pdf viewer in asp net c# : Add jpg to pdf application control tool html azure .net online postgresql-9.4-A48-part3005

Chapter 2. The SQL Language
---------------+---------+---------+------+------------
San Francisco |
46 |
50 | 0.25 | 1994-11-27
San Francisco |
43 |
57 |
0 | 1994-11-29
Hayward
|
37 |
54 |
| 1994-11-29
(3 rows)
You can write expressions, not just simple column references, in the select list. For example, you can
do:
SELECT city, (temp_hi+temp_lo)/2 AS temp_avg, date FROM weather;
This should give:
city
| temp_avg |
date
---------------+----------+------------
San Francisco |
48 | 1994-11-27
San Francisco |
50 | 1994-11-29
Hayward
|
45 | 1994-11-29
(3 rows)
Notice how the
AS
clause is used to relabel the output column. (The
AS
clause is optional.)
Aquerycanbe “qualified” byaddinga
WHERE
clause thatspecifies whichrows are wanted. The
WHERE
clause contains a Boolean (truth value) expression, and only rows for which the Boolean expression
is true are returned. The usual Boolean operators (
AND
,
OR
,and
NOT
)are allowed in the qualification.
For example, the following retrieves the weather of San Francisco on rainy days:
SELECT
*
FROM weather
WHERE city = ’San Francisco’ AND prcp > 0.0;
Result:
city
| temp_lo | temp_hi | prcp |
date
---------------+---------+---------+------+------------
San Francisco |
46 |
50 | 0.25 | 1994-11-27
(1 row)
You can request that the results of a query be returned in sorted order:
SELECT
*
FROM weather
ORDER BY city;
city
| temp_lo | temp_hi | prcp |
date
---------------+---------+---------+------+------------
Hayward
|
37 |
54 |
| 1994-11-29
San Francisco |
43 |
57 |
0 | 1994-11-29
San Francisco |
46 |
50 | 0.25 | 1994-11-27
In this example, the sort order isn’t fully specified, and so you might get the San Francisco rows in
either order. But you’d always get the results shown above if you do:
SELECT
*
FROM weather
ORDER BY city, temp_lo;
8
Add jpg to pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
adding a jpeg to a pdf; add photo to pdf in preview
Add jpg to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
adding image to pdf in preview; add an image to a pdf in preview
Chapter 2. The SQL Language
You can request that duplicate rows be removed from the result of a query:
SELECT DISTINCT city
FROM weather;
city
---------------
Hayward
San Francisco
(2 rows)
Here again, the result rowordering might vary. Youcan ensure consistent results by using
DISTINCT
and
ORDER BY
together:
2
SELECT DISTINCT city
FROM weather
ORDER BY city;
2.6. Joins Between Tables
Thus far, our queries have only accessed one table at a time. Queries can access multiple tables at
once, or access the same table in such a way that multiple rows of the table are being processed at the
same time. A query that accesses multiple rows of the same or different tables at one time is called
ajoin query. As an example, say you wish to list all the weather records together with the location
of the associated city. To do that, we need to compare the
city
column of each row of the
weather
table with the
name
column of all rows in the
cities
table, and select the pairs of rows where these
values match.
Note: This is only a conceptual model. The join is usually performed in a more efficient manner
than actually comparing each possible pair of rows, but this is invisible to the user.
This would be accomplished by the following query:
SELECT
*
FROM weather, cities
WHERE city = name;
city
| temp_lo | temp_hi | prcp |
date
|
name
| location
---------------+---------+---------+------+------------+---------------+-----------
San Francisco |
46 |
50 | 0.25 | 1994-11-27 | San Francisco | (-194,53)
San Francisco |
43 |
57 |
0 | 1994-11-29 | San Francisco | (-194,53)
(2 rows)
Observe two things about the result set:
There is no result row for the city of Hayward. This is because there is no matching entry in the
cities
table for Hayward, so the join ignores the unmatched rows in the
weather
table. We will
see shortly how this can be fixed.
2. Insome database systems, includingolderversionsof PostgreSQL, the implementationof
DISTINCT
automaticallyorders
the rows and so
ORDER BY
is unnecessary. But this is not required by the SQL standard, and current PostgreSQL does not
guarantee that
DISTINCT
causes the rowsto be ordered.
9
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
Add necessary references page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(0) ' Convert the first PDF page to page.ConvertToImage(ImageType.JPEG, Program.RootPath + "\\Output.jpg").
add image to pdf reader; add picture to pdf file
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
example, this C#.NET PDF to JPEG converter library will name the converted JPEG image file Output.jpg. Convert PDF to JPEG Using C#.NET. Add necessary references
how to add photo to pdf in preview; add a picture to a pdf file
Chapter 2. The SQL Language
There are two columns containing the city name. This is correct because the lists of columns from
the
weather
and
cities
tables are concatenated. In practice this is undesirable, though, so you
will probably want to list the output columns explicitly rather than using
*
:
SELECT city, temp_lo, temp_hi, prcp, date, location
FROM weather, cities
WHERE city = name;
Exercise: Attempt to determine the semantics of this query when the
WHERE
clause is omitted.
Since the columns all haddifferent names, the parser automatically found whichtable they belongto.
If there were duplicate column names in the two tables you’d need to qualify the column names to
showwhich one you meant, as in:
SELECT weather.city, weather.temp_lo, weather.temp_hi,
weather.prcp, weather.date, cities.location
FROM weather, cities
WHERE cities.name = weather.city;
It is widely considered goodstyle to qualify allcolumnnames in a join query, so that the querywon’t
fail if a duplicate column name is later added to one of the tables.
Join queries of the kind seen thus far can also be written in this alternative form:
SELECT
*
FROM weather INNER JOIN cities ON (weather.city = cities.name);
This syntax is not as commonly used as the oneabove, but we show ithere to help you understand the
following topics.
Now we will figure out how we can get the Hayward records back in. What we want the query to do
is to scan the
weather
table and for each row to find the matching
cities
row(s). If no matching
row is found we want some “empty values” to be substituted for the
cities
table’s columns. This
kind of query is called an outer join. (The joins we have seen so far are inner joins.) The command
looks like this:
SELECT
*
FROM weather LEFT OUTER JOIN cities ON (weather.city = cities.name);
city
| temp_lo | temp_hi | prcp |
date
|
name
| location
---------------+---------+---------+------+------------+---------------+-----------
Hayward
|
37 |
54 |
| 1994-11-29 |
|
San Francisco |
46 |
50 | 0.25 | 1994-11-27 | San Francisco | (-194,53)
San Francisco |
43 |
57 |
0 | 1994-11-29 | San Francisco | (-194,53)
(3 rows)
This query is called a left outer join because the table mentioned on the left of the join operator will
have each of its rows in the output at least once, whereas the table on the right will only have those
rows output that match some row of the left table. When outputtinga left-table row for whichthere is
no right-table match, empty (null) values are substitutedfor the right-table columns.
Exercise: There are also right outer joins and full outer joins. Try to find out what those do.
We can also join a table against itself. This is called a self join. As an example, suppose we wish to
find all the weather records that are in the temperature range of other weather records. So we need to
compare the
temp_lo
and
temp_hi
columns of each
weather
row to the
temp_lo
and
temp_hi
columns of all other
weather
rows. We cando this with the following query:
10
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
Add necessary references to your C# project: String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
how to add an image to a pdf in acrobat; add image to pdf file
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Tiff Image to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
Add necessary references to your C# project: RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. inputFilePath = @"C:\input.tif"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert tiff
add image to pdf acrobat reader; add picture to pdf preview
Chapter 2. The SQL Language
SELECT W1.city, W1.temp_lo AS low, W1.temp_hi AS high,
W2.city, W2.temp_lo AS low, W2.temp_hi AS high
FROM weather W1, weather W2
WHERE W1.temp_lo < W2.temp_lo
AND W1.temp_hi > W2.temp_hi;
city
| low | high |
city
| low | high
---------------+-----+------+---------------+-----+------
San Francisco |
43 |
57 | San Francisco |
46 |
50
Hayward
|
37 |
54 | San Francisco |
46 |
50
(2 rows)
Here we have relabeled the weather table as
W1
and
W2
to be able to distinguish the left and right side
of the join. You can also use these kinds of aliases in other queries to save some typing, e.g.:
SELECT
*
FROM weather w, cities c
WHERE w.city = c.name;
You will encounter this style of abbreviating quite frequently.
2.7. Aggregate Functions
Likemostother relationaldatabase products, PostgreSQL supports aggregate functions. An aggregate
function computes a single result from multiple input rows. For example, there are aggregates to
compute the
count
,
sum
,
avg
(average),
max
(maximum) and
min
(minimum) over a set of rows.
As an example, we can find the highest low-temperature reading anywhere with:
SELECT max(temp_lo) FROM weather;
max
-----
46
(1 row)
If we wanted to know what city(or cities) that readingoccurred in, we might try:
SELECT city FROM weather WHERE temp_lo = max(temp_lo);
WRONG
but this will not work since the aggregate
max
cannot be used in the
WHERE
clause. (This restriction
exists because the
WHERE
clause determines which rows willbe included inthe aggregate calculation;
soobviouslyit has to be evaluated before aggregate functions are computed.) However, as is often the
case the query canbe restated to accomplish the desired result, here by using a subquery:
SELECT city FROM weather
WHERE temp_lo = (SELECT max(temp_lo) FROM weather);
city
---------------
San Francisco
(1 row)
11
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
1.bmp")); images.Add(new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")); images.Add(new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.png")); / Build a PDF document with
add image pdf acrobat; add picture to pdf online
VB.NET Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images
1.bmp")) images.Add(New REImage(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.jpg")) images.Add(New REImage(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.png")) ' Build a PDF document with
how to add an image to a pdf; adding images to pdf files
Chapter 2. The SQL Language
This is OK because the subquery is an independent computation that computes its own aggregate
separately from what is happening in the outer query.
Aggregates are also very useful in combination with
GROUP BY
clauses. For example, we can get the
maximum low temperature observed in each city with:
SELECT city, max(temp_lo)
FROM weather
GROUP BY city;
city
| max
---------------+-----
Hayward
|
37
San Francisco |
46
(2 rows)
which gives us one outputrow per city. Each aggregate result is computed over the table rows match-
ing that city. We can filter these grouped rows using
HAVING
:
SELECT city, max(temp_lo)
FROM weather
GROUP BY city
HAVING max(temp_lo) < 40;
city
| max
---------+-----
Hayward |
37
(1 row)
which gives us the same results for only the cities that have all
temp_lo
values below 40. Finally, if
we only care about cities whose names begin with “
S
”, we might do:
SELECT city, max(temp_lo)
FROM weather
WHERE city LIKE ’S%’˚
GROUP BY city
HAVING max(temp_lo) < 40;
˚
The
LIKE
operator does pattern matching and is explained in Section 9.7.
It is important to understand the interaction between aggregates and SQL’s
WHERE
and
HAVING
clauses. The fundamental difference between
WHERE
and
HAVING
is this:
WHERE
selects input rows
before groups and aggregates are computed (thus, it controls which rows go into the aggregate com-
putation), whereas
HAVING
selects group rows after groups and aggregates are computed. Thus, the
WHERE
clause must not contain aggregate functions; it makes no sense to try to use an aggregate to
determine which rows will be inputs to the aggregates. On the other hand, the
HAVING
clause al-
ways contains aggregate functions. (Strictly speaking, you are allowed to write a
HAVING
clause that
doesn’t use aggregates, but it’s seldom useful. The same condition could be used more efficiently at
the
WHERE
stage.)
Inthe previous example, wecan applythe cityname restriction in
WHERE
,since it needs noaggregate.
This is more efficient than adding the restriction to
HAVING
,becausewe avoid doing the grouping and
aggregate calculations for all rows that fail the
WHERE
check.
12
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to other
Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. Add Stamp Annotation. image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and
add signature image to pdf; add image in pdf using java
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF with VB.NET WPF PDF Viewer
Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work PDF to image file formats with high quality, support converting PDF to PNG, JPG, BMP and
add an image to a pdf; how to add an image to a pdf in preview
Chapter 2. The SQL Language
2.8. Updates
You can update existing rows using the
UPDATE
command. Suppose you discover the temperature
readings are all off by 2 degrees after November 28. You can correct the data as follows:
UPDATE weather
SET temp_hi = temp_hi - 2,
temp_lo = temp_lo - 2
WHERE date > ’1994-11-28’;
Look at the new state of the data:
SELECT
*
FROM weather;
city
| temp_lo | temp_hi | prcp |
date
---------------+---------+---------+------+------------
San Francisco |
46 |
50 | 0.25 | 1994-11-27
San Francisco |
41 |
55 |
0 | 1994-11-29
Hayward
|
35 |
52 |
| 1994-11-29
(3 rows)
2.9. Deletions
Rows can be removedfrom a table usingthe
DELETE
command. Suppose youare no longer interested
in the weather of Hayward. Then you can do the following to delete those rows from the table:
DELETE FROM weather WHERE city = ’Hayward’;
All weather records belonging to Hayward are removed.
SELECT
*
FROM weather;
city
| temp_lo | temp_hi | prcp |
date
---------------+---------+---------+------+------------
San Francisco |
46 |
50 | 0.25 | 1994-11-27
San Francisco |
41 |
55 |
0 | 1994-11-29
(2 rows)
One should be wary of statements of the form
DELETE FROM
tablename
;
Without a qualification,
DELETE
will remove all rows from the given table, leaving it empty. The
system will not request confirmation before doing this!
13
Chapter 3. Advanced Features
3.1. Introduction
In the previous chapter we have covered the basics of using SQL to store and access your data in
PostgreSQL. We will now discuss some more advanced features of SQL that simplify management
and prevent loss or corruption of your data. Finally, we will look at some PostgreSQL extensions.
This chapter will on occasion refer to examples found in Chapter 2 to change or improve them, so
it will be useful to have read that chapter. Some examples from this chapter can also be found in
advanced.sql
in the tutorial directory. This file also contains some sample data to load, which is
not repeated here. (Refer to Section 2.1 for how to use the file.)
3.2. Views
Refer back to the queries in Section 2.6. Suppose the combined listing of weather records and city
location is of particular interest to your application, but you do not want to type the query each time
you need it. You can create a view over the query, which gives a name to the query that you can refer
to like an ordinary table:
CREATE VIEW myview AS
SELECT city, temp_lo, temp_hi, prcp, date, location
FROM weather, cities
WHERE city = name;
SELECT
*
FROM myview;
Making liberal use of views is a key aspect of good SQL database design. Views allow you to en-
capsulate the details of the structure of your tables, which might change as your application evolves,
behind consistent interfaces.
Views can be used in almost any place a real table can be used. Building views upon other views is
not uncommon.
3.3. Foreign Keys
Recall the
weather
and
cities
tables from Chapter 2. Consider the following problem: You want
to make sure that no one can insert rows in the
weather
table that do not have a matching entry
in the
cities
table. This is called maintaining the referential integrity of your data. In simplistic
database systems this would be implemented (if at all) by first looking at the
cities
table to check
if a matching record exists, and then inserting or rejecting the new
weather
records. This approach
has a number of problems and is very inconvenient, so PostgreSQL can do this for you.
The newdeclaration of the tables wouldlook like this:
CREATE TABLE cities (
city
varchar(80) primary key,
location point
);
14
Chapter 3. Advanced Features
CREATE TABLE weather (
city
varchar(80) references cities(city),
temp_lo
int,
temp_hi
int,
prcp
real,
date
date
);
Now try inserting an invalid record:
INSERT INTO weather VALUES (’Berkeley’, 45, 53, 0.0, ’1994-11-28’);
ERROR:
insert or update on table "weather" violates foreign key constraint "weather_city_fkey"
DETAIL:
Key (city)=(Berkeley) is not present in table "cities".
The behavior of foreignkeyscanbefinelytunedtoyour application. We willnot gobeyondthis simple
example in this tutorial, but just refer you to Chapter 5 for more information. Making correct use of
foreign keys will definitely improve the quality of your database applications, so you are strongly
encouraged to learnabout them.
3.4. Transactions
Transactions are a fundamentalconceptof all database systems. The essential pointof a transactionis
that it bundles multiple steps into a single, all-or-nothing operation. The intermediate states between
the steps are not visible to other concurrent transactions, and if some failure occurs that prevents the
transaction from completing, then none of the steps affect the database at all.
For example, consider a bank database that contains balances for various customer accounts, as well
as total deposit balances for branches. Suppose that we want to record a payment of $100.00 from
Alice’s account to Bob’s account. Simplifying outrageously, the SQL commands for this might look
like:
UPDATE accounts SET balance = balance - 100.00
WHERE name = ’Alice’;
UPDATE branches SET balance = balance - 100.00
WHERE name = (SELECT branch_name FROM accounts WHERE name = ’Alice’);
UPDATE accounts SET balance = balance + 100.00
WHERE name = ’Bob’;
UPDATE branches SET balance = balance + 100.00
WHERE name = (SELECT branch_name FROM accounts WHERE name = ’Bob’);
The details of these commands are not important here; the important point is that there are several
separate updates involved to accomplish this rather simple operation. Our bank’s officers will want to
be assured that either all these updates happen, or none of them happen. It would certainly not do for
asystem failure to result in Bob receiving $100.00 that was not debited from Alice. Nor would Alice
long remain a happy customer if she was debited without Bob being credited. We need a guarantee
that if something goes wrong partway through the operation, none of the steps executed so far will
take effect. Grouping the updates into a transaction gives us this guarantee. A transaction is said to
be atomic: from the point of view of other transactions, it either happens completely or not at all.
15
Chapter 3. Advanced Features
We also want a guarantee that once a transaction is completed and acknowledged by the database
system, it has indeed been permanently recorded and won’t be lost even if a crash ensues shortly
thereafter. For example, if we are recording acash withdrawal by Bob, wedonotwant any chance that
the debitto his account will disappear ina crash just after he walks out the bankdoor. A transactional
database guarantees that all the updates made by a transaction are logged in permanent storage (i.e.,
on disk) before the transaction is reported complete.
Another important property of transactional databases is closely related to the notion of atomic up-
dates: when multiple transactions are running concurrently, each one should not be able to see the
incomplete changes made by others. For example, if one transaction is busy totalling all the branch
balances, it would not do for it to include the debit from Alice’s branch but not the credit to Bob’s
branch, nor vice versa. So transactions must be all-or-nothing not only in terms of their permanent
effect on the database, but alsoin terms of their visibility as they happen. The updates made so far by
an open transaction are invisible to other transactions until the transaction completes, whereupon all
the updates become visible simultaneously.
In PostgreSQL, a transaction is set up by surrounding the SQL commands of the transaction with
BEGIN
and
COMMIT
commands. So our banking transaction would actually looklike:
BEGIN;
UPDATE accounts SET balance = balance - 100.00
WHERE name = ’Alice’;
-- etc etc
COMMIT;
If, partwaythroughthetransaction, wedecide wedo not wanttocommit (perhaps we justnoticedthat
Alice’s balance went negative), we canissue the command
ROLLBACK
instead of
COMMIT
,and all our
updates so far will be canceled.
PostgreSQL actually treats every SQL statement as being executed within a transaction. If you do not
issue a
BEGIN
command, then each individual statement has an implicit
BEGIN
and (if successful)
COMMIT
wrapped around it. A group of statements surrounded by
BEGIN
and
COMMIT
is sometimes
called a transaction block.
Note: Some client libraries issue
BEGIN
and
COMMIT
commands automatically, so that you might
get the effect of transaction blocks without asking. Check the documentationfor the interface you
are using.
It’s possible to control the statements in a transaction in a more granular fashion through the use of
savepoints. Savepoints allow you toselectively discard parts of the transaction, while committing the
rest. After defining a savepoint with
SAVEPOINT
,you can if needed roll back to the savepoint with
ROLLBACK TO
. All the transaction’s database changes between defining the savepoint and rolling
back to it are discarded, but changes earlier than the savepoint are kept.
After rolling back to a savepoint, it continues to be defined, so you can roll back to it several times.
Conversely, if you are sure you won’t need to roll back to a particular savepoint again, it can be
released, so the system can free some resources. Keep in mind that either releasing or rolling back to
asavepoint will automatically release all savepoints that were defined after it.
All this is happening within the transaction block, so none of it is visible to other database sessions.
When and if you commit the transaction block, the committed actions become visible as a unit to
other sessions, while the rolled-back actions never become visible at all.
16
Chapter 3. Advanced Features
Remembering the bank database, suppose we debit $100.00 from Alice’s account, and credit Bob’s
account, only to find later that we should have credited Wally’s account. We could do it using save-
points like this:
BEGIN;
UPDATE accounts SET balance = balance - 100.00
WHERE name = ’Alice’;
SAVEPOINT my_savepoint;
UPDATE accounts SET balance = balance + 100.00
WHERE name = ’Bob’;
-- oops ... forget that and use Wally’s account
ROLLBACK TO my_savepoint;
UPDATE accounts SET balance = balance + 100.00
WHERE name = ’Wally’;
COMMIT;
This example is, of course, oversimplified, but there’s a lot of control possible in a transaction block
through the useof savepoints. Moreover,
ROLLBACK TO
is theonly way to regain controlof a transac-
tion blockthatwasputinabortedstatebythesystem duetoanerror, short of rollingitbackcompletely
and starting again.
3.5. Window Functions
Awindow function performs a calculation across a set of table rows that are somehow related to the
current row. This is comparable tothetype of calculation thatcan be done with anaggregate function.
But unlike regular aggregate functions, use of a window function does not cause rows to become
grouped into a single output row — the rows retain their separate identities. Behind the scenes, the
window function is able to access more than just the current row of the query result.
Here is an example that shows how to compare each employee’s salary with the average salary in his
or her department:
SELECT depname, empno, salary, avg(salary) OVER (PARTITION BY depname) FROM empsalary;
depname
| empno | salary |
avg
-----------+-------+--------+-----------------------
develop
|
11 |
5200 | 5020.0000000000000000
develop
|
7 |
4200 | 5020.0000000000000000
develop
|
9 |
4500 | 5020.0000000000000000
develop
|
8 |
6000 | 5020.0000000000000000
develop
|
10 |
5200 | 5020.0000000000000000
personnel |
5 |
3500 | 3700.0000000000000000
personnel |
2 |
3900 | 3700.0000000000000000
sales
|
3 |
4800 | 4866.6666666666666667
sales
|
1 |
5000 | 4866.6666666666666667
sales
|
4 |
4800 | 4866.6666666666666667
(10 rows)
The first three output columns come directly from the table
empsalary
,and there is one output row
for each row in the table. The fourth column represents anaverage taken across all the table rows that
have the same
depname
value as thecurrent row. (This actuallyis the same functionas theregular
avg
aggregate function, but the
OVER
clause causes it to be treated as a window function and computed
across an appropriate set of rows.)
17
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested