pdf viewer in asp net c# : Add png to pdf preview software Library cloud windows asp.net html class postgresql-9.4-A46-part2983

F.26.3. Author ....................................................................................................2834
F.27. pg_prewarm........................................................................................................2834
F.27.1. Functions................................................................................................2835
F.27.2. Author ....................................................................................................2835
F.28. pgrowlocks..........................................................................................................2835
F.28.1. Overview................................................................................................2835
F.28.2. Sample Output .......................................................................................2836
F.28.3. Author ....................................................................................................2836
F.29. pg_stat_statements..............................................................................................2837
F.29.1. The
pg_stat_statements
View........................................................2837
F.29.2. Functions................................................................................................2839
F.29.3. Configuration Parameters.......................................................................2840
F.29.4. Sample Output .......................................................................................2840
F.29.5. Authors...................................................................................................2841
F.30. pgstattuple...........................................................................................................2841
F.30.1. Functions................................................................................................2841
F.30.2. Authors...................................................................................................2843
F.31. pg_trgm...............................................................................................................2844
F.31.1. Trigram (or Trigraph) Concepts.............................................................2844
F.31.2. Functions and Operators ........................................................................2844
F.31.3. Index Support.........................................................................................2845
F.31.4. Text Search Integration..........................................................................2846
F.31.5. References..............................................................................................2847
F.31.6. Authors...................................................................................................2847
F.32. postgres_fdw.......................................................................................................2847
F.32.1. FDW Options of postgres_fdw..............................................................2848
F.32.1.1. Connection Options...................................................................2848
F.32.1.2. Object Name Options................................................................2848
F.32.1.3. Cost Estimation Options............................................................2848
F.32.1.4. Updatability Options .................................................................2849
F.32.2. Connection Management.......................................................................2849
F.32.3. Transaction Management.......................................................................2850
F.32.4. Remote Query Optimization..................................................................2850
F.32.5. Remote Query Execution Environment.................................................2850
F.32.6. Cross-Version Compatibility..................................................................2851
F.32.7. Examples................................................................................................2851
F.32.8. Author ....................................................................................................2851
F.33. seg.......................................................................................................................2852
F.33.1. Rationale................................................................................................2852
F.33.2. Syntax ....................................................................................................2852
F.33.3. Precision.................................................................................................2853
F.33.4. Usage......................................................................................................2853
F.33.5. Notes ......................................................................................................2854
F.33.6. Credits....................................................................................................2855
F.34. sepgsql................................................................................................................2855
F.34.1. Overview................................................................................................2855
F.34.2. Installation..............................................................................................2855
F.34.3. Regression Tests.....................................................................................2856
F.34.4. GUC Parameters ....................................................................................2858
F.34.5. Features..................................................................................................2858
F.34.5.1. Controlled Object Classes .........................................................2858
F.34.5.2. DML Permissions......................................................................2858
lxi
Add png to pdf preview - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add photo pdf; adding image to pdf in preview
Add png to pdf preview - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
adding images to pdf forms; add image to pdf form
F.34.5.3. DDL Permissions ......................................................................2859
F.34.5.4. Trusted Procedures....................................................................2860
F.34.5.5. Dynamic Domain Transitions....................................................2860
F.34.5.6. Miscellaneous............................................................................2861
F.34.6. Sepgsql Functions ..................................................................................2861
F.34.7. Limitations.............................................................................................2862
F.34.8. External Resources.................................................................................2862
F.34.9. Author ....................................................................................................2863
F.35. spi........................................................................................................................2863
F.35.1. refint — Functions for Implementing Referential Integrity...................2863
F.35.2. timetravel — Functions for Implementing Time Travel........................2863
F.35.3. autoinc — Functions for Autoincrementing Fields ...............................2864
F.35.4. insert_username — Functions for Tracking Who Changed a Table......2865
F.35.5. moddatetime — Functions for Tracking Last Modification Time.........2865
F.36. sslinfo..................................................................................................................2865
F.36.1. Functions Provided ................................................................................2865
F.36.2. Author ....................................................................................................2867
F.37. tablefunc .............................................................................................................2867
F.37.1. Functions Provided ................................................................................2867
F.37.1.1.
normal_rand
...........................................................................2868
F.37.1.2.
crosstab(text)
.....................................................................2868
F.37.1.3.
crosstab
N
(text)
..................................................................2870
F.37.1.4.
crosstab(text, text)
........................................................2871
F.37.1.5.
connectby
................................................................................2874
F.37.2. Author ....................................................................................................2876
F.38. tcn .......................................................................................................................2876
F.39. test_decoding......................................................................................................2877
F.40. test_parser...........................................................................................................2878
F.40.1. Usage......................................................................................................2878
F.41. test_shm_mq.......................................................................................................2879
F.41.1. Functions................................................................................................2879
F.42. tsearch2...............................................................................................................2880
F.42.1. Portability Issues....................................................................................2880
F.42.2. Converting a pre-8.3Installation............................................................2881
F.42.3. References..............................................................................................2881
F.43. unaccent..............................................................................................................2881
F.43.1. Configuration.........................................................................................2881
F.43.2. Usage......................................................................................................2882
F.43.3. Functions................................................................................................2883
F.44. uuid-ossp.............................................................................................................2883
F.44.1.
uuid-ossp
Functions ...........................................................................2883
F.44.2. Building
uuid-ossp
.............................................................................2885
F.44.3. Author ....................................................................................................2885
F.45. xml2....................................................................................................................2885
F.45.1. Deprecation Notice ................................................................................2885
F.45.2. Description of Functions........................................................................2885
F.45.3.
xpath_table
........................................................................................2886
F.45.3.1. Multivalued Results...................................................................2888
F.45.4. XSLT Functions .....................................................................................2889
F.45.4.1.
xslt_process
.........................................................................2889
F.45.5. Author ....................................................................................................2889
G. Additional Supplied Programs.........................................................................................2890
lxii
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
With the SDK, you can preview the document content according to the preview thumbnail by the ways as following. C# DLLs for Word File Preview. Add references:
add photo to pdf for; add image to pdf in preview
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
C# DLLs: Preview PowerPoint Document. Add necessary XDoc.PowerPoint DLL libraries into your created C# application as references. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
how to add image to pdf in preview; add jpg to pdf acrobat
G.1. Client Applications..............................................................................................2890
oid2name............................................................................................................2890
pgbench..............................................................................................................2895
vacuumlo............................................................................................................2906
G.2. Server Applications .............................................................................................2908
pg_archivecleanup .............................................................................................2908
pg_standby.........................................................................................................2911
pg_test_fsync.....................................................................................................2915
pg_test_timing ...................................................................................................2917
pg_upgrade.........................................................................................................2921
pg_xlogdump.....................................................................................................2928
H. External Projects ..............................................................................................................2930
H.1. Client Interfaces...................................................................................................2930
H.2. Administration Tools ...........................................................................................2930
H.3. Procedural Languages..........................................................................................2930
H.4. Extensions............................................................................................................2931
I. The Source Code Repository.............................................................................................2932
I.1. Getting The Source via Git ...................................................................................2932
J. Documentation ..................................................................................................................2933
J.1. DocBook...............................................................................................................2933
J.2. Tool Sets................................................................................................................2933
J.2.1. Linux RPM Installation............................................................................2934
J.2.2. FreeBSD Installation................................................................................2934
J.2.3. Debian Packages.......................................................................................2935
J.2.4. OS X.........................................................................................................2935
J.2.5. Manual Installation from Source..............................................................2935
J.2.5.1. Installing OpenJade .....................................................................2936
J.2.5.2. Installing the DocBook DTD Kit.................................................2936
J.2.5.3. Installing the DocBook DSSSL Style Sheets ..............................2937
J.2.5.4. Installing JadeTeX.......................................................................2937
J.2.6. Detection by
configure
.........................................................................2938
J.3. Building The Documentation................................................................................2938
J.3.1. HTML.......................................................................................................2938
J.3.2. Manpages..................................................................................................2938
J.3.3. Print Output via JadeTeX.........................................................................2939
J.3.4. Overflow Text...........................................................................................2939
J.3.5. Print Output via RTF................................................................................2940
J.3.6. Plain Text Files.........................................................................................2941
J.3.7. Syntax Check............................................................................................2941
J.4. Documentation Authoring ....................................................................................2941
J.4.1. Emacs/PSGML.........................................................................................2942
J.4.2. Other Emacs Modes .................................................................................2943
J.5. Style Guide............................................................................................................2943
J.5.1. Reference Pages .......................................................................................2943
K. Acronyms .........................................................................................................................2945
Bibliography..................................................................................................................................2951
Index...............................................................................................................................................2953
lxiii
C# Word - Render Word to Other Images
Besides raster image Jpeg, images forms like Png, Bmp, Gif, .NET Graphics, and REImage (an intermediate class) are also supported. Add references:
add jpg to pdf document; add picture to pdf online
C# powerpoint - Render PowerPoint to Other Images
Besides raster image Jpeg, images forms like Png, Bmp, Gif, .NET Graphics, and Add necessary XDoc.PowerPoint DLL libraries into your created C# application as
how to add image to pdf document; add signature image to pdf acrobat
Preface
This book is the official documentation of PostgreSQL. It has been written by the PostgreSQL devel-
opers and other volunteers in parallel to the development of the PostgreSQL software. It describes all
the functionality that the current version of PostgreSQL officially supports.
To make the large amount of information about PostgreSQL manageable, this book has been orga-
nized in several parts. Each part is targeted at a different class of users, or at users in different stages
of their PostgreSQL experience:
Part I is an informal introduction for new users.
Part II documents the SQL query languageenvironment, includingdata types and functions, as well
as user-level performance tuning. Every PostgreSQL user should readthis.
Part III describes the installationandadministration of theserver. Everyonewhoruns aPostgreSQL
server, be it for private use or for others, should read this part.
Part IV describes the programminginterfaces for PostgreSQL client programs.
Part V contains information for advanced users about the extensibility capabilities of the server.
Topics include user-defined data types and functions.
Part VI contains reference informationabout SQL commands, client and server programs. This part
supports the other parts with structured information sorted by command or program.
Part VII contains assorted information that might be of use to PostgreSQL developers.
1. What is PostgreSQL?
PostgreSQL is an object-relational database management system (ORDBMS) based on POSTGRES,
Version 4.2
1
,developed at the University of California at Berkeley Computer Science Department.
POSTGRES pioneered many concepts that only became available in some commercial database sys-
tems much later.
PostgreSQL is an open-source descendant of this original Berkeley code. It supports a large part of
the SQL standard and offers many modern features:
complex queries
foreign keys
triggers
updatable views
transactional integrity
multiversion concurrency control
Also, PostgreSQL can be extended by the user in many ways, for example by adding new
data types
functions
operators
aggregate functions
index methods
1. http://db.cs.berkeley.edu/postgres.html
lxiv
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Besides, using this PDF document metadata adding control, you can add some additional information to generated PDF file. Create PDF from Jpeg, png, images.
adding a jpeg to a pdf; adding a png to a pdf
C# PDF: How to Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET with
The PDF document manipulating add-on from RasterEdge DocImage SDK for .NET is Support thumbnail image and outline preview for quick PDF document page
add an image to a pdf acrobat; add jpg to pdf online
Preface
procedural languages
Andbecause of the liberal license, PostgreSQL canbe used, modified, and distributed by anyone free
of charge for any purpose, be it private, commercial, or academic.
2. A Brief History of PostgreSQL
The object-relational database management system now known as PostgreSQL is derived from the
POSTGRES package written at the University of California at Berkeley. With over two decades of
development behind it, PostgreSQL is now the most advanced open-source database available any-
where.
2.1. The Berkeley POSTGRES Project
The POSTGRES project, led by Professor Michael Stonebraker, was sponsored by the Defense Ad-
vanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the ArmyResearchOffice (ARO), the National Science
Foundation (NSF), and ESL, Inc. The implementation of POSTGRES began in 1986. The initialcon-
cepts for the system were presented in The design of POSTGRES , and the definition of the initial
data model appeared in The POSTGRES data model . The design of the rule system at that time was
described in The design of the POSTGRES rules system. The rationale and architecture of the storage
manager were detailed in The design of the POSTGRES storage system.
POSTGRES has undergone several major releases since then. The first “demoware” system became
operational in 1987 and was shown at the 1988 ACM-SIGMOD Conference. Version 1, described in
The implementation of POSTGRES , was released to a few external users in June 1989. In response to
acritique of the first rule system ( A commentary on the POSTGRES rules system ), the rule system
was redesigned ( On Rules, Procedures, Caching and Views in Database Systems ), and Version 2
was released in June 1990 with the new rule system. Version 3 appeared in 1991 and added support
for multiple storage managers, an improved queryexecutor, and a rewritten rule system. For the most
part, subsequent releases until Postgres95 (see below) focused on portability and reliability.
POSTGRES has been used to implement many different research and production applications. These
include: a financial data analysis system, a jet engine performance monitoring package, an aster-
oid tracking database, a medical information database, and several geographic information systems.
POSTGRES has also been used as an educational tool at several universities. Finally, Illustra Infor-
mation Technologies (later merged into Informix
2
,which is nowowned byIBM
3
)picked upthe code
and commercialized it. In late 1992, POSTGRES became the primary data manager for the Sequoia
2000 scientific computing project
4
.
The size of the external user community nearly doubled during 1993. It became increasingly obvious
that maintenance of the prototype code and support was taking up large amounts of time that should
have been devoted to database research. In an effort to reduce this support burden, the Berkeley
POSTGRES project officially ended with Version 4.2.
2. http://www.informix.com/
3. http://www.ibm.com/
4. http://meteora.ucsd.edu/s2k/s2k_home.html
lxv
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. Also a preview component enables compressing and
pdf insert image; how to add a jpeg to a pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Bmp, Jpeg, Png, Gif, and DLLs for Inserting Page to PDF Document. Add necessary references
adding images to pdf; how to add image to pdf reader
Preface
2.2. Postgres95
In 1994, Andrew Yu and Jolly Chen added an SQL language interpreter to POSTGRES. Under a
new name, Postgres95 was subsequently released to the web to find its own way in the world as an
open-source descendant of the original POSTGRES Berkeley code.
Postgres95 code was completely ANSI C and trimmed in size by 25%. Many internal changes im-
proved performance and maintainability. Postgres95 release 1.0.x ran about 30-50% faster on the
Wisconsin Benchmark compared to POSTGRES, Version 4.2. Apart from bug fixes, the following
were the major enhancements:
The query language PostQUEL was replaced with SQL (implemented in the server). (Interface
library libpq was named after PostQUEL.) Subqueries were not supported until PostgreSQL (see
below), butthey couldbe imitated in Postgres95with user-definedSQL functions. Aggregate func-
tions were re-implemented. Support for the
GROUP BY
query clause was also added.
Anew program (psql) was provided for interactive SQL queries, which used GNU Readline. This
largely superseded the old monitor program.
Anew front-end library,
libpgtcl
,supported Tcl-based clients. A sample shell,
pgtclsh
,pro-
vided new Tcl commands to interface Tcl programs with the Postgres95server.
The large-object interface was overhauled. The inversion large objects were the only mechanism
for storing large objects. (The inversion file system was removed.)
The instance-level rule system was removed. Rules were still available as rewrite rules.
Ashort tutorial introducing regular SQL features as well as those of Postgres95 was distributed
with the source code
GNU make (instead of BSD make) was used for the build. Also, Postgres95 could be compiled
with anunpatched GCC (data alignment of doubles was fixed).
2.3. PostgreSQL
By 1996, it becameclear that the name “Postgres95” would not stand the testof time. Wechosea new
name, PostgreSQL, to reflect the relationship between the original POSTGRES and the more recent
versions with SQL capability. At the same time, we set the version numbering to start at 6.0, putting
the numbers back into the sequence originally begun by the Berkeley POSTGRES project.
Manypeople continue to refer to PostgreSQL as “Postgres” (now rarely in all capital letters) because
of tradition or because it is easier topronounce. This usage is widelyaccepted as a nickname or alias.
The emphasis duringdevelopmentof Postgres95 was on identifying and understandingexistingprob-
lems in the server code. WithPostgreSQL, the emphasis has shifted to augmenting features andcapa-
bilities, although work continues in all areas.
Details about what has happened in PostgreSQL since then can be found in Appendix E.
3. Conventions
The following conventions are used in thesynopsis of acommand: brackets (
[
and
]
)indicate optional
parts. (In the synopsis of a Tcl command, question marks (
?
)are used instead, as is usual in Tcl.)
lxvi
Preface
Braces (
{
and
}
)and vertical lines (
|
)indicate thatyoumust choose one alternative. Dots (
...
)mean
that the preceding element can be repeated.
Where it enhances the clarity, SQL commands are preceded by the prompt
=>
,and shell commands
are preceded by the prompt
$
.Normally, prompts are not shown, though.
An administrator is generally a person who is in charge of installing and running the server. A user
could be anyone who is using, or wants to use, any part of the PostgreSQL system. These terms
should not be interpreted too narrowly; this book does not have fixed presumptions about system
administrationprocedures.
4. Further Information
Besides the documentation, that is, this book, there are other resources about PostgreSQL:
Wiki
The PostgreSQL wiki
5
contains the project’s FAQ
6
(Frequently Asked Questions) list, TODO
7
list, and detailed information about many more topics.
Web Site
ThePostgreSQL website
8
carries details onthe latest release and other informationtomake your
work or play with PostgreSQL more productive.
Mailing Lists
The mailing lists are a good place to have your questions answered, to share experiences with
other users, and to contact the developers. Consult the PostgreSQL web site for details.
Yourself!
PostgreSQL is an open-source project. As such, it depends on the user community for ongoing
support. As you begin to use PostgreSQL, you will rely on others for help, either through the
documentation or through the mailing lists. Consider contributing your knowledge back. Read
the mailinglists and answer questions. If youlearnsomething whichis not in the documentation,
write it up and contribute it. If you add features to the code, contribute them.
5. Bug Reporting Guidelines
When you find a bugin PostgreSQL we want tohear about it. Your bugreports play an importantpart
in making PostgreSQL more reliable because even the utmost care cannot guarantee that every part
of PostgreSQL will work on every platform under every circumstance.
The following suggestions are intended to assist you in forming bug reports that can be handled in an
effective fashion. No one is required tofollow them but doing so tends to be to everyone’s advantage.
We cannot promise to fix every bug right away. If the bug is obvious, critical, or affects a lot of users,
chances are good that someone will look into it. It could also happen that we tell you to update to a
newer version tosee if the bug happens there. Or we might decide that the bug cannot be fixed before
5. http://wiki.postgresql.org
6. http://wiki.postgresql.org/wiki/Frequently_Asked_Questions
7. http://wiki.postgresql.org/wiki/Todo
8. http://www.postgresql.org
lxvii
Preface
some major rewrite we might be planning is done. Or perhaps it is simply too hard and there are
more important things on the agenda. If youneed help immediately, consider obtaining a commercial
support contract.
5.1. Identifying Bugs
Before you report a bug, please read and re-read the documentation to verify that you can really do
whatever it is you are trying. If it is not clear from the documentation whether you can do something
or not, please report that too; it is a bug in the documentation. If it turns out that a program does
something different from what the documentation says, that is a bug. That might include, but is not
limited to, the following circumstances:
Aprogram terminates with a fatal signal or an operating system error message that would point to
aproblem inthe program. (Acounterexample might be a “disk full” message, since you have to fix
that yourself.)
Aprogram produces the wrong output for any given input.
Aprogram refuses to accept valid input (as defined in the documentation).
Aprogram accepts invalid inputwithout a notice or error message. But keep in mindthatyour idea
of invalid input might be our idea of an extension or compatibility with traditional practice.
PostgreSQL fails to compile, build, or install according to the instructions on supported platforms.
Here “program” refers to any executable, not only the backend process.
Being slow or resource-hogging is not necessarily a bug. Read the documentation or ask on one of
the mailing lists for help in tuning your applications. Failing to comply to the SQL standard is not
necessarily a bug either, unless compliance for the specific feature is explicitly claimed.
Before you continue, check on the TODO list and in the FAQ to see if your bug is already known.
If you cannot decode the information on the TODO list, report your problem. The least we can do is
make the TODO list clearer.
5.2. What to Report
The most important thing to remember about bug reporting is to state all the facts and only facts. Do
not speculate what youthink went wrong, what “it seemed to do”, or whichpart of the program has a
fault. If you are not familiar with the implementation you would probably guess wrong and not help
us a bit. And even if you are, educated explanations are a great supplement to but no substitute for
facts. If we are goingtofixthe bugwe stillhave tosee ithappen for ourselves first. Reporting the bare
facts is relatively straightforward (you can probably copy and paste them from the screen) but all too
often important details are left out because someone thoughtit does not matter or the report would be
understood anyway.
The following items should be contained in every bug report:
The exact sequence of steps fromprogramstart-upnecessarytoreproducetheproblem. This should
be self-contained; it is not enough to send in a bare
SELECT
statement without the preceding
CREATE TABLE
and
INSERT
statements, if the output should depend on the data in the tables.
We donothave the time toreverse-engineer your database schema, and if we are supposed tomake
up our own data we would probably miss the problem.
lxviii
Preface
The best format for a test case for SQL-related problems is a file that can be run through the psql
frontend that shows the problem. (Be sure to not have anything in your
~/.psqlrc
start-up file.)
An easy way to create this file is to use pg_dump to dump out the table declarations and data
needed to set the scene, then add the problem query. You are encouraged to minimize the size of
your example, but this is not absolutely necessary. If the bug is reproducible, we will find it either
way.
If your application uses some other client interface, such as PHP, then please try to isolate the
offending queries. We will probably not setup a web server toreproduce your problem. Inanycase
remember to provide the exact input files; do not guess that the problem happens for “large files”
or “midsize databases”, etc. since this information is too inexact to be of use.
The output yougot. Please do notsay thatit“didn’twork” or “crashed”. If there is anerror message,
show it, even if you do not understand it. If the program terminates with an operating system error,
say which. If nothing at all happens, say so. Even if the result of your test case is a program crash
or otherwise obvious it might not happen on our platform. The easiest thing is to copy the output
from the terminal, if possible.
Note: If you are reporting an error message, please obtain the most verbose form of the mes-
sage. In psql, say
\set VERBOSITY verbose
beforehand. If you are extracting the message
from the server log, set the run-time parameter log_error_verbosity to
verbose
so that all de-
tails are logged.
Note: In case of fatal errors, the error message reported by the client might not contain all the
information available. Please also look at the log output of the database server. If you do not
keep your server’s logoutput, this would be a good time to start doing so.
The output you expected is very important to state. If you just write “This command gives me that
output.” or “This is not what I expected.”, we might run it ourselves, scan the output, and think it
looks OK and is exactly what we expected. We should not have to spend the time to decode the
exact semantics behind your commands. Especially refrain from merely saying that “This is not
what SQL says/Oracle does.” Digging out the correct behavior from SQL is not a fun undertaking,
nor do we all know how all the other relational databases out there behave. (If your problem is a
program crash, you can obviously omit this item.)
Anycommandline options and other start-upoptions, includinganyrelevantenvironmentvariables
or configuration files that you changed from the default. Again, please provide exact information.
If you are using a prepackaged distribution that starts the database server at boot time, you should
try to find out how that is done.
Anything you did at all differently from the installation instructions.
The PostgreSQL version. You can run the command
SELECT version();
to find out the version
of the server you are connected to. Most executable programs also support a
--version
option; at
least
postgres --version
and
psql --version
should work. If the function or the options do
notexistthen your version is morethanold enough to warrantanupgrade. If you runa prepackaged
version, suchas RPMs, say so, including any subversionthe package might have. If you are talking
about a Git snapshot, mention that, including the commit hash.
If your version is older than 9.4.7 we will almost certainlytell you to upgrade. There are manybug
fixes and improvements in each new release, so it is quite possible that a bugyouhave encountered
lxix
Preface
in an older release of PostgreSQL has already been fixed. We can only provide limited support
for sites using older releases of PostgreSQL; if you require more than we can provide, consider
acquiring a commercial support contract.
Platform information. This includes the kernel name and version, C library, processor, memory
information, and so on. In most cases it is sufficient to report the vendor and version, but do not
assume everyoneknows whatexactly“Debian” contains or that everyone runs oni386s. If youhave
installation problems then information about the toolchain on your machine (compiler, make, and
so on) is also necessary.
Do not be afraid if your bug report becomes rather lengthy. That is a fact of life. It is better to report
everything the first time than us having to squeeze the facts out of you. On the other hand, if your
input files are huge, it is fair to ask first whether somebody is interested in looking into it. Here is an
article
9
that outlines some more tips on reporting bugs.
Do not spend all your time to figure out which changes in the input make the problem go away. This
will probably not help solving it. If it turns out that the bug cannot be fixed right away, you will still
have time to findand shareyour work-around. Also, once again, do not waste your time guessingwhy
the bug exists. We will find that out soon enough.
When writing a bug report, please avoid confusing terminology. The software package in total is
called “PostgreSQL”, sometimes “Postgres” for short. If you are specifically talking about the back-
end process, mention that, donot just say “PostgreSQL crashes”. A crash of a single backend process
is quite different from crash of the parent “postgres” process; please don’t say “the server crashed”
whenyou meana singlebackendprocess went down, nor viceversa. Also, client programs suchas the
interactive frontend “psql” are completely separate from the backend. Please try to be specific about
whether the problem is on the client or server side.
5.3. Where to Report Bugs
Ingeneral, send bug reports to the bugreport mailinglist at<
pgsql-bugs@postgresql.org
>. You
are requested to use a descriptive subject for your email message, perhaps parts of the error message.
Another method is to fill in the bug report web-form available at the project’s web site
10
.Entering a
bug report this way causes it to be mailed to the <
pgsql-bugs@postgresql.org
>mailing list.
If your bug report has security implications and you’d prefer that it not become immediately vis-
ible in public archives, don’t send it to
pgsql-bugs
.Security issues can be reported privately to
<
security@postgresql.org
>.
Do not send bug reports to any of the user mailing lists, such as <
pgsql-sql@postgresql.org
>
or <
pgsql-general@postgresql.org
>. These mailing lists are for answering user questions, and
their subscribers normally do not wish to receive bug reports. More importantly, they are unlikely to
fix them.
Also,
please
do
not
send
reports
to
the
developers’
mailing
list
<
pgsql-hackers@postgresql.org
>. This list is for discussing the development of PostgreSQL,
and it would be nice if we could keep the bug reports separate. We might choose to take up a
discussion about your bug report on
pgsql-hackers
,if the problem needs more review.
If you have a problem withthe documentation, the bestplace to reportit is the documentation mailing
list <
pgsql-docs@postgresql.org
>. Please be specific about whatpart of the documentationyou
are unhappy with.
9. http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/bugs.html
10. http://www.postgresql.org/
lxx
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested