pdf viewer in asp net c# : Add jpg signature to pdf control application platform web page azure windows web browser postgresql-9.4-A47-part2994

Preface
If your bug is a portability problem on a non-supported platform, send mail to
<
pgsql-hackers@postgresql.org
>, so we (and you) can work on porting PostgreSQL to your
platform.
Note: Due to the unfortunate amount of spam going around, all of the above email addresses
are closed mailing lists. That is, you need to be subscribed to a list to be allowed to post on it.
(You need not be subscribed to use the bug-report web form, however.) If you would like to send
mail but do not want to receive list traffic, you can subscribe and set your subscription option to
nomail
.For more information send mail to <
majordomo@postgresql.org
>with the single word
help
in the body of the message.
lxxi
Add jpg signature to pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
how to add an image to a pdf in reader; add jpg to pdf
Add jpg signature to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add an image to a pdf; add jpg to pdf file
I. Tutorial
Welcome to the PostgreSQL Tutorial. The following few chapters are intended to give a simple in-
troduction to PostgreSQL, relational database concepts, and the SQL language to those who are new
to any one of these aspects. We only assume some general knowledge about how to use computers.
No particular Unix or programming experience is required. This part is mainly intended to give you
some hands-on experience with important aspects of the PostgreSQL system. It makes no attempt to
be a complete or thorough treatment of the topics it covers.
After you have worked through this tutorial you might want to move on to reading Part II to gain a
more formal knowledge of the SQL language, or Part IV for information about developing applica-
tions for PostgreSQL. Those who set up and manage their own server should also read Part III.
JPG to JBIG2 Converter | Convert JPEG to JBIG2, Convert JBIG2 to
original images without any affecting; Ability to convert image swiftly between JPG & JBIG2 in Also can be used as add-on for RasterEdge .NET Imaging SDK. Start
add a picture to a pdf; how to add a jpeg to a pdf
JPEG Image Viewer| What is JPEG
JPEG, JPG. excluded in the standard RasterEdge .NET Imaging SDK, you may add it on images into other file formats, including Bitmap, Png, Gif, Tiff, PDF, MS-Word
adding images to a pdf document; add picture to pdf file
XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET, All Mature Features Introductions
and Communications in Medicine; Raster Image Files: BMP, GIF, JPG, PNG, JBIG2PDF NET document and image viewer allows users to add various annotations Signature.
how to add image to pdf form; adding a png to a pdf
VB.NET PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images
Create image files including all PDF contents, like watermark and signature. Convert PDF to Jpg, Png, Bmp, Gif, Tiff and Bitmap in ASP Add necessary references:
how to add image to pdf in preview; how to add an image to a pdf file in acrobat
Chapter 1. Getting Started
1.1. Installation
Before you can use PostgreSQL you need to install it, of course. It is possible that PostgreSQL is
already installed at your site, either because it was included in your operating system distribution
or because the system administrator already installed it. If that is the case, you should obtain infor-
mation from the operating system documentation or your system administrator about how to access
PostgreSQL.
If you are not sure whether PostgreSQL is already available or whether you can use it for your ex-
perimentation then you can install it yourself. Doing so is not hard and it can be a good exercise.
PostgreSQL can be installed by any unprivilegeduser; no superuser (root) access is required.
If you are installing PostgreSQL yourself, then refer to Chapter 15 for instructions on installation,
and return to this guide when the installation is complete. Be sure to follow closely the section about
setting up the appropriate environment variables.
If your site administrator has not set things up in the defaultway, you might have some more work to
do. For example, if the database server machine is a remote machine, you willneed to set the
PGHOST
environment variable to the name of the database server machine. The environment variable
PGPORT
might also have to be set. The bottom line is this: if you try to start an application program and it
complains that it cannot connect to the database, you should consult your site administrator or, if
that is you, the documentation to make sure that your environment is properly set up. If you did not
understand the preceding paragraph then read the next section.
1.2. Architectural Fundamentals
Before we proceed, you should understandthe basic PostgreSQL system architecture. Understanding
how the parts of PostgreSQL interact will make this chapter somewhat clearer.
In database jargon, PostgreSQL uses a client/server model. A PostgreSQL session consists of the
following cooperating processes (programs):
Aserver process, which manages thedatabase files, accepts connections to the database from client
applications, and performs database actions on behalf of the clients. The database server program
is called
postgres
.
The user’s client (frontend) application that wants to perform database operations. Client applica-
tions can be very diverse in nature: a client could be a text-oriented tool, a graphical application, a
web server that accesses the database to display web pages, or a specialized database maintenance
tool. Some client applications are supplied with the PostgreSQL distribution; most are developed
by users.
As is typical of client/server applications, the client and the server can be on different hosts. In that
case they communicate over a TCP/IP network connection. You should keep this in mind, because
the files that canbe accessed on a client machine might not be accessible (or might only be accessible
using a different file name) on the database server machine.
The PostgreSQL server can handle multiple concurrent connections from clients. To achieve this
it starts (“forks”) a new process for each connection. From that point on, the client and the new
1
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
similar software; Support a batch conversion of JPG to PDF with amazingly high speed; Get a compressed PDF file after conversion; Support
add picture to pdf; add picture to pdf online
JPG to DICOM Converter | Convert JPEG to DICOM, Convert DICOM to
Image Converter Pro - JPEG to DICOM Converter. Convert JPEG (JPG) Images to, from DICOM Images on Windows.
add jpg to pdf acrobat; add png to pdf preview
Chapter 1. Getting Started
server process communicate withoutinterventionbytheoriginal
postgres
process. Thus, the master
server process is always running, waiting for client connections, whereas client and associated server
processes come and go. (All of this is of course invisible to the user. We only mention it here for
completeness.)
1.3. Creating a Database
The firsttest to see whether youcan access the database server is totry tocreate adatabase. A running
PostgreSQL server canmanagemanydatabases. Typically, a separate databaseis usedfor eachproject
or for each user.
Possibly, your site administrator has alreadycreated a database for your use. He should have told you
what the name of your database is. In that case you can omit this step and skip ahead to the next
section.
To create a new database, in this example named
mydb
,you use the following command:
$ createdb mydb
If this produces no response thenthis stepwas successful andyou can skip over the remainder of this
section.
If you see a message similar to:
createdb: command not found
then PostgreSQL was not installed properly. Either it was not installed at all or your shell’s search
path was not set toinclude it. Try calling the command with an absolute path instead:
$ /usr/local/pgsql/bin/createdb mydb
The path at your site might be different. Contact your site administrator or check the installation
instructions to correct the situation.
Another response could be this:
createdb: could not connect to database postgres: could not connect to server: No such file or directory
Is the server running locally and accepting
connections on Unix domain socket "/tmp/.s.PGSQL.5432"?
This means that the server was not started, or it was not started where
createdb
expected it. Again,
check the installation instructions or consult the administrator.
Another response could be this:
createdb: could not connect to database postgres: FATAL:
role "joe" does not exist
where your own login name is mentioned. This will happen if the administrator has not created a
PostgreSQL user account for you. (PostgreSQL user accounts are distinct from operating system user
accounts.) If you are the administrator, see Chapter 20 for help creating accounts. You will need to
become the operating system user under which PostgreSQL was installed (usually
postgres
)to
create the first user account. It could also be that you were assigned a PostgreSQL user name that is
different from your operating system user name; in that case you need to use the
-U
switch or set the
PGUSER
environment variable to specify your PostgreSQL user name.
If you have a user account but it does not have the privileges required to create a database, you will
see the following:
2
JPG to PNG Converter | Convert JPEG to PNG, Convert PNG to JPG
Image Converter Pro - JPEG to PNG Converter. Convert JPEG (JPG) Images to, from PNG Images on Windows.
add photo to pdf file; add an image to a pdf form
JPG to GIF Converter | Convert JPEG to GIF, Convert GIF to JPG
Converter. Convert JPEG (JPG) Images to, from GIF Images on Windows. JPEG to GIF Converter can directly convert GIF files to JPG files.
add image to pdf file; add image to pdf acrobat reader
Chapter 1. Getting Started
createdb: database creation failed: ERROR:
permission denied to create database
Not every user has authorization to create new databases. If PostgreSQL refuses to create databases
for you then the site administrator needs to grant you permission to create databases. Consult your
site administrator if this occurs. If you installed PostgreSQL yourself then you should log in for the
purposes of this tutorial under the user account that you started the server as.
1
You can also create databases with other names. PostgreSQL allows you to create any number of
databases at a given site. Database names must have an alphabetic firstcharacter andare limitedto 63
bytes in length. A convenient choice is to create a database with the same name as your current user
name. Manytools assume thatdatabase name as the default, soit can save yousome typing. Tocreate
that database, simply type:
$ createdb
If you donot want to use your databaseanymore you can remove it. For example, if you are the owner
(creator) of the database
mydb
,you can destroy it using the following command:
$ dropdb mydb
(For this command, the database name does not default to the user account name. You always need to
specify it.) This actionphysicallyremoves all files associatedwith the database andcannotbe undone,
so this should only be done with a great deal of forethought.
More about
createdb
and
dropdb
can be found increatedb and dropdb respectively.
1.4. Accessing a Database
Once you have created a database, you can access it by:
Running the PostgreSQL interactive terminal program, called psql, which allows you to interac-
tively enter, edit, andexecute SQL commands.
Using an existing graphical frontend tool like pgAdmin or an office suite with ODBC or JDBC
support to create and manipulate a database. These possibilities are not covered in this tutorial.
Writing a custom application, using one of the several available language bindings. These possibil-
ities are discussed further in Part IV.
You probably wanttostartup
psql
totry the examples in this tutorial. Itcanbe activatedfor the
mydb
database by typing the command:
$ psql mydb
If you do not supply the database name then it will default to your user account name. You already
discovered this scheme in the previous section using
createdb
.
In
psql
,you will be greeted with the following message:
1. Asan explanation for why this works: PostgreSQL user names are separate from operating system user accounts. When
you connect to a database, you can choose what PostgreSQL user name to connect as; if you don’t, it will default to the same
name as your current operating system account. As it happens, there will always be a PostgreSQL user account that has the
same name as the operating system user that started the server, and it also happens that that user always has permission to
create databases. Instead of logging in as that user you can also specify the
-U
option everywhere to select a PostgreSQL user
name to connect as.
3
Chapter 1. Getting Started
psql (9.4.7)
Type "help" for help.
mydb=>
The last line could also be:
mydb=#
That would mean you are a database superuser, which is most likely the case if you installed the
PostgreSQL instance yourself. Being a superuser means that you are not subject to access controls.
For the purposes of this tutorial that is not important.
If you encounter problems starting
psql
then go back to the previous section. The diagnostics of
createdb
and
psql
are similar, and if the former worked the latter should work as well.
The last line printed out by
psql
is the prompt, and it indicates that
psql
is listening to you and that
you can type SQL queries into a work space maintained by
psql
.Try out these commands:
mydb=> SELECT version();
version
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
PostgreSQL 9.4.7 on i586-pc-linux-gnu, compiled by GCC 2.96, 32-bit
(1 row)
mydb=> SELECT current_date;
date
------------
2002-08-31
(1 row)
mydb=> SELECT 2 + 2;
?column?
----------
4
(1 row)
The
psql
program has a number of internal commands that are not SQL commands. They beginwith
the backslashcharacter, “
\
”. For example, you can get help on the syntax of various PostgreSQL SQL
commands by typing:
mydb=> \h
To get out of
psql
,type:
mydb=> \q
and
psql
will quit and return you to your command shell. (For more internal commands, type
\?
at
the
psql
prompt.) The full capabilities of
psql
are documented in psql. In this tutorial we will not
use these features explicitly, but you can use them yourself when it is helpful.
4
Chapter 2. The SQL Language
2.1. Introduction
This chapter provides an overview of how to use SQL to perform simple operations. This tutorial
is only intended to give you an introduction and is in no way a complete tutorial on SQL. Numer-
ous books have been written on SQL, including Understanding the New SQL and A Guide to the
SQL Standard. You should be aware that some PostgreSQL language features are extensions to the
standard.
In the examples that follow, we assume that you have created a database named
mydb
,as described in
the previous chapter, and have been able to start psql.
Examples in this manual can also be found in the PostgreSQL source distribution in the directory
src/tutorial/
.(Binary distributions of PostgreSQL might not compile these files.) To use those
files, first change to that directory and run make:
$ cd
....
/src/tutorial
$ make
This creates the scripts and compiles the C files containing user-definedfunctions andtypes. Then, to
start the tutorial, do the following:
$ cd
....
/tutorial
$ psql -s mydb
...
mydb=> \i basics.sql
The
\i
command reads incommands from the specifiedfile.
psql
’s
-s
optionputs you in single step
mode which pauses before sending each statement to the server. The commands used in this section
are in the file
basics.sql
.
2.2. Concepts
PostgreSQL is a relational database management system (RDBMS). That means it is a system for
managing data stored in relations. Relation is essentially a mathematical term for table. The notion
of storing data in tables is so commonplace today that it might seem inherently obvious, but there
are a number of other ways of organizing databases. Files and directories on Unix-like operating
systems form an example of a hierarchical database. A more modern development is the object-
oriented database.
Each table is a named collection of rows. Each row of a given table has the same set of named
columns, andeach column is of a specific data type. Whereas columns have a fixed order in eachrow,
it is important to remember that SQL does not guarantee the order of the rows within the table in any
way (although they can be explicitly sorted for display).
Tables are grouped into databases, and a collection of databases managed by a single PostgreSQL
server instance constitutes a database cluster.
5
Chapter 2. The SQL Language
2.3. Creating a New Table
You cancreate anewtable byspecifyingthe table name, along withallcolumnnames andtheir types:
CREATE TABLE weather (
city
varchar(80),
temp_lo
int,
-- low temperature
temp_hi
int,
-- high temperature
prcp
real,
-- precipitation
date
date
);
You can enter this into
psql
with the line breaks.
psql
will recognize that the command is not
terminated until the semicolon.
White space (i.e., spaces, tabs, and newlines) can be used freely in SQL commands. That means you
can type the command aligned differently than above, or even all on one line. Two dashes (“
--
”) in-
troduce comments. Whatever follows them is ignored up tothe endof theline. SQL is case insensitive
about key words and identifiers, except when identifiers are double-quoted to preserve the case (not
done above).
varchar(80)
specifies a data type that can store arbitrary character strings up to 80 characters in
length.
int
is the normal integer type.
real
is a type for storingsingle precisionfloating-point num-
bers.
date
should be self-explanatory. (Yes, the column of type
date
is alsonamed
date
.This might
be convenient or confusing — you choose.)
PostgreSQL supports the standard SQL types
int
,
smallint
,
real
,
double precision
,
char(
N
)
,
varchar(
N
)
,
date
,
time
,
timestamp
,and
interval
,as well as other types of general
utility and a rich set of geometric types. PostgreSQL can be customized with an arbitrary number of
user-defined data types. Consequently, type names are not key words in the syntax, except where
required to support special cases in the SQL standard.
The second example will store cities and their associated geographical location:
CREATE TABLE cities (
name
varchar(80),
location
point
);
The
point
type is an example of a PostgreSQL-specific data type.
Finally, it should be mentioned that if you don’t need a table any longer or want to recreate it differ-
ently you can remove it using the following command:
DROP TABLE
tablename
;
2.4. Populating a Table With Rows
The
INSERT
statement is used topopulate a table with rows:
INSERT INTO weather VALUES (’San Francisco’, 46, 50, 0.25, ’1994-11-27’);
6
Chapter 2. The SQL Language
Note that alldata types use rather obvious input formats. Constants that are not simple numericvalues
usually must be surrounded by single quotes (
), as in the example. The
date
type is actually quite
flexible in what it accepts, but for this tutorial we will stick to the unambiguous format shown here.
The
point
type requires a coordinate pair as input, as shown here:
INSERT INTO cities VALUES (’San Francisco’, ’(-194.0, 53.0)’);
The syntax used so far requires you to remember the order of the columns. An alternative syntax
allows you to list the columns explicitly:
INSERT INTO weather (city, temp_lo, temp_hi, prcp, date)
VALUES (’San Francisco’, 43, 57, 0.0, ’1994-11-29’);
You can list the columns in a different order if you wish or even omit some columns, e.g., if the
precipitation is unknown:
INSERT INTO weather (date, city, temp_hi, temp_lo)
VALUES (’1994-11-29’, ’Hayward’, 54, 37);
Many developers consider explicitly listing the columns better style than relying on the order implic-
itly.
Please enter all the commands shown above so you have some data to work with in the following
sections.
You could also have used
COPY
to load large amounts of data from flat-text files. This is usually
faster because the
COPY
command is optimized for this applicationwhile allowing less flexibilitythan
INSERT
.An example would be:
COPY weather FROM ’/home/user/weather.txt’;
where the file name for the source file must be available onthe machine runningthe backend process,
not the client, since the backend process reads the file directly. You can read more about the
COPY
command in COPY.
2.5. Querying a Table
To retrieve data from a table, the table is queried. An SQL
SELECT
statement is used to do this. The
statement is divided into a select list (the part that lists the columns to be returned), a table list (the
part that lists the tables from which to retrieve the data), and an optional qualification (the part that
specifies any restrictions). For example, to retrieve all the rows of table
weather
,type:
SELECT
*
FROM weather;
Here
*
is a shorthand for “all columns”.
1
So the same result would be had with:
SELECT city, temp_lo, temp_hi, prcp, date FROM weather;
The output should be:
city
| temp_lo | temp_hi | prcp |
date
1. While
SELECT
*
is useful for off-the-cuff queries, it is widely considered bad style in production code, since adding a
columnto the table would change the results.
7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested