consider storing the data as
citext
and explicitlycasting
the column to
text
when you want case-sensitive comparison. In either situation, you will need
two indexes if you want both types of searches to be fast.
The schema containing the
citext
operators must be in the current
search_path
(typically
public
); if it is not, the normal case-sensitive
text
operators will be invoked instead.
F.7.5. Author
David E. Wheeler <
david@kineticode.com
>
Inspired by the original
citext
module by Donald Fraser.
F.8. cube
This module implements a data type
cube
for representingmultidimensional cubes.
F.8.1. Syntax
Table F-1 shows the valid external representations for the
cube
type.
x
,
y
,etc. denote floating-point
numbers.
Table F-1. Cube External Representations
x
Aone-dimensional point (or, zero-length
one-dimensional interval)
(
x
)
Same as above
x1
,
x2
,...,
xn
Apoint inn-dimensional space, represented
internally as a zero-volume cube
(
x1
,
x2
,...,
xn
)
Same as above
(
x
),(
y
)
Aone-dimensional interval starting at
x
and
ending at
y
or vice versa; the order does not
matter
[(
x
),(
y
)]
Same as above
(
x1
,...,
xn
),(
y1
,...,
yn
)
An n-dimensional cube represented by a pair of
its diagonally opposite corners
[(
x1
,...,
xn
),(
y1
,...,
yn
)]
Same as above
It does not matter whichorder the opposite corners of a cube are enteredin. The
cube
functions auto-
matically swap values if neededtocreate a uniform “lower left— upper right” internal representation.
2749
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Convert image files to PDF. File & Page Process. Annotate & Comment. Add, insert PDF native annotations to PDF file. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF
acrobat insert image in pdf; add jpg to pdf document
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. you can easily perform file conversion from PDF document to image or document
add picture to pdf form; add jpg to pdf file
Appendix F. Additional Supplied Modules
White space is ignored, so
[(
x
),(
y
)]
is the same as
[ (
x
), (
y
) ]
.
F.8.2. Precision
Values are storedinternallyas 64-bit floatingpoint numbers. This means that numbers with more than
about 16 significant digits will be truncated.
F.8.3. Usage
The
cube
module includes a GiST index operator class for
cube
values. The operators supported by
the GiST operator class are shown in Table F-2.
Table F-2. Cube GiST Operators
Operator
Description
a = b
The cubes a and b are identical.
a && b
The cubes a and b overlap.
a @> b
The cube a contains the cube b.
a <@ b
The cube a is contained in the cube b.
(Before PostgreSQL 8.2, the containment operators
@>
and
<@
were respectively called
@
and
~
.
These names are still available, but are deprecated and will eventually be retired. Notice that the old
names are reversed from the convention formerly followed by the core geometric data types!)
The standard B-tree operators are also provided, for example
Operator
Description
[a, b] < [c, d]
Less than
[a, b] > [c, d]
Greater than
These operators do not make a lot of sense for any practical purpose but sorting. These operators first
compare (a) to (c), and if these are equal, compare (b) to (d). That results in reasonably good sorting
in most cases, which is useful if you want to use ORDER BY with this type.
Table F-3 shows the available functions.
Table F-3. Cube Functions
cube(float8) returns cube
Makes a one dimensional cube with both
coordinates the same.
cube(1) == ’(1)’
cube(float8, float8) returns cube
Makes a one dimensional cube.
cube(1,2) ==
’(1),(2)’
cube(float8[]) returns cube
Makes a zero-volume cube using the coordinates
defined by the array.
cube(ARRAY[1,2]) ==
’(1,2)’
2750
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Image and Document Conversion Supported by Windows Viewer. Convert to PDF.
how to add image to pdf document; add image pdf
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. SDK to convert PowerPoint document to PDF document code for PowerPoint to TIFF image conversion
add jpg to pdf acrobat; add a picture to a pdf
Appendix F. Additional Supplied Modules
cube(float8[], float8[]) returns
cube
Makes a cube with upper right and lower left
coordinates as defined by the two arrays, which
must be of the same length.
cube(’{1,2}’::float[],
’{3,4}’::float[]) == ’(1,2),(3,4)’
cube(cube, float8) returns cube
Makes a new cube by adding a dimension on to
an existing cube with the same values for both
parts of the newcoordinate. This is useful for
building cubes piece by piece from calculated
values.
cube(’(1)’,2) == ’(1,2),(1,2)’
cube(cube, float8, float8) returns
cube
Makes a new cube by adding a dimension on to
an existing cube. This is useful for building
cubes piece by piece from calculatedvalues.
cube(’(1,2)’,3,4) == ’(1,3),(2,4)’
cube_dim(cube) returns int
Returns the number of dimensions of the cube
cube_ll_coord(cube, int) returns
double
Returns the n’th coordinate value for the lower
left corner of a cube
cube_ur_coord(cube, int) returns
double
Returns the n’th coordinate value for the upper
right corner of a cube
cube_is_point(cube) returns bool
Returns true if a cube is a point, that is, the two
defining corners are the same.
cube_distance(cube, cube) returns
double
Returns the distance between two cubes. If both
cubes are points, this is the normal distance
function.
cube_subset(cube, int[]) returns
cube
Makes a new cube from an existing cube, using
alist of dimension indexes from an array. Can be
used tofindboth the LL and UR coordinates of a
single dimension, e.g.
cube_subset(cube(’(1,3,5),(6,7,8)’),
ARRAY[2]) = ’(3),(7)’
.Or can be used to
drop dimensions, or reorder them as desired, e.g.
cube_subset(cube(’(1,3,5),(6,7,8)’),
ARRAY[3,2,1,1]) = ’(5, 3, 1, 1),(8,
7, 6, 6)’
.
cube_union(cube, cube) returns cube
Produces the union of two cubes
cube_inter(cube, cube) returns cube
Produces the intersection of two cubes
2751
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word SDK to convert Word document to PDF document. demo code for Word to TIFF image conversion
how to add a jpeg to a pdf file; adding an image to a pdf file
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Using this VB.NET Imaging PDF Watermark Add-on, you can a watermark that consists of text or image (such as And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no
acrobat add image to pdf; add jpg to pdf online
Appendix F. Additional Supplied Modules
cube_enlarge(cube c, double r, int
n) returns cube
Increases the size of a cube by a specified radius
in at least ndimensions. If the radius is negative
the cube is shrunk instead. This is useful for
creating bounding boxes around a point for
searching for nearby points. All defined
dimensions are changed by the radius r. LL
coordinates are decreased by r and UR
coordinates are increased byr. If a LL
coordinate is increased to larger than the
corresponding UR coordinate (this canonly
happen when r < 0) than both coordinates are
set to their average. If n is greater than the
number of defined dimensions and the cube is
being increased (r >= 0) then 0is used as the
base for the extra coordinates.
F.8.4. Defaults
Ibelieve this union:
select cube_union(’(0,5,2),(2,3,1)’, ’0’);
cube_union
-------------------
(0, 0, 0),(2, 5, 2)
(1 row)
does not contradict common sense, neither does the intersection
select cube_inter(’(0,-1),(1,1)’, ’(-2),(2)’);
cube_inter
-------------
(0, 0),(1, 0)
(1 row)
In all binary operations on differently-dimensioned cubes, I assume the lower-dimensional one to be
aCartesian projection, i. e., having zeroes in place of coordinates omittedin the string representation.
The above examples are equivalent to:
cube_union(’(0,5,2),(2,3,1)’,’(0,0,0),(0,0,0)’);
cube_inter(’(0,-1),(1,1)’,’(-2,0),(2,0)’);
The following containment predicate uses the point syntax, while in fact the second argument is
internally represented by a box. This syntax makes it unnecessary to define a separate point type and
functions for (box,point) predicates.
select cube_contains(’(0,0),(1,1)’, ’0.5,0.5’);
cube_contains
--------------
t
(1 row)
2752
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
Also designed to be used add-on for .NET Image SDK, RasterEdge Bitmap to PDF Converter can Powerful image converter for Bitmap and PDF files; No need for
how to add photo to pdf in preview; adding jpg to pdf
PDF to WORD Converter | Convert PDF to Word, Convert Word to PDF
out transformation between different kinds of image files and Word Converter has accurate output, and PDF to Word need the support of Adobe Acrobat & Microsoft
add photo to pdf in preview; adding image to pdf in preview
F.8.5. Notes
For examples of usage, see the regression test
sql/cube.sql
.
To make it harder for people to break things, there is a limit of 100 on the number of dimensions of
cubes. This is set in
cubedata.h
if you need something bigger.
F.8.6. Credits
Original author: Gene Selkov, Jr. <
selkovjr@mcs.anl.gov
>, Mathematics and Computer Science
Division, Argonne National Laboratory.
My thanks are primarily to Prof. Joe Hellerstein (http://db.cs.berkeley.edu/jmh/) for
elucidating the gist of the GiST (http://gist.cs.berkeley.edu/), and to his former student,
Andy Dong (http://best.me.berkeley.edu/~adong/), for his example written for Illustra,
http://best.berkeley.edu/~adong/rtree/index.html. I am also grateful to all Postgres developers,
present and past, for enabling myself to create my own world and live undisturbed in it. And I would
like to acknowledge my gratitude to Argonne Lab and to the U.S. Department of Energy for the
years of faithful support of my database research.
Minor updates to this package were made by Bruno Wolff III <
bruno@wolff.to
> in
August/September of 2002. These include changing the precision from single precision to double
precision and adding some new functions.
Additional updates were made by Joshua Reich <
josh@root.net
>in July 2006. These include
cube(float8[], float8[])
and cleaning up the code to use the V1 call protocol instead of the
deprecated V0 protocol.
F.9. dblink
dblink
is a module that supports connections toother PostgreSQL databases from within a database
session.
See also postgres_fdw, which provides roughly the same functionality using a more modern and
standards-compliant infrastructure.
dblink_connect
Name
dblink_connect — opens a persistent connection to a remote database
Synopsis
dblink_connect(text connstr) returns text
dblink_connect(text connname, text connstr) returns text
2753
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
as a kind of compensation for limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS VB.NET PPT: VB Code to Add Embedded Image Object to
add photo to pdf preview; adding image to pdf
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
adding image to pdf file; how to add a photo to a pdf document
dblink_connect
Description
dblink_connect()
establishes a connection to a remote PostgreSQL database. The server and
database to be contacted are identifiedthrough a standard libpq connection string. Optionally, a name
can be assigned to the connection. Multiple named connections can be open at once, but only one un-
named connectionis permittedat a time. The connectionwill persist untilclosedor until the database
session is ended.
The connection string may also be the name of an existing foreign server. It is recommended to use
the foreign-data wrapper
dblink_fdw
when defining the foreign server. See the example below, as
well as CREATE SERVER and CREATE USER MAPPING.
Arguments
connname
The name to use for this connection; if omitted, anunnamed connectionis opened, replacing any
existing unnamed connection.
connstr
libpq-style connection info string, for example
hostaddr=127.0.0.1 port=5432
dbname=mydb user=postgres password=mypasswd
. For details see Section 31.1.1.
Alternatively, the name of a foreign server.
Return Value
Returns status, which is always
OK
(since any error causes the function to throw an error instead of
returning).
Notes
Only superusers may use
dblink_connect
to create non-password-authenticated connections. If
non-superusers need this capability, use
dblink_connect_u
instead.
It is unwise to choose connection names that contain equal signs, as this opens a risk of confusion
with connection info strings in other
dblink
functions.
Examples
SELECT dblink_connect(’dbname=postgres’);
dblink_connect
----------------
OK
(1 row)
SELECT dblink_connect(’myconn’, ’dbname=postgres’);
dblink_connect
----------------
OK
(1 row)
2754
dblink_connect
-- FOREIGN DATA WRAPPER functionality
-- Note: local connection must require password authentication for this to work properly
--
Otherwise, you will receive the following error from dblink_connect():
--
----------------------------------------------------------------------
--
ERROR:
password is required
--
DETAIL:
Non-superuser cannot connect if the server does not request a password.
--
HINT:
Target server’s authentication method must be changed.
CREATE SERVER fdtest FOREIGN DATA WRAPPER dblink_fdw OPTIONS (hostaddr ’127.0.0.1’, dbname ’contrib_regression’);
CREATE USER dblink_regression_test WITH PASSWORD ’secret’;
CREATE USER MAPPING FOR dblink_regression_test SERVER fdtest OPTIONS (user ’dblink_regression_test’, password ’secret’);
GRANT USAGE ON FOREIGN SERVER fdtest TO dblink_regression_test;
GRANT SELECT ON TABLE foo TO dblink_regression_test;
\set ORIGINAL_USER :USER
\c - dblink_regression_test
SELECT dblink_connect(’myconn’, ’fdtest’);
dblink_connect
----------------
OK
(1 row)
SELECT
*
FROM dblink(’myconn’,’SELECT
*
FROM foo’) AS t(a int, b text, c text[]);
a
| b |
c
----+---+---------------
0 | a | {a0,b0,c0}
1 | b | {a1,b1,c1}
2 | c | {a2,b2,c2}
3 | d | {a3,b3,c3}
4 | e | {a4,b4,c4}
5 | f | {a5,b5,c5}
6 | g | {a6,b6,c6}
7 | h | {a7,b7,c7}
8 | i | {a8,b8,c8}
9 | j | {a9,b9,c9}
10 | k | {a10,b10,c10}
(11 rows)
\c - :ORIGINAL_USER
REVOKE USAGE ON FOREIGN SERVER fdtest FROM dblink_regression_test;
REVOKE SELECT ON TABLE foo FROM dblink_regression_test;
DROP USER MAPPING FOR dblink_regression_test SERVER fdtest;
DROP USER dblink_regression_test;
DROP SERVER fdtest;
2755
dblink_connect_u
Name
dblink_connect_u — opens a persistent connection to a remote database, insecurely
Synopsis
dblink_connect_u(text connstr) returns text
dblink_connect_u(text connname, text connstr) returns text
Description
dblink_connect_u()
is identical to
dblink_connect()
,except that it will allow non-superusers
to connect using any authentication method.
If the remote server selects an authentication method that does not involve a password, then im-
personation and subsequent escalation of privileges can occur, because the session will appear to
have originated from the user as which the local PostgreSQL server runs. Also, even if the remote
server does demand a password, it is possible for the password to be supplied from the server en-
vironment, such as a
~/.pgpass
file belonging to the server’s user. This opens not only a risk of
impersonation, but the possibility of exposing a password to an untrustworthy remote server. There-
fore,
dblink_connect_u()
is initially installed with all privileges revoked from
PUBLIC
,making
it un-callable except by superusers. In some situations it may be appropriate to grant
EXECUTE
per-
mission for
dblink_connect_u()
to specific users who are considered trustworthy, but this should
be done with care. It is also recommended that any
~/.pgpass
file belonging to the server’s user not
contain any records specifying a wildcard host name.
For further details see
dblink_connect()
.
2756
dblink_disconnect
Name
dblink_disconnect — closes a persistent connection to a remote database
Synopsis
dblink_disconnect() returns text
dblink_disconnect(text connname) returns text
Description
dblink_disconnect()
closes a connection previously opened by
dblink_connect()
.The form
with no arguments closes an unnamed connection.
Arguments
connname
The name of a named connection to be closed.
Return Value
Returns status, which is always
OK
(since any error causes the function to throw an error instead of
returning).
Examples
SELECT dblink_disconnect();
dblink_disconnect
-------------------
OK
(1 row)
SELECT dblink_disconnect(’myconn’);
dblink_disconnect
-------------------
OK
(1 row)
2757
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested