pdf viewer in asp net c# : Add image in pdf using java Library control component .net web page asp.net mvc postgresql-9.4-A438-part2959

Chapter 9. Functions and Operators
situations in client code is not always easy, or even possible, and writing expressions to detect them
can be error-prone. An alternative is touse
suppress_redundant_updates_trigger
,whichwill
skip updates that don’t change the data. You should use this with care, however. The trigger takes a
small but non-trivial time for each record, so if most of the records affected by an update are actually
changed, use of this trigger will actually make the update run slower.
The
suppress_redundant_updates_trigger
function can be added toa table like this:
CREATE TRIGGER z_min_update
BEFORE UPDATE ON tablename
FOR EACH ROW EXECUTE PROCEDURE suppress_redundant_updates_trigger();
In most cases, you would want to fire this trigger last for each row. Bearing in mind that triggers fire
in name order, you would then choose a trigger name that comes after the name of any other trigger
you might have on the table.
For more information about creating triggers, see CREATE TRIGGER.
9.28. Event Trigger Functions
Currently
PostgreSQL
provides
one
built-in
event
trigger
helper
function,
pg_event_trigger_dropped_objects
.
pg_event_trigger_dropped_objects
returns
a
list
of
all
objects
dropped
by the command in whose
sql_drop
event it is called. If called in any
other
context,
pg_event_trigger_dropped_objects
raises
an
error.
pg_event_trigger_dropped_objects
returns the following columns:
Name
Type
Description
classid
Oid
OID of catalog the object
belonged in
objid
Oid
OID the object had within the
catalog
objsubid
int32
Object sub-id (e.g. attribute
number for columns)
object_type
text
Type of the object
schema_name
text
Name of the schema the object
belonged in, if any; otherwise
NULL
.No quoting is applied.
object_name
text
Name of the object, if the
combination of schema and
name can be usedas a unique
identifier for the object;
otherwise
NULL
.No quoting is
applied, and name is never
schema-qualified.
object_identity
text
Text rendering of the object
identity, schema-qualified. Each
and every identifier present in
the identity is quoted if
necessary.
308
Add image in pdf using java - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add png to pdf preview; adding images to pdf
Add image in pdf using java - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
adding an image to a pdf form; add image to pdf acrobat
Chapter 9. Functions and Operators
The
pg_event_trigger_dropped_objects
function can be used in an event trigger like this:
CREATE FUNCTION test_event_trigger_for_drops()
RETURNS event_trigger LANGUAGE plpgsql AS $$
DECLARE
obj record;
BEGIN
FOR obj IN SELECT
*
FROM pg_event_trigger_dropped_objects()
LOOP
RAISE NOTICE ’% dropped object: % %.% %’,
tg_tag,
obj.object_type,
obj.schema_name,
obj.object_name,
obj.object_identity;
END LOOP;
END
$$;
CREATE EVENT TRIGGER test_event_trigger_for_drops
ON sql_drop
EXECUTE PROCEDURE test_event_trigger_for_drops();
For more information about event triggers, see Chapter 37.
309
Java Imaging SDK Library: Document Image Scan, Process, PDF
imaging solutions, allowing developers to add document and Using RasterEdge Java Image SDK, developers can easily open Tiff, Jpeg2000, DICOM, JBIG2, PDF, MS Word
how to add image to pdf; add a jpeg to a pdf
DocImage SDK for .NET: HTML Viewer, View, Annotate, Convert, Print
in .NET, including Microsoft Word, Excel, PPT, PDF, Tiff, Dicom OCR .NET OCR Add-on provides you with powerful and of years before I found this .NET Image SDK.
add picture to pdf document; add image to pdf acrobat reader
Chapter 10. Type Conversion
SQL statements can, intentionally or not, require the mixing of different data types in the same ex-
pression. PostgreSQL has extensive facilities for evaluating mixed-type expressions.
In many cases a user does not need to understand the details of the type conversion mechanism.
However, implicitconversions done byPostgreSQL can affect the results of a query. When necessary,
these results can be tailored by using explicit type conversion.
This chapter introduces the PostgreSQL type conversion mechanisms and conventions. Refer to the
relevant sections in Chapter 8 and Chapter 9 for more information on specific data types and allowed
functions and operators.
10.1. Overview
SQL is a strongly typed language. That is, every data item has an associated data type which deter-
mines its behavior and allowedusage. PostgreSQL has an extensible type system that is more general
and flexible than other SQL implementations. Hence, most type conversion behavior in PostgreSQL
is governed by general rules rather than by ad hoc heuristics. This allows the use of mixed-type ex-
pressions even with user-defined types.
The PostgreSQL scanner/parser divides lexical elements into five fundamental categories: integers,
non-integer numbers, strings, identifiers, and key words. Constants of most non-numeric types are
first classified as strings. The SQL language definition allows specifyingtype names with strings, and
this mechanism can be used inPostgreSQL to start the parser down the correct path. For example, the
query:
SELECT text ’Origin’ AS "label", point ’(0,0)’ AS "value";
label
| value
--------+-------
Origin | (0,0)
(1 row)
has two literal constants, of type
text
and
point
.If a type is not specified for a string literal, then
the placeholder type
unknown
is assigned initially, to be resolved in later stages as described below.
There are four fundamentalSQL constructsrequiring distinct typeconversion rules inthePostgreSQL
parser:
Function calls
Much of the PostgreSQL type system is built around a rich set of functions. Functions can have
one or more arguments. Since PostgreSQL permits function overloading, the function name
alonedoesnotuniquelyidentifythe functionto be called;the parser mustselecttherightfunction
based on the data types of the supplied arguments.
Operators
PostgreSQL allows expressions with prefix and postfix unary (one-argument) operators, as well
as binary (two-argument) operators. Like functions, operators can be overloaded, so the same
problem of selectingthe right operator exists.
310
DocImage SDK for .NET: Document Imaging Features
6 (OJPEG) encoding Image only PDF encoding support. or lossy compression JPEG 2000 Codec Add-on: Capable and encoding JPEG 2000 image using wavelet compression
add photo to pdf for; adding images to pdf forms
VB.NET Image: .NET Image SDK for Image Viewing, Processing &
Deploy .NET Image SDK in VB, VB.NET Project for Barcode PDF Processing in VB.NET, VB.NET Project for Barcode Use powerful imaging SDK & add-ons to make your
add photo to pdf; add picture to pdf preview
Chapter 10. Type Conversion
Value Storage
SQL
INSERT
and
UPDATE
statements place the results of expressions into a table. The expres-
sions in the statement must be matched up with, and perhaps converted to, the types of the target
columns.
UNION
,
CASE
,and related constructs
Since all query results from a unionized
SELECT
statement must appear in a single set of
columns, the types of the results of each
SELECT
clause must be matched up and converted to
auniform set. Similarly, the result expressions of a
CASE
construct must be converted to a
common type so that the
CASE
expression as a whole has a known output type. The same holds
for
ARRAY
constructs, and for the
GREATEST
and
LEAST
functions.
The system catalogs store information about which conversions, or casts, exist between which data
types, and how to perform those conversions. Additional casts can be added by the user with the
CREATE CAST command. (This is usually done in conjunction with defining new data types. The
set of casts between built-in types has been carefully crafted and is best not altered.)
An additional heuristic provided by the parser allows improved determination of the proper cast-
ing behavior among groups of types that have implicit casts. Data types are divided into several
basic type categories, including
boolean
,
numeric
,
string
,
bitstring
,
datetime
,
timespan
,
geometric
,
network
,and user-defined. (For a list see Table 48-53;but note it is also possible tocre-
ate custom type categories.) Within eachcategory there can be one or more preferred types, which are
preferred when there is a choice of possible types. With careful selection of preferred types andavail-
able implicit casts, it is possible to ensure that ambiguous expressions (those with multiple candidate
parsing solutions) can be resolved in a useful way.
All type conversion rules are designed with several principles in mind:
Implicit conversions should never have surprising or unpredictable outcomes.
There should be no extra overhead in the parser or executor if a query does not need implicit type
conversion. That is, if a query is well-formed and the types already match, then the query should
execute without spending extra time in the parser and without introducing unnecessary implicit
conversion calls in the query.
Additionally, if a query usually requires an implicit conversion for a function, and if then the user
defines a new functionwith the correctargument types, the parser should use this new function and
no longer do implicit conversion to use the old function.
10.2. Operators
The specific operator that is referenced by an operator expression is determined using the following
procedure. Note that this procedure is indirectly affectedby the precedence of the operators involved,
since that will determine which sub-expressions are taken to be the inputs of which operators. See
Section 4.1.6 for more information.
Operator Type Resolution
1. Select the operators to be considered from the
pg_operator
system catalog. If a non-schema-
qualified operator name was used (the usual case), the operators considered are those with the
311
C# PowerPoint: Read, Decode & Scan Barcode Image from PowerPoint
C# PowerPoint: Decode PDF-417 Barcode Image, C# SDK, C# PowerPoint: ITF-14 Barcode Scanning Add-on. decode Intelligent Mail linear barcode image from PowerPoint
how to add image to pdf file; pdf insert image
.NET Excel Document Add-on | Manipulate Excel File in .NET
to convert Excel to PNG, JPEG, BMP, and GIF image formats, and to TIFF, PDF and SVG functions of this DLL, .NET programmers also need to add .NET Basic DLL
add jpg to pdf preview; how to add an image to a pdf in preview
Chapter 10. Type Conversion
matching name and argument count that are visible in the current searchpath(see Section 5.7.3).
If a qualified operator name was given, only operators in the specified schema are considered.
a. If the search path finds multiple operators with identical argument types, only the one
appearingearliestin the path is considered. Operators with different argument types are
considered on an equal footing regardless of search path position.
2. Checkfor anoperator acceptingexactly the input argument types. If oneexists (therecan beonly
one exact match in the set of operators considered), use it.
a. If oneargument of a binaryoperator invocationis of the
unknown
type, thenassumeitis
the sametype as the other argumentfor this check. Invocations involving two
unknown
inputs, or a unary operator with an
unknown
input, will never find a match at this step.
b. If one argument of a binary operator invocation is of the
unknown
type and the other is
of adomain type, nextcheck to seeif thereis anoperator accepting exactlythedomain’s
base type on both sides; if so, use it.
3. Look for the best match.
a. Discard candidate operators for which the input types do not match and cannot be con-
verted (using animplicit conversion) to match.
unknown
literals are assumed to becon-
vertible toanything for this purpose. If only one candidate remains, use it; elsecontinue
to the next step.
b. If any input argument is of a domain type, treat it as being of the domain’s base type for
all subsequent steps. This ensures that domains act like their base types for purposes of
ambiguous-operator resolution.
c. Run through all candidates and keep those with the most exact matches on input types.
Keep all candidates if none have exact matches. If only one candidate remains, use it;
else continue tothe next step.
d. Run through all candidates and keep those that accept preferred types (of the input data
type’s type category) atthe most positions wheretype conversionwill be required. Keep
all candidates if none accept preferred types. If only one candidate remains, use it; else
continue to the next step.
e. If any input arguments are
unknown
,check the type categories accepted at those ar-
gument positions by the remaining candidates. At each position, select the
string
category if any candidate accepts that category. (This bias towards string is appropriate
since an unknown-type literal looks like a string.) Otherwise, if all the remaining can-
didates accept the same type category, select that category; otherwise fail because the
correct choice cannot be deduced without more clues. Now discard candidates that do
not accept the selected type category. Furthermore, if any candidate accepts a preferred
type in that category, discard candidates that accept non-preferred types for that argu-
ment. Keepall candidates if none survive these tests. If only one candidate remains, use
it; else continue to the next step.
f. If there are both
unknown
and known-type arguments, and all the known-type argu-
ments have the same type, assume that the
unknown
arguments are also of that type,
and check which candidates canacceptthattype at the
unknown
-argument positions. If
exactly one candidate passes this test, use it. Otherwise, fail.
Some examples follow.
312
DICOM Image Viewer| What is DICOM
RasterEdge .NET Imaging SDK, you may add it on formats, including Bitmap, Png, Gif, Tiff, PDF, MS-Word NET sample codings are provided for image conversion if
adding an image to a pdf file; add jpg signature to pdf
.NET Word Document Add-on DLL of RasterEdge DocImage SDK for .NET
any page of Word document to raster image file (PNG and convert Word to other documents, like PDF, TIFF and be ordered for using .NET Word Document Add-on for
add picture to pdf; add image in pdf using java
Chapter 10. Type Conversion
Example 10-1. Factorial Operator Type Resolution
There is only one factorial operator (postfix
!
)defined in the standard catalog, and it takes an argu-
ment of type
bigint
.The scanner assigns an initial type of
integer
to the argument in this query
expression:
SELECT 40 ! AS "40 factorial";
40 factorial
--------------------------------------------------
815915283247897734345611269596115894272000000000
(1 row)
So the parser does a type conversion on the operand and the query is equivalent to:
SELECT CAST(40 AS bigint) ! AS "40 factorial";
Example 10-2. String Concatenation Operator Type Resolution
Astring-like syntax is used for working with string types and for working with complex extension
types. Strings with unspecified type are matched with likely operator candidates.
An example with one unspecified argument:
SELECT text ’abc’ || ’def’ AS "text and unknown";
text and unknown
------------------
abcdef
(1 row)
In this case the parser looks to see if there is an operator taking
text
for both arguments. Since there
is, it assumes that the second argument should be interpreted as type
text
.
Here is a concatenation of two values of unspecified types:
SELECT ’abc’ || ’def’ AS "unspecified";
unspecified
-------------
abcdef
(1 row)
In this case there is no initial hint for which type to use, since no types are specified in the query.
So, the parser looks for all candidate operators and finds that there are candidates accepting both
string-category and bit-string-category inputs. Since string category is preferred when available, that
category is selected, and then the preferred type for strings,
text
,is used as the specific type to
resolve the unknown-type literals as.
Example 10-3. Absolute-Value and Negation Operator Type Resolution
The PostgreSQL operator catalog has several entries for the prefixoperator
@
,all of whichimplement
absolute-value operations for various numeric data types. One of these entries is for type
float8
,
which is the preferred type in the numeric category. Therefore, PostgreSQL will use that entry when
faced with an
unknown
input:
SELECT @ ’-4.5’ AS "abs";
313
Guide for ASP.NET Barcode Web Server Control
Open your project using Visual Studio, and add DLL to the You can also Add VB.NET to the Web Forms: Dim pages; Confirm the barcode and insert a image tag (img
add image pdf; how to add image to pdf in preview
.NET PowerPoint Add-on |PowerPoint Document Imaging in .NET
Support loading a PowerPoint (.pptx) file using Visual C# or JPEG, BMP and GIF) and other documents (PDF, TIFF and both .NET Core SDK and .NET PowerPoint Add-on
add image to pdf reader; acrobat insert image into pdf
Chapter 10. Type Conversion
abs
-----
4.5
(1 row)
Here the system has implicitly resolved the unknown-type literal as type
float8
before applying the
chosen operator. We can verify that
float8
and not some other type was used:
SELECT @ ’-4.5e500’ AS "abs";
ERROR:
"-4.5e500" is out of range for type double precision
On the other hand, the prefix operator
~
(bitwise negation) is defined only for integer data types, not
for
float8
.So, if we try a similar case with
~
,we get:
SELECT ~ ’20’ AS "negation";
ERROR:
operator is not unique: ~ "unknown"
HINT:
Could not choose a best candidate operator. You might need to add
explicit type casts.
This happens because the system cannot decide which of the several possible
~
operators should be
preferred. We can help it out with an explicit cast:
SELECT ~ CAST(’20’ AS int8) AS "negation";
negation
----------
-21
(1 row)
Example 10-4. Array Inclusion Operator Type Resolution
Here is another example of resolving an operator with one known and one unknown input:
SELECT array[1,2] <@ ’{1,2,3}’ as "is subset";
is subset
-----------
t
(1 row)
The PostgreSQL operator catalog has several entries for the infix operator
<@
, but the only two
that could possibly accept an integer array on the left-hand side are array inclusion (
anyarray <@
anyarray
)and range inclusion (
anyelement <@ anyrange
). Since none of these polymorphic
pseudo-types (see Section 8.20) are considered preferred, the parser cannot resolve the ambiguity on
that basis. However, step 3.f tells it to assume that the unknown-type literal is of the same type as the
other input, that is, integer array. Now only one of the two operators can match, so array inclusion is
selected. (Had range inclusion been selected, we would have gotten an error, because the string does
not have the right format to be a range literal.)
Example 10-5. Custom Operator on a Domain Type
Users sometimes try to declare operators applying just to a domain type. This is possible but is not
nearlyas usefulas itmightseem, becausetheoperator resolutionrules are designed to select operators
applying to the domain’s base type. As an example consider
CREATE DOMAIN mytext AS text CHECK(...);
314
Chapter 10. Type Conversion
CREATE FUNCTION mytext_eq_text (mytext, text) RETURNS boolean AS ...;
CREATE OPERATOR = (procedure=mytext_eq_text, leftarg=mytext, rightarg=text);
CREATE TABLE mytable (val mytext);
SELECT
*
FROM mytable WHERE val = ’foo’;
This query will not use the custom operator. The parser will first see if there is a
mytext = mytext
operator (step 2.a), which there is not; then it will consider the domain’s base type
text
,and see if
there is a
text = text
operator (step 2.b), which there is; so it resolves the
unknown
-type literal as
text
and uses the
text = text
operator. The only way to get the custom operator to be used is to
explicitly cast the literal:
SELECT
*
FROM mytable WHERE val = text ’foo’;
so that the
mytext = text
operator is found immediately according to the exact-match rule. If the
best-match rules arereached, they activelydiscriminate againstoperators on domaintypes. If theydid
not, such an operator would create too many ambiguous-operator failures, because the casting rules
always consider a domain as castable to or from its base type, and so the domain operator would be
considered usable in all the same cases as a similarly-named operator onthe base type.
10.3. Functions
The specific functionthat isreferencedbya functioncall is determinedusing the following procedure.
Function Type Resolution
1. Select the functions to be considered from the
pg_proc
system catalog. If a
non-schema-qualified function name was used, the functions considered are those with the
matching name and argument count that are visible in the current searchpath(see Section 5.7.3).
If a qualified function name was given, only functions in the specified schema are considered.
a. If the search path finds multiple functions of identical argument types, only the one
appearing earliest in the path is considered. Functions of different argument types are
considered on an equal footing regardless of search path position.
b. If a function is declared witha
VARIADIC
array parameter, andthe call does not use the
VARIADIC
keyword, then the function is treatedas if the array parameter were replaced
by one or more occurrences of its element type, as needed to match the call. After
such expansion the function might haveeffective argument types identical to some non-
variadic function. In that case the function appearing earlier in the search path is used,
or if the two functions are in the same schema, the non-variadic one is preferred.
c. Functions that have default values for parameters are considered to match any call that
omits zero or more of the defaultable parameter positions. If more than one such func-
tionmatches a call, the one appearingearliest in the searchpath is used. If there are two
or more such functions in the same schema with identical parameter types in the non-
defaulted positions (which is possible if they have different sets of defaultable param-
eters), the system will not be able to determine which to prefer, and so an “ambiguous
function call” error will result if no better match to the call can be found.
2. Check for a function accepting exactly the input argument types. If one exists (there can be only
one exact match in the set of functions considered), use it. (Cases involving
unknown
will never
find a match at this step.)
315
Chapter 10. Type Conversion
3. If noexact match is found, see if the function call appears to bea special type conversionrequest.
This happens if the function call has just one argument and the function name is the same as
the (internal) name of some data type. Furthermore, the function argument must be either an
unknown-type literal, or a type that is binary-coercible to the named data type, or a type that
could be converted to the named data type by applying that type’s I/O functions (that is, the
conversion is either to or from one of the standard string types). When these conditions are met,
the function call is treated as a form of
CAST
specification.
1
4. Look for the best match.
a. Discard candidate functions for which the input types do not match and cannot be con-
verted (using animplicit conversion) to match.
unknown
literals are assumed to becon-
vertible toanything for this purpose. If only one candidate remains, use it; elsecontinue
to the next step.
b. If any input argument is of a domain type, treat it as being of the domain’s base type for
all subsequent steps. This ensures that domains act like their base types for purposes of
ambiguous-function resolution.
c. Run through all candidates and keep those with the most exact matches on input types.
Keep all candidates if none have exact matches. If only one candidate remains, use it;
else continue tothe next step.
d. Run through all candidates and keep those that accept preferred types (of the input data
type’s type category) atthe most positions wheretype conversionwill be required. Keep
all candidates if none accept preferred types. If only one candidate remains, use it; else
continue to the next step.
e. If any input arguments are
unknown
,check the type categories accepted at those ar-
gument positions by the remaining candidates. At each position, select the
string
category if any candidate accepts that category. (This bias towards string is appropriate
since an unknown-type literal looks like a string.) Otherwise, if all the remaining can-
didates accept the same type category, select that category; otherwise fail because the
correct choice cannot be deduced without more clues. Now discard candidates that do
not accept the selected type category. Furthermore, if any candidate accepts a preferred
type in that category, discard candidates that accept non-preferred types for that argu-
ment. Keepall candidates if none survive these tests. If only one candidate remains, use
it; else continue to the next step.
f. If there are both
unknown
and known-type arguments, and all the known-type argu-
ments have the same type, assume that the
unknown
arguments are also of that type,
and check which candidates canacceptthattype at the
unknown
-argument positions. If
exactly one candidate passes this test, use it. Otherwise, fail.
Note that the “best match” rules are identical for operator and function type resolution. Some exam-
ples follow.
Example 10-6. Rounding Function Argument Type Resolution
There is only one
round
function that takes two arguments;it takes a first argument of type
numeric
and a second argument of type
integer
.So the following query automatically converts the first
1. The reason for thisstep is to support function-style cast specifications in cases where there is not an actual cast function.
If there is a cast function, it is conventionally named after its output type, and so there is no need to have a special case. See
CREATE CAST for additional commentary.
316
Chapter 10. Type Conversion
argument of type
integer
to
numeric
:
SELECT round(4, 4);
round
--------
4.0000
(1 row)
That query is actually transformed by the parser to:
SELECT round(CAST (4 AS numeric), 4);
Since numeric constants with decimal points are initially assigned the type
numeric
,the following
query will require no type conversion and therefore might be slightly more efficient:
SELECT round(4.0, 4);
Example 10-7. Substring Function Type Resolution
There are several
substr
functions, one of which takes types
text
and
integer
.If called with a
string constant of unspecified type, the system chooses the candidate function that accepts an argu-
ment of the preferred category
string
(namely of type
text
).
SELECT substr(’1234’, 3);
substr
--------
34
(1 row)
If the string is declared to be of type
varchar
,as might be the case if it comes from a table, then the
parser will try to convert it to become
text
:
SELECT substr(varchar ’1234’, 3);
substr
--------
34
(1 row)
This is transformed by the parser to effectively become:
SELECT substr(CAST (varchar ’1234’ AS text), 3);
Note: Theparser learns from the
pg_cast
catalogthat
text
and
varchar
arebinary-compatible,
meaning that one can be passed to a function that accepts the other without doing any physical
conversion. Therefore, no type conversion call is really inserted in this case.
And, if the functionis called with an argument of type
integer
,the parser will tryto convert that to
text
:
SELECT substr(1234, 3);
ERROR:
function substr(integer, integer) does not exist
HINT:
No function matches the given name and argument types. You might need
to add explicit type casts.
This does not work because
integer
does not have an implicit cast to
text
.An explicit cast will
work, however:
317
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested